Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Zach Gelb

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me this week is one of the freshest guys on the radio. Zach Gelb is a rising star in Sports radio, and you can find him every weekday on CBS Sports Radio from 6-10 pm EST. Yes, he beat me in our NFL picks this year, and I owe him a Fat Head of myself, but I am still waiting on my steak.

Zach's dad Bob has been in the radio business for a long time running the Mike and The Mad Dog show. Bob helped Zach start his first show in their basement when he was eight years old. Zach always knew he wanted to be a sports broadcaster but did play many sports growing up. He retired from playing sports to talking about them in 10th grade, and he has carved an insane path to the top of his industry. 

Zach chose Temple over Syracuse and worked hard not on his books but on his studio time. He says that his most significant experience came from being in the studio and learning from real-life experiences. Zach landed his first job in New Jersey out of college at WNJE. He made a few more moves before landing one of the top spots for CBS Sports Radio. 

Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddled Up With Gus. I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus for Rod. And welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well, I say to those people you've never read 16 31 digital news dot com Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Otto up with Gus. Check it out today at W. W W 16 31 digital news dot com Hey, everyone, welcome to another snowy episode of Huddle Up With Us. I'm your host, Gust Ferrat, 15 year NFL quarterback, and I want to welcome you to the new 16 31 digital news studio. But right now it's my daughter's bedroom, and I wanna thank MTV for always hosting us and producing our show and all of our people that work with us. Thank you very much. This week's guest is, um, somebody that I got to know over the last few years we kind of rib each other. He's a lot younger than I am He actually was born when I started playing football in the NFL. But he is a rising star in the media world. You may have heard of his show. He's on weekdays from 6 to 10 p.m. On CBS Sports radio. He does an amazing job. He talks very fast, so he must be from Long Island, New York Welcome into the show. Zach Gal. Zack. How you doing, Buddy? Gus, I'm doing fantastic. I didn't know you were a guitar player. Do you play guitar? See that in the background? Is that just your daughters? No, I bought that. I don't play that. I just bought my daughter Young. Actually, when she was young, we made all the kids get lessons in music, right? Whatever they chose, she chose the guitar, and we still have it hanging around on. We have a piano downstairs, and the only thing we ever got rid of was my son's electric drum set. Yeah, that could be very noisy. My parents when I when I was a kid, they started me off with piano, so I used to play a little Moon River and then I tried to play the piano a few weeks ago, and I haven't played it in years. And I can't remember anything on the piano. So I guess my musical days of me playing instruments are are way past my prime, I guess, is what I'm gonna say. Well, you know, I think we all have something that's way past our prime. Eso Zach, tell me about growing up in Long Island. What was it like for you? I mean, you, your knowledge of sports is incredible. You know, so many things. When I listen to your show, you are always on point about everything that's going on and even your history of the games is super solid. So tell me about growing up and how you fell in love with sports. But I think it helps when my birth was actually announced on the radio because my dad at the time was producing three greatest forts talk radio program in the history of this business in Mike and the Mad Dog. So, um, you know, my whole life was practically growing up on the radio, and as far as I could remember, in the car is a kid. The radio was always on. Hey, we gotta listen to Mike and Chris. Maybe we'll get to hear Dad today, a swell since he was producing that show. So as a kid, I would always be going to games through their connections and always would try to play hookey. When I got a little bit older and asked my mom if I could miss and skips um school and going to work with Dad or if Dad was going to the Big East tournament or a Mets game during the day Yankees game, whatever it was, I always tried to play tag along, so we're, ah, big sports family and we'd like to talk about sports. So, you know, I always say this radio and Eric Spitz, who was my old boss, used to say, This radio is like a textbook. It's free and there's a lot of knowledge. Eso you sit down in the car and you get to hear from a lot of people. So I try to incorporate, uh, intentionally, unintentionally ah, lot of the host that I've listened to you and learn from throughout the years and kind of just store it all in my brain. That's awesome. That's a great story on that's kind of how a lot of people gettinto what they love as they get older. Now, when we go back to when you were young, did you play any sports? What, like sports? Did you play growing up? I mean, because you look like you could have been, you know, anywhere on that offensive line playing tight end. You know, somewhere in that area, you could have been even, like, Ah, fullback. I don't know what Where were you? Yes. I don't know if my speed's good enough for a full back, but I played some basketball. Ah, little bit of baseball than I couldn't really had a curveball. But I was a good catcher. I did play football. I played two years of high school football, was a left tackle and then also a defensive tackle. But after my sophomore year and you know I was good at football, I wasn't great. But after my my sophomore year, I really knew that I wanted to be an announcer and I was actually more interested in announcing the football games than playing the game. So I think...

