Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Tony Pease

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The founder of GoodBookey a sports-based charity fundraising platform, he also founded Carimus, a computer software company, Tony Pease joins the Huddle. GoodBookey is available on the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Fall is here and old maybe he's got all the styles you need. Right now, with up to fifty percent off store wide, hurry in for the season's biggest trends like rock star Jeans and Frost Fery Jackets on sale. Jeans started just eighteen bucks for adults, twelve bucks for Kids, plus good, warm and stylish outer where for just eighteen bucks for adults, seventeen bucks for kids. Want to save even more, redeem your super cash now through Sunday. Hurry and now for up to fifty percent off store wide at old maybe and old Maybecom fell a ten, twenty six through eleven. Three selectiles only lie day. This week. Guest is just in a great story, you know because, as you like to put it, he was a submariner. We don't get a lot of those on our show. We don't get a lot of those are on our show. He served our countries, you know, he was part of that. He goes on to n see state. I think you had a relative or somebody goes well the story. Yeah, she was a alumni and a waitress of at one of the bars that he's very fond of down there, mitches tavern. Mitch is tavern. I think there was a wasn't there a movie film there, the Bull Durham, bulldour and bullerm and they just did a thirty out of there too. So Tony P's will be joining us today from good bookie and his other company, Care Caramis, I think it's how you say it. But his story is great. Another great guest. Of all the transitions that you make. Another whiffleball player, another one. We're on a streak of whiffleball players, right, but his game was to play with both only one hand handed wootball player. Yeah, making the game harder than it already is. Yes, that always resulted in awkward swings. For me, the one ended, but I've seen it done. Yeah, I look forward to right or wrong. Right, there is no right or wrong, and I look forward to talking with Tony because I think that huddle up can really find a cherry that we can gravitate towards and work with good bookie to really raise some money for that charity. Yeah, well, I just think it's such an interesting concept because the sports gaming industry in some people's minds is kind of a dark, kind of seedy thing with selfish and you know, people maybe not always with the best intense and stuff. This is just the opposite of that. It's the fun of gaming. But it all gets the the winner his charity right and our gets his charity paid for. The loser it feels good because he's giving it and he gets tached right off and he get attacks right off, you know. And Tony's a great guys from the DC area. Went to Bishop O'CONNELL, Big Redskins Fan, in ACC fan, big ACC fans. So a lot to talk with him about to him about today and it's going to be exciting to have them on huddle up. And and can't wait to hear who, if any, famous people are in his phone. Yeah, I suspect there was going to be definitely someone out of the tech world. Definitely, definitely all right, join us here on huddle up. Welcome Tony Peas. So today we have Tony P's on from Good Book E. Tony, welcome to the huddle and thanks for getting in the huddle with Guessin Dave. Yeah, thanks for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Yeah, we really want to start with when you were young. I mean because our shows about how sports impacted you and shaped your life a little bit. So where did you grow up? Who was that influence in your life that really gave you a love of sports? Well, I grew up action in the DC area and so I'm a big Redskins Fan, and particularly the year's ninety for it and ninety seven, which is a good time and for sure good years. We haven't had a lot of them since, but I grew up in the heyday of the DC area sports, so we were super excited to you...

...know, with the Redskins and the capitals. You know, obviously we're performing pretty well, the bullets not so much, or now the wizards. But growing up my family's all into sports. My my aunt was actually one of the women's national rugby players before rugby sevens was a big deal. My Dad played football the Air Force Academy. I played football basketball at O'CONNELL Bishop, O'CONNELL Arrington. So a lot of those guys influence my love of sports. And Yeah, my uncle's played at the air for Naval Academy. So my I would probably the least accomplished athlete but the biggest enthusiast of sports and my family. So what was your first sports memory? What was the first, what do you remember from being a kid and playing sports? I remember playing when I was really young, playing Pop Warner football, and I remember playing defensive end and sneaking in on the quarterback and getting them right and helmet helmet and knocking myself out. It's my first my first memory, and I broke everybody was cheering and I think that was before people were concerned about concussions and I was seeing stars and stuff like that, and I think the thrill and excitement of everybody else cheering is what got me really excited about football and sports in general. Did your mom say you're not going back and playing again? No, it was a normal thing we all we played. I played from there on till through high school. So yeah, everybody in my family plague football. That's a big thing. Nowadays we're kids are really going not allowed to play because parents were worried about them getting hurt, but I always tell them like, your kids can get hurt no matter what they do. You know, yeah, this is accidents happen all the time. Tony, I have to get this question out of the way. It's we've beaten it to death on our show, but did you have neighborhood Whi Football Games? Yes, we did. We had very detailed rules were sometimes you could only bat with one hand. You know, they're is of one kid who could throw a curve. I mean yeah, so it was almost every day when it was baseball season. I mean our neighborhood was full of kids. We were lucky to grow up with a dozen or so kids. So we had football and football season, basketball, basketball season, baseball and baseball season. You know, we really talked about how the kids aren't doing that these days. You know, we grew up in neighborhoods where we were outside all the time. You were allowed inside, and now, with esports and everything else, times were changing. Yeah, it's are getting out and we see that in local sports and for the kids, and we all understand as adults know that, and that's what kind of why, David, I want to start to show us how important sports are to us. And Yeah, not only watching them and being a fan, but then playing in then and learning so many valuable lessons from sports. And so what do you think that first valuable lessons you learned in sports? Oh Man, that's I think a teamwork is the obvious thing. I mean, you know in football in particular, and you have to have everybody's got a pretty critical role and any peace breaks down and then you know, the whole the whole system is shot. And basketball, on some of the other sports, you have the opportunity to, you know, have one person who's a dominant athlete take it over, but in football it's everybody's got a job to do and people have to work hard and you know, that was that's that's a pretty impative important thing. I mean, particularly in business today, you know, I'm making sure that you can rely on your teammates to do the jobs that you're expecting them to do. That's really critical and that comes, I think, from sports. Right. I agree with that. I think also being able to manage if there's you know, like you don't know when you're playing neighborhood sports. You don't have umpires, so you don't you know, you're managing yourself. It's self governing, and I think that translates into the run no parents, no good parents, that you got to figure it out. It's just like I remember once time we were playing sports and something happens. So I gotten a fight with a kid when home was crying. I was little and my dad said, what's wrong with you? I said Johnny was mean to me. He goes, get back out there and take care of yourself. You know, that's just how our parents were. That wouldn't happen nowadays. I mean I can remember...

