Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Vince Van Patten

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

A tour poker player and professional tennis player, now promoting his new film, 7 Days to Vegas, Vince Van Patten joins the Huddle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

He was gonna not too much. I'm kind of excited, though, about what will be going on and that will be what the pirates baseball. That's not normally. I would say yes, but that's not the case today. Today we have Hollywood royalty on our podcast. The van pattent family is elite in Hollywood. Their name is very well recognized and today we'll be talking to Vince van Patton, as you and I referred to him over the phone, VVP, vvp. He's very well known for a lot of reasons the family we mentioned. He was a phenomenal tennis player, be John macron row well as a number one player, beat the number one playing the world in tennis. How many people can say that and how many people could say they didn't have a coach self? Taught Self, taught he went old school, didn't do the the old img academy stuff that it seems like everyone goes through now. He taught himself in barely was coached until he got the very highest level start. He said he started on some nasty courts and Brooklyn where him and his brothers played and they're playing a stickball and then they went over to play the tennis out yeah, they were just it's like every other story we've heard. You got to go outside, you got to get outside and play. Don't come home, you know, but it's money. He's also famous for the World Poker Tour and prop bets and all that, but he was taught how to play poker. Yes, Dad taught him. Yeah, because that mean, as you mentioned before, he had more tutelage on playing poker then he did on tennis. Right, and been excelled at both, and he's a very well known commentator now on the TV for poker. Well, I think that one thing we were also excited to hear about was his brother was also coached many Hollywood celebrities, but one famous one was fair Fawcett. Yeah, the poster roll of anyone forty five and older. Right, I would say. Right, let's remember that. Yeah, I would remember that. Yeah, but also his brother also teaches John Lovitt's and heard some pretty good stories about that as well. Yeah, now, they they've they're. His Poker Games in La I'm sure, have been legendary. All right, Dave, so in the huddle today. I'm really excited. It's our first athlete actor, Poker Star, Poker Star personality, you name it, he's done it. I think he's just come from an outstanding family and some of the things we want to get to or about how that family dynamics has really been strong for man. What's Hollywood royalty really I mean really, it really is. If you look at the accomplishments of their family and how long they've been people follow their family and enjoyed their work, it's pretty crazy, right, and we're going to talk a little bit about he's got coming out right looking seven days of Vegas and least lecy sent me a double x and not, like most people, send me a medium and I got giant fit into it. And thanks for not forcing the double x on me, even though, but I would fit better right, right. So right now we got Vince van Patton. Vince, thanks for jumping in a hutle with Gustin. Dave, how are you doing? A lot of share doing good. Thanks for wearing those tshirts. They look good on you, I know. Thank you for some of them. I love it. It actually fits. It's going to be a great shirt to wear around. So really, where we start is we go back and we want to start at the beginning for you and really. Where was that love of sport? What was that influence for you when you were young to give you that love of sport? That's a great question. You know, we grew up in Long Island first twelve years of my life and Bell Rose Long Island and it was there in the days where everybody went on the street, the parents that get out of the house after school. All you did was be in the streets and this village and there was twenty five kids all around us and we are on the block and we played sports in the street. We would play stickball in the summer, you know, we'd go down to those two tennis courts that were blacked are almost very bad. But Island Railroad, we would play baseball and football right in the street and to had a ball. That's how we did it. So were you a giant or a jets fan? Jets, jets. Yep, I still still out, still out. Good. Good. Have you ever gotten to meet Joe Nameth? And never have. Wait a second, I'm going to take it back. I was a Heffner's about twenty years ago, twenty five years ago, and he was there. I don't think we actually met, but I saw and he you know, idolized them and well, you probably had a swarm of women around them and is wearing his fur coat and is, you know, can imagine, probably Joe it and have to have the play war Ma Mansion. Yeah, yeah, this was about twenty...