I you know, I gave up the football side of things. It wasn't an easy decision. But I made that transition early on in my life for I'm going from the football field to the booth. And it's actually funny when I was at Temple since I was calling the Temple Football Games. And that rule ended up becoming the head football coach my sophomore year when they brought in a new offensive line coach by the name of Chris Suiza hand since I'm a gargantuan human being. They told Chris that I was a new recruit on his first day on the job and we were kind of in on that joke. And Chris said to me because Temple didn't have a good football team at the time and then that build up the program really well to get into the national prominence that they've seen over the last few years. And Chris said to me, We need some bodies in practice. If you wanted to screw your broadcasting career over for a little bit, you could come be a tackle dummy in practice. So I was offered to be a I guess I walk on for the Temple football team, but I politely declined because this has always been my passion has been a sports talk radio. Well, I think you chose the right right lane, right? You know, you didn't very well if you knew what you wanted to do. We have somebody in here in Pittsburgh. His names. Larry Richard. He's like the voice of Pittsburgh Steeler games. He's on Katie K radio. Larry, he's been around forever. Everyone knows Larry. He's like, you hear his voice and you know it and he when I interviewed him for my show, it's a kind of the same thing. He knew from a young age what he wanted to do. And he's an announcer. He loves sports, and he said when he was a kid, he go out in the baseball field. Everybody's playing pickup ball on the you know the lot next to their house, and he had a big family. He said he would be a second baseman and he's always saying the kid's name who's up to bat and you know he's got he's already got one out. He's like announcing the game from second base. Did you find yourself doing that as a kid when you're hanging out with your buddies? Yeah, you know, I think all of us because all my friends are big sports fans. So one of my friends, Alex, we would kind of be in the car and just have these heated, intense sports conversations. So yeah, that that would always be something that I would do. And then, really, I got my start in my parents basement because I went on the Internet and I found this platform where you could host a radio show from your basement. So that's where it all started, literally in my parents basement. That's why it was ironic. Now doing a national show when Cove it hit, my family said, Get out of New York City, come to Long Island. So I was living with them for four or five months before we were coming back, Thio to New York, and I was once again in the basement doing shows. Except this time, I think we had just a few more listeners. Since we are on CBS for its radio, so like to come full circle this year. What is your show called When you were a kid was It's just still the Zach Gal show. No, no, it was actually looking back on it. It was a very pompous name, but I thought it was like a cute thing. As a kid, my dad came up with something called instead of the expert using my first name, Zack Z Experts. So I look back at some of those audio clips and videos and I kind of cringe because I have a high pitched voice. And I'm like, see, experts at help here on show vo dot com or log talk radio. Are you Castor and I'm Z experts. So the morning show host Greg Janadi here on the fan in New York. He was actually once on my show when I was in high school. And now we're colleagues, so he will bring that up from time to time. How? I used to call myself a Z expert. Now, did you interview your dad on Z expert? So my dad was actually my first producer. So, everyone, if you know Mike Francesa, he has an addiction to Diet Coke. So I used to always I don't drink soda, but I was always used to joke around with my dad. Now you're no longer getting paid to get me my diet coke. So he was my producer. I remember we used to do the show out on a Saturday at 1 p.m. Every Saturday at 1 p.m. And then I said to myself when I got a little bit older Dad, I wanna have a social life on the weekend so that we change the Showtime toe Wednesday at 7 p.m. So he would come right in off the train from work at about 6 36 50 and then Boom would be on for an hour every Wednesday on this website called Show vo dot com. But he kind of really tried to stay out of it. He would give me pointers here and there, but I wasn't a traditional producer. Let's say he really put the onus on May to make me learnt my craft, and he would challenge me a little bit. But he said, You're in charge of booking all the guest and and what the content is, and he kind of would just help oversee it now that when you were younger and you're learning this trade from your dad, um, you know, because when you have your guests on, you have to be very knowledgeable not only about your guests, but the topics you're talking about, you do a great job of that. So what kind of pointers did he give you about that when you were young? He would always just drop me random fax. He would. He actually said to me, Don't do this for a living. When I when I...

