Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Tiki Barber

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Former New York Giants running back, Tiki Barber joins the show. The former Virginia Cavalier was drafted by the Giants in the second round of the 1997 NFL Draft, and played his entire ten-year professional career for the team. Barber retired from the NFL at the end of the 2006 NFL postseason as the Giants' all-time rushing and reception leader. Barber was inducted into the Virginia Hall of Fame in 2011. Barber finished his career with 10,449 rushing yards which ranks 27th all-time. He is one of just 31 running backs to rush for over 10,000 yards in a career. This was despite the fact that Barber didn't become the Giants' starting running back until the year 2000, his fourth year in the league. Once he became the starter, he rushed for at least 1,000 yards in six of his final seven seasons with the lone year being in 2001, in which he only played in 14 games, but still managed to rush for 865 yards. Barber had three seasons in which he averaged over five yards per carry (2001, 2005, 2006) and only got better as he got older. Barber averaged 1,680 yards in his final three seasons and finished each year with over 2,000 scrimmage yards. He is one of just three running backs in NFL history to accomplish that feat in three consecutive seasons. Despite not taking off till later in his career, he also currently holds 22 Giants' Franchise records. Following his playing career, Barber became a national media presence, notably joining NBC's Today Show as a correspondent in 2007 and Football Night In America/Sunday Night Football. He has published multiple books including a series of children books about him and his identical twin brother, former Tampa Bay Buccaneers cornerback Rhonde Barber. Tiki Barber was also involved in Olympics coverage in 2008 and 2010. During his football career, he had a political talk radio show that featured guests such as John McCain. Barber has made many cameos in TV shows and even acted in a Broadway play, Kinky Boots, during a limited run from January 21, 2019 until March 3 of that year. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with gusts. I'm your host, gusts far Rut. I played quarterback in the NFL for fifteen years and have lots of stories to share. I'm joined by my longtime friend and COS Dave Hagar. Dave and I talked to our guests about how sports shape their success in life. We are RADIOCOM original podcast and you can catch us on the new RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You can also find us under the big top at the sports circus hosted by sal the ring master. Look for us on amptvcom. That's a a MP tvcom the next time you stay in hotels across America. I hope you enjoy our show and let us know what you think by going to our website, Ullo up with gustscom. Please like and subscribe. Now let's get in the huddle with today's guest. Hello everyone, thank you for joining us on another episode of Hudd up with Gus. I'm here with my longtime friend of CO host Dave I guess, and today, Dave, we're joined by a very special guest. Had An amazing athletic career and it's continue his career on and many different for an areas. So it proves that athletes can do all types of things and you know, he's one of the smartest guys. been a Baltictorium is high school graduate of top honors or Virginia. So this guy has just the epitome of what athletes can do, I think. And today joining us in a huntle former New York giant tiki barber. So, Tiki, thank you for joining us today and we're glad that you're in the huddle with us. I appreciate you gus. Good to see a day they seen you. So Chiki tells about you know, we know a lot about played against both you and your brother Rande. You never intercepted me, but he has. So I like you a lot more. Yeah, exactly. So I'm the Nice be twin guys. Yeah, yeah, rody's the one that's kind of like the mean twin. He's the easy Althar Ego. I'm the good guy. Yeah, but but the word is, when you came out of the roomb we were the fiery one, right, the fires right, that's right. Yeah, so you know. But you guys have similar careers. Both athleticism. Brains just do amazing things. But what was that first time that you can remember back to when you were a kid growing up that you fell in love with sports? Yeah, you know, it started plants, soccer, interestingly enough, and I remember hating the sport because it was cold, like it was in the fall and it was freezing. Andy had to wear shorts and like a tshirt. Our coach wanted to make us tough and all we're doing is running around. I didn't get the sport as like, what the heck are we doing? We just run it. But I love the running. And so the next year my bunch of our friends started playing football. We were like ten years old and me and Ronnie didn't want to be left out, so we decided to join the football team and because we were so fast, we got like the marquee positions and so the coaches was like all right, just take it and go run, you know, there, and we'd run around the end and had success really early because of our just natural athleticism and it maybe love sport. I get it was a way to be accepted and to, I don't know, achieve something you didn't. You don't realize it because you're having fun when you're a kid, but over time it became our way to differentiate and be unique in a way. T did you like as a kid growing up? Did you play a lot of sports with kids in your neighborhood? Like, would you guys have neighborhood pick up thends and stuff like that? Yeah, no doubt. I mean I kind of missed that. You know, raising my kids now it's they're isolated. They stay inside playing video games and they they're own sports teams, but it's not as free as it used to be. When I was a kid, you know, I remember getting on my bike and just leaving and writing and being out for five, six hours out of a whole day. My mom not really worrying. I mean she probably do was worried, but not like I would worry if my kids left its. It like twelve years old and was gone for five hours. You know. So Times of chains a little bit and that that freedom of play is gone. It's so much more structured the these days. I don't well, that's a good thing or a bad thing. They just as kind of is what it is. But you know, I think, I think that unstructured plays, what kind of made me. I don't know it. It made me do so many different things. It's why I love playing, you know, football, it is why I love baseball, it's why I love wrestling, because I we were always just doing all those things. Well, well, the know, the No raffing and no coaching totally help people develop their interpersonal skills and stuff too. You had to you disorder a problems yourself. You didn't have a raft to break it up. You had...