...five years ago and I think he met his wife's future wife. They're not mistake right. So, so when you guys were young, so you said, they're a bunch of kids from the neighborhood would just go out in the street. You know, it's crazy that doesn't happen today and so many of our guests talk about that. Can you explain about, you know, what you've learned from those experiences where there weren't parents out there bugging you with there weren't coaches, there weren't rest you had to figure everything out for yourself from so true, and we were in this little villas. We were right on the boarder of Queens and Nassau County and it was, like I said, twenty kids and we'd have bike races to and we were all the streets. It was cars coming, but we'd have bike races, twelve of us around the block and everybody was competitive and I was the youngest and my brother Nell's Van Patton was a great athlete and he was like the king. He's couple of years older than me, King of the neighborhood. You know, everybody followed nels around. Noll's, what are you doing? I'm going to climb that tree. He would say. It was okay, Della's okay, and I was like a little runt. And NELL's was great at football and he was great at baseball and everything. Great, great athlete. So I think I grew up in his shadow a little bit and wanted to compete with them. So that was fun. But yeah, you don't do that. And by the way, in Long Island, back in those days, precise bicycle races and all the fun we had with the sports. In the wintertime when the snow would come down, we did a stupid thing called skitching. I think they outlawed it because never go but sketching was you get on you find an oil truck or any kind of truck and it's juvenile de linquts would jump on the back of it and like you know, getting the back and surf it until two or three blocks down down the road. So that was a dumb thing we did. I think that's that's absolute. Now no one does that, but we were what we were climbing trees where on the railroad tracks, the third rail. You know, we're always taken stupid chances, but it was fun. Yeah, and those are kind of situations that you really learn about yourself. And you know, we had several guests come on to talk about you know, you get knocked down, you got to get back up, like there's nobody, there's no coaches running out, their athletic trainer running out, it's just you and your friends and you don't want to be the kid that was laying there. So it teaches you a lot about how to you know, hey, I might get knocked down, it may hurt a little bit or whatever, but it just teaches you so much that I got to keep up with the crowd and the socialization. You can't replace that. And he's the youngest one doing it right, and when you're the youngest one you don't want to be left behind. It's so true. And don't forget, coming back from school, guys will always saying hey, let's wrestle, and it throw you down on the grass and beach up and wrestle and hit you a few times you've got tough at them and these kids. It's really true. And by the way, I started playing tennis when I was about nine years old. We had these two little courts and bell rows village no one played and it was right next to the fire department and we started playing in the summer as my brother and I and and finally we had about eight of us and it's bells village team and they said, okay, this is exciting. You guys are getting pretty good now in tennis. You're going to play the Douglaston Country Club. A Douglaston was about six miles away. Okay, so we play the Douglaston country club and we thought we were okay in tennis. We come over there with one stupid racket each. We go in this club and it's like all of a sudden it's the rich kids, it's the kids. They have tennis lessons. We've never had lessons or anything like that. We had eight matches. The bellows village didn't win one game. We've got beat six hundred, six hund six hundred and six undred and six across the board, eight of us, and we just play. Oh, we don't know how to play this game, but it was good for us. We took our hits right. I think pultimately that helps you later on get that fire and want to be good at something. Well, that's almost that reality versus expectation, right. Your reality was going in you had really you played, but you didn't really know. So what were your expectations going? and was we're going to win every game, or was it we're going to learn how to do this the proper way and understand a little bit. So a lot of kids grow going through that today. They co it's so true. I think sports are great because of that. It teaches you how to take a loss, how to improve you if you want to hang in there and get better. It's great exercise and like like. We know the kids aren't getting quite as much exercise now. They're on the cell phones and all that, doing a lot more of that. So the world is a different world right now. So I'm going to ask him about you. You got to ask the question all, Ad Vince, we asked most of our guests this and that we're hitting about nine hundred four. It's an amazing percentage that participate amongst all the sports you played in Long Island was whiffleball, one of those sports. All Derby, whole run Derby pitch that whiffleball and we had everything set up at the hit the ground or you out at the hitted past the the sidewalk. It was a base hit, and then we had a whole run over the trees and all that. Yes, the greatest, its greatest game. stickball too. Yeah, pits into that box and up against a school or something. I love stickball, you know. We...

...talked about how, you know, you just put a lawn chair for the catcher and that's a strike zone as well. So if you've if it hits the strike zone, it's a strike. Right. So there's so many great things about whilftball and all of our guests talked about how much they love playing whoofball. Literally, when I said like ninety five percent of them it's like ninety five. Yeah, yeah, and if there's not enough players, not enough fielders, sometimes you hit the guy with the ball if he's running around second then he's out. You know, it's if it's like foreign for and you could put good spin on the whiffleball. All right, right. Wall was another great game. You know, everyone have a stoop back then and did the stupid he kept it was great. Yeah, right, so you started playing tennis when you were nine, and then did you play any other sports as you went and grew up? Where did you go to high school? We Little League at St Gregory's. I was pretty good and my brother Nels was the all star and did that and I we played football. I never played actually on any team, Football, pee wee and all that. Never did that, but love football, big idol of yours, big fan. Well, thank you. Still Love the NFL and watching football all the time. It's fun to bet on. I mean now that I'm in fantasy against my family, it's you know, every week I beat somebody. I'm always texting him, like you guys can't keep up with dad, you know, kicking that butts all that stuff. So but it is a lot of fun. So when did you guys move to California? How old were you? So I was twelve and we moved out to Sherman Oaks in the valley, San Fernando Valley, and I played more tennis at the public park there just because the parents would in the summertime, all year round, they would go there and they said you want to come along? Oh, yeah, yeah, so my two brothers and I would go to the park and they would just leave you off and out of bottom. We just kept playing, getting better and then when I was about twelve and a half, my father said there's a junior tennis tournament. It's the nationals, the then southern CAL sectionals. Do you want to play in it? I said yes, of course I want to play in it. So I played the sectionals. First round. Same Story. I play Walter Rodondo, this young kid. He's the first seed. Hundred and twenty eight draw and I lose six hundred and six hundred to Walter Rodondo. He just destroys me. I walked off the court thinking I could play and realizing I was just a hack then. So played junior tournaments. I never really was ranked in southern California until my last year of eighteen, so I was ranked maybe ten. So I was a hack. I didn't have lessons. I've ever got any lessons from tennis and I just watched the good players play, like road labor when he was playing TV, and that's how I got better. I would try to emulate the strokes right and was your brother nails, a good tennis player. He was. He was terrific, he was great. Might Pay. He was better than me, but he had a bad temper. So he lose it. And when when he was something happened out there and he would throw his racket. He just had a terrible temper. So that really hurt him a lot in his game. He was on the street as well. He was on the ATP circuit. I think he got ranked top three hundred, something like that. He was Mac and rode before Mac and Rowe he's pretty mad. Yeah, macro probably watched him. To say all those are the things I want to do. Is Everybody wants me. You know, Bi and Borg also had a bad temper. When he was like thirteen, fourteen, he would never I think it. He had terrible temper. He was throwing rackets and then the coach said look, you you aren't. If you do that again, I'll cut you off. Your shaming your family, blah, Blah Blah. And so from that day on he learned, he got it and then he became this iceman and he never had a temper after that and then he became the great player he is. I remember hearing words resting heart rate is almost it's like twenty. But yeah, really, yeah, it's some of your play. At a time it was unbelood like he was the most physically get a person on earth or something. It was like it was like a twenty two beats per minute. Well, I think there was just a recent a match that went on for like four and a half hours. Dave, you and I can, let alone, you know, do anything for four and a half hours, besides playing tennis at the highest level for four and a half hours, which is incredible. What's the longest Matt you've ever had? I played a five hour at the US Open. I think it was second or third round back in the early S. they're tough and I used to sweat a lot of sweater, so I sweat it all out and I cramp a lot, so it's awful. Then I lost it Johnny Mac in the third round of the open two years in a row in eighty two and eighty three. was disciplined. But yeah, easily five hour matches that play. So tell us a little bit about your parents. How were they with you guys? I mean you guys are all competitive. You were, you know, we all played sports, you and your brothers, and what were your mom and dad like with you today, come watch your events today, support you in any way? Not Really. You know that they drop you off at some junior tennis tournament and then my father would go off to the racetrack. I'll be back in four hours. In terms, I remember my Buddy Daryl Goldman and I, at fourteen, took the bus up to Santa Barbara to this tournament. And that's what you did back then. You...