...the times of when I was older and like kids, parents coming to our house and and Ye owing at my dad for something I did to their kid and I'm my dad's like well, just have your kid take care of it, right. That just doesn't happen anymore. Yeah, it is absolutely crazy. There's, I think it's like emails back and forth between the parents and yeah, and text and Ta big, real big with text. Now bull words on text, for sure. Yeah. So, yeah, I think a little bit too far. I think we a little too far in that direction of, you know, try and coddling and protecting kids. And I've got young kids. My kids are ten, eleven and thirteen, and so I'm trying to like, you know, when they come up from school and like what are you doing? Why aren't you outside? You know, there's nobody to play with, there's nothing happening outside. So, you know, we try and get them out. That's much as we can do. Do like pick up sports and things like that and keep them busy. But yeah, I mean if hard because everything's organized though. Yeah, you know, there's no kids organizing it themselves. You know, I member as a kid you'd pick up your bike, you go to one house, get one kid, go to next house, get another kid, until you had a team and then you just figure out and go play. So, yeah, you go into Bishop, you go to Bishop Connell. What was your high school years like? In Sports? You play three three seasons. We yeah, I played golf or tennis, football and basketball, and so there was great. I mean we actually had a quite a bit of talent come out of that school. You know, I was in the standout athlete by any means, but we had a number of success we got beat up pretty regularly bike schools like de Matha, but other than that, you know, we held our own. Yeah, so then you get in your do you have a favorite coach you had in high school? We Ye, well, the coach was changing. We had so coach Hase and coach Schneider were the two guys that were the head coaches of the football team when I was there. So I love them all. I mean I thought all the coaches were, you know, as a Catholic school, they were underpaid, you know, over committed people, and they were all teachers as well as coaches, which I don't know if that happens very much anymore. I think, you know, some people have specialty jobs as coaches, but you know, these guys were certainly put a lot of work in, you know, made it a great experience. We had this one coach, Colonel Gutter, who was a up army colonel, retired army colonel, who's also the school disciplinarian and coach the defense. So you can kind of imagine what kind of person he was. Ran To tension on on Saturdays, which I spent a lot of Saturdays with them. Yeah, yeah, he was certainly really influential. Maybe you so you're saying that Halo over your head behind you really didn't come into play until later, but I'm saying there's it's making up for some thanks, some previous in discretions. Very right. So did you get to go to a lot of redskins games when you were younger? I did. I was at the pretty famous giants game, redskins giants game that ended in the tie. I was I actually I went to another game. That was a jets game at the old RFK. That ended in the tie also, and so I've only a couple of them because it was a very expensive right. But yeah, I love going to the Redskins game. I like the RFK Games a little bit better. Is that stadium was a you know, that was a machine. That thing rocked. We used to get a lot of go ahead. I was saying it was going to I'm kind of sad they're getting ready to tear it down. Or of K. Yeah, and we met just after you guys moved RFK really so I never got to see in our follow game. I just heard it was the last or great experience. The last game that we played there against the cowboys was just it was just awesome. I mean it was amazing. You know, it's only place we were seen with the bleachers actually bounce and then you have the hog ats and then you have a whole band and all their gear and then Dan cider came in. It kind of who was a tailgating like it older? Was it? Like it was outside the stadium, just like a traditional yeah, I mean I thought...

...or of K wasn't in a great place, but there are still places where people would tail gate. Yeah, I mean I think that's the experience they wanted to create when they what's the new stadium called? Now? I think they changed. It is still Fedexfield, last time I checked. Yeah, I'm in Earth Carolina now, so I haven't been to a redskin scam in quite a while. But it's like a spaceship landed in the middle of nowhere and it's all park a lot. Who would have thought they were they would be tarping off seats to the that's an opening. That's understandable. And Tony was young, there was. You know, there's like a ten year waiting list for season tickets and and that just doesn't you can just walk right up and get tickets now. Yeah, yeah, probably even more after they just blew a lead against the eagles. Easier. Yeah, that's a tough one. That's tough on it. So one of those every years, a hopeful year, but you know, just with our ownership that's never going to work out right. So, Tony, Um, you played sports in high school. Yet I'm guessing you you've you you're an entrepreneur or you've been involved with many companies. Started some companies when did you get that spirit? When you're looking for college, you're thinking, I think you were engineering majors at right. That's right. Yeah, so like. So what kind of pushed you in that in the direction of were you into school and kind of like what you majored in and how things kind of developed in there? Yeah, for me the entrepreneurial thing was I like competitive things. I mean I think that comes from sports and entrepreneurial. You know, life it's a little bit more feaster famine, and so for me that's always been a little bit more engaging. If you're going to spend time doing anything professionally, you know it should be exciting. You know, forty eight hours of weeks a lot of time to spend doing something you don't like doing. So I try to gravitate towards things that I'm interested in. I was I was in the navy, so for as a nuclear submarner and the navy for a number of years and when I got out I went to NC state, got a degree in mechanical engineering and then the typical jobs and mechanical engineering are big companies, automotive companies, things like that, and my mentors actually convinced me to go work for him and a small software business. So I went to work for him and this was in the two thousand and six, two thousand and five and then. So that's just was a major change in my trajectory to be focused more on the software industry. Who's your mentor? His name's grant Willard, and so he was ran a company called I cubed and convinced me and my pregnant wife to take a much lesser paying job to come work for him, and we did. And then as soon as we got there, he actually sold a part of the company and get went to go work for adobe. But we had an opportunity needed to buy out the remaining assets of the company and kind of take that on as our own project. And so he and I've been pretty close since then, still working together off and on and different capacities. Now, when you mentioned the Navy, going back to the Navy, you said Sub Mariner. Are you in submarines? Submarine Set's right. What's life like in the submarine besides tight yeah, I mean that's imagine, you know, lock yourself in your house for six months, paying all the walls gray, close the blinds to the fishing rice that's what it's like. Oh Man, I but I have an uncle who was in the navy. He was a commander and he ran, I guess the best way to describe it, when we were going to war, the first Gulf War. He ran all the for the navy, all the supplies, but go back and forth from here over there, everything, truck's food, whatever. His name was Jim deets, but he when he was still in a navy and I was with the redskins. Yeah, he offered me to go out on nuclear sub for a day and then come back and I'm like, don't really want to do that. I was sixty four. He said, yeah, you probably not going to fit very well, and so, yeah, you'd beat a forty five degree and yeah, just walking around that. I had an opportunity to fly in a jet and and we had practice. We couldn't go. So just C that's a bummer up and I know the nuclear sub would have been...