...to figure that right. What was going on? Yeah, get the fight. You better figure it out right. But other to help you out, like or picking teams or like, Hey, you know, hey, Hey, I lost my baseball. Okay, what ball do you have? We got a football, right, let's go play football. Figure it out, and that's right. Make the rules up as we go. You know, Dave and I talked about whiffleball a lot. Like there's always rules for whiffleball that you make in whatever environment in your in you might have a big yard, a small yard, whatever it is. You just make the rules up as you go and I think, yeah, I think, I do. Think kids miss that today now. I think you're right. I mean it's almost it's like they're catered to by adults all the time, like we as parents, and it's our fault as well, you know, we're telling our kids what they should be doing and how they should be doing it instead of letting them figure it out themselves. And so that natural curiosity that was, I think, important, and guess you you know this is well, it was important to help you get through like tough times when you're, you know, in high school or in earn or in college and you can't quite figure it out. You have this like intuitiveness that you learn when you were ten, you're twelve years old, that help you. Nowadays, kids hit problems and they often can't figure out how to get out of them and then it derails him sometime. Yeah, I mean I've gone through a lot of things in my career, as a lot of people know, and all those tough times that I've gone through growing up living out in the country, I can remember a time where I came home crying. I don't know, I've maybe eight years old or something, and these two older kids that maybe we're twelve, thirteen or something stole my bike and I went home and like they wouldn't give it back and I went home and told my dad. He's working in a garden after work. You know, you just worked in eight hour shift, and he goes, that's your bike. Don't come home until you have it again. Yeah, go get it right, go get it. And I'm like, I thought, you man, I go, Dad, but how am I gonna he goes, you got to figure that out, you got to figure out how to get that bike back. And so walking around the neighborhood for eight hours trying to figure out this thing. Then realize that these two kids put it in the highest tree that they could find and which I got my buddy and we went and took the bike back and I went back home. It was it was almost time for the whistle to blow. I knew if I didn't have my bike, I was late. I was really going to be in trouble. But I don't know, I'm the same way. My kids didn't go through anything like that and I wish they would have. Yeah, you know, it's because it builds a toughness. And you know, now they get it and by playing sports. But it happens later, you know, and and and sometimes it takes adversity later in life. And you know, I know they're going to be okay, because you know, that's the end of the day, you just trying to raise good kids and it's more important when people say your kids a good kid, as opposed to he's a good athlete. And my two older ones are at that point of seventeen and fifteen, are playing football up and Greenwich and they're they've been really good as athletes. But I get more joy out of parents telling me your kids a good kid, but I also want them to be successful. All right, it's because I know what it was like for me to go through life as a successful athlete and the doors that had opened. Right. It just it just the world becomes your oyster, especially if you take advantage of it and you play the game the right way. Yeah, so did you and your brother play every sport together or their type that you played in different yeah? Yeah, I mean I grew up the single mom. My Mom and dad were divorced when I was young, two years older so, and so my mom was would tell all the sports leagues they better be on the same team, you know, if they're not play at all, because that going to two practices, right. It's so. Yeah, we were always, always together, went to school together. As you know, Gust and Dave at the University of Virginia. Felt like there was a chance, like a really small change. Ants come drafted. They Ronde after I got picked in the second round to go to the giants, that Ronde was going to get picked to come the giants to in the third round, but the bucks took him about to pick before the giants had a shot and the only time we really got to play together again was in the pro bowls. It's right. It's why I love my last three years when I didn't get good, like pro bowl good until the end of my career and and oath four, five and six and those last three years or ape, I was able to play in Hawaii with my brother. In fact, my last game was as a teammate of my brother, which was kind of awesome. It brought it full circle for me. Oh Yeah, I'm sure that that had to be very difficult after all those years playing on the same team, being together waiting room. You guys were roommates at college, roommates at home, probably, that's right, and then all of a sudden, you can you imagine, Dave, you get to the pros and then you're growing up separately. Well, they're playing also in the same time zone to so they've one o'clock start, so it's kind of hard to watch each other, you know. Yeah, no, I never got to see it. I'd always called him like right, what happened? You know, I could see the score...

...because they have all the scores, although, you know, in the stadium, so I can see either win or a loss. Of that. All Right, what happened? Yeah, he's like, Hey, I picked off Radigan, picked off a lot of people. Your brother's really, really good. Um Now in high school, so you're so we learn you're playing soccer and football now in high school. Did you play multiple sports in high school? Well, I stopped soccer after like twelve years old because I ate it be in cold. But what we did do? We tried out with the basketball team and we didn't make it because we didn't know how to drivel, like it was a skill we never developed, and so we didn't make the basketball team and the coach said come back next year. I know you're good athlete. You know, work on this skill and come back next year. Instead, we went out for the wrestling team. So we didn't make the basketball team. So we wrestled and we were really good at wrestling and in fact we both went to districts and we're districts champions at our weight, respective weight classes, in eighth grade and in ninth grade. And so basketball never came back into the into the picture and I kind of met still bug out of my basketballs at one sport I never really really really took up. But wrestling and then, obviously football and then track and field were the things that we did during high school. And track was great because it developed my speed and allowed me to, I don't know, be an agile runner, which would served me well as a football player, obviously, an interestingly, though, wrestling was probably more important because, you I learned so much about my body, like how to, you know, manipulate other other bodies and how to take hits, how to fall, like all these things that are important in football I learned from being a wrestler. And so we did that up until ten grade and then we stopped and we just ran football, play football and ran track. But I loved it. I love being an athlete and I missed those, those high school athletic competitions because they're, I don't know, the just kind of pure. You don't. You're not, like you not worried about being the best in the nation. Nowadays kids are, but back then you just worried about being the best in your neighborhood or right best in your in the in the town, or maybe the best in the state. It wasn't more like getting on twitter or whatever and looking where am I ranked in the whatever the yeah, ranking or whatever. You were doing those things in here like you do now. Do you find yourself like for me, sometimes I'll smell something that brings back like an instant memory, like I can remember playing baseball and what my gloves smelled like, and so sometimes if you smell leather, it'll smell like that. So wrestling, there's a lot of smells going on and wrestling what you don't want to remember? Yeah, you know you may not want to remember them, but dude, it's funny you say that because so my my football coach and junior high was also the wrestling coach, Steve Spangler. He ultimately went to the high schools, always my high school coach to and then a couple years after we left high school he became the principle. So he's the principle of guys we went to and he was great, but he was like, I mean he was tough, and so wrestling. They it's not like at least hours wasn't an open Jim. It was a little tiny room, right. He would shut and it was all padded, like every bench of the walls were padded and he would shut the door and it was like a sauna and there for two hours of practice. And you talk about like smells and like more like sensations. So there was a door and the like, a like a utility door and the back right corner of the the wrestling room and we'd be doing our thing, whatever wrestling, you know, running around, just running, losing weight and we'd probably get a break, but you couldn't leave the room and so everybody would clamor for this like this little door. It was like little tiny door and it was a slit about that that big underneath it, and everybody's just trying to get air. You're just like t get out of the way. He just like try to get some cool air, but your phase, I'll think I'll ever forget that because it was so intense, like wrestling is so intense, and that that little half of a breath of cool air would like make your day. So yeah, I know what you mean. You never forget those things. Well, I mean I've coached football after I played and and kids that were wrestlers. I've seen him go. And you talk about learning your body, wrestling has got to teach you more about your body and your stamina and you know how far that can take yourself than anything out, because I had kids that just played football and they would run. They think they're going to pass out in the wrestlers are just like yeah, whatever, and they're just running back of their outside. True, you know, and it's true. It teaches you such a mentality. My wife discipline standpoint. So Harry, my wife's father, my wife Father, was my high school football coach and he recently just passed. His favorite players were always wrestlers. Yeah, yeah, and there's also like a like a like a adaptability to their game, so they could it could almost do whatever you want because they're even though they're small, they're strong, I know. Yeah, really strong,...