...just you scrambled, you go with some other parents. But my father appreciated that we were playing. My Mother did too, and they played, but they never saw a baseball game that I was at, you know, when I was playing little league or anything. That's just wasn't done. But we know they loved us and they supported us, but they just weren't as hands on with that type of thing. You know. Well Right, I think it's amazing. I mean he turned out to be a phenomenal tennis player, but self taught essentially. I mean you really didn't have any lessons. You didn't you didn't play in college or not. But you know, then they turned because when I made the pro circuit and I played the US Open, a top twenty five in the world and all that and my father became really excited. You know, he's really exciting, and he wouldn't be in a lot of the big matches and they would sit in the box in the corner at the US Open and he would be so nervous and he would just sit there and no emotion, wouldn't even clap. And then, just finally, if I would miss a shot, I hear him at hear him outside and your job like that. Oh, and I look over driving me crazy, right. So it was just it was just not good. He couldn't watch the eventually couldn't watch anymore. He was just too nervous about the results. So well, I'll tell you sure about my father. My father was a mill guy in Pittsburgh, right, and one of fifteen kids. You know, Love Them, love sports that I was playing, I was in high school basketball, and they kicked him out of the gymnasium and he was never allowed to come back because he was so loud. He wasn't yelling at the coach or anybody else, he was yelling at me and he and I could hear him just like that. You know when Your Dad's Yeana, you're making a noise or doing whatever, and I can remember her to this day and it kind of made me happy. He was looking through the gym doors. You know, those little windows are like this big and you just see his face watching the game. But he was a lout in the gym, but he could stand outside and I'm like, man, thank God he's but that's how he always was. That's how he you know, everything I've ever done. I'd play in the NFL. I'd call him and say Hey, Dad, man, through four touchdowns. He goes, yeah, but he's through those two interceptions. What were you thinking? That was savage, just him. That's how he that's how he did it with me every last father also, you got. I'd be a tournament any be there and I practice about four hours during the day. I walk off exhausted because he quitting now. I said tell you, yeah, I'm done this, to go ahead do that. But you know, I just saw Yo Hand Creek. He's over there still practicing. I don't I don't care about your hand cre he's cut his happy yeah, well, doll a little bit. He didn't realize that some you do have to pull yourself off. You don't want to overtrain, which I did a lot, which yeah, personally the track. I watched your highlight from when you were in doubles and you guys beat Connor and Everett and you were intent. Oh Yeah, all, you were intent. Yes, thank you, that's right. You. How did you get film with that? That's amazing. I think Cathy Renoldi and I, yes, Pete Connors and Chrissie, and they were upset. I mean they did not want to lose to us and we beat them in this big championship in Houston back in the day. And Yeah, I was very intense. Drove myself to the limit. I thought I could be an able one in the world. I got to twenty five. I was disappointed when I didn't get there because after a while, when you start beating all these top players, you start saying I can do that, I can be number one. And I intensified even more and I played even harder and longer. was probably hurt me. And I did get a coach out there and he was from Greece and he was a great guy, but he did stay keep me on the court a little too long. So I got a lot of injuries, a back injury, bt, shoulder, bad knees. You know, you know the drill. So that just de Tours you and then you got to pull back and I never got to that place and I actually felt I disappointed myself. It's crazy, because you put yourself, and I said, you think you're a failure at twenty five in the world, which is strange. Right. visary, when you beat Mac and Roe, you that was in singles and Tokyo's all right, yeah, what was he ranked at the time when you beat him? Oh, he was double one of the world. He only lost batch of the previous year. This was the biggest indoor tournament in the world at the time, the SACO tournament, and I just had a great week. I'd be Betis and I beat Mac and whole bunch of great, great guys, and it was I just peeked, you know. I just first round. I was up against Jose Louise Clerk and I was down to match points to WHO's I and I came back from there. And then after winning that and coming back, everything's gravy. You get that momentum and I started thinking I'm not going to lose, I'm going to beat beat us. I lose to beat US Jeralitis the first set, six hundred six hundred, down six hundred and two hundred and I came back beat him in three sets, and so the momentum was happening. I said give me Johnny Mac and I won my quarterfinal match. And at that night I just sat the stands watching Johnny Mac play his quarterfinal and I study every one of the places he goes during situations. Really try to study that. Add Out. Where does he go forhand side, because you had to guess he served was so devastating you...