...really cool though. Yeah, do you can still tour them? Every once in while they'll pull into Alamida and CAL and and they'll provide I tours for the parts that people are allowed to see. But it was a it was an interesting experience. I mean, I know it wouldn't change it for the world. It's a very tight team, you know, a hundred and twenty people. You know, everybody's got a very specific job. You got to depend on everybody to get your sleep and to eat. And I mean it's a it's a really interesting microcasm of of life because it's all contained. It's a you know, I again, I it's a much better memory than it wasn't experienced, because there were some time of trying times, but it was a pretty exciting opportunity. So you were there out for six months straight. I was on a fast attack and so fast attacks have a different rotational tempo. And then so we have we deployments that lasted six months or more, especially since September eleven. So September eleven, which is today, you know, and that during that time, which was for a lot of people in the military, was the longest employment. So yeah, so we six or more months. We spent. The question that people ask me is how long have I went been on a submarine straight, and it was a hundred and twenty eight days. It was ninety eight days without seeing the sun. We that's living in goods work. Were you right? Yeah, exactly, exactly. Well, thank you for your service to we really appreciate that. And yet my that, you know, being on a sub is, you know, those are the people that protect us that nobody knows or around. I mean, do you guys have like how close can you get to something without them knowing you're even? Quote, you know, it's got to be crap. You know, there's a lot that you probably shouldn't share detail wise, but there's a good book called Blind Man's bluff, which is about the Cold War Soviet era submariner battles, or stalking really, which is a really good story that talks about, you know, both sides going into harbors and connecting the cables and, you know, doing all sorts of things undetected. Wow, so they're pretty quiet. Yeah, things had to get a little bit chippy though, about a hundred and twenty seventh day or so, right. I mean don't, don't you? I mean you know that to talk about having to kind of umpire. Yeah, so you need to like, what do you guys do for Stress Relief? I mean, it's a it's a different world, like because you're not thinking about that because you're on a you know, you're on a war zone or you're on a battle station. So a lot of times the I mean those things, you know, one of the things in the navy does really well as they give you good food, and so you had a lot to look forward to, like a meals for the things that you would look forward to, and we would do different diversions. We'd play cards, we you know, we play this PGA Tour Golf Game, you know, on a computer and and these things like that. There's movies that you can watch sometimes, but I mean, you know, it's a lot of it's just like focusing on the job at hand and people are pretty focused. I mean there's a surprisingly, a surprising amount of maturity and resolve for, you know, eighteen to twenty two year old kids that are doing this. Yeah, and that I'm sure that care. He's over into entrepreneurial world and starting a company and then being a part of that and saying look, guys, we get through anything, you know. I'm sure. Yeah, that all carries over to being a leader. It does. I mean that there's obviously a lot of great examples that you have. You know, in the military you see a lot of great leaders. You see some bad ones, that give you ideas of, you know, how to not lead, but then a lot of really good ones that give you examples of what's good leadership and how to motivate people appropriately, particularly in the military, because people are they're bound by, you know, more legal requirements than most civilians and their jobs. But you know you'd that's not the way you motivate people to do something. And so watching underpaid overwork people motivated to do something pretty complicated, you knows, is a something that's stuck with me and and particularly in the workforce. I mean, if you you find people who've hired veterans or work with veterans, you know they'll say that veterans are among...

...the most dependable people that they've have on their team, because it's the mission, isn't you know? They have that mission focus, which I think is pretty critical. So it's so so after the Navy, is that when you went to ENC STATE? That's right. What was lifelike an NC state or especially as a sports fan, because you're in the heart of ACC country? Yes, yeah, in fact I went to enc state because of the Vilvano basketball years. I mean because my wife and I were stationed in Pearl Harbor in Hawaii and when I was getting out we were trying to pick places that we wanted to live. My familist on on DC and her family was in Mobile Alabama. Their Big Alabama fans, and so we didn't really want to be in either location. We wanted to be somewhere between them. So North Carolina came up and so we actually had all of our stuff shipped to Raleigh, North Carolina, because we didn't have an address here, and then we went to mobile. We got married, we had two or three day honeymoon and when I found out I got accepted into and state, having shipped all my stuff there anyway, we were kind of already all in. So then we drove up. We've stayed in a hotel here for the first day and then we found a place to live the next day, went to classes the day after that and they've been here ever since. And this is in two thousand and three wow. No, my sister was a graduate and s stage she used the waitress and Mitches tavern. Are you familiar? Yeah, I shoot a long time waitress of Mitches. I'm sure she told you that that was one of the famous scenes from Bull Durham was from Mitch's tavern. That, yes, that, that, and also they just filmed the not just film, but the thirty on the fell, I know, eighty three championship. And then, yeah, it was a round table at midges tavern. Yeah, that was kind of acid. that. That was a big part of, you know, being here and being in I didn't really understand the importance of ACC country until I got here and then we were also there were the Philip Rivers era, you know, which was an amazing, amazing time to be a wolfpack fan because, you know, that really put us on the map for as far as relevance goes, and that was, I think, still you know, we've had an amazing string of quarterbacks, of course, with Philip rivers and Russell Wilson. You know, we'll see how Finley and Jacoby Brissette is a Gamer. You know, a lot of good quarterbacks come out of quarterback. You I'm not sure it's sticking, but that's what we're going for. Right you may have to catch up to a few other colleges for that one, but we're making good progress in this decade. You are you are so after after college, you said you and your wife kind of went on with your mentor and tried what was his company? IQ? You said, I cube. Yeah, what was that company? What specifically did they do? So they did software for manufacturing companies, which is actually was really good background because I have as a mechanical engineer and I had a background and heavy machinery. I was an engineer in the navy or technician in the Navy, and I had some work experience and engineering departments. So I was very familiar with, you know, manufacturing processes, and so the software was all around optimizing manufacturing processes, like doing digital assemblies and things of that nature. So cad and PLM's as the terms, the industry terms, and so we had customers that were Raytheon Boeing, you know, a lot of defense companies. We had commercial companies like Caterpillar and Cummins and bows, and so we would it was really an interesting job because you go to these places, you'd get to tour their facilities, you get to see how they make these awesome products. You know, one of my favorite ones was going to see the joint strike fighter being built from lockey Martin, which was great in an assembly line of these, you know, billion dollar aircrafts coming down. So really cool. And try. How many were they make it? All of them? There's a lot. I mean I think there was probably there had to be twenty to fifty on the line and there were the building was, I think, a mile long. It was incredible. So do you know, like, for a plane like that, how many different companies build products for that plane? manufact I have different products for a plane like that.