...like this stupid unexplainable strength. They're they're they're often like the smartest guys, because it's all tactical, right when you're in an individual sport and it's like literally man against man, and it's not like boxing where you're just striking. Yeah, it's you're grappling with someone. You're trying to how can I get your body leverage off of off kilter so that I can gain an advantage, and it's like it's really hand to hand combat. That's important in football because, especially if you're, you know, a blocker or some capacity, it's all about finding the right leverage and wrestlers just have that intuitively and they have to do it on a regular basis. So, I mean, I try to get my kids to wrestle. They don't. It's just just there's not the same in the northeast like it was in the south or like it is out west. But some maybe, maybe one of these days, one of my yet, maybe one of my young ones, and get well, my kids are in college now and gunner, I remember the first time you put a singlet on. He came out and he's like Dad, I just can't wear this. I'm like you have that's wrestling, you have to wear this. He goes, I know, but they were wrestling, a lot of tournaments, a lot of people were there and he's like Dad, I'm just I don't know, I can't get over like whearing this and and everybody seeing it. I'm like, dude, it's just want to be a rast. That's where you're going to have the right kind of panity. Yeah, is not. Are you know like this nasty is. Thank you. You just can't care. Well, he tell us about your high school football career. Then, like when did you really start to become good and you started to know things? Maybe? Yeah, it go beyond high school. Yeah, so for US high school football didn't start till ten grade. So my freshman year I was still didn't like junior high. So my ten grade year, which is my first year in High School, Eleven twelve is our high school, me and Ronde joined the team and we were so good and are my I think because my coach knew me from junior high right, because I told you, my junior high coach is my high school coach as well. He said, if you can earn a starting job, then then we're I'm going to give it to you, and so our running back, I started running back, was this guy. His name is Dwayne web and he was great, but because my camp went so well, they moved him to quarterback and I ended up starting a running back as a sophomore and that's kind of what I knew that I had had it. You know that whatever that intangible is was my was my sophomore year. Ronde didn't. He didn't it. Eddn't end up happing for him till the next year. But once he became the starter, he was like all district and one of the best players in the state. And so we've kind of always done this thing. He staggers me by a year. So, getting to the NFL, I start as a rook as a rookie for the giants. He kind of didn't play at all. He was almost out of the League in the rookie season, but then the very next year he becomes one of the best, you know, defensive backs in the national football the same thing happened in college. I started, or I played at least a lot as a freshman first year, as we call it at UVA. He didn't do anything. His next year, which is richer. Freshman Year, he was the ACC rookie of the of the year. Like so we've always like used each other's successes to help propel one another forward. And it started I started in high school. Now the problem is that it Cape Spring. We weren't very good. I think we can despite having two guys who ended up being multiple year pro bowlers in the NFL. I think we won most in the most in one season we won was five games. Like we just didn't have a have a good team, but we had fun. My mic like guard, was as big as mate, like he was like we were small, so we could get pushed around. We played some of these bigger, bigger teams, but we had a ton of fun and I learned a lot about success and achievement from some of the failures that I went through in high school. Well, I tell people all the time it doesn't matter where you go to school, if you're good and you work hard, you have heart and determination. Is Right, they're going to find you right now, especially now, especially, especially yes you time with colleges, absolutely, and it's so much more. I heard this the other day because, you know, my son is my oldest son of seventeen and we're starting to go through this process and you know it. Like a lot of people want to talk about stats right, like hey, how many how many touchdowns do you have and how many yards you rush? For ultimately that matters, but probably like that much it's really about what kind of kid are you? Are you going to fit into our program? Are you going to work hard? How do you deal with with failure and and disappointments? And you know, I had this conversation with my seventeen year old about the week and a half ago, two weeks ago, because I was reading about the NFL draft and how, you know, these these scouts now are looking back at what these kids did in high school, like it's apparent get ready for the NFL. They look what they what would they like in high school? And so I said to my my oldest son, and he's a I said Ay, that want to ask you a question. I don't want...

...you to answer. I just wanted to think about it. Right, if if someone went and ask you, you know what, what do you best at, or what's your best trade, or how do you deal with success? How do you deal with failure, how do you deal with disappointment? Would you have an answer? And then he said yes, I would. I said, okay, now what if they ask your teammates in your coaches that same question? What would they say about you? And he's like, you know, that's deep. I got to think about that one. And, but, but that's that's really what matters, because ultimately you can think you're the greatest thing, you're doing all the all things the right way, but if you're if you're not a good teammate, if you don't work the right way from your coaches, that's the perception that ultimately will derail you when you go to the next levels. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston bondaventure hotel and sweets and enjoy brickfast us for two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, started every day with a hearty meal to kickstart your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on us for each day you stay. For reservations, be sure the Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservations at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LA xbw or call one hundred eight hundred two to eight ninety, two hundred and ninety and ask for Promotional Code S for B. Yeah, no, I completely agree with that and I think that feedback is the most important thing you can get, and a lot of times friends don't give you feedback. You know, I think you have right. You had such a special relationship with your brother that you probably were giving each other feedback when you didn't want to. It was like real, like totally this shit there's said about you. You were terrible, right. Yeah, you end up look good, but you were terrible. But it was awesome. You know that. That's what kind of I needed it, right, especially when I got to New York. I mean I was you get, you can't help but get over confident about, you know, success when you when you come, but when you do it in a place like New York, and so to have my brother to like keep it real was such an important part of, I think, my success. What was the recruiting process with you and your brother for College? Yeah, so we we were were like really good athletes in the state. We weren't like five star athletes. Don't even know if we had stars back then. I don't remember what the process was like, but Virginia Tech looked at us because that's where my mom and dad went to school and my dad was a football star there. The local school, Clemson, was one of the team club schools that we looked at. Penn state was interested but then Jim Caldwell, who was recruiting us, left and went to wait force to be the head coach. So nobody picked us up. So we were getting like letters here and there right and we only took two visits. One was to Virginia, obviously. The other one was the Clemson. We were really interested in going to Michigan because of the academic prestige of that that university, even though it was a long way away. And I remember we got a call from forgetting to running back coach, Jim something or another. I can't remember his name now, but he gave us a call right before our visit and said, unfortunately, we have to cancel your trip because we're snowed in. And it was like all right, we're good, we're I go at. We can't get into it, out of it. Snowed in like snowed like plays can get in. Yeah, we commitish to Virginia like two days later. Yeah, and it turned out to be the best. It is the best situation for us. I was I was a geek going growing up. I was a geek all through college. I wanted to be an astronaut. Football was just something I was I was also really good at and Virginia was the right academic environment for me to grow and become a man that I that I ultimately became. Along the way, I got good at football like my second, third year. I mean I was kind of just an average guy and then I got an opportunity to start against Michigan and a pigskin classic and had a hundred eighty yards and the rest was was college football, or at least Virginia football history, and that propelled me to the NFL. But you know, I wanted to work for or Microsoft or something like that. Football kind of interrupted my my actual dream when I when I went to UVA. Right, we like think all of our guests for joining us here on how to up. You know, they can find us on RADIOCOM or they can find us under the big top, as was sal the ring master and the sports circus, and on amp TV. So we're here talking with Tike Barber. We're moving into your college days. Your you and your brother are roommates. Is it feel like a we didn't even leave home, like we're together, we're doing this thing at we're going after the world together. I mean that would be such a good feeling. It was. It was. It was comforting because UVA is an intimidating place, like and timid any academic environment. They care about sports and obviously as of late they really started to do well with the major sports. We've always been good at the like the nonprofessional sports like Lacrosse and an owns. All that is professional on now with the with the Pll soccer. We were always great at diving...