...told him in high school I wanna be a sports talk radio host. He goes, the business can be brutal. You don't want to do this. And sometimes when you're a dad, I could see that. I guess from his perspective that, you know, the ups and downs and some of the public backlash in this business. So maybe he wanted me to do something else. I don't know what that would have been. I wasn't intelligent enough to be a doctor. I would not have been able to study enough to be a lawyer. So this was always something that I did. So I kind of pushed back at him and to know this is what I'm doing. And he kind of wanted to see if I could swim or if I was going to sink. And then after realizing that I could swim and stay afloat. Hey, would give me a few pointers just by dropping random information. Random s A T words, I guess which helped me prepare for the S A. T. But also prepare for the radio. So it was a checks and balance system. Hey, really? Let me drive the ship. But if he ever thought I could do something better Hey, wouldn't be afraid to voice his opinion, which I did appreciate. Yeah, he would use words like don't bloviate too much. Right? So you've got these words on you and say there's a fine line, right? See, I don't have great depth. I don't have a bevy of words when it comes to all the vocabulary and in abundance or whatever other word that you wanna use. But I have about, like, 10 that that I'm really good at perfecting. I guess it's because I'm loquacious on. I have those 10 words and I kind of just use them in a cycle. So it makes me appear to be a lot more area like than what I actually am. Well, that's what I mean. You're you're talking about sports, so you don't have to be like at a high, high level. You just have to be high enough toe to be a little bit more than your most of your guests. Yeah, well, here's one I'll never forget. It was Steph Curry and Kevin Durant. They were in a press conference together. They played in the Warriors and someone used the word kerfuffle and they were like, Wow, that's a good word. So I guess if you just impressed the guests and drop a word here or there to the listening audience will be like, Oh, wow, this guy's a lot more intelligent and you kind of full people that way. But at the end of the day, to me, sports talk is like two guys, two girls, whoever just sitting down at a bar and just shooting the breeze and and kind of not taking ourselves a little bit, you know, you know, not taking ourselves all that seriously and having fun and entertaining that. That, to me, is what makes a good sports talk radio program. Right now, it definitely does. I love that, too, when it's just a conversation and not somebody asking just questions. Right? Uh, so you talked to us a little bit about playing sports in high school, right? That you did it. You tried it. It wasn't really your thing. So tell us about when your first time announcing in high school where there was a football game, a basketball game, whatever it was. What? What was that experience like for you? Yeah. So it was awesome. I started the shot in my parents basement that was in high school. And, you know, in my high school, I would have friends that would listen. And, um, you know, would would like it. Some would make fun of it, you know, whatever it waas. But I think that we started to do a really quality show because even though it was just in the community there, people were talking about it, and I was recognized in my high school for it. But then when you get into the rest of it, um, yeah, I would say the first game I did was was homecoming or something like that during a high school game where I was just a p a announcer. So I went to a sleep away camp. Though this was actually the first memory I have. I went to a sleep away camp this game called Pine Forest, and at Pine Forest that had a broadcasting session that you could do where they just had microphones on and a Low AM frequency. And I remember doing a show there, and we would also broadcast it to the pool eso when everyone would have general swim me in a body of mine, a friend by the name of Danny Caine. We would host a show. Cain and Gelb. He beat me in a game of tennis, which I thought he cheated. And that's why he got top billing on the name of Came first. I thought my name should have been, uh, first. So we did a show there, so that's just kind of some of the early memories. And then I went to college, and I think I was a little bit more advanced than the regular college student. And when I was in college, I did a show on the on the college radio station and also ah TV show to, uh called the Mat Rule Weekly. So we did aired Matt rules press conference, and then from there, kind of did break it down. So I had a little background of both TV and radio when I was in college. Yes, so tell me why Temple? So I went to go visit Syracuse as a kid. I always wanted to go to Syracuse, and I went to Syracuse and the school just didn't click with May. And you know, it's a It's a great program, but something that kind of pushed me away from Syracuse. I had a broadcasting demo and I went to hand it in when I had an interview. Thio talk to the people at Syracuse and the Emissions Department, and they wouldn't take it. So I was kind of a little skeptical...

...going to Syracuse, and I always thought, as you would know, people take your college football tape. That's what Qadry Ismail, who played at Syracuse, said. If I had a tape as a freshman, they would take that tape so they didn't take my tape. So I thought that was bizarre. And then, you know, since that Super a camp that I mentioned it was based in Pennsylvania. So I had a lot of friends and family in Philadelphia, and a guidance counselor suggested that temple would be good and It's a very diverse school and they have a very underrated. I think it's an excellent broadcasting program and I went and I talked to their missions department and they said We don't care if you're a freshman in a sophomore junior, a senior. When you're ready to go on the air, we'll put you on the air where at other schools and hey, Syracuse has a great track record. But at Syracuse, you really don't get on the air until junior or senior year. And I think the most imperative part of having a good broadcasting career and getting ahead of the game is to have the most amount of reps is possible. So being able to go to Temple and get on the air immediately, I thought benefited me more than maybe getting into Syracuse and then going there and sitting on the bench freshman sophomore junior year. You don't have to complicate this stuff and people overcomplicate this business, not a single class. The history of radio that I took or any of that stuff got me to where I am today. It was the stuff that I did away from the classroom, being a part of the student TV department being a part of the student radio station getting internships. That's what gave me the real life experience that I needed. Not in 1967. This person did that on the radio. I probably I didn't fail the class, but I probably got a fear of being the class it did not care about getting an A. You were listening to Mike and Mad Dog, right? You weren't listening to your teacher. Yeah, that was that to me, was was really the experience, whether it was Mike and Chris, whether it was Craig Kardon, Sid Rosenberg, producers like Ray Martel or even someone that I got Thio Intern for and now they have me as a guest on their show, which is surreal. Angelo Cataldi, who's been doing this for 30 years in Philadelphia. So interning for Angelo was such put me in such an advantage. It gave me such an advantage point because I got to see how a guy like that prepares day in and day out and you could know the most about sports. You could know all the stats in the world. If you can't entertain, you're not gonna be able Thio maintain a job on sports talk radio. Angela really taught me just by watching him the entertainment part of this business. Yeah. So when you were a temple, you also earned a scholarship, right? The Richie Ashburn. Um, scholarship. So what? Tell me a little bit about that. What was that? Uh, I mean, obviously I know him as a player, but what does that scholarship? What did that mean to you? Yeah. So it was actually was nominated by someone at Temple. Larry Dougherty, who's the sports information director, and I got it my senior year. Now the letter. Funny story about this telling me I won the scholarship, which I had no clue. I was even a candidate for. And it's given out by the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association. And they have, ah, legendary banquet each and every year. When I was at that banquet, it was it was remarkably Jake. Four. Check of the Flyers getting honored Matt Cleantech, who was the general manager of the Phillies getting honored. You had Olympian soccer players there It was. Larry Holmes was also there, So it's a big banquet and I was playing a small role of it where I was honored as one of the college recipients. So they just It just kind of gave me further. I don't wanna say validation, but it was another honor off the hard work and the relationships that I built a temple. But the funny story is, they sent that. I guess they had my address in the temple database, but it wasn't updated, so they sent it to my old apartment where I lived junior year. And then I moved for my senior year to a different home on campus. Luckily, ah, friend of mine took over my least at my old place before I moved in with a new group of friends and they were saying, Hey, you got a letter here. Come pick it up and I don't know what the letter was. And then I sat down and read it. I said, Wow, this is this is pretty cool. Yeah. No, that's awesome. I think it is validation of all the hard work you put in from the time you were a little hallway through your college career. So tell me, you know, we all have these stumbles. You may be, you know, which I think you are one of these guys, like the star quarterback. You lose one game in college, but you're going on until the draft, and you're gonna be number one pick. That's how I feel. You are in this industry, but you all every every one of us in college has a stumble. So can you remember a time that you had a stumble in college that you said? Well, this is gonna be tough. I gotta get through this. Um, you know, I don't know if one specific encounter stands out, but there's times where I'll do a show, and I'll say to myself, Man, I didn't think...