There's hundreds that I mean subcomponents to electronics. I mean there's if you look at a commercial airliner, there's over a hundred thousand parts, over a hundred thousand unique objects on it, and so and that can have thousands of there can be thousands of people manufacturing all those parts that go into the final assembly. So the process of managing that is as around the software work that we did. Right. Yeah, because I remember when I lived in St Louis, I would and visit it. A manufacturing company was a friend of mine and he was making just a screw to fit on one of those jet planes, just that's all he made. Yeah, and so I'm like, how many companies are out there that just make one little part for this plane, which is amazing wow, but there's there's things like the International Space Station, which if the somebody they need a hatch or placed, there's only one part, there's only one hatch. So then come they'll put it out for bid and the company will, you know, bit on making that one hatch that goes to international space station. And so it's it's really interesting from taking something that there's only one of, like the International Space Station, to taking something that there's a million of, you know, like a car or computer, and seeing how those parts and pieces are manufactured. One of the coolest things that I got to do was a triumph motorcycles, which I am a motorcycle fan and I have one triumph myself. I got to go tour all their factories and in Thailand, which was incredible. And you know, one of the things that they do is they hand paint their gas tanks and they sign still to this day, they the person who hand paints its signs and underneath. So you get to see a lot of really cool things in these manufacturing plants. It's it's pretty amazing how many, like how many people worked in one of those plants in Thailand. I mean, oh, thousands. I mean the there was four plants and they were doing different processes or there's thousands of people that work in those plants. Yeah, so after I cubed, and then what was your next what was your next st we sold I cubed to a company called KPI t, so I worked with them. We spun off another company called ICI digital or, which was on manufacturing, and then in two thousand, let's see, two thousand and sixteen, I resigned from my position to KPI T to start the company that I'm currently running called Caramis, and that's the company that we used to build good book ee Nice. And what is Karamis? CARAMIS is a software development consulting firm. We focus on doing digital strategy and software development. We say we're first flight application development. So when people need new things built new products, websites that are highly creative, that have engaging user experiences, that's what we do. Yeah, that's pretty amazing, because that is a tough thing. There's a lot of people that don't understand all that. They have a great idea and they don't know how to put it into into on the paper or they don't know how to actually design it the right way. So do you come in and help them with those kind of ideas. That's right, I mean not with the idea. So we've the person has the idea, and this may be done some understanding of the market traction or the market positioning for it, and then they come to us and we can help to find the business processes, identify the personas who are you building for? Why are you building it, and then we can help create a blueprint for their application. Development. That starts with creative work, and so one of the things that makes us unique, as there's development shops and creative shops, but where the combination of both. So when you come here, we can have you you know, if you know the cases, this is something we experience personally. So when we were talking about doing good bookie, we wanted to, you know, have it built. We were going to subcontract it, and people like it's going to be two hundredzero dollars and you know, you got to have this, you got to have that. So we started doing it ourselves and we realize that other people wanted the same service. And so the services that we when somebody has an idea, they could come to us and we could have, you know, for in four weeks, we can have a prototype. You know, and the look and feel, the design of the UX, the...

Road Map, the fixed price quote, like a lot of the pieces that you would need to understand whether you wanted to take this product to market. And then you know, in another six months we could have a built for you. So people spend years obsessing about these ideas with no way to move it forward, and so that's where we come in. And whether it's an individual, we have some startups that we work with, but we also have large companies. So, you know, fortune five hundred companies come to us because they have the same thing where they need, you know, to defind some product vision, and we help them get that done. Yes, or Dave and I work with a company that developed an APP that measures of monitors your brain performance, but you know, the APP is kind of rudimentary and I know the whole process that they've gone through as far as APP designers and bringing those people in that have to make it better. And and then when you try to go the cheap route, then you find out that they cut corners and it's it is. It's an intensive process and it does cost a lot of money, and one of my things is always you get what you paid for. Yep, right. Well, but you want it to be predictable because, you know, a lot of times of entrepreneurs they don't have an unlimited bank account to code to cover the cost of these things. So it's like building a house. You know, a lot of people say, why, I have this idea, let me get a developer, developer store building at but that'd be like going up to a construction worker and saying, Hey, I want a house, here's where you start building. Just start building the house. You know, I want three bathroom. It's whatever, whateverever. You Go away, you come back. What's the likely that they build something that you're proud of? Right, you know, versus the way that homes are actually built is, you know, you have four plans, then you have engineering drawings, you have exterior elevations, you've got all this stuff before permits, you've got all this stuff before shovel goes in the ground, and so we're trying to take that discipline and bring it into the software world. Yeah, and what is crazy about building a house, which I've done a few, is that if you make a change after everything is designed, the cost goes right through the roof. And that's where they that's it. I'm sure it's the same thing. It's the same and software, because it's like if you, you know, if you're like I wanted the basement, you know, you've your house is complete. I want the basement ceilings to be two feet higher, that's a big problem. It's a big problem after the house is built. And it's the same as software. If you say you want the database, you know, to perform a different way, that's you know, that's the same expense. Yeah, those algorithms and everything. Good planning is essential. It is essential. And you know, when you talk about a good foundation, you know everybody thinks like, okay, I'm going to poor good foundation for the house, but it actually starts way before that's even done. Is like you said it. If you think about a house, you're going to go into the elevation, all the architectural stuff, you know, the electrical design, the plumbing and it's and getting all the cook just a lot of work around here is a building, a mine right, ablem around house basing. It makes me thinking and a few so what's one? The idea for good bookie, like, how did that? How did that all come about? Actually, the way that it came about is when we were when we had just taken this job at I cubed and my pregnant wife and I we were a little tight on cash. My friends from earlier they would go on this annual golf trip and because I went in a different directory, my income was on a different level, and so I always said no to it. And so there's one year or my wife's were you really should go to this golf trip. And what it is is it's a three or it's three days of golf, five rounds, and it's kind of like a writerer cup thing. We split up into different teams, we've got all these different formats and so I'm grinding because there's a hundred dollar bet on this thing and I have to win and I'm a terrible golfer, and so so everybody's all loose. You know, these guys are making two hundredzero dollars a year and I'm barely making sixty and you know, kids on the way and all this other stuff. That's ore. I'm not drinking during the courses. I'm just trying to play the best golf that I can possibly play. And it comes down to the final hole and these guys are losing their minds over the pipe. One guy had a, you know, twenty foot put, one guy to twenty five foot put and the winner basically lagged it up within a foot and that's what end winning the game. And so these...