...right track and field baseball we've recently got really good out of the last decade or so. But it wasn't like state. You you know what I mean. So yes, it was. They celebrated athletic or athletic success, but it was really like all right, well, well, what are you majoring in? And you're getting a grant to do this or that the other thing you know, are you going to work on the hill? And so it was a little bit intimidating for us. So to have, you know, my twin with me ever, like literally every step of the way. We took all the same classes our first year's there and and walk the same path, so to speak. It made it comfortable and made it made it easy for us. And then football, once football started to take off and we became comfortable there and coach Welsh, who was amazing, challenged US could be great. We were able to fulfill, I think, a lot of people's expectations for us. WHO's the better student between you two? It's not even question. I was. I just worked hard at it. Yeah, rod it was Roddy Smart. I mean he is smart, but he didn't want to be the smartest. He just he was good being smart. I was. I wanted to be the smartest. And me, to this day, my wife and friends they call me fun fact Tike because I studied stupid things that don't make any sense, have any point, but it's just things that are interesting to me. Yeah, and interesting. I think that helped me become a better football player because you know, this is like it's not always the biggest guy, strongest guy, and that that wasn't me, right. I was hundred and ninety five pounds when I was at first year UVA and but I knew like about like physics, and I knew about how to from wrestling and other things, how to take content packed and how to stay on my feet. That help me help me become a successful player and at UV it right. So I want to ask is why? Why did you did you want to be at NASA? Were you a kid in Virginia looking up at the stars all the time, saying it's just, yeah, it's drug, you know your well get them. Is New York City. You probably don't see any stars in New York now, not at all. I mean we're out in Jersey now so sometimes we can. But you'll remember this. Guss I was a challenger Baby. So when I was eleven years old, this this space shuttle Challenger blew up and I remember it. We were in school at Oak Grove Elementary, and all of the teachers were like sitting around us. We were sitting on a circle watching the TV, the TV's because Sandra McCullough was on that, that space shuttle right. She was a teacher, and it blew up. Like we're sitting in school and it's this thing blows up and it was in all the teachers like leave the room. Everybody's emotional and like it was like in this indelible moment my life that I'll just never forget. And not too soon after that, like NASA became like really interesting in the world because of that disaster. But then what they were doing going forward and space camps became huge. N If you remember this, this era. Yeah, like the late S, space can't became big, a big deal, and it was all the rage and media, but we couldn't afford it right. All my friends would go to space camps in the summer, but we couldn't because my mom didn't make up money right. And go space can though. My dream became to be an astrol and go to space cans. But you know what, I'm going to go be an astronaut and my mom would always tell me, you can go be an astronaut. You just got to you got to be the best student in the school, and that's what drove me up to make straight AIDS. I didn't make a be from eighth grade on and finishes one of our validy Torians at a case break high school. And so, like I chose you. I looked at Michigan because I had a great engineering school, Right Virginia Tech, obviously is a great polytechnic institute as well, because you know, the actual name is Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Ultimately it was UVA because of their engineering program there the East School, which is what I entered as, and so I went to the east school at Uva and it was challenging, man, because I had to take all my classes early in the morning because football was in the afternoon, and then labs I would have to do like in the evening after football practice, and so my life was like inundated with stuff. And but I fell in love with computers right it was the first time I'd ever interacted with a computer. I mean I had a commodore sixty four, but like a powerful computer at Uva, and writing these programs became like English. It was so easy to me. It just was really intuitive. And so I unfortunately left my dream of being an astronaut and went into the commerce school, the business school, and study database design and management and the macintire School of Commerce. I was in in mys major, and that became my dream because right about that time, guess what happened? In one thousand nine hundred and ninety three or four, the Internet started to blow up. In time...

...programming in html and creating these like this, these these these pages that were kind of pointless. Like I had a I had created my own page. It was like t tiki barber page, and I had bunch of like Hawaiian Te keys right on the front page and I had yet to do an h map reference to find the one to get in. So I created like this, like only one of them would let you into the page, and I had like pictures from college, like from my college games and stuff like that. But if you pick the wrong one, you got they're hurted somewhere else and it was. So it's just like, I don't know, I spent my I was such a Geek. It's hit my entire like nights sitting in the computer lab and again, these things like will never, I'll never, don't never leave my mind, right because like one thousand nine hundred and ninety five, a game was created called doom. You guys remember this? Oh Yeah, doom. So doom took over UVA's computer labs. Like people stopped working and would play the stupid video game. Was a one of the first first person shooters. Right, they play this video game four hours, and I'm not talking about like two or three, I'm kind of like six or seven. how Ye people are playing the stupid game doom, to the point that they had to ban it from the computer lab because people who did have computers in there like apartments like I did. Oh yeah, it couldn't get work done. So you know, it was we had to learn how to switch. So you quickly switch from like playing doom to like whatever program you were doing your writing. So that was my existence, man. I mean football was big part of my life, but it was it was also a small part of my life. Yeah, I'm in college. I really wish I would have learned more about computers, because I actually did the first AOL sports live interview on the Internet for them. They came right. Yeah, so when I was playing for the Redskins, Jimmy Lynn, who was had a veil all sports, came to my house and we did an interview where member Dave. He was telling us about that, that he put everything out there, he goes, yet you were the first one we've ever done. He like are my house from from their headquarters was a mile away. So it's right about the can work. So you know, and I at the time I'm like okay, and to know how special you know, that was. Until later on you hear about it like man, why did I do more with them? You know, but you don't some people. If you don't know, you don't know. Yeah, that's right and that's the that's it. A lot of people just don't aren't aware where it's going. But I think because of hy K, like the potential of hy k. We all remember this when we thought the world was going to shut down. It is all because some of these a lot of computer programs were built on these old systems, you know, like like like coball or any some of these other programming languages. It didn't have four spaces, like for slot spaces for for the date. They only had two spaces its right, like data points for for the date. And they're like, Oh, what happens when we get to two thousand? We can't just previate eighty eight or seventy five or ninety nine. Was the world's going to come to an end? Right rob you had like actually had like fifty years, because they can, for computer programming started. It was probably in the S, so you still had like till two thousand and fifty before you had duplicate records and things started hey wire. But it like took over like like the school. It took over like how like lessons were designed. It was it was crazy, it was insane, it was exciting and scary. To think about was scary. We're talking about a computer potential, computer bug. It was like most terrifying thing. And now we're talking about coronavirus and the things that nature. So it's just it was a different world, man. It was well more straightforward. Why to KS played for the Detroit Lions. We were going to play Minnesota. The team made us take all of our family with us because that was the weekend. It was going to turn over and like we said, okay, if we're all going down, we want you to be with your family in the whole team. We took all of our like we had our I had our my wife, two kids, everybody there, and it's like okay, like they could die like that discussed it is. That's crazy. There was nuts. We took everybody had their whole family in the hotel them. I remember like after midnight when it's switched. I remember like turning on the TV being like, you know, the clicking it going. I mean it seems mantling way, honey, seems normal. One not one thing happened. Everybody's computers still work. Every yeah, you know, we still played the Games. Like the NFL is not got to shut down the whole world could be ending, but the NFL got to go on. Well, that's with those when worries weren't that really worriesome? Right, exactly, exactly. So you and your brother are going through. You have incredible college careers. Now it's time to kind of being recognized by the NFL. I'm sure you guys had a ton of scouts come see you and then all of a sudden you guys go to the combine and then, yeah, can go and get into the...