...had to guess inside of the other. So I think I really watched and I learned from that. I tagged him the next day seven hund five hundred sixty three, and that was probably the highlight of my tennis career. How many swear words did he say in that match? I'm sure you remember a few. He was sent because nuts, but he is. He was great for the game. Still is doing a great job as a commentator, I think, and he's wont to play. You follow you have a favorite now in tennis? Do you like to follow them? Like to watch? I think of the US Open was amazing and Djokovic. I mean he's like come be out there, I can't I believe the fitness level they're getting to. They shake it off. Now they do have a whole team. Now, back of the S we didn't have teams. More or less right now, they massage and they knew exactly what to do. So they do their yoga, they do all that. But but Djokovic and Federer, I mean Nadal, I'm just so impressed with their tennis and their sportsmanship. I think the great sports which is nice to say. Who's the hardest server you ever had to go against? Yeah, I beat Roscoe Tanner. He had to serve a hundred and forty miles per hour lefty and toss it up and he would just hit you, thross it and catch it on the ride. Bam. But if you can get the return back, I was in pretty good shape because he didn't have much more. John MACARO, his serve was so devastated because you couldn't you know he would move it around. Being a left he's a big advantage in tennis when you have that lefty serve. So those are the two greatest service that I played against. Well, you probably like the NFL right, so if you talked to the players that were in the NFL in the S. they're saying, yeah, we did the same thing, but you guys now make way more money. I'm sure it's the same thing in tennis. I think it's fifteen fold from what I made. It has if it athlete gets through it, the whole world's going after these jobs. You deserve it and plus NFL is doing tremendous so I don't begrudge any athlete what they can make. I think they deserve it. No, I don't either. But you know, one of the things in the NFL we always talked about the guys before us were the ones who paved the way and you know you respect them, and so it's really nice been being able to talk to older players that were older than me and then the younger players now who understand that because we sacrifice so much. You know, went through arbitration, did all those things, that you're able to reap a lot of the benefits now. I don't know how the tennis world works with all that stuff, but it seems like with everything they have now, with all the sponsorships, everybody coming in, it's crazy money, but it's good. It's well deserved. It's only a few in the world's I thought with the money I made through tennis. I thought after I retired like an eight, eight eighty nine. I said, well, okay, I never have to work again. You know, this is great. What a two year you know? So, who knew? So I went back to the acting world and doing that and writing and and then, of course, my poker game came alive and I had a poker game that started small and became this big underground game in Hollywood and all these fun guys played it. It was all about the people who was playing against. And eventually the crazy bet that I made was that I could bet that I could walk from La to Las Vegas in seven days, two hundred and eighty miles. And so we make the movie about that bet and it's called seven days to Vegas. As you can see, right little with that poker game. Yeah, I know, those player guys are great. Tomorrow an issue wide and exclude of theaters and you can go to the Od itunes and everything like that later coming up the two days. Yeah, I know, we're excited. I can't wait to watch it. But if you go back to you know, we talked a lot about your sports, but now you go back to when you were kid and you were still you were a child actor as well. I was. I was at kid actor, nine years old and did a lot of the big shows, the TV series, you name it, I did all and then kind of washed up at eighteen. So my career went down as an actor. But then I found the tennis. I got lucky to make it tennis. I don't know really how it happened, just and then I've been very lucky, very blessed my whole life. I think the Vince has been a part of many shows I still watched today and it's maybe you are very some time show. I am a lot of time. My d would are my dv Ores, like wonder woman, six million dollar man, which he's been on both of those. Right. I've ever worked Johnny Carson for whatever reason. You know that I love that stuff, big fan, but he's as he's recognizable now, like when we heard you. I know what it looks like. Well, when I saw his acting shots from wonder woman and when he was when he played were you your Andy, the bionic boy? Right, that's right. Yeah, I remember. I mean it's funny because I was like that's sad, but I just watched out about three weeks ago. Tell them the story about your dad. Some I was telling guys before the show. My...

Dad Never Watch TV. Super hard working guide, never had really time for TV, except maybe sports. He'd watch a lot of NBA and stuff and stealer games. But it was funny. Whenever I had wonder woman on, my dad always sat down next to me and had a beer and I was only like I was like eight at the time. I couldn't figure out why. I was like, wow, this is pretty cool. We must like superheroes and stuff. I think if he seeds episodes now as an adult, I understand why he was watching. But he watched it because he knew Vincel. He knew Vince was all right, satisfy. He had nothing to do with lived. Yeah, no, there. It was a bonding experience, though, so that was that was nice. What however it comes it's good. But you know, I think when we talk about life and the dynamics and the transitions that we all go through, it seems like you guys had a really good family structure that really helped you know, no matter what happened, that you were going to get through it, whether it was your brothers or your parents or anybody else, because we know in the industry you're in it could be pretty brutal to families. All the tick Pan Patent and acted and my mother was a tune tailor dancer. But anyway, their whole thing was they were very grateful to have a family, to have some food on the table and to have a profession. That my father started doing well because he was washed up after he did a show call, I remember, Mama, and then he didn't work for ten years and he knew what it was like to struggle. But basically, growing up he always taught us don't take yourself too seriously, do you job, do it well, and don't take life too seriouslet's just enjoy it, be good to other people, not profession get ahead, and he was not into that. So he was a great father. He wasn't like a lot most actives that the show they live. They just love just the one thing. My father had hobbies and things he loved to do and play tennis and play sports and go to the racetrack and play poker. So his whole thing was just enjoy your life, go to the beach, go to the ocean. So they were great parents that way. They need US appreciate the small things right. And he taught you how to play poker right. Should did at age eight, because every day he'd be going to the race star. We lived in assaw bell rows. It was right next to Belmont Park, right little quarter of a mile. My father did that a purpose. Want to be right five down my park and every day. And so a Bile I was dad, where you going at racetrack? I said, Oh, you want to tag along? He goes, you got to know a handicap. So okay. So he taught me everything about handicapping and then how to play poker, because he would have two or three poker games at nighttime back at the house. So he taught me how to play poker. I took a liking to it. Yeah, it is a lot of fun. I've played in the NFL. We would play every Saturday night before the game. Yeah, we would get a group of us and it was all the same five, six, seven guys and we played all kind of poker. was always dealers choice and so we passed it around and everybody have a different deal and I can tell you I've won some money and I've lost some money. So I'm not the greatest poker player, but I do love playing it. It's a great way to socialize and have a lot of fun. I always say it's nice to win, but it's nice to win, but it's three times harder to take the loss as it is the win. When you're when you go, oh, that was terrific, I'm gonna go to buy pair of shoes, something Nice, whatever. When I lose, it takes three days to get over it takes when you hit, you know, when you're playing for pretty good sticks that's hit, sometimes it really hurts. Oh Yeah, yeah, and I'm sure you've played in between or between the sheets. Ever play that game? No, yeah, so it's where you put one card down and you and then you put another card down. You say it's going to be in between him or higher lower. You See, doc AC, do see? Yeah, so we us, we had all kind of names for it, but that was the biggest loss I've ever taken and that was a hard one to overcome because I hit the post and so there were four cards left and it was a two and a king. Yeah, I'm like, let's get to so we've been playing for like an hour. We had four decks playing at the same time, so nobody could count cards and all that, and I hit the post of King came up and I owed like sixteen grand oh times as much, if the exact card matches out. Yeah, it's like that comes up in the whole room explodes like, you know, it's like before bed check in. The whole roads go. It's like I'm just sitting there like how am I going to tell my wife? That's the only thing I was worried about. Start to hit the playbook. Probably after that. You got a game tomorrow. Yeah, yeah, well, that was our release before the game, but we did that quite off but we had the same group of guys where it didn't leave the room and it was fun and we really enjoyed it. So you said you had a group of people that you love to play poker with. Was it the same people all the time? Would you find New People? Well, when you have a game you try to keep it going. Once a week, twice a week. You have to have a rotistory of about a hundred players and I always just played to gamble, to have fun. Some people when they have a game they take a rake. I would never do that in so but our bunch of a lot of friends, a lot of people come in and out, and the thing about poker can be a social thing. Some people don't quite know what to do with...