...guys lost their mind. They're jumping around there. I have a video of it's somewhere, which I got to find. It's I'm like, we won, I got the hundred bucks. So, you know, I'm like now it's in my pocket, I can give it back to my wife and then but these guys they go into the clubhouse and they drink it away. It's gone. Like the money, the actual monetary value of this, had no impact on them whatsoever. And so there was probably, I think there was eighteen people who played. So there's nine hundred dollars that changed hands and there was no purpose to that nine hundred other than bragging rights and a marker of somebody's victory. And so I was thinking, well, there's got to be a better way to experience the same thing, but do something useful with that money, and so that's when we came up with the idea for good bookie, and so I had that on kind of the back of my mind as a data point and then after I was looking for something else to do, around two thousand and sixteen, that was the right time to get started on it. And one of the things that sorry, go ahead, no, I'm just going to ask you. So you had you had the idea, you had to build on it. Now, I mean obviously this when you do. What was your first step and in creating taking that idea to the next step to make it a reality. I think quitting my job is probably the thing that made it you know, you can't casually participate in something like starting a business and a lot of the stakes that people make because they have something that they really want to do but they can't quite get it done because they're working their jobs, their kids and all this other stuff, there's no empirical pressure for them to focus on achieving some outcome. And so when I resigned, it was it was official. Now I had to make it work right, you know, because no income and we got to focus now on on how to make, you know, the business productive and and one of the other things that helped was we ended up winning a startup contest in pair us, which came with a hundred thousand euro investments. Pretty good, you know. Shortly, yeah, shortly after, which was really helpful. Well, Tony, tell us exactly what good book he is, just for our audience. It doesn't know what exactly good book he is a wife different than a lot of other sites out there. Sure. So, good book is the Gamification of charitable donations. So what we do is we simulate sports betting to raise money for high impact nonprofits. And there's a couple problems that we're solving. Is. One is, you know, people should be able to freely bet and wager and socially brag about, you know, beating their friends. This is kind of like the my friends freaking out on the golf course right example. And but the other thing is every year, towards the end of the year, people focus on doing social impact or altruism, you know, end of your tax deductions, but they don't really engage and there's not an easy way for people to engage with charities, like on a ongoing disays. And then from a charity's perspective, they have a really hard time engaging net new donors and and and doing consistent donations. And so good book he helps, you know, people stay engaged by doing things like social betting with her friends, which is legal. We're legal and a hundred and all the states and thirty countries, which is makes us unique. And then for the charities, it's free for the charities. And then a good book he provides a way for you to, you know, kind of promote your charity. Says when you lose a bet, when you know if we were to make a bet and you were to lose, you actually make a donation of my charity. And so that's how it works. And it's a hundred percent tax seductable. So Dave and I were out playing golf and we said we're going to bet a hundred bucks on this round and Dave beat me. I'd have to pay to his charity the hundred dollars and it's all done through good bookie. It's all done through good bookie right. So you can do there's a couple ways that you can do it. You can there's sports bets, so all sporting events are in APP right now. You Bet against the line and then there's the prop bet, which you can type in any freeform thing, you can voice to text, and then you can pick your charity and then the other person accepts about picks their own charity. And then another model of good bookie, as we do corporate challenges. So, for instance, if you guys wanted to have an NFL pick them, you know we could. We would run a special game. That was we this is kind of a...

...deeper story, but we do a corporate challenge where it's like you can do do a private or public game, where you can have the public engage as a way to amplify a brand's social mission. And then, just like the capital one NCAA Pickum, except ours is you make a donation to play. Wow, that's it's pretty interesting. So I love the idea and can so there's so many charity events, you know, there's there's there's golf tournaments, there's you know, people have all these things. How can good book you work with these people that already have charities and are trying to raise more money for their charities? I mean, we've built the platform and so there's basically five types of betting that occur and so the platform, our platform, can support these five types and we just overlay, you know, some branding and the maybe a unique experience on top of it for the APP so there's pick Um, parley, prop trifecta and one other that I'm I'm that's escaping me, but we have that built into the APPS. For instance, if you wanted to do like the Chivee is, you know who the tribe is. So the tribe is one of our partners and we have a custom spelling be for them which is a live event that we built. We did all the designing of the game for and at. What it is is it's a Trifecta type bet where the their fans can bet which team they think is going to win and they can also make donations to boost challenges. So they have to spell it backwards or, you know, a couple different things that are called sabotages. So we did this for them last year and the first spelling bee and they raised twentyzero dollars for the tribe charities, which is their inhouse charitable or so that's an example of last year we did a college pick Um. So every week you pick it, we had a new charity and we raise thousands of dollars every week for whatever the charity was. It was featured, and so it's actually a different way for the brands and the charities to work together to, you know, to do user engagement, but also to amplify this the cause and to raise funds for the cause. Right, I love it. I think it's a great idea and and the fact that you're going to get a terrible donation from losing today on the golf course is even better. Right. I think that it really good. I wouldn't bet on that scenario. But he's about a six handicap or something. I'm about it, twenty six. He just won't play a bigger he just has to get out of the course of play. That's all. He just go outside. Takes me, but you always say you can't see too like. I can't really. I just I tried to work glad the last time I went out off and I wore my glasses and I basically sometimes we're for driving, always for sports television, but it was I was real sweaty and they just kept falling off. I think I shot him. He says it's his glasses. I think it's all the twisted teas he was drinking in the spring. So that's probably a combination. Maybe there yeah, a little kid. You know, I love it. So good, bookie. What's what's the next step for good, bookie? What do you guys have coming up that excite you? Well, we've there's a number of these companies are getting into sports speading, and so one of the things that's really exciting is we have a partnership with sport radar, who's one of the big data providers there, the official data provider of the NFL. We're piloting an internal game for them, so it's only amongst their employees, where they can do a weekly pick them on the NFL, and so if that goes well, we're hoping to expand that and it's we've been into one week and so each week they'll have a different internal prizes, prizes for their teammate, for the people in the company. And Yeah, so that's pretty exciting to us, the ability to run corporate challenges like private challenges where, you know, people can bet and have fun, but it's about social good. So we're excited about that. So have you talked to kint like we just interviewed a gentleman from fandel couple weeks ago,...