...draft. I mean you're doing this all together and had to be like just such a dream come true. Is such a surreal moment for you and Ronde. Yeah, tell us about draft day. Yeah, so it was a surreal dream and Ronde actually, because I you know, I mentioned he read shirt. He had an extra year but of eligibility, but he said, you know, I was graduating. So he's like, you're not going to be here, I've already graduated with the heck am I going to stay at school for right? So he came out early and a lot of people didn't like said, well, you're making a mistake because your draft, you know, status is lower than it could be if he stayed for another year. I think about that. That's nothing. Used to say this. Oh yeah, stand of the year because you don't prove your draft status. Now it's the other way around. Is like get out early because your second contract you're going to be too old if you stayed till right. It's crazy, like how it's all flipped. So, yeah, we went through this process and I remember, like we were fast, we were track athletes, like we knew how to run, we know how to do all the things that good football players do. But that was that was right after the the whole Mike Momola thing. Yeah, right, remember this Mike Mamula who trained for the combine and we specifically for the combine and crush it and, you know, getting drafted really high. Yeah, by the Eagles. Right. So that's right. And so my agent, we hired, like had us go out to Arizona and train for the combine. I'm like, why am I going to train for the combat? I know how to run a forty, like, I know how to like bench, but I know how to do all these things. But it was it was actually really cool because me and Rohande displaced from like this world that we had known for four years at UVA. And were like across the country and Arizona training for the combine and we like we got we had. I mean we've always been tight, but it was was like being grown up tight, if that makes sense. Yeah, tight, like to leave school and go to Arizona and then like start to prepare for the NFL draft made us grown up tight. It was neat. It was unique because we were kind of on our own, like you're on your own college, but there's like a structure there. When you're halfway across the country and on your own, it's kind of it's kind of cool draft. That was interesting. We decided to play golf. We went to Birdwood Country Club, which is and shows soil Ginia. It's the University of Virginia's right home home course for the golf team and you know, it was like we weren't good at golf. So we're just kind of out the messing around and hacking around, expecting the phone call and it didn't come until, least for me, until like whole seventeen. So we're almost done and I remember Pat Hamlin, who was still the the information sports information guy there, called me and said, hey, we're going to going to put you on the phone with coach fossil and we're going to take you with the next pick. And it was the sixth pick in the second round. And, to be honest with you, like, coach fossils is first year. So I'm like, who the heck is coach fossil team? I didn't know. It took me like it was a few minutes to figure out what steak was drafted right, but it but it was neat, you know it was. It wasn't any fanfare. It's kind of like congrats and brother, gave you a hug and we finished out the round. They went and went to a bar and had some beers and dinner with and waited for him to get picked, which happened about and two hours later. And so that's pretty amazing story, though, the two brothers could pick the same day. I mean, yeah, you know, how did your mom deal with all that? Now see if she loved it. And Ju was there. She was at dinner with us, and but we had spent the morning by ourselves just now playing golf and like we knew it was we knew what was happening. We knew for the first time in our lives, we were going to be separated and and it was like it was bitter sweet. It was awesome because we were entering this date and following this dream that we had wanted for so long, but at the same time we knew that for the first time in our existence, we were not going to be under the same roof and doing the same thing. But it was I mean it's it's a dream, right. It's like it's I can't, I can't explain the emotion that that we fell but some anxiety as well. I mean our phone will that first year, because back then you had to pay for your Cell Phone Bill Right. This was ridiculous. Oh yeah, I mean we talked every night like what's going on, because that wasn't we weren't married. which kind of I'm in? I'm in Jersey or New York, he's down in Tampa. It's just like he was just weird and it was, but it was we figured it out. We always do. Yeah, I'm sure. Well, it's nice that you guys had each other to lean on. I was married after my first year, so I had my wife and I've been closed for a long, long time, so I always had her to lean on. So I can imagine what you guys went through for the first time being a part that had to be definitely difficult but exciting. Yeah, definitely. That has to be the point of the lowest, the low key draft story that we've heard for someone that's projected high. You know what I mean? Yeah, where it's I mean you guys just it was you guys out in the golf course. We had no idea. Think about like back then, you don't really you didn't really know.

Like I was projected anywhere from, you know, top of the middle of the first round till the third round, like nothing. Bell Kuiper had me is like a fourth round trafting than that, I came to find out the coach fossil actually wanted to take me at number seven overall, but they took Ike. And Jim Skipper, my running back coach, he would tell me some time later. He's like take I cost you some money. It was like what do you mean? He's like, Jim wanted to take you number seven, but but he also wanted I kill your and he and he told Jim told. Jim Skipper told Jim Fossil. If you take tke at seven, you're not going to get ike in the second round. If you take Ike at seven, you might still get Tiki in the second round. And and I felt all the way back to the second round and it worked out. You know, I almost interestingly got picked by the Tampa Bay buccaneers. They chose wark done at the end of the first round and and I've subsequently had this conversation with with rich McKay, was now the vice president president, not the vice president of president at the Atlanta Falcons. He said we had a conversation about you or work done. Interestingly, me and work done pro stats are almost identical, right, and he said what one US over with wark was that he went to Florida state and they were in tentle wow. If he had to work, had been in, I don't know, Pittsburgh or something. I could have been a I could have been a bucket. Are Right. Well, do you think if you've Daoud a drafted you, do you think they would still drafted your brother? You know, I don't know that they had a need at both positions. So probably the giants also had a need at both positions them, because Jason Sehorn was in his like third year, I believe, and so they were like it was given to that point where they had to either try to replace Jason or sign them to a long term contract. They ultimately sign into a long term contract like two years later. So like it was to there's a couple instances where we almost on draft A, we almost ended up on the same team, but it didn't happen. And then you guys both play with the same team your whole careers. Yeah, which is where I mean very ard. I played ten and I was I mean I was lucky to stay because they tried to replace me early, often because I got hurt and then I was in effective. They brought in Gary Brown and they drafted Joe Montgomery from ohouse state. Right Sean Bennett, they brought in from a free earing went to school, but he was a he was a good player. Then they drafted Ron Dane in two thousand who was the heisman trophy winner in the all time leading Russia and college football history. And so it's I got well, Tike, he's got to be done. But at that point, that's that's the year that it hit for me. In two thousand four right yere and in the NFL, things just slowed down for me and Sean Payton with our offensive, coordinated, changed the scheme to fit, to fit me, and it was he who wanted to use me a lot like Marshall Falk was used with the with it, with the rams and it, and it excel. It took my career, took off a rest for a thousand yards. For the first time. We went to the Super Bowl, I signed an extension and the rest is history. Yeah, Valet, stay and play in your next getaway to loss angelst. The Western Bond Adventure Hotel and suits offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments from all the action and accessible to Hollywood beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation, or call one two, one hundred and three, six, two four one thousand and ask for Promo Code PS. I mean just what a crazy, amazing story, and I think that what you guys have gone through such a great story to tell. Even though there's a lot of information out there about you and your brother but I feel like that what we want to do is really bring that out in the way that you just have is that, you know, we all have these different transitions in life and you guys had to make a tough one for each of you and it works out, you know. Yeah, and a lot of people don't think that because I have to get a new job or move to something else or go wherever, it's not going to work out, and you guys ultimately prove that it does. Yeah, I think life is, because I think life is a constant process of reinvention and if you get stuck and doing or thinking that you have to be who you were, you you're never going to move forward, you can never advance like you always have to get involved, and I think having a twin and having someone to live by, care assleep through what by life, through for all, for all, really my whole life, forty four years, almost forty five now, has helped me manage that. All Right, so I've been lucky. So you go through your you have an amazing career. I mean pro bowls, you almost you went to super bowl right, but then you left, like you retired. Then the next year they is that one, n one the very next year. Yeah,...