...it was all that good. And I think we are our toughest critics and you go back and you listen. And if you're honest with yourself, sometimes we're too over the top and two critical of ourselves. Because every times where I'm like, yeah, I don't know how that segment went that I listen back and they say, Wow, that was actually great. But I'll never forget. This is actually Ah, funny blunder. So, Dan Liebowitz, we were at the American Athletic Conference tournament. We had to raise money to get there to broadcast the games down in Orlando, Florida and there was some controversial. Finishing the game prior to us and Dan at the time was the I think his title was the associate commissioner of the American Athletic Conference and dancing. He was once an assistant under John Chaney, who just passed away. We had a little bit of a connection because Dan would always come back to Temple for time to time, and he was part of the leadership group for the American Athletic Conference. The conference the Temple plays in and I've interviewed Dan. I've talked to Dan numerous times and we're having him on and I'm I'm over prepared for the interview, talking about one of the controversial finishes from the from the previous game and I go All right, we're back here on W H I P. Now joining us as we're here live at the American Athletic Conference. I couldn't remember Dan's name, so I feel terrible. I go, Yeah, you know how you do it. Like I never said his name. So I don't know if the listening audience may have caught on to it, but I knew it. And my co host also knew that I couldn't remember his name. So even though I know Dan and I know Dan very well, I learned from that. Whenever I have a guest on, it's okay to be over prepared. Sometimes I got myself for being over prepared. It's okay to be over prepared, right? The guest name down, just in case of that moment ever did arise again where I would have a brain fart. But for some reason that I couldn't remember Dan Liebovitz his name. Well, I've been hitting ahead a lot, so that happens to me quite often. So I know how you feel. Uh, you know. So you're a temple. You're going through your college career. Now you're getting ready. Go on. The real world. Uh, what was that transition like? Now I'm gonna be on my own. Now. I gotta Did you have a job waiting for you when you came out of college? Or did you have to go find something? I got a job very quickly, and it was actually because of the work I was putting in. Still, in my second semester, my final semester, the second semester at Temple. And in that final semester, I was going to a Big Five Hall of Fame or a Big Five ceremony event. Philadelphia. Big Five. The five schools. They have an award banquet at the end of the year and on that way to the bank with a friend of mine said, Hey, I just applied for a job and interviewed for a radio station for a program director and afternoon dr Host for a sports radio station in New Jersey. I said Teoh, a sports radio station in New Jersey. What are you talking about? People in New Jersey. They either get the Philly stations. W I P. Or 97 5 fanatic or they're listening to the fan up in New York. So he goes, No, they just look formats. It's this new sports talk station in New Jersey, and my friends said to may like talking me talking as him. I'm not gonna take this. I'm only interested in TV. So I said, Send me the contact. So I emailed the boss, David Bevin's, and they were looking for someone that was young, and I emailed him, and when I went into his office, they said, Oh, we were actually going to call you next week because Tom McCarthy, who was the play by play voice of the Phillies and does some games nationally, NFL and CBS He recommended me for the job because he did this job 20 something years ago when they were Sports station. And then throughout the years they flipped formats, toe religious stations and political talk stations. So they were I was actually on their radar. So I went into that job and and I interviewed for the job and I knew walking out that there's no way I wasn't going to get off for the gig because it's a small I am station. I had all these contacts. I've already at this time in college made national headlines for interviews that I did. So I thought I was the perfect person, and I think my leadership visions did match up with the boss, David Bevin's. So I got a call back three days later and they said, We want to offer you the job So I was the program director for the 9:20 a.m. Fox Sports radio station. It was called New Jersey and then also as a part of my responsibilities, I was the program director for the Christian religious station and I'm Jewish. So I always thought that was you every year during Christmas time. Merry Christmas. Merry Christmas. People would send me Bibles and everything s Oh, that was my my first real job out of college. And I was there for about a year and eight months. And thankfully, they allowed me...