...themselves and you can go to a casino, I'll go to friend's house and really have a good time. It's a social thing. It's so even if to lose a little money, you know it's still been beneficial for you to your life because it's a nice thing. But yeah, over the years then the game got, you know, it gets bigger. As you know, Games just always get bigger. And then my game got pretty big and it was tough to take losses. I had to finally quitted about twelve years ago because the ups and downs right, it is very emotional. It is very emotional. So so you finish your tennis career and then after your tennis career, where did you what was your next step? Like, you know, you made some money and you're saying, okay, I'm going to retire, I'm going to move on. What was that next transition like for you? Yeah, I think that. First of all, I think I retired when I was about thirty one years old and or thirty two. Or thirty two, I forget to chat but people now it's different, but back then everybody would say, Oh, you're thirty years old, you're going to retire, you're going to I mean same question that I guess all you great athletes, all the football players, get to but it's like they forced you to retire and no one told me, hey, you could play to your forty five years old. No one said otherwise I might have paced myself, but with injuries and everything, they go oh, maybe I have, maybe I'm getting old, and you start putting at your head, and that's why I retired a little earlier and I realize now, like I guess he played to forty years old, Djokovic federals. Now I think thirty eight. You know, these guys play a long time after keep yourself and shit. But nevertheless I did retire and then came back into the acting world, got a two gigs, started writing, made a couple small movies and play a little poker on side. Then I got the world poker tour, the gig on as a commentator eighteen seasons ago. So life has been just just going well, going well. I got how did that game come about? How did you become a commentator world poker? Tour. First of all, before two thousand and one and two thousand and two, when you watch poker on TV. When it was on TV, no one cared because you didn't see the cards. So it wasn't till Steve Lipscombe, the creative the world poker tour, came along. He said, I got an idea. If you look at the cards with the camera, people will watch it. All right, so he hires Mike Sex and Mike Sex and the great poker player helped raise the money and they were looking for the second sidekick. No one else was in the game. They knew I was an active in the new I had done it once before the world series. I guess I was the candidate. I get the job. Mike and I look at each other go huh, this is going to be fun. But the last two shows, you know, whatever becomes a phenomena, it just goes through the route because people are seeing the cards and the finally realizing why poker so interesting, that you don't have to have the best hand. You could bet a lot of money and take the pot. Yeah, I know, yeah, and it's what's interesting about is that the great ones always seem to kind of just work their way through. They don't have to have the best cards. But I don't know what it is about poker. I was terrible at holding, terrible because I couldn't read the table. You couldn't let you know. You want to understand like people's demeanors and what you know, because I knew all these guys I've playing with, because we would play together all the time. But you know, it's just like, man, I got a good cards, I'm going in, you know, and we're so like athletes. We just want to win, right. We just went hey, I got the best card, I'm gonna go throw a touchdown right, I got you know, this the matchup by and what? But then, right inevitably you get beat because you know you got three aces, but then somebody else pulled a full house and you're so well, yeah, to be a good poke player I have to have a lot of street smarts. You got to be patient, but you got to open up your game at certain times. You got to be a great competitor with the bottom line is, at the end of the night you want to walk away with the money and it's not just hey, I want to have five pots or you know, take it then so, but now everybody's good because of TV. Everybody's pretty good. Back of the day, when you played in a home game, you know, like you said, guys would be a little more timid, they would make mistakes. So you can take advantage of that. Right. And then the tells are a big part of poker. But now they're all pretty good in these tournaments. They have the sunglasses on, the hoodies. Yeah, it's well, who's the best poker player in the world right now? That's great questions. It rotates. First of all, Doyle Bronson is the greatest. He's the granddaddy of them all, baby proof poker, right, and he's that's in the big game at Belascio. But they say, you know, Phil Ivy, he's not playing world poker tour events as much, but you know, he's still a great, great player. My Buddy mikes sex and is fantastic. Fill hell with is terrific. It goes on and on. But the funny thing about poker it's very streaky now for these top guys. They run good for a year, the big superstar, they don't hear from, you know, for back three or four years toill. Go take a sabbatically just don't have any results, because there is a lot of luck involved at that level. So you can disappear in three or four years and hopefully your bank roll doesn't go with you. Right. So, in all your times of playing this bet that came up about your movie, like how it was. It's so it's a real bet. It's something that really happened to you. That's what I want...