...which which is Great. You're probably like, okay, I could have just stayed on. I would have meant that whoever and done whatever. But you know, it's funny. I was telling Dave that the year that you guys lost to the Ravens into Super Bowl, I played them the first playoff game in Baltimore because I was the quarterback for the broncos. That's right, and we played in Baltimore in rain and that defense was good. That they were. They were unbelievable and it was a scheme like they had Sam Adams and Tony Sarah Gousa and as three hundred pounds, really like three hundred and thirty pound D tackles. So there was no way to block Ray Lewis, right, is a reason that right at the seasons that he had when that when that front for was as stout as it was. But you couldn't block them. So he could go. mean, he's athletic enough, it's fast enough and physical enough, but there was no impenement from him playing sideline to sideline. And so we met them. It was I mean they punted up, they kicked us off into like the twelve or fourteen yard line. We never got out of our own and zone. That like until the second half. It was it was rough sledding for a team that had played pretty well. We had played well up until that point. Well, I think that's like overall the for totally yardage. It's about the lowest and Super Bowl history probably. Yeah, the combined totally. Artach was like yeah, forty, fifty years. He only mean there was like a punt return, there was backback kickoff returns, like they scored points, but it wasn't because, you know, they dominated us. They had that one big play where Jason Sehorn, it wasn't really seat horns play, it was really the safeties play. See one kind of covered up for him with but that was really it. You mean they round the ball to and Jamal Lewis and then played great defense, like they had a great game plan and it and it dusted us. Well, you know, when we played you couldn't make a pass down, feeling sad on everything, because the front the heaven was so good. You didn't have time in the pocket. You had to get rid of the ball. So their guys, their corners never they were just like glue on add and Rod MC. You know it's right. And then we had a decent running game. That's just like, Oh man, we just yeah, it didn't matter because they could shut down the run game. They could, and Trent did a good enough job to manage the game. I remember he threw one. Turell Buckley went to pick it off, went through his hands. Shannon sharp was their tight end grab that runs down the side and there's the only score. We lost. Seven, two, three, and you know, but they were, they were really, really good that year. Yeah, you're right. So unless you could a fight block them up for, you know, six seconds, three, seventy five seconds so that you could throw a deep pass, you had no chance. Right, that's hard. It was easier. Set them done well that game, and then you had to have somebody fast enough to get behind it. Right. Well, now, I was going to say that game too. I think it was like forty mile an hour wind also. Oh yeah, so you were. It was my best. It was fair. Yeah, but so you have an amazing career pro bowls. You were I'm not sure if I read this right. This right, you can have said that you were NFL players a year, right, weren't you? In you know far that? Well, I made the an all pro team, but it was it wasn't like the NFL's player of the year. It's like the like one of the magazines like ap or or sports. It was not a maybe maybe it was sports illustrated or sporting news or something like that. Back in two thousand and five, which was one of my better years, I had two hund three two hundred yard games that year. I was a year to Wellington Mara and Bob Tish both passed away and it had an impact, really a strong impact on my all my life, obviously my football season, but my life. Like I remember coach call flip telling us that we were the team of record for Bob and Wellington because we knew that they might pass away and having had the relationship that I had with them, every game was meaningful to me that season, including, you know, the Redskins game right after Wellington passed away, where I rushed for two hundred and eleven yards and have a touchdown, and that was in three quarters and we blew we blew the skins out that. I mean it's thirty six and nothing, but it was. It was meaningful to me because it was the only way to pay for me to pay tribute to one of the greats of the sport, certainly the NFL and in particular the New York giants. Right. So I think what it says there's that when you can play the game with tons of emotion and passion, you reach heights that you didn't think you could reach, and I think that's what the game of football is all about. When you see teams that are really good, they're playing for a cause, for a reason, and just just like you did in two thousand and five, I think, yeah, exactly right, you can't. You can't discount that right and it's there. It feels a tangible it sounds wishywashy, but you know this gust like football players live by these stupid cliches, like I got to get one hundred ten percent. You actually do. You know what right take it on play a time. You actually do, because you get caught thinking about mistakes or then the successes from previous, you know, iterations of a game, and then you end up like being...

...paralyzed. So you like we live by these things because they're real. Well, I was going to ask Tiki about retirement. How do you go about? Like you left, you still had some miles left. You could have gone, you know, like you chose to leave at a time where you were still a very good player. What was the thinking process in that? Well, it was, it was it was twofold one. Physically, my body was just starting to break down. I could feel it. It didn't show itself because I because of the prep, but I could feel myself slowing a little bit at like fifty yard touchdown runs were turning into, you know, twenty five yard runs or you know, contact that I used to not feel. Now of a sudden, my I can't get out of bed for three days. Yeah, and so like, physically I was starting to deteriorate, but I think more more importantly, the opportunities that came my way by being in New Yorker were unexplained. But just I find I found myself often saying why, what am I doing here right and I'll give you a couple examples. One, I met Samom Perez, who was the but who is the premiere of Israel, in a restaurant and at Tau and fifty seven street in New York City and he invited me to Israel, and so I went to Israel as a guest of the premiere of Israel. I remember sitting in the Knnessel, which is there part of it, and having like a state meeting, like two chairs, like Cameron. People me and like what am I doing here? I've made my brother wrote children's books, ultimately twelve of them, with Simon and Schuster. My editor is like girl, was a woman by the name of Paula Wiseman. She was also Dick Cheney's wife. So Lynn Chaney's editor as well. So I end up find myself this like Simon and Schuster dinner, sitting next to Lynn Chaney and she had invites me to the vice president's Christmas party. And so three weeks later I'm in DC shaking hand the Vice President, Dick Cheney, and and you know, cobnobbing with Lieutenant General Old Piero at a Bar, who was secretary of State Rice's military advisor. You fast forward a year later, I'm having a conversation with Tony Snow, who I knew from my Fox News days, who used to be the White House press secretary, who had was having conversations with Secretary of state rice, and he says to me, you know who really wants to meet you, secretary of State Rice don't like get out of here. Week later, I get a call from the secretary secretary. They set up a meeting and I'm having lunch in the State Department with Condo Lisa Rice, and I'm so looking, that's like what am I doing here right? So these things just kept happening to me, like over and over and over, and football, while still a big part of my life, became like less interesting, if that makes sense. Oh yeah, like back up thirty minutes ago. I'm a Geek, like, I love information, I love like absorbing new experiences, and at thirty years old, thirty one years old, I could feel myself being more interested in all of these other things that I was doing. Yeah, and going to work out with Joe Cerini, my trainer, and squatting, you know, six hundred pounds and deadlift in five hundred pounds, and and building myself up physically for a game that I could feel myself slowing down in. So it's complicated and like people look at it and they get centicoal or they get like snarky about it because the giants want a super bowl the following year. But I, like I wasn't willing to commit what I used to commit to be as great as I was and I knew it and so I walked away. It's hard for people to understand that, but that's my reality now. I think that's an amazing explanation, because you had other opportunities coming at you that we're bringing interests, right, you are. You were like me. Were you've done football for so long it's like, okay, I'm going to go do the same thing again. You have know what you have to do, but you got to do it to get out in the field and compete against the top athletes in the world. They're all of a sudden you have other realms coming at you that you wonder about. Right, you're wondering if how government and broadcasting, and you're meeting all these people that are and I can imagine why. I just can see it why. That would be interesting to say, okay, I've had opportunities, this is given me those. I'm gonna go chase him now. I'm getting excited again. That's right, and try and and look would winning of soup. I often think about this because people ask me all the time. You regret, you know, leaving for the diets. Won a super bowl and I so I think where I am now in my life and the things that I've that I've done, doing a national radio show and having a couple businesses that I've started and, you know, the kids, and like I try to think if I, if I had a championship, would it change like my life and where I am right now? And the answer is probably no. Like maybe perceptually in New York it would, but what it would I...

