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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 6 months ago

Steve Buckhantz and Phil Chenier

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me in the huddle this week is the Duo of Steve Buckhantz and Phil Chenier. They have recently started reliving some of the good ol' days on a new podcast they started. On the Road with Buck and Phil is a relaxing trip down memory lane. I would encourage any longtime fan to check it out! Phil and Steve talk to me about growing up and how they fell in love with sports. 

Steve was the longtime Washington Wizards play-by-play announcer and a Washington-area sports broadcaster who grew up in Virginia and went to James Madison University. Phil Chenier is a former professional basketball player, a guard in the NBA for ten seasons. Born and raised in Berkeley, California, Chenier graduated from Berkeley High School and played college basketball at the University of California in Berkeley. He was also a television sports broadcaster for the NBA's Washington Wizards.

Buckhantz and Chenier were the familiar faces and voices on Bullets and Wizards broadcasts from 1997 until 2017 when NBC Sports Washington announced Chenier would not return as the team's primary in-game analyst, a role he had for 33 years. While Chenier no longer calls games, he contributes to NBCSW's Wizards coverage. Buckhantz did play-by-play for several college basketball games last season and was working as the public address announcer for the XFL's D.C. Defenders when the novel Coronavirus pandemic postponed the season and ultimately caused the league to fold.

The friendship they have created over years of broadcasting Wizards games pulled them together again to tell their many stories in their podcast. Being able to interview them together gives us a glimpse into their friendship and the incredible journey they enjoyed. 

Thanks, Steve and Phil 

...welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup. Brian. Here, sports fans. Whether your game is on the gridiron,at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, Mm hmm, mhm. Welcome to thisweek's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents' passionfor sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing forseven NFL franchises with 100 and 14 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who theplayers are and how the games are. One. Uh, it's not every day you get to hangout with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out andplush 16 31 digital studios. It's kick off time, so snap your chin straps onand get ready to huddle up with us with two left. Hey, everyone, welcome toanother episode of Huddle Up with Gus. I'm your host. Gus Frerotte, 15 yearNFL quarterback. I'm here in the 16 31 digital news studio, but you know, asyou can see another week of being in my daughter's bedroom, Uh, so, um, youknow I want to thank 16 31 digital news for for helping me produce a show andputting it on there. New platform. And then also, I want to thank sounder FM.Big shout out to Tim Kelly and those guys for bringing me onto theirplatform. Really? Like what they're doing and how they're changing theworld of technology and podcasting. So today's guests I have two on, So thisis gonna be a great show. Uh uh, Phil Lanier, who was drafted into the NBA bythe Baltimore Bullets back in 1971. Uh, and Phil, no offense, but that was theyear I was born. I have to hear that from a lot of people I played with. SoI finally get to say it to somebody else. But, you know, back in 71 3 timeNBA All star, uh, just amazing basketball player will go into a littlebit of that and then also, Steve bucket somebody I know from my times with, uh,you know, back in Washington, d c. Who covered me and And when I was playingand and, you know, Steve was pretty good. He said a lot of nice thingsabout me. Surprisingly, um, you know, I just interviewed Michael Wilbon SteveAnd I was saying like, Man, I really don't like Tony Kornheiser with allthat much, and he was really meaning me. But, Steve, you were always so nice tobe. And, you know, Steve, you've been doing this for so long. You guys, youand Phil together, uh, did the Wizards, uh, while bullets, then the wizardsgames for, like, 20 years. What a what a crew you guys made. And and nowyou've taken this show on the road and now you to have your own podcastbecause on the road with bucking Phil and I think you guys do it becausethere's so many things you probably wanted to say on the air but never hadthe opportunity. And podcasting lets you bring out those stories that youprobably always wanted to say. So Phil and Steve, thank you for joining me onHuddle up with Gus. How are you guys? You were great guys. And truthfully, wedo it because we have nothing else to do. Gus, that's, uh, pretty much. Wefind ourselves walking around twiddling our thumbs, and, uh, seriously, um, youknow, we work together, obviously for 20 years and I knew Phil even beforethat, I used to referee in a summer league in Washington. A basketballleague. I heard you gave one of these. I am a technical. Yeah, you know, I'mdeserving. Undeserving. Correct. Yeah, well, I don't even know if Gus wants usto say why you you deserve the technical foul. But be that as it may,that was back in the seventies, Gus, when we had this, uh, league herecalled the Urban Coalition League, which was a great league. And it was asummer league, and it was in in a gymnasium at Roosevelt High School, andit was a tiny gym, and it was small, and it was hot, but all these greatplayers played it, and the Bullets had...