...to get in like. I think it's I think it's pretty interesting because I've done I've done stuff like that too. That was the great thing about my home game was it wasn't about poker. It was about the crazy bets we all made and we would bet on. I Made Bets on the tennis court. I've been roller blades and a frying pan. I would play people. I made a half court bet with a basketball from half court to throw it in that ten throws I would get, let's say, for five hundred bucks right, better said Nice. I made it. I was good at ten. Okay, now eight, knock me down. At Eight. I was good at eight. The number came down to four, four, and then I lost everything. I lost it all back because it went down to four throws and I couldn't make it. But I was pretty good with with the you know, throw from Headquart, but that was another bet we made. Anyway, we made crazy bets and the movie seven days of Vegas is really about the crazy bets and the stupidest bet and the craziest bet I ever made was that I can walk from La to Las Vegas and seven days with a lot of money, as two hundred and eighty miles. Now a lot of this is fictionalized because it's a movie, so he fix a lot of it, but it is fun and I describe this as the hangover meets the sting. This kind of movie. We'll go. I want to hang out with these guys that are a lot of fun and this twist and turns and it's all about cons and hustles. Who Else is stirring in the movie with you? Okay, my wife, Eileen Davidson young in the restless housewives of beverly. She's in it. She's fantastic. She's a great actress. My brother, Jimmy Van Patten, plays my brother very name dropper in the film, Ross McCall, John or Hurley, Willie Garson, Chadlow, Jennifer Tilly. I mean it's an ensemble piece, Paul Walter Houser for my Tanya, very funny guy. So it's an ensemble piece. It's coming out tomorrow and exclusive theaters and Itunes and Vod all that in a few days. Was it a lot of fun? I mean did you? I mean a lot of it takes place obviously walking to Vegas and go through trials and tribulations. Was it a lot of fun making this movie? Yeah, it was a lot of fun because we they follow me, the characters follow me in this big black RV see see me fail, basically, and they're all great actors and funny guys. So they would making prop bets inside that are the all day long when they weren't shooting and pitching cars and cards, and they actually had one guy. Can you drive along the desert on top of the RV going thirty miles per hour? Stupid actor did it. You know he's up there trying to make that that. I mean we can make it stupid prop bets. So it was fun. It was out, the desert was very hot, but we got it done. It was it's a dream shoot, basically really fun. That's why I was going to ask what time of the year did you shoot it? Because that that must be unbelievable. Well, luckily we shot it in April, Mid April, not too bad, and then we did reach, not reachhots, but to added scenes five days in the desert and we did that in July. Oh, it's like it's brutal. You know, you have Baker California and see the parameter thermometer say a hundred and fourteen and I'm Oh, by the way, one of the things in the movie is I have to make the walk, but I have to wear a suit, suit, so on the whole movie I'm wearing this suit. Rather that's just one of the conditions. That's what prop bet. Crazy gamblers due to each other say, okay, you got the bet, I'll bet you this buck, but let's throw. You got to wear a seat. So you're throwing crazy conditions and they can need to say yes, no or walk away. Right. Well, this is in the movie. I have to wear a seat. So very, very hot. Now, I mean those are those are the kind of bits that I've made my whole life. When you get with your buddies and and you know those people and you're saying I can do this and you know I've made a few of those kind of bets. I used to do ones. I didn't have a lot of money to throw around. But if we're playing like see tech went super bowl and the loser had to put a mouthful pennies in her mouth for five minutes or whatever. You know, it was like those type of things. Oh, yeah, just you know, that's but that's that's how we get started in all this stuff. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, course. No, I was going to say so you you've made other movies as well. The break, right, how was that? Because that was about tennis. Yeah, what was that like me, because I mean you and your family vall played tennis. I think was it your brother that was in it? Were helped you write it or produce this? For you know, I had a different writer. I always like to bring it a partner or writer. I like to bounce things off a writing partner. Right, and that film back in ninety four, ninety five, but it's about tennis and a coach. I played the coach and this young kid that's the psychopath and I sort of try to get him through the US Open. Mark Sheen was in it, right on, Chong and Nice cast and we made that film and it was pretty successful and I didn't want to make another film because I had had it. You know. I just wanted to do the world poker tour, blah, blah, blah, and then I enjoyed writing, but to put everything else together as a lot of work till finally my wife and I work. Saw a movie about six years ago and it was about Hollywood and it should have been...