...and are you looking to talk to those kind of companies as well, because those are sports the rule? Like you know, their betting to win money, but I think that, you know, that could be like a great partnership, it feels like for people to get along with them. I mean there's draft kings, ors, fandel. There's a lot of those company kind of companies out there. Yeah, there's a end, a lot more popping up. I'm one of the differences. A lot of them use the same technology back end, you know, Fandel and draft kings, of course, our world capitalized companies. They have their own products and pretty dominant market share. You know, I think there was about a billion dollars invested in those companies respectively. Yeah, I know it's a lot of money, but you know, I've been to go into some of these conferences and seem how some of these APP companies are in their approach to the market. I would certainly think a partnership with one of those companies be good for us. How good it is for them, we'd have to figure that out. But you know, one of the important things to know is that and gambling and sports betting, you know, it's sixty to eighty percent of people lose money, and so I'm not sure how this plays out from a societal perspective, but betting isn't a good way to make money for the masks, and so as gambling becomes a little bit more legal and it's heavily regulated and these these organizations are going to have to go to state to state to comply with different tax rules and things like that, and they don't have a big margin anyway. So it'll be interesting to see how this all plays out. I mean it's certainly good for us that people are more open minded about sports wedding. You know, when we got started we had a lot to overcome. You know, saying what you know, don't worry sports bedding. It's legal and it's for charity and people are quite that doesn't make any sense, right. So you partnered with Sports Win Marketing as well? Right, we did. Yes, so we ran the college pick Um for them last year and what was that like? So how did Warren Moon do that? He win his bet. He did pretty good. Yeah, he did pretty good, and Scott Meltzer did pretty good. Then those are the two principles over there. Yeah, it was fun to work with those guys. We had a great time experimenting with how to place the charities. We had some really good prizes. We had all expense paid trip to the Rose Bowl with for the winner, and so a couple guys got a trip of a lifetime. We had a coach's vers cancer experience for Las Vegas, so we send a couple people there and then the the guy who won, his dad was actually cancer survivor, so they brought him down on the court and he had a really great experience. So one of the big things we learned from the sportsman marketing activity was people value the experiences. So if we can have prizes that are something interesting for people to do, that generates a lot more use. Yeah, I like it, Dave. Why do you think it's? The concept is it gives sports betting is kind of not like good book. You, but on other sites and offshore and everything is kind of a dirty what would they would have a whole instead of a hey, yeah, exactly, it's sort of a dirty, selfish this is just the opposite of that. Right. It's a fuel good thing and you're not if it just feels like well, win or lose, it's you're winning. Yea. So let's say you play a bet and I'm just on good book. I want to place a bet on a game. So if I win that bet that. How does that work? You know I'm saying, I just win that setter. Charity. If you're doing the pickum right, like if one of our pickum games, you make a donation to play and so whoever the host is. So if you wanted to have, you know, gus and Dave's, you know, nfl challenge or something like that, you guys would pick the charity that you wanted to supports or every donation we go to that charity. That's the ideas, like, of course. So what in sports on marketing, we rotated the charity every week. What we learned was that wasn't really good because the charities couldn't get any traction and of the cause and that kind of marginalize the value of having an impact it. So what we found is that it's better if to stick with one charity. So if you were going to do a multi week Pickum, you would have, you know, the v Foundation, or we...

...would have American can society or something be a promotional partner, because then they can reach out to their network and get their their fans engaged playing, and you can reach out and get your fans engaged and we can get our fans engaged, and so that's kind of a marketing effort that goes three ways. And so it's really important to have the charity engaged, because the charity is the one that compels people to act. So, for instance, for huddle up for a podcast, if we want to go out and find a charity that we want to be involved with, we can then call you and then we can really work with that charity, get our fans engaged and really trying to get some benefit towards that charity one way or another, one way or another right. And then you would get price sponsors as well, because you have to have something of value. So it could be, you know, play golf with gust and Dave or something like that. You know people. That would be like I said, people really value the experiences. So you call us, we design something that would sit on top of our APP and it would be brand focused. So would be very branded for huddle up and yeah, then you would go. We help promote it, charity promotes it, you promote it. Sounds like a plan. Dave. No, absolutely. How is business been? You've been open now a few years with good bookie. Yeah, the good book is making steady progress it's we still have some objections because we're smaller players in the sports bedding space. I think we have better technology than most because we're kind of nerds and basements, you know, here, but we're in North Carolina, so we're not as capitalized or wired into some of the networks where we'd like to be. So we've been making steady progress. The CARAMEIS business. The application development is going great with thirty people. You know, in our company we've got two offices and Raleigh, which is where I am, and Boulder Colorado and some people remote, and so we boot stop this company from two thousand and sixteen to now and it's been like a rocket chip. Yeah, so we're kind of doing the same thing. We've started back in March we were with a media company and then we kind of came back and did starting to do it on our own. We have a few people. We've been growing steadily over ever since and it is a lot of work. It's a passionate everybody in your group has to have and and be on the same boat. I think it's something that fun that we could mainly try with our all of our guests that we have. All we we've had some incredible guests on already. We have some coming in the future, and I think it would be a lot of fun just to do a simple bet with them before, you know, during the show or when they come on, and then everything goes charity. I think I'd be a great way to do it. Yeah, I'd love to talk to we figure something out, and I mean we can come up. We were pretty creative when it comes to the ways to get people to bet and things that you can bet on. So we can show you some of the stuff we've done in the past and we can see if there's something that that resonates that you guys might pitch and do it. Dave, you're not a little bit of the pirates. So it's it's it's great for the other guy, though. Yeah, that's what we're worried about. That's right. Yeah, so in this case it's actually good, although yeah, and you're even on the Bro and you're soon understand and well, they after the last game, I think you're okay. After now they don't play page. They would have given me maybe their line was plus thirty and I would have been a real least pushed. I don't think it was that bad. Yeah, we have to add an extra digit for the Patriots Line this year. Yeah, right, really go after the latest developments. Yeah, what do you guys get your lines? Spurt radar, as ours, our odds provider and our feed provider. That's pretty good there. And then are you doing? Can can you bet on every sport or you just we're trying. We have you can premier league, you know, all the major sports. Some we will do golf, sometimes for custom events. Yeah, I mean we could do anything and everything has a feed. I mean we could do esports, you know, even because there's a feed on. There's a line for everything. We're considering doing something for the upcoming election, you know, letting people bet on the outcome of the election. I'm not sure if that's good or bag. That primaries. Yeah, yeah, you sports is growing like crazy. I just did a camp down and Dallas Fort Worth and esports is big part of...