Thio get other opportunities to 97 5. The fanatic, the big one of the big stations in Philadelphia, called me up and they asked me to host Postgame in the year that the Eagles won the Super Bowl. And then when I was at the Super Bowl that year and we were getting ready for all those shows, I met Eric Spitz, who I've known my entire life. But Eric Spit wanted to interview me for the weekend overnights opening at CBS Sports Radio, and I got that job and I left my job at 9 20 New Jersey and 97 5 fanatic for a part time weekend overnight gig. But it was a national gigot. It was something I couldn't pass up and through their ended up moving up in the CBS Sports radio lineup from Monday to Friday, where you now join me each and every Friday during football season for the huddle up with dust picks. Which, by the way, just to get the listening audience, um, insight here. Not to talk too long. Gus beat me in the regular season, but then I kicked his butt in the postseason and the overall record did make me the winner for this year. If you combine the regular season, you kind of felt like you, right? Right in the regular season. But in the postseason, nobody could touch him. I didn't care for the Rams. I didn't care for the Bears when I played them in the regular season. But when it came to the postseason, unfortunately, you were Drew Brees. You were Aaron Rodgers, and you were Patrick Mahomes and I was shocked. Barratt, jp Bay. Do you think that Do you think that Patrick Mahomes is sending Tom Brady a fat head because he loved? I'm going to say no on that one? I did read, though I was watching inside the NFL, which is a great show. They do a great job, Mike and up everybody that they're gonna have some conversation. If you go back Thio the 2018 a f c championship game. Brady after the game in a private behind the scenes in the tunnel of Arrowhead Stadium. He actually talked to Patrick Mahomes for an extensive time in the home, said, That was a pretty big conversation to have. Oh, of course. I mean, at that point. Tom. Still the goat, right? He's Tom Brady has been how many Super Bowls? And now he's still doing it. It's been absolutely amazing what Tom has done on the field, and I know you followed his career for a long time. Eso tell me a little bit Now you get to CBS Sports, right? And you're doing this weekend gig and you're saying, Okay, I'm taking another step. Have you gone to the peak of where you wanna be yet, or how much further do you think you want to go? Um, people ask me this all the time about the future, and I just tried to take advantage of what I could control. Now I love the job that I'm in right now. If that means eventually moving up in the lineup even further, I would all be on board but to be 26 or get this opportunity when I was 25. Since I've been doing this now for two years on the weekday lineup, show that 6 to 10 p.m. Eastern, 3 to 7 Pacific's of drive time on the West Coast and we're on Monday through Friday and we're on 200 affiliates and serious and radio dot com it Z. It's a great opportunity, and it's something that I'm so focused on in the now that if I start thinking about other things, you don't take advantage of the situation that you have currently. So that's kind of how I'm wired. But when I have to think about the future, I would be lying to you. And, you know, I've said this before. Um, if I'm not thinking about maybe doing local radio in Philly or in Boston or New York, the station that I grew up listening to W. Van I do shows there now so that that's just stuff where I think about. But I love the national stuff because I have so much freedom to talk about whatever I want. We could be leading one today with the next we could be leading one day with the Buccaneers. The Trailblazers? You never know. A college football. You never know where it's going to go. So I'm happy where I am now. We'll see what it turns out to bay. Do you think you would ever go to like television? Right. So, like ESPN because you would be great on there. I mean, you would, you know, you would be the Stephen a. Smith of e. Think you could match his his his, uh, bloviation, if that's a word. So you know it is Now. You thought about that Because even E would rather listen to you then have to people I have to listen to when they talk about, you know, during a game, right? Because you have so much knowledge where you put things forward, it would be great if you ever even thought about announcing the game. Yeah, I appreciate that. S o the actually, we go back the first play by play I ever did. This is actually pretty funny. Temple was playing Notre Dame. It's Matt rules. First game as a head coach to temple. So the college radio station Say it again. I said that couldn't have gone well for Temple. Yeah, they didn't win. They were close in the first half, but they didn't. They did not win the game. Uh, field goal kicker missed way too many field goals in that game. And...