...be doing anything differently? And the answer is no. And so I don't regret it because it didn't negatively affect me by not being on a championship team, if that makes sense. Like for I think it's some people who define themselves by by sport. Maybe it would, but that was never me. That wasn't me when I was fifteen years old. It's certainly not me when I'm forty four. So you've gone through a lot of things that you've retired, you live in life like everybody else was living. Now is as everybody says you. Now we're in the real world and we're doing, yeah, normal things. But so give us a kind of a quick history of everything that you've done for yourself personally and in businesswise, and and really what you're doing now that you have a vision and a passion about that, you want to speak to yeah, so, I mean again, it's like sports. There's some successes some failures. The first thing I did actually, when I retired to start a in an affordable housing world with Steve Ross, who's the owner of the dolphins. He had a he was looking at a portfolio. It was based out of my hometown. So what partnered with them and the timing ended up being terrible because the market corrected itself at Oa and, you know, tax credit equity, which was how we were financing this deal, went from ninety six cents on the dollar to about sixty seven cents on the dollar. So we couldn't finance the deal. And obviously that was on the equity side. On the debt side, nobody was lending in two thousand and eighty either. So like we're like defaulting on this big deal that we were getting into. Luckily, Steve, who's a mintum of man, let us out of that deal. He personally guaranteed it and it turned around for him. You fast forward a couple of years later. He ends up becoming the initial investor, seed investor, for a company that I started called Enthusio, which is an event company and Media Company that is split into two things. One is an influencer marketing company called Julius Enthusio. We do events in about eight different markets across the country, soon to be hopefully twenty markets around the country, with with retired athletes and in entertainers in a membership based type of type of environment. Is Fun and it's growing and it's it's engaging, like keeps me busy. Where's the name about Fusio from? So we realized when we started the company that everyone is an enthusiast of something, and so like did Thusio? Oh was I want to go to dinner with Gus Right, for I want to play basketball with whatever John Starts, not with tk and Ronde. Yeah, exactly. Like we created a market place where that where that transaction could happen. The hard part about it was that we ultimately we're touching every transaction, and when you have to touch every transaction, it's not scalable, and so we shifted the business a little bit to the demand side as opposed to supply side. Is, when you're working on the supply side you're essentially an agent. Right. We didn't want to be an agent. We wanted to find demand and service that demand right, and that's why we split the two companies. One does events for like financial advice Uysers or others who are entertaining clients with our without in our network, and then one and influencer marketing company, so that brands were looking for the perfect influencer for their their their campaign can find them through us. And so it's been great. Obviously I've been doing CBS sports radio for eight years and now me and Brandon Tierney have a national show that it's on from now three to six eastern new in the three Pacific and and that's great because keeps me and engaged and touching the world of sports, which I still love even though I'm not involved in it as an athlete anymore. So what do you think that Joe Judge has to do to continue what the New York giants have built all these years with Jim Fossil and and Tom Coughlin and and everybody else that has been a coach there in the players that have come? Yeah, you know, he just hired Jason Garrett's offensive cortinates. Yep, what do you think? I want that movie? Yeah, what do you? I do too, because I think it'll help Joe. What do you think Joe has to do to keep that that giants that just hey, we're the best in this business. We know what. I listened to his in his introductory press conference. He said something that like really resonated with me that he wanted to bring like the blue collar back to this New York giants team like this, this this northeast. Are In New Jersey, New York, Connecticut. Is a lot of blue collar giants fans here and it's all about work. It's not about being flashy, it's not about you know, look at me. It's about doing doing your job, being accountable for your job and and and if there's one thing that he needs to bring back, it's that right. It's not about, you know, my success, it is about our success and I think he's got the right coaching staff around him to start to do that. I know that Brett Bilma is also involved now as a linebacker coach, Jason Garrett,...

...who I have ton of respect for. He was a teammate of mine back up for us that year we went to the Super Bowl. That we talked about and was really integral and helping carry collins became the quarterback that he ultimately became for us. And so it's building a right staff, which he's done because his young coach who had doesn't have head coaching experience, but he's got hit coachings, former head coaches, on his staff. And then now it's about putting the right talent together. And, like the giants have always had a philosophy, it's about character right. It's not about you have the best potential, it's about character. Like what Michael Strayhand was drafted. He wasn't like the consensus number one overall defensive linemen are deep Russian and the his draft monic tumor certainly wasn't that. I wasn't that, but we were. We became greats because of the work effort at work ethic that we committed to and I think the giant needed players like that. They do have a few of them right now, I think, especially with, say, Quan, who is as humble of player as I've ever seen, despiked his immense talent. And if you keep building that way, then I think Joe Judge would be on the right path. TIKI now being on the radio. You have to follow all sports. And Yep, have you always been like that? If you always followed majorly allasball or yeah, the only one day that I didn't like like have the deep dive in was bit was baseball. But I'm lucky because brandon tyranny, my cohost, he played baseball at Merison. He loves the sport and so over the last like seven, you seven and a half years, I've learned like the inside and the like, the like the inner workings of how what baseball is all about, and it's been fun right because we get to have these conversations about spend Rad and, you know shift, the shift and all these issues that are affecting that game and have a cool conversation about it. Basketball, I've always loved how that game has changed over the last, you know, really ten years, but even of less five now is is fascinating. I'm always talking with Brandon about the rockets. He doesn't believe they can win, but like just to watch them play. They're so small. They're all like linebackers to the like all thick like defenders. So if you try to you try to switch out to a smaller guy, doesn't matter right because they just switched the pick and roll and like they just pound you in a submission and then they're they're willing to give up point paints, like they did against the next they lost this game, but a couple days ago they gave up that. I think the point paint differential was like negative twenty eight. But they combat it by being so positive in the three point rates and in the three point plus. And so sometimes it will work, sometimes it won't. But just think about that. Like when we were growing up watching whoever, the next of the whoever, like it was a dump it down with a big man, is back into the task. It's going to make the dream shake right in Houston, like he had these post moves that were ridiculous. WHO has a post move anymore? You know what I mean? No, but I got my spot on the wing. I don't care if you I don't care who's trying to stop me to get there and get to my spot. I'm going to take it right. And so it's like the game is it involved intead of talk about it on a daily basis. It's fun. Yeah, I'm sure you've learned a lot. I mean, I just wonder if you would talk about all these different point differentials. And all these different things. If you weren't doing a sports show now, right, would it? No, pop, you're interest. But now that you're in there, because I know how you are with data and analytics and you want to learn, I bet you just dive head first and you've learned that. You've learned about sports and you would have never thought that you would have. That's it had an interesting it's got you know, you know what it is. Guss it like. It informs me, like because I understand where the data is coming from and informs me about what I'm actually seeing all the court and it's fun. And I've got an opportunity of the last two years to do some College Football Games with compass media on the radio, and so like being live at a game and and and like taking all these data points and and trying to discuss it, like explain it to an audience. It's something and I didn't think that I would enjoy, but I've started to love it. And you know, there's nothing like being in a live game. I did a couple of Alabama Games of the last couple of years and that environment, a Brian Denny Stadium, is I mean that's like football. Like you never believe. And so that's intent I've been doing. I've enjoyed the evolution of my professional career awesome. So now we're going to get into our last segment here really quick. No Huddle. Take a couple of minutes here, but we want to thank everybody listening. They can join us on RADIOCOM and also RADIOCOM sports and find us under the big top with sell, the ring master in sports circus and amp TV. So now, TQ, we're going to get into the no huddle segment. Dave always runs the show here, so dave lead away. All Right, tk if we're talking UVA Mount Rushmore and you can't put presidents on, you have to put athletes.