...a team in there still was on it. And,you know, we had a bunch of guys that were on the Bullets team truck Robinsonand a lot of these guys have played. And, uh and I refereed. So that was thefirst time I ever met Phil. But who would have thought that? Let's see,That was 73. And then we started working together seriously in about 97.Who would have thought that that many years later, we'd be partners, and thenwe were for 20 years. So, uh, you know, we we've developed quite a relationship.Very close friendship, as you can imagine. Uh, because you can't workwith somebody for 20 years and not be really good friends with him. It's justnot gonna last. So it's been quite a relationship, but we carried it on withthis podcast for a little bit of a reunion. Well, it's kind of funny, Phil,to get to know each other very intimately. Sometimes you know theiridiosyncrasies. And I picked up on some of the Steve Buchholz traits, andthey're they're very, you know, interesting and stories worthmentioning. So, you know, we just thought all of that combined and he hasa a super knowledge of restaurants. And he has. He has. He's gifted in the inthe area of recall. He can remember things that happened 30 years ago thathad have no other reason, but the fact that you know he experiences so he canrecall that. So he has amazing recall and and it really helps in thebroadcast to when he's doing the games he can recall stories he would callplayers. He can tell you what you did your first time out on the field,gusting, and it's it's an amazing talent, but it's also one, at least tosome funny stories. Oh, yeah, you know, I wanted to go back because you talkedabout the Bulls playing in a small gym. I mean, Phil, can you imagine NBAplayers today going to playing a little local gym like that? No. We findourselves talking about that quite frequently in in making comparisons.But that's all we knew at the time we played in. Roosevelt played a Dunbarmother. Where else? Spingarn High School? Yeah, yeah, I mean, we we would.I mean, each year it seemed like the league would change, and that wasfinally and Dusty's were hot. Jim's no air condition. It was in the heat ofthe summer. And but that's what we're used to. Now these guys go off to Vegasfor summer league and air condition. Beautiful arenas. So when they're notpracticing, obviously they have access to the city of Las Vegas. And, uh,sometimes that probably leads to trouble. Yeah, well, we've all heardthe James Harden stories, right? So what would kind of shape that thereferees have to be in that these old Jim's? Well, listen, this wasn't the itwas fun and it was good, but it wasn't the NBA. Having said that, several ofthe guys that I worked with in this Urban Coalition league went on to bevery prominent NBA referees. Lou Grillo, Joe Forte. Uh, there were a few others,and these were guys that back then they were doing college basketball games.They weren't in the NBA, and and and both Liu and Zhou became very prominentcollege basketball referees. I know Joe Forte refereed the, uh, the N C doubleA championship game. That was the Jim Valvano game, the N C State win. Uh,and he was very prominent, and they went on to become really well known andand great NBA refs. And so what kind of shape were we in? I don't know if I wasin any kind of shape, but we we would run around in that hot Jim and you hadto be in a little bit of shape because it was one time when I called a foul atthe end of the game. Uh, on on. I called it on landing Elmore, who wasplaying for the Maryland team, and they were playing the Bullets team that hadfilled and truck Robinson. And, you know, some of these guys on the team.And when I called the foul truck went to the line and made two free throws towin the game. And Len Elmore just about chased me out of the gymnasium, so torun away. But it was It was a great...