...then it got lopsided the second half, but our college radio station was called W H I P. Now Philly. The main station is W I. P. So often people get us confused for one another when you're just some random person you know at, you know Notre Dame and you're just looking. Oh, yeah, this must be the professional station. So I'm on the 50 yard line in the prime press box spot for Temple and Notre Dame, and I thought I did a good job for my first call, but I looked to my left. An NBC has their broadcast for Notre Dame and we're in a better position than they are in the booth. So I couldn't believe that And the actual local radio guys that did the game afterwards, like they put us on the 25 30 yard line and I kind of realized so they probably got us confused as the professional station, so that was that was the first play by play experience that ever did. But to answer your question, Hey, with how the business is changing, I would be open to TV. I think TV is scripted from time to time, as long as I could be genuine as long as I could be my authentic self. I only say things that I believe, and I think too many people in our business now just for the paycheck. I think God bless them, but that's how they make a living. They say things to just get that paycheck, and they don't actually believe what they say when it comes to sports. I'm so passionate about this stuff and I could rant about, you know, many stuff, many of stuff that if I don't believe it, I will. I will never say it. So I have to believe something in order to say, And that's how I think, Um, you know, my style is and why I think it happens to be a good show, right? Well, that's what people want, you know, they wanted authentic right. They can totally Phil, if somebody's not being authentic and false and what they're saying or just trying to placate to their audience. I mean, that's not what you do, and I think that you do a great job of it. One of the things I wanted to ask you if you could tell our listeners about how when you have a show that that is like your show and you're you're dealing with so many guests coming in and it's five days a week and you always have to get new guest. Sometimes you have repeats like me on a Friday night and things like that, but you're getting guest, but you're getting unbelievable guests. So tell me about that process for your team. How does that happen? Does does. Does you know CBS Sports help you with that? Or is that your team calling all these people on and bugging them relentlessly? It's a team effort when it comes to guest booking. Since I really have been doing this in high school and college, Um, even professionally I think I have, ah, a leg up when it comes to the contacts and what I always dio as you could tell from being on the show and this isn't the case with everyone, but I try to form relationships with my guest. So when they're coming on the show, it's not up. I gotta do this radio interview. It's like, Wow, I'm coming on with Zach and I actually want to talk to Zach and that's why I think we get Mawr out of it. I was doing a conference the other day and I was talking to some young up and coming broadcasters from Temple. And I said, When you have someone on the show afterwards, text them a thank you, or if it is Thanksgiving, you know you don't wanna text them too much, But with them, I have to be Thanksgiving. If it's their birthday, wish him a happy birthday and those air things that I think the little things that go a long way. You know, we had Bruce Arians on. I think we're the only show in the country to have Bruce Arians on the day after they punched their ticket to the Super Bowl and I just texted Bruce. Hey, congratulations sent me back. Thanks. And then I followed back up with them. I wouldn't be doing my job if I didn't ask you to come on the show today and there's an understanding of personal relationships. And then what I gotta do professionally. And he said, Hey, call me at at four o'clock and we'll be good to go And we taped it and and it was, Ah, big hit for us. So I think those relationships are important. And when you have those relationships, sometimes it's not easy toe. Ask the tough question, but I think it does assist in that process. When people do understand that, yes, you're trying to have relationships with them. But you also I have a job to do. So I try to make it a personable relationship when people come on. But when you come on the show, if you did something that wasn't right, if you did something stupid or if you had a questionable decision, I gotta ask about or else I can't bring it on, right? Right. No, I completely understand that. So tell me one of your guests that you've had on that made you the most nervous, right? That they were in idle or they were somebody your dad idolized. You know what I mean? There are those people out there. No matter. I mean, I still feel that way. Even though I played 15 years in the NFL and I'm appear to some of these people, I still feel that way. When I interview them like Man, I watched this guy growing up and it was just I can't believe I get to interview him now I don't really get nervous really all that much. But the one person that I...

...think I vividly recall being nervous to interview with Bob Costas on. But just because the name speaks for himself and I was in college and I wrote to Bob and he responded back and he said, Oh, yeah, I'll come on your your college radio show and that to me I was a little bit nervous about. And when I get nervous like I don't like, I won't shake or I won't sweat profusely. I do that enough as it is, but I'll start the little obvious things like, How do you say his last name, like be Googling videos or you tubing videos? You know Bob Costas interview just to make sure that I'm saying his name correctly when obviously I know it. So that's the one. But overall, like you asked me to about the guest booking the question before I try to make things in the entire show. I try to make it a team atmosphere because, yes, it is my show. I get the final say at the end of the day. The only one that could override me technically is my program director, but I have the freedom to do what I want. But that's not the way that I really like to operate a show. I like it to be a team environment. And every day I come in with the plan and I asked my producer, All right, what's your plan? How could we collaborate and make it better? And I think when you give people a say in the process, I do believe that at the end of the day they wanted to work even harder for you. So yeah, ah, lot of this stuff. It is driven by myself. But there are times where I liked the other voice, and I try to get that other voice the other day because if it was just whatever I say, I say I say that's one voice and I could think this is the right way to do something. But another perspective and some diversity always does help. So what is the one sport that makes you the most nervous to talk about? Because for me, sometimes when you have to talk to somebody that you're not so familiar with their sport, like football, baseball, basketball? Um, you know some of those hockey you know we're pretty familiar with. We see a lot of that. But then there's other people that you've probably interviewed that you weren't so familiar with their sport. Does that make you like, You know, that's a little harder for me sometimes. Well, yeah, if you ask me. That's why I think authenticity for me shines. If you call in and have a soccer point, I'm not gonna be able to tell you anything. Horse racing. I have a minuscule amount of knowledge. The three big races out of the year