...terriffic. Should been this. It's interesting to see the insides of Hollywood and the Glamor. The movie didn't work. It's just wasn't very good. We were talking about it after and after she said she was that's a shame, she was, but you've got to do your movie now. But what she was that's right, write something about your poker game in the crazy bet you do. I have to should yes, you do your movie. So she convinced me to write the film and I'm glad I did. Six years later, finally coming out, and the time you thought about it till till it's actually out, it's six years. Because that was that about typical for a movie. It's a little listen longer than most, but usually for a screenplay we meet you fifteen different drafts we try to make it really good. That takes took a couple of years. Then you got to raise the money, then you got to go to studios for this and that, get the actors come. It's a mess, not an easy bits, as you guys could imagine. Well, it's a long shot. When you do get something out, and this when it's doing that, which studios putting it out for you? We have a distribution from gravatus. Okay, here another I was going to ask you about John o'hearly. What's he like in person? I know from Seinfeld, but he's classic, same voice. Yeah, is it really? It's late actor, funny guy to hang out with. Just a lovely guy. Lovely Guy, the best, and he's good in this film. He plays his billionaire. I will tell you anymore, but it's very good. Spell. Now I'm so excited to see seven days the Vegas and I'm really excited to, you know, sit down with you, Dave, grab some popcorn and then think about what bets we're going to make. Will make some proton that. No pennies in the mouth, though, please. Yeah, yeah, I don't want to hear about your college fraternity days. There's a lot of things you don't want to hear about. Hey, to the mouth, sous awful and Oh, it couldn't be worse. Sing any just smelling a penny's yeah enough, but put like fifteen in your mouth for five minutes and I'm amazed they actually didn't die from that. Whether it's swallowing or or whatever was on the pennies, but it was. I did be good for you. I wouldn't recommend it. So do you still play tennis? To that's a knee problems, but I work around it and haven't. I never got any surgeries. I just don't believe that. Little nervous about doctors. So I've had my knee problems, but now they get better. I Rehab them. I shoulder. I'll play tennis maybe once or twice a week. Loving it again. To come back into it recreationally and hit the ball and no pressure. Only play for forty five minutes singles per day or every other day or whatever is nice. It's refreshing because there's no pressure and I realized why I love the game so much. Does Eileen play? She does play, but not very often. She she works out all the time doing other things, but she does now play very off. I want to get her out there. She loves the game. What about your kids? You play against your son's Yeah, I got a twenty six year old and the twenty four and they both picked up the game. I didn't teach them earlier. I try to teach them, but I think I burnt them out. You know, lived like four years old on the tennis court doing drills and because of that I might have pushed them too fast. They never wanted to do that. They played soccer, top level soccer, great surfer, all that, and now, when they got older, they went, Oh, what is his tennis game? I taught them that and now we play together and they're very good and become good players. That's nice. I was because I was research with some of your life and everything. And what was the maze? I saw some of your twitter. Where you guys? I guess you went out the night before. Then you're walking through Pebble Beach, the golf course. Yeah, and then you had a picture of your son in the background saying he's still recovering from his hangover. Is Pretty it's pretty funny. It was pretty funny. What and real. By Way, we have also have a sixteen year old and he's great and cross country, which that's all sport, was going to do it all over because you're there with forty teammates, guys and girls. You know, what was I doing on the tennis court? You know, playing one guy on the other side of the net. That's a great sport and he loves that and he's a track and field as well. He could run the Vegas though. Yeah, you can make a sequel and it'll be running to me. What do you what do you think you learned from sports and how it transitioned over to acting, like where they're similarity for you? I think sports toughen you up. Gotta know how to take that loss, walk away and try to get better actings. To say acting is brutal, all the rejection you have when you have to do interviews and all that. So you better know how to take a loss. Concentration. You got to be able to focus, focus, focus in both things, as you know, guss and, and be real clear and decisive, and also in poker to it's the same. I believe that you have to a lot of people don't what to do, but they don't have the heart to pull the trigger at the right time. And in tennis you have to be able to do that. You got to step it up, hit that ace when you have to it. pokers the same thing. You got to make that bluff when you have to and the most people will not shy away from that. And I think in order to be poker player or good actor, you have to have that concentration and that that heart. When...

...you talked about when you played Mac and ruin, you studied him like what can you do in similar that's like that in poker? Do you do a lot of studying and poker and now these kids, these young players, they study everything and everyone. And if I was going to get back into it seriously, yeah, I would look at all the World Polka tour tapes and watch what these guys did. Write it down so you have your notes. Big thing you've got to know how guys play. Do they have a steal a pot? The certain pros that are very tight? Maybe they won't steal a pot one side of every fifty times. Others fifty percent of the time they taken pots away from you. So very, very important to study players and see what they're doing. I'm going back to tennis. What would you say your best attribute and tennis was what was your your serve, back hand? What was it wasn't the serve mediocrity at best. Forehand was horrible, a hack. Just took it back. I don't know what I was doing, and it evolved. backhand. I had a two hand backhand because I didn't have the strength in the one hand. It's a genius backhand, great, great back and leg speed, foot speed. And then competitiveness. I wanted to win so bad. I mean I got pushed around, bullied by these young junior tennis players for so many years and they kind of laughed at me, you know. In fact, once we were all hanging out and they said, what are you going to do when you get older? I was about fourteen time and this guy said this, this guy, and I went, I'm going to be a tennis pro and they all looked at each other and start laughing, bursting out laughs. You're not for going to be a tennis BOA. Blah Blah, Blah Blaha. Okay, maybe not, maybe not. I'll never forget that, but that inspired me to come back, train harder, and then I started lifting weights when I was like seventeen or eighteen because I was very scrawny until then and all the back of the day they said, can't lift weights, she'll be Musky. Never lift weights if you're going to be a tennis player. I realized it made me feel better and I move better on the court when I was lifting weight. That that heavy, and that's what moved my game up. I think I was the first player back then start lifting weights a regular basis, where even in the NFL back in the day they wouldn't lift weights. Right, it is all right. It just weightlifting and understanding the body and the health and wellness and everything. I mean it started like almost in eight late s or early S, and now it's just taken to the as we seen from Tom Brady, who still playing at forty two years old. You know, act you can extend your career for a long time. So it also told you. They also told you. I would like to take j coozie's and jump in the ocean, you know, hot, cold, and Oh you can't do that. He that's batty muscles. that WHO's don't get hot water, don't go in the cold. They at. All these rules all turn out to be wrong, right, and you were the groundbreaker. Yeah, yeah, you know, to do it. So one of the last things we do, Vince, is we called our no huddle. It's our two minute drill. We fire out, we fire a bunch of questions at you and just, you know, give us some quick answer. So, Dave, go ahead. You always start us off our advance. What's your biggest pet peeve? Bad Lines, people that are very slow in the line. Far Me. Oh, that's the worst, worst, it has to be the worst. Like and then they got to repeat it. It's probably going on for own sound in patient with that. WHO's the WHO's at all the time you've been playing cards? Who's the biggest sword of loser you've ever played against? Famous, but Jerry Van Dyke from coach was the best leader because he would be at every pot. He was only at the poker game to get the cookies. Would just be eating. That's the worst. Not a Thames person, but he would take pizza boxes at the ends. Yeah, told the pizza box the poker game people, but he's not famous, so there you go. All right. How about the best? Oh wait, I'm sorry. Still help me with you know, famous. Still help me with he's wonderful. He's a bad loser. It's bet loser. He'll go into the you know, on the ground. He's rolling up. How can that guy have called me? He's a character. Oh Yeah, I've seen that on when I've watched the show. Yeah, he's like Yourn Borg when he was young. He's got that mentality. Who's the best celebrity tennis player out there today? Robert De val used to be Robert D val and now he's think he's planning anymore. James Cohn wasn't bad today. I don't know that. They don't play much celebrity tennis anymore. John Lovitts, he plays with my brother. My brother teaches them every day. They work out every day. Very funny in the court he won't hit the ball to my brother who's instructor. He serves and he looks over at you because why did you think of that one? But your your brother, also famously taught a famous actress fair faster, right, he did. He taught Sarah so years. He's like the teacher to the stars out in La and that's your brother nails hell's. Yeah, Great Guy, great athlete, as you know. If they didn't listen to him, did he get a temper with him and say, Hey, come on now. You gotta focus. Did you go away and he...