What, what for athletes would you put on them Mount Rushmore? Is this all sports? This is all sports, though. Ralph Sampson, for sure. Herman Moore got to be hard not to play. Shawn more on there as well, Claudio Rena, as he they won championships with soccer, and there's a Lacrosse player. I know I'm missing, but I'm going to say Thomas Jones, just to put my my boy on there, because I had all my record. We won't tell Chris long you left them off of there. Yeah, I won't even live there. He doesn't need what is your biggest pet peeve? My biggest pet peas. That's a sports pet peeve. We're talking about any pet peep. Mine is people in the left lane when you're driving. I think my biggest pet peeve, honestly, is is people who drive behind you with their high beams on right. This happens to me like literally every day and they don't know it, and so I'm trying to like tell them how to. I don't how to like tell them to your high beams drawing right the ball, but it doesn't do. They think you just like at a Haf yeah, people who cried with the high beams on because it blinds me. Well, I like I even people flash me thinking my high beams are on and they're not on. Yeah, that's also frustrating, man. I love going back at him. Maybe they'll just tell you it's a cop down the road, but that's it. That's supposed to be turning them off and on. Because, yes, I didn't know that. All right, t what's the biggest difference between the NFL today and when you retired? Contact? It's like they've legislated contact out of the game, and in some ways that's a good thing because of how physical the game has been, as always been, in the dangers that come from that, like, you know, repeated head trauma, and obviously that's what we talk about. I mean the joint damage and things that nature. He's guys need to need replacement. So I think it's the kind untact that is not being administered as it used to be. What's your worst habit? My worst habit, I don't know if I have you know you got worse Ted so my show. My wife will tell you it's because I put my clothes inside out when I put them in the laundry. Oh, all right, did I don't. I don't turn them the right way. You're not like everybody else. Would just throw them all in there and hope they come out. Okay, yeah, exactly, Tiki. If you could trade places with anyone in the world at any time in history, who would that be? Just for a day? It has to be like a real person. It could be whoever you'd like it to be. I give you a fictional person. Sure, if I could trade places with anyone, I'd want to be the doctor. I'm I'm a doctor who fan, doctor, doctor who, were in the world, like anywhere in time, horse space. That's it's good. That's a real good one. Who is the most famous party, by the way? Dr Strange or yeah, Dr Strange, right, he's a time. Yeah, no, Dr Stray, yeah, Oh, yeah, he's an all the doctor strange. He's more like he is doc. He's Dr who. But it's not the same, doesn't? They don't. They don't make the connection. But Dr Strange is doctor who. Right, right. So for flipping through your phone and you know a lot of people. WHO's the most famous person? And TIQ's phone own right now. That's a good question's the most famous person in mine hole? There's a lot. I don't know. I'd mentioned a really good one today. I'll say I'll say Alex Rodriguez, only because of who he's dating. Yeah, are soon to be marrying. Right. I'm going to go back to another Mount Rushmore question, but this time for the giants. WHO WOULD THAT BE? Obviously you can include yourself, Abod I'm not on the mount restamourt of the giants. Lte, is there? Frankifford Wellington, clearly, who was a great owner and probably George Young, who came in and change like the feel of this team after that whole that fumble her Edwards fumble returned. What's Anka Right. So I'd say those four. That's a good, good run. Mount Rushmore for the giants. Okay, two more. Mine is your favorite sports movie. Favorite sports movie maybe the SANDLOT. Oh, I like, that's a good one. The bad news bears what I remember watching the most when I was a kid because I don't know, I related to some of those kids. Yeah,...

...that's right. Just wanted to go be a part of something and just everybody was terrible. I Hey, I'd so relate to that to day. Last one, all right, he last one. If you could give advice to a young Tiki Bar Barber for you know, ten seconds, what would that advice be? My advice to a young Tekey Barber, like a young Tiki barber like twelve, or young tke barber like eighteen, whoa whenever you think he most needs advice, or get both. It might be an interesting this is just a surprise you. Actually I would I would tell tke barber before he went to college, pursue the technical career that you wanted, not the NFL wow. I often think. I often think about this because, like and all athletes, you know, this gusts because you see this with your some of your former teammates, and they get lost and like yeah, they just think football's over and it's like man, what Hell am I doing now? And I'm not lost by any stretch. I've had a kind of very full life. My wife is fantastic, my kids are great, my careers, it's exactly where I wanted to be. But I often think back to ninety seven when I graduated. It was the going of the Internet boot like it was it was about to happen, and and and I loved it. I mean, I can't I mean I loved it more than football, and I'm not joking. And I often think, what if I had chosen to actually go work for war pole or Microsoft? Right, not that I could have, because I wouldee. At that point you're expected go to the NFL. Like what would I even been in? Like, what? What? I be a billionaire now, right? What? Right? What? What change, like country or world changing technology? Could I have developed just and I don't know, like if I take that, if I'd taken the same work ethic that made me successful as an NFL player and applied it to that world, that computer design world. What what I done now? Well, I know you wouldn't. I know you wouldn't have been squatting six hundred pounds now at all. I would even thought about it. I've been running around, but been I stip to the athlete right. Quite yeah, you would have just been using a lot more up here, that's for sure. Yeah, yeah, sometimes I regret not using it as more. I'm sure you use it a lot more than you think. Yeah, you know what I mean. Yeah, I got you. I got you. Well, man eye. It was awesome. Thank you for spending so much time with us and sharing your story with our fans and and joining Dave and I in the Hubble. We really appreciate your time. Tq, my pleasure, guess. Thank they all right. Thank you, T take care, buddy, be good. You do get thank you. We want to thank everyone for listening. To huddle up with Gus. Please go to our website, huddle up with gustscom and subscribe and leave us a message and let us know what you thought about the podcast or maybe future guests you would like to hear from. So thank you again for listening to huddle up with Gus and find us on the new RADIOCOM APP or under the big top at the sports circus, posted by sal the ring master,.

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