golf had become a lot more of an avid golf fan as of late. I always liked golf, but I've been watching golf more. But yeah, your four major sports and on a national scale, I love hockey. You're not really talking about hockey. I love baseball nationally. You don't really talk that much baseball. It's football, NFL, college and basketball. That's really what drives the train and don't get me wrong. Alabama. I watch a lot of Alabama football Alabama football fan that watches every single game in every single play. Hell, no Maura about Alabama football than I will, but I have a good knowledge on Alabama football, because how much during the news? But that was just, you know, one example that that'll throw at you. So, yeah, the diehard fan on a national scale could even know more than the host. But it's It's kind of knowing a little bit of everything that I think makes a good national talk show host and also knowing what stations you're on, what affiliates you're on because I broadcast in New York. But I got to make sure that I'm hitting the markets in Baltimore in Portland and Oregon, that carrier, So you gotta kind of. It's 24 7 job. You're preparing every every single day, especially with the cell phones and everything. You have everything in the palm of your hand, and that's all preparation for the show. Yeah, that's gotta be tough. I was thinking about I mean I do one show a week with the podcast and just booking guests. Um, you know, it's tough because of cancel on. You have the reschedule. I can't do it. So I can't imagine what it's like five days a week to try and do that. And I think that where you are, you are such a rising starting to do such a good job with it that if you didn't have a guest to come on your show that night, that it would still be a breeze for you for four hours. Well, you know, I love guess, but I will only put a guest on if there's a purpose. I will not just throw a random writer on to talk football off season. There has to be a purpose for the guest. And, yeah, there's some days where I go. I'm not really feeling anyone, and I'll just talk for four hours and we'll have callers that will. That will buzz the phone line, so there always has to be a purpose for a guest. But you're right. It can get stressful. I'll tell you a story. We're doing a Q B carousel segment right now with how active this offseason is gonna be. So every night we had a team or we had two teams tonight. And what? We try to take those segments because they're 5 to 8 minutes. There's a lot of production that goes in and sound effects that go into it. So our guests for the 40 Niners that we were supposed to tape with that five...

...could not do it, you know, and ended up Texas last second. Guys, I gotta cancel. So then I ended up texting a buddy of mine that used to hire me and failure networks in San Francisco. He goes, I have a 40 Niners guy for you. So we're about to go to this spot live. We're a minute 30 for coming back to break that Guess that we were promised not picking up his phone eso. Since it's two teams a day, we already had one team in the can. So I got into the talk back to my producer and said, Play the one that we already have in the can and that will kill 57 minutes. And instead of doing that team second, let's do that team first. And during those five minutes. I gave my producer a number and I said, This is a former 40 Niners player. Ian Williams, nose tackle from 2010 to 2016 cold. Call him and see if he could come on. And he picked up the phone 30 seconds before we were about to come back as the other segment was wrapping up and we ended up doing that interview. Now, if he didn't pick up the phone, I would have just talked for five minutes about the 40 Niners. But, uh, that sometimes the behind the scenes of of radio where people make commitments and then they blow them off. And then some people, they panic. In that moment, if a guest doesn't pick up their phone, you always got to be prepared to talk about something else because your audience is there and your audience is Time is very valuable. Yeah, So one thing I was gonna ask you to do you look forward to the calls coming in from your audience, or is that something like because it seems like to me, that'd be kind of fun, because you're going to get bad ones. You're gonna get good ones. You're going to get people that don't talk that do talk and you can either. You can hit now, don't want this guy. So what's that like for you? It depends because there's a lot of bad callers like, I mean, brutal callers. But then a lot of good callers. Yeah, and there's there's regulars. But when you go to that phone line, it's opening up Pandora's box and you don't know what the heck is going. Thio come out of that Pandora's box, so it is fun. But I like toe have fun with the callers. Like, if the color is is not that great of a caller, you got a Either dump them quickly and get them off. Or you could sometimes turn a bad caller into a good caller. I had a guy called me up once, and he goes, Oh, I love listening to the Scott Gelb show and he goes, I gotta point on. I forget what you're like. Let's say the Raiders he wanted to talk about so I go away before you make a point about the Raiders. What show you listening Thio? Because sometimes people get nervous and they misspeak. He goes to Scott Gelb show that was like how the guy sounded like, Oh oh, interesting As a kid, I remember listening to Craig Kardon. Craig was once called, I guess Greg or some different name. And he was already doing that show on W. F. A. And 67 years already when I heard this call so he did a name quiz. All right, I'll give you every host of the name of the station. I'll give you the last name. You give me the first name. So I just remember that in the moment. And I said to the caller, Hey, before you make your point, I'm gonna give you a name of a host or a network So Lawrence guy said, Amy, Amanda, Laura Guy said Damon Barber Guy said, Tiki tyranny guy said Branton and I go Gelb and he goes easy. Scott on told him My name is not Scott. My name is Zak. He goes, I listened to you every day. I thought your name was Scott for all these years. Now they say my name Zak. I don't know. 9 to 10 times. It's not 20 with how many times I say it during the show. So that's what you get with listeners. Sometimes every listener, we thank them, but there, but the callers air different than the listeners. Mike Francesa once said this and I think it's it's dead on. The callers aren't your listeners. The callers wanna be a part of the show. The callers want to entertain. The callers want to perform. The callers think that they could do your job. So I'm not afraid to challenge my callers. And I'm also not afraid to use my callers to give me a different insight and a different opinion, because a lot of times a caller and I don't know, Oregon, he could be more tapped in tow, Oregon football than I am, and you get that local sense. But you gotta take it with a grain of salt because you never know if the information is gonna be factual enough, right? So I'm sure you've got a lot of callers calling in from Philly right now. And Indianapolis with the big Carson Wentz trade. Yeah. Hey, um, I look back at Carson. I was a firm believer, and Carson Wentz and I thought he was gonna be a great franchise quarterback and I think Howie Roseman is the biggest one to blame for the Eagles demise. Doug Peterson. You hear things come out and I've been, ah, big defender of Doug Peterson. Not that I think he's a great coach, but I didn't think he deserved to lose his job. You hear about some of the miscommunication or lack of...