...goes? Ah, man, why doesn't all loves hit the BALL BACK TO ME? I think you could ask it just about any forty five year old male in the world with their dream job is, and half of them would say beat Farrifauce. It's tennis instructor. Right, that sounds I never even conceive that my mind. That's that's something else. Okay, Vince, if you could trade places with anyone in the world for one day, who would that be? Well, trump, yeah, I'll mean that. Great Question. Trade. I'm black, kind of I don't know. I have a I might myself. There you go. I'd think Vince, actually, if you ask me that right after hearing this whole story. So who's the funniest person? You know? Brother Jimmy. Jimmy is truly funny. He could have been a tough stand up comedian, but yeah, he's an actor. He's in seven days of Agas. He plays my brother and you just hang out with them. He's fun. He's a fun funny guy. He's the guy that you when he comes in a room, everybody's going to laugh for an hour straight. You'll make it a part he's the greatest. He's giving of himself and everything's Glib and everything's fun. It's great guy. All right, Vince, if you could go back in time and give a young Vince Fan Patton ten seconds of advice, what would that be? Don't, don't get so intense on the tennis court. Just pull back, pace yourself, pace yourself at everything alive, because it does come to you, and I learned that in my s after the tennis circuit was over. Learned that. So that's what I would tell myself. Your Dad, your dad, was always trying to teach you that. Right, just just take it as it comes, right, but you know, you eat to have it in you that you drive yourself or you don't think I drove myself too, too fast, too too fast, and I would I would say slow down right, right. So, if we're flipping through your phone right now, who's the most famous person in your phone? There's a bunch in there. I think they see you would call right now. They pick it up. Say Hey, vins, what's going on? Who picks up the phone anymore? Right, or if you text them, John Lovitz, he's not that. Okay, he's good in kind affleck is in there, but we haven't spoken in a long time, but he's a great guy. He's still in the Rollo decks. You know, what are you gonna do? I don't want to name drop them. And Yeah, no, we just we asked that one to every one of our guests because we've had a lot of great, great people on. So, Dave, one more Um, let's see you. Okay. So, besides the bet of walking to Vegas, what's The craziest prop beat you've ever been a part of? I used to well, this is that crazy, but I used to make a bet that I could hop over ten foot chain link fence on the tennis court in three seconds. It's I was younger. Three seconds, one, two, then you jumped down. Wow, I take that bad. I don't know if that could happen. You're right, it didn't happen there. Also, I played body, Body Riggs, the Great Court Hustler. I once met him, that I could run around a hotel in less than sixty seconds and I won that bet. Made Fifty Eight. UNBEKNOWNST to him, I had time myself earlier in the day. That's good to know if you can win or lose those beds before you go into exactly, the guy that makes the prop back is usually going to win it. You know that? Good, because there I mean yeah, never, guy usually that made that comes up with it. The the chain link when makes me cringe because my buddy did that in high school. But he got caught on the top and he's wearing shorts and it was a bad scene, really very yeah, and that was that. He had to actually get help to be removed down. Not to laugh about it, but it was. It was messy. It messy. Yes, chicking benches, though, I used to be good because we grew up in Long Island, the first of all, and you would hop over things all constantly, chain link, bence, hedges, bushes, you topple. I was great at hopping over things. See. So then it's yes, because when you guys played stickball, you're breaking windows. You had to get away from the people. They were running after you. But Hey, we really appreciate you joining us into huddle. One last thing, if you give us a little shout out from Vince Van Patting and seven days of Vegas and we love wearing our shirts and can't wait to watch a movie. Okay, yes, give us a little shout out the huddle up would be great. Shout out. Well, how should I say it would but yeah, Hey, this is Vince van Patten, seven days of Vegas. You know, I really enjoyed my time on houddle up. Whatever you want to say about you know, since you know, it's a little bit better now after an hour here. Yep, Yep. Hey, this is Ben Span Patten with the movie seven days to Vegas. Had A great time with huddle up. Thanks for having me on. Awesome. Hey, and in the next movie, I'll just...

...throw it out there. Maybe on whiffleball. Get up a whiffleball movie. Is that sound? Yeah, to you go back to Brooklyn and do it in Brooklyn, in the streets of Brooklyn, and and we'll try to get some kids off their phones and off their computers and let's go out and make a movie about whiffleball in the streets of Brooklyn. I'll watch it. Yeah, I'd be great. Might be the only one. Everybody over forty, I think, would watch it. Love it. Never been done. Never see more groundbreaking. Yeah, thanks. Right, all right, thanks, man's good luck with everything. Good luck with the premiere. Really appreciate all right, take kids by right hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shaped to life. As always, I'm joined by my great friend and Co host Dave Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with gusts and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

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