...it and the one professor there was saying that there is a game. It's called Dodo. It's an acronym, and they played over in China. The winner. The total prize pool was thirty four million dollars in the winter, one hundred and fifteen million. Wow, in esports and it's growing like crazy. Well, there's that one kid who won the fortnight from Petsylvania, buzzy, but he want. He want more than Tiger Woods one for winning the masters or something away three million bucks. Yeah, I think it was like fifteen or something. Yeah, just young. Yeah, if you're twenty two you're too old for esports, which is oh yeah, there's such money in it every it'd be great way because with twitch and all those different avenues where people love to go and watch, that would be a great way to get involved into you know, betting on it, you know where it goes to charity and you feel good about it because the sports is getting to where it's you know, hey, we got to get these kids interested in some other stuff. Yeah, absolutely, whiffleball. You can always go back to wiffleball. That's all. It's a yeah, I doubt any sports kid could hit your curve, Dave. Well, they wouldn't even know what if I said whiffleball, they wouldn't take it. You have to start from the scratch, Dave. Dave says he has a curve from twelve to six. So I'm still waiting to see it. It's nice. We got to set it up. We got it our new studio here big enough. We can probably have BP after we get up done with Tony. Yeah, definitely. You said you're in thirty half times. Oh See, I want here. I was never a fan of one handed. It's a awkward swing, but the bats a light like two handed. It's almost like it's a I know, but I just I felt strong. It was always like girl strum older. I'm a that was like girl strawberry, I love you. I could swing left handed better with yeah, I like the Willie starter wind up. That's that's all. That's a that's a classic to Tony said you're also in thirty countries. How's international business? Ebs and flows, because we don't promote it as much as we as we probably should, and then we have to there. So there so much leak segmentation that we've spent a little less time and focus on that. We won. Obviously, the startup contest was from Paris, and so there's a company called PMU, which is a horse racing company that we spend a couple years trying to figure something out with that we couldn't do. We you know, we have people bet on some weird stuff that come in from like Turkey and I ran and everyone so ill we'll see something coming in like are we even supposed to be there? We don't know. We just kind of let it go. How do you been on cricket? We don't have a feed on cricket. I don't even but we could get one. I mean, do you have an open bet for five days? I'm not sure how that didn't work. You know, because it's that's a huge sport. It's like wilful wall with a paddle. Yeah, away, yeah, we should get into that. We should get into that. That's as you should do as host to cricket tournament and just get a bunch of your old athlete buddies, teach him how to play cricket and then have a game. Yeah, I don't know if there's own no beer in Pittsburgh for that. Oh there is. It's Burg and cricket just don't seem like they're Mesh. I don't think we'd have a lot of fan base for it'd be like going to a pirate again, back to the pirates. But yes, your baby might be better attended. I think it's start the Pittsburgh International Cricket Club. Yeah, right, right, actually get some of the fires to play. They which is better? Rules Up, you're right, yeah, this is no, yeah, no, one know. Just like everybody like, Oh, it's so fun. Yeah, we changed every rule. But yeah, so I think good book. He's a great idea. Obviously we'd love to talk to you later about if there's something that we can do charity wise together. I think that would fit in two really in our mission and what we want to do with with huddle up and and you know our our our goal in this is to really inform people about how important sports are in people's lives and all the transitions you've made. Just think about to wear how you got here and everywhere you've been with your wife and and everything it took to...