...communication in that organization, but for Carson, here's my problem with him. Do I think that he is totally to blame for his shortcomings? No. The team was banged up. They did not draft well. They did not run the football enough. But you look at the show. Matson. Shawn Watson was screwed over left and right in Houston. He's still protected the football. He's still put up prodigious passing numbers where Carson Wentz usually threw the ball to the other team than his team. So Carson, to me, has a lack of accountability, and I heard some rumblings. I read articles when I was in Philly about his lack of leadership and some of the problems in locker room and the person I saw. It just didn't make sense. But now it's starting to make sense, So that deal, I think it's a win win. I usually don't like saying that, but I do think it's a win win because Philadelphia had to move on from Carson. It was a bleak market. You get a three and then the two that could turn into a one. And for the Colts, what else were you gonna? Who else are you gonna bring in? Jamis? Winston? I like Jamie's better than Carson, but Frank Reich knows Carson. I thought it's a low risk, high reward and he'll be in a better spot in India because you got a good offensive line. You got to solve run game and you got a good defense. So now we'll see if Carson could cut out the turnovers. But if he can't, then he's. I finally got to hear from him that I'm the problem. I did wrong instead of kind of blaming it on others. But the thing I don't get like if I'm a caller from Philly, I'm saying Okay, wait. You just traded our quarterback. You fired our head, coach. Why do both, right? We thought that you were firing Doug Peterson because he wasn't getting along with Carson Wentz, right? So I don't understand why you get rid of your starting quarterback and your head coach at the same time. And not only that, the guy that you brought in next, Syriani was not overly qualified and you brought him in because he was a disciple of Frank Reich. And you thought, because you bring in someone that knows Frank Rack that was going to smooth things over with Carson Wentz and just toe put some or flame more gasoline here on the fire. You get rid of Doug, you get rid of also the quarterback, but you keep the guy who's the general manager who oversees all of that. I don't get like Howie. Roseman still has the job. I thought, If you're going to get rid of Doug, you had to get rid of Howie Roseman and clearly Jeffrey Lurie didn't think that which I always say this line on the radio. Howie Roseman then must have naked pictures of Jeffrey Lurie. That's the only explanation I have somewhere, somewhere, right? I think we say that everything they gotta be embarrassing. Hey, exact man. It was great catching up with you. Please tell all our fans and they can follow you your you know, your drive time when they can catch you on the radio, give us all that information so they can They can catch up with Zach Gill. Yeah, sure. It z a c h g l b on Twitter and on instagram and all you have to dio is find out where your local CBS Sports radio affiliate is, or turn on Sirius Channel two oh six, Open up your phones radio dot com application. You could listen to us Monday through Friday from 6 to 10 p.m. Eastern and 3 to 7 PM Pacific. So very simply, that's how everything goes down. And, Gus, um, it's actually this has been a blast. Men, last two years I met you. I don't know if you remember this. I met you at the Super Bowl, Super Bowl 52 in Minneapolis when I was actually interviewing for the weekend overnight gig. And you gave me your I have your business card still in my wallet somewhere, and I remember meeting you there and then when my producer pitched me the idea through your podcast to bring you on weekly for our pick segment, I was like, I'm all in with Gus Frerotte. So I appreciate you having me and also appreciate all the great work that you do on our show. Yeah, I know. I appreciate you having me on your show. It's been a lot of fun. I don't like losing to you, so I cannot wait till next season. Give me something to look forward to, so we might have to switch. I would rather win the Super Bowl than be the champs in the regular season, right? It's like being its's Aaron Rodgers. Rather be the M V p or B. A Super Bowl champion. You tell me, Super Bowl champion, as you could see in my bedroom, I have a lot of blank walls face, So your fat head that you owe me autographed would look very good right behind me. I also think it would look better and your CBS Sports radio office, and then we can see that. So everyone my fat head. I actually was gonna try and find a small wanted today for myself to wear, but I couldn't find any small helmets laying around my house, so that might be at that head as well. I don't know, but Zack. Man, you have been awesome. Thanks for having me on your show. You are rising star, and I think whether it's your on CBS Sports radio the rest of your career, wherever you go, you're gonna kill it. So thanks for joining me on Hutto Up with Doesn't appreciate your time. Hi, This is former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte, 16 31. Digital advertising is your one stop shop to promote your business and get new customers for award winning Creative to getting as online and...

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