...experience for me. I think the playershad fun, you know? Look, these guys like to play basketball, man. And likelike Phil said, they didn't care that they weren't, you know, they justwanted to get out and play. Now, now the games are a little more structured.We have even some of the outdoor facilities here in D. C are a littlenicer and all. But back then, that's where you want to play basketball. Andeverybody wanted to play. Yeah, no, that's that. Those are great stories.So let's get to the how you guys got here from when you were kids, right?Phil? You grew up in Berkeley. You went you went to the University ofCalifornia. Tell me about the first time where you fell in love with sports.Because I'm assuming you played multiple sports when you were growingup and you probably had a great neighborhood where everybody wentoutside. Like I was telling something. Our parents never let us in the houseuntil that whistle blew at night, right? You had to be outside playing. It's alot different than today. So tell me about that, Phil. Yeah. I grew up inBerkeley, uh, fairly small community, right next to Oakland. And, uh, Istarted off playing Little League baseball. That was my first sport, Uh,that I loved Big Willie Mays fans. Of course, the Giants had just moved toSan Francisco. So, uh, and I was doing quite well there. Uh, but it was in myjunior high year. I had a teacher, and, you know, this is a longer story,really. But he just kind of took a liking to me. He took a, um he just sawsomething in me. And this was after the basketball season. We played eighthgrade basketball, and I was walking through the gym and he pulled me overand said, Hey, you know, I think you can work on your games. Um, let me showyou something. He took me out, Uh, he started me using to use my left hand,and he gave me the mic and drill, which is a big part of fundamental drills andcoaching clinics will show you to do, And I always remembered that, but healso worked on a lot of other things Jazz step using your dribble, thingsthat later on and after I really started playing at a high level incollege and pros, you know, I'm reflecting back to these lessons thathe taught me are these skills that he gave me and these concepts that Iincorporated into my game and they just became, uh, you know, just a naturalpart of how I played. And that's when I started to make the transition tobasketball. That was the same year I went to a high school tournament. Uh,they called it the TLC Tournament of Champions in the Bay Area, and, uh, theschool that I would eventually go to play my climates High school. Myclimates is a school in Oakland that had put out players like Bill Russellmade up Ensign Frank Robinson, Um, Joe Ellis, Paul Silas, uh, number of theycalled the School of Champions. And it was a great game. I loved it. I got soexcited and I went out between that and this guy down, door lag, telling meabout, you know, working with my skills, that's all I want to do. And I would goto the school grounds and play. I would go to the park and plays. If nobody wasthere, I would just use my imagination and play. So, you know, I starteddeveloping rather quickly, and by the time I got into the 10th grade in highschool, I started playing varsity right away. And, you know, I just continuedto grow and develop, but But I just love playing. I love the competitionthat I had, Um, and I like the idea of being considered one of the best, sothat that attitude just kind of stuck with me. I ended up choosing CalBerkeley because they had a couple of other players, uh, from other areasthat were, uh, top notch players.

Charlie Johnson was one he went to. Hegrew up just down the road in Palo Alto. Another guy by name of Jackie rituals.And then, uh, Agent Lee Truitt, who played in San Francisco. So the four ofus went to Cal thinking we were gonna unseat U C L. A. Didn't happen. Butwhat? What a great experience I had at Cal Berkeley, Not just on the court,but off the court. Always had some kind of political issue that was going on.It just forced you to be socially aware of what was going on. Uh, you know, yougo up and walk up and down Telegraph Avenue. I took Buck up there a coupleof times. Uh, he saw the higher Christmas and the hippies up there.Gosh, I don't know. You know that. Yeah. He was a hippie, too, right? It's a funexperience. It really was. Well, I have a good friend who went to Berkeley.Mike Silver, who writes for, uh with the NFL Network used to write forSports Illustrated. All that and we talk all the time, and I have to hearso many stories, right. I have to hear so many stories about it, So Iunderstand a lot of that. And so we seem to put out a bunch of greatfootball, especially quarterbacks. But we can't ever go to the Provo. Up tothe, uh, to promote the Rose Bowl was a game that we used to go to back in theseventies. Oh, yeah, it was always the Big 10 in the in the pack. Eight orNazi? What's back? 12. 13? Whatever it is, Yeah, it just keeps growing andjust keep getting rid of more places and growing a couple of the big. That'sthe only way you can play for the national championship if you join oneof these Big five, right? So, you know, which is kind of which kind of sad. So,Steve, tell me about you. You're growing up and you're a D. C. Guy. Imean, you know, you didn't leave home either. The furthest you went was JamesMadison in Atlanta. You know, after you graduated from James Madison, I knowyou went down there for a little bit, but tell me about growing up becauseI've had a lot of these conversations with people in your field of work whatyou've done. But there's always a start somewhere or somebody or as a familywas in an idol. What was that? Start Few of how you fell in love with sports.Yeah, I mean, I guess you have to go way back us. I mean, I my father played,played football in high school. Interestingly enough, he went to highschool at Roosevelt High School, and he was a pretty good football player. Then,uh, his gym teacher was read our back. And, uh, just ahead of him was BowieKuhn, who was, you know, commissioner of major league baseball for a longtime. So he played football in Roosevelt and and and, I don't know, Iguess sports just kind of naturally was in my genes in some fashion, but itreally began to blossom. You know, he had he had season tickets to theRedskins. He had him since 1937 Gus. Well, when they when they were here andthey played at Griffith Stadium before any of us were around and he used totell me the story, he loved to tell me the story that as a kid, I guess he wasmaybe 15 or 16. He managed to get a season ticket to the Redskins games.Well, back then they played six home games, and he would tell me that aseason ticket back then cost $6.60 our 10/1000 game a ticket, and we've hadthose season tickets ever since. And, um, so you know, I got thrust intobeing. Not at that price, though. I know it's a little, uh, charges you alittle bit more now. Yeah, and he takes your money real early so that he can.There's there's slightly less people in the stands to kidding. No kidding, Gus.So, um, I got into that and then also really basketball. Um, we had some somefamily friends who were were part owners of the of the Bullets of felonyMerle Foreman, who passed away. But he was big in sports, and he, along with aPoland, um, you know, bought the...

...bullets and brought them to Baltimorein 1967. And so that's when I first started, you know, going to those gamesbecause of this fellow Earl Foreman. And I was friendly with his sons andall of that, so my parents would drive us to the Baltimore Civic center to seethem play. And that's when I first saw Earl Monroe and Gus Johnson and what'sUnsettled and Kevin Lottery and Jack Maron and Don OHL and all these greatold Bullets players. And then eventually, obviously, Phil came. Butthis was a little later. I was in college when Phil came, and so this was19. I was in college. You graduated 77 from Madison, but that's when I gotinto to sports and following sports. But what was interesting to us is thatit all kind of mesh meshed with television. Um, I would watch the newsevery night and I mean, I was a junkie. I would watch the news, and we had asportscaster here in Washington when I was growing up, a fellow named WarnerWolfe who was very famous. And in fact, if you Google him and go back and someof your viewers and listeners should probably do this, he really he startedwhat everything you see on TV. Chris Berman is basically a Warner Wolfeclone, and Carmen watched Warner Wolf when Warner left D. C and went to NewYork. And what you see on ESPN and some of these other sports channels in someway, shape or form. These guys are doing Warner Wolf. He's the first onethat started, you know? Hey, get out of here. You know, boom of the week andall this stuff. And he became legendary, and I used to watch him and all theother sports guys in town right up until the fact when I got my first jobin TV, which was in 77 down in Harrisonburg, I was watching the localsports guys here, Glenn Brenner, who was the best I've ever seen. Um uh, youknow, George, Michael eventually was here also, But we had a guy named NickCharles who was a great sportscaster. He passed away, but he was fabulous. Wehad a bunch of them in D. C. So that's sort of how I, you know, I knew I wasgoing to go to college to get into broadcasting. I applied at AU AmericanUniversity, James Madison, which back then was Madison College and theUniversity of Miami in Florida. Got accepted at all three, which was thatwould never happen today. And and I ended up going to Miami, actually, fora semester, and it was so I couldn't get into the campus radio station. Andit was just crazy. When I transferred to Madison and I played football inhigh school and I was a kicker. I was pretty good. In fact, I'll show youthis. I keep this in my office. This is my square toed. Oh, yeah. This is thesame shoe that Mark Moseley had when he kicked with the Redskins. And back then,Gus, A lot of your listeners and viewers won't know this, but kickersdid not kick soccer style. There were no soccer style kickers back then and,you know, discuss. But everybody was a straight on kicker. Mosley. GeorgeBlanda obviously was one of the best ever. I was in high school, too. Yeah,you were, too. So I did that, and my my high school football coach had thengone to James Madison to be an offensive line coach, and he helped metransfer from Miami to Madison, thinking that I would come there as apunter to and I was pretty decent punter. And, you know, I was thinkingthat I would punch at Madison. So I got there to Madison and I never I wanted Iwent right to the campus radio station. And that's how I got into sports there.So I worked there at the campus station. Does that look familiar? Yes, it does.Ladies and gentlemen, that's uh huh. Spring of 74. Yeah, I didn't. 27.Uh, yeah. You feel like that's my...

...favorite part of the little blood. Alittle stash? Yeah. Oh, my God, That's horrifying. Then TV in Harrisonburg andfrom Harrisonburg. I went to Chattanooga from Chattanooga toNashville from Nashville to Atlanta and then from Atlanta to D. C. And I cameup here in D. C. In 1984 worked at the Fox stations for 14 years, did a lot offreelance play by play. Did I did Navy football for seven years on the radio.I did some NFL on Fox games. A lot of college basketball filled in for agreat play by play guy that did the Bullets named Mel Proctor. And that'show I got into doing the bullets games. 1996 97. He was. He had left to go toSan Diego Padres baseball and I had done some fill in for him and I hadworked with Bill C near you know, on those filling games and that lastseason I filled in for the last 20 games with another fellow named DaveJohnson. We alternated and he does the radio now. And the following year waswhen I got the Bullets job and I left Channel five. So I did 14 years ofChannel five covering the Redskins, obviously, and you and then, um, in 97the year you went to the Pro Bowl, I I left five to go do the bullets and didthat for 2022 years, 20 with Phil and two with Carol often. So that's how Igot into it. And it started way back as a young Bullets fan, covering or notcovering the team but watching the team when they were in Baltimore. Well, youknow, that's amazing because, you know, I look at like, Phil. He grew up inCalifornia. He probably would have loved to play for, you know,professionally for one of those teams out there. I always look at myself. Igrew up in Pittsburgh. I'm here now. I would have loved to play for theSteelers that never happened for me. And there you are. You get to come homeand do what you do. Yeah, and and you And then you're falling. Everybody youlove, you know, like my number 12. My whole career because of Terry Bradshaw,right? Phil, I'm sure you you had some idols growing up that you were sayingabout We were talking about like I had that, You know, I always wanted to playfor the Steelers, and I grew up watching them in the seventies, youknow? And it was just something I wanted to be home. But you were sayingabout California that necessarily that might not have been the case for you.Oh, yeah. I was saying that at that time, numbers didn't I mean, again, Iwas a big Willie Mays fan. So number 24 was kind of like 23 is today, right?Right? Yeah, definitely. You know, And then the other thing you got to thinkabout, especially in high school, and probably at that time, even in college.But I know in high school you had limited numbers. It was like, how manyplayers did you have? 12. So the numbers were one through 12. You reallydidn't have a whole lot of selection, right? Even when I came to the bullets,you know, I was just given number 45. I've worn in high school. I've worn 30in college. I wore 31. Um, and that's just by chance that that's the number Iwas given. So when I came here and with the bullets, they didn't ask me. Evenwhat number do you want? That gave me 45 I was just happy to have a uniform.Whatever number they gave me, they gave me a triple digit number. I'd have beenhappy with that. So But today, obviously, things are a lot different.Guys are a lot more selective. They're a little bit more superstitious aboutnumbers and all that. So it does come into play. And then, of course, whenyou look down the line, you're talking about packaging. You're talking aboutbranding yourself. That number is a big part of players brain. Oh, it's It'shuge. Now the Jersey sales alone people make people a ton of money. So when youleft California, I mean, you're playing for University of California. You getdrafted by Baltimore. Here's the West Coast guy coming to the East Coast inBaltimore and D C area. You know, major areas that's completely different thanCalifornia. Did you take you some time...

...to, you know, kind of transition to adifferent. I mean, it's a different lifestyle. That's a real good question.Uh, Gus and I didn't I didn't have the time to make adjustments because I cameout a year earlier. That was the first year the NBA established what theycalled the hardship case. That was the first year the NBA allowedunderclassmen to be eligible. Before then, you had to wait four years afteryour high school class. So but what was happening was the NBA was losingplayers to the A B A. And, uh, they said, Look, we we better get in on thispackage. Plus, there was already the Spencer Haywood lawsuit that was comingat them that I think they saw that it was just a matter of time they weregoing to lose that case. So they jumped on this, Um, I decided I wanted to takeadvantage of it. I have been part of the pan American trials in, um um inColorado, Colorado Springs and did well. I got a lot of notoriety there fortheir number of teams that were interested in me. So I came out a yearearly, but because it was so I don't want to say dysfunctional. But it wasIt was so new that the NBA didn't know how to handle it. So what they ended updoing was they had a subsequent draft after the regular draft, and this draftwas like in I want to say in August. So, you know, you got drafted and you had,you know? I mean, the season was getting ready because at that point westarted training camp in September back then and so I didn't have no time. Plus,I was supposed to be drafted by the Chicago Bulls. Something happened. Well,Bob Perry tells the story. He liked what he saw, but he wasn't one of theguys that that got, uh, got in touch with my agents, and so they were notaware of the bullets being interested in me. I was supposed to go to Chicagolike I said so now were thrown back again because I have to have a contractnegotiated before I go to camp. So by the time they negotiate a contract andwe signed, it's a week before the season. So I come into camp. You werelike it was the coach, and I mean, they were still doing double days. They do.At that point, they did double days for for 28 days. And, uh so those last fivedays, I came in and I had to do double days. I was I was tired of going out.Put it that way. Oh, no, no, no. So and And that was when they had Earl Monroe,they had, uh, uh, Kevin LA Cree Freddie Starter. Um and so they Within thefirst day or two, they made the trade to bring Archie Clark in, and theytraded Kevin, Low Calorie and Freddie Carter. And then Earl decided that hewas going to go. He played a game or two, and then he went AWOL. He wantedto be traded. He wanted a new contract. So that opened the door for me. Allthree of those guys were gone, and for a couple of games, Archie even held out.So I think we had a starting backcourt of myself and Rich Rinaldi. And, uh,you know, we we have fun, Jack and those shots up because, well, it'sfunny. I was reading one of your cards. I don't know what year it was, but itsaid I like reading the back of the card because they have little snippetsof people, right? And it said in the back it had a little like they drew alittle guy on there shooting the ball, and they said, uh, Phil Shamir has thebest shot in the NBA. So I was like, That's awesome. Like if they're sayingthat on the back of the card that he...

...did and we compare it, you know, whenwe were doing the games, you know Bradley Beal, who has a again, aperfect jump shot. We would often compare Bradley Beal's shot to Phil'sbecause, you know, we we referred to it as just the sweetest jumper you eversaw because it was perfectly, uh, you know, shoulders were square straight up,follow through, just like Bill and Phil had that shot man, and nobody had aprettier jump shots and filled it. I bet fills left hand was way betterthough. Yeah. So, Steve, you know, you grew up in inD. C. And you got to, like, watch all these teams, and then all of a sudden,you're talking about all these teams and your sportscaster for all of them,and it's got to be kind of like a dream come true. Like any kid