...get to where you are today. And every one of our stories that we've had on has been about that and then the amazing transitions. We've never had a submarg either. No, we have not. And just to just to tell your story. We appreciate it. We do one last little segment here where it's called no huddle. It's kind of fun. We fire a bunch of questions at you and and love to hear your answer. So day fire away and no huddle. Okay, now I'm going to guess this is going to be somewhere in the ACC but I'm going to we'll ask Tony what's the best sports then you you've ever been to Lane Stadium Virginia Tuck? Really, I've never been there, but I've seen in TV, though, and you know there's are look crazy. Go to the Thursday night game if you have the chance. I mean that's not very expensive and you have to go to Thursday night game. It's nuts. All right. So you have you're a big sports fan and I'm sure you know. Sure if you're a movie buff. But what is your favorite sports movie? slapshot. Yes, we just had Dave Hanson on not too long ago. Oh Really? Yeah, from slapshot. He was awesome. That's great answer. Yeah, I love it. As first one we've had. I like it. It's usually league of their own. We had numerous guests a league at their own. Yeah, three in to row. I think I haven't seen it yet, but they were I'd rather watch. They were women's authors and Writers and stuff. So that was true. That was that would change. It was more fitting Um, Tony, and I will say my second favorite is the natural. That's a that's a class and actually, if you can see the I don't know if you can see, but this sprinkles on the halo for a logo, Oh, from the the from the home run scene. Yeah, so one of one of my partner in the business who's about my age. I'm like, I'm like, you know, we want sprinkles on the halo like in the natural. Is like what's the natural? I'm like what? I haven't seen the natural, so IDATA watch the home run scene from the natural. Like like that, that's what it's got to look like. No, I get accused of from my wife of not being great sensitive and ever crying or anything. I think the natural is one thing that can actually besides the birth of my children, the natural always gets me just a little bit welled up. Yeah, Tony, what's the most overhyped thing today in sports? What's the most overhyped thing today and sports? Oh, man, oh, the wildcat, unless it's tast some hell. Right, right, well, yeah, he is pretty good at the saints right, the low quarter I don't even know what he is. They say he's a quarterback, but he plays special teams. He's he's a receipt call touchdown. Yeah, it's crazy. It seemed like fa I love watch them. It seems like for a while teams were like trying to just force the wild cut in and it didn't even like apply to their personnel. Yeah, but I when I played for the dolphins, they would love bringing Ronny Brown into the wolcat with him and Ricky Williams in a backfield. Yeah, I'd be like, yeah, I watch that pretty cool. That's right. So, if we had to go through your phone right now and we asked this for every guests, like who's the most famous person in your phone right now? The most famous person and my phone probably Dave Meltzer from Sports One Marketing Nice. He's probably the most famous. I think born moons contact information might be in there somewhere. Right. That would apply. Yeah, we always say like, if you call them with the answer, that's what that's what our criteria is. Oh, I probably get screened on both fronts. Welcome to the club. Yeah, exactly. Now, Tony, if you could go back in time and tell a younger version of yourself one bit of advice, what would that be? obsess about learning to long snap. So when I was in a high school. I didn't get a lot of field time. There's a kid does names Casey Crawford, who ended up playing for Tampa Bay. A Kid, he was...

...sick. I'm six too and I was a hundred sixty pounds, SOA can wet, trying to play defensive end, and this kid was guy man, six man at the time. He was six six, two hundred and twenty, just you know, and they're after he came to the team I was I had to find my positions where I could, and so if I could go back to my younger self, knowing that I'm going to be under two hundred pounds, no taller than six to, I'd obsess about the little details and special teams to keep me in the game so I can played in college. Oh yeah, the more you can do. That's the that's the motto. That's yeah, all right. So long snapping was a long snapping was the thing. I heard somebody get scholarships for long snapping. That's something I think I would. I know we have when my kids with the central Catholic here in Pittsburgh and we have two of our long snappers. I got full rise, one to pit and one is long snapper for Clemson. So it does pay off if you're good at it. Yep, me lack a notoriety. I mean there's there, but there's NFL long snappers have been the league. Fifteen here, right, you know, you don't know their name, but they're getting an NFL paycheck. Exactly, snap, exactly. And now the rules. You barely get touch. Yeah, you, they can't. They can't hit you, they can knock you down, still can't even be in front of you. And on field goals, an extra point. No, sounds bigger. Good Gig. Yeah, good gigs. So it sounds like okay, kake. So you've created a great innovation in the world of sports. But over the last ten years, besides good bookie, what do you think the greatest innovation in sports has been the greatest Ino Isho Pylon camps. I think the Pylon Cam and actually my friend, my friend, invented that where he's one of the inventors, Mark Rowley. Yeah, he's working on a new company called live CGI, but he is to work at ESPN and he's one of the holders of the patent of the pylon camps, which I love. Right, and I think our friend Kevin Rabbit. His company, a EP, bought them and they kind of run all the pylon camps though. Wow, with the production and all that. Yeah, I don't know the big I just remember going down to see in their company. It's in it's in Baltimore. I'm not sure the details of where it was, but he was with ESPN when they were working on it. Yeah, you know, they have it on the sticks now, on the first down markers they have a camera. I love it. I love that kind of how they're doing it. But like the other night I saw in the saints game where the Guy I'm like where that angle from, and it come was coming from the bottom of the first down marker, which is crazy. Well, no, wonder why attendance is down and a lot of sports, because, I mean you have you have everything, possibly one and every angle, unless you want to go there and pay for a twenty dollar beer. You know right, you know, thirty dollar working. Yeah, I like watch it at home myself. I prefer I do too. I mean there's a couple things. Exception, I think, is hockey. I think is the one sport that's better in person than it is on TV. That's because they put the best music. That's right, that's all. Who Loud, but really good music. Ninety percent white snake. Yeah, I was just gonna say s here. Metal. Yeah, I know, I'm not even a bigger hockey fan, but I love England England games partly because of that. Yeah, definitely agree. Um. Okay, last question. If you could be an athlete change places with one athlete in the world today, just for a day, who would that be? Tom Brady, that's maybe dunk for for so many read where the say we're the same age and I can. I wake up with aches and pains having done nothing, you know, physically. I don't know's I'm with you. I wake up with aches and paints too. Well, you have a good reason. I don't know. I don't know. It looks. It's a me. He looks younger every time you see him, and in the steelers give the other night he looked about twenty six. I mean that's what happens when you grind up plants and drink them every day. Yeah, right, sleeping oxygen chambers. Yeah, the other thing I would buy. The other one, I would probably say a close second, would be Lebron James, because I would like to know what it...

...would be like to be that big and athletic. So nobody's our driver doing two hundred twenty five miles an hour around a track? Nope, definitely a great what about you, Dave? WHO's yours? Um, see, I'd like to go back in time. I'm sort of like a like. You want to be will chamberlain. Well, that also for a number of reasons. That was me. Yeah, it's other reasons. But Similarly, Mickey Mantle, I think Mickey Man old would been in his prime. See, I would be one of more be like Babe Ruth just because he smoked and drank and ate and still hit home runs. Well, I think Mickey Manal did the same, but he was thirty pounds less. Yeah, you know, but it's been fun. They were friends with the writers and you can get away with anything. Yeah, exactly. They came over to your how like? How many writers? We've interviewed some, some writers who parents were writers and said then all the players just come to their house to dinner and things, and I'm like that would never happen today. Now, you know, it's such an adversary relationship. Of Right, right, not back to the day. All right, we appreciate Tony, thanks for being on the show. Thank you too. Right, guys, thanks for having me. I appreciate it. Take care. By Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on howdle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how sports shaped to life. As always, I'm joined by my great friend and Co host, Dave Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with Guss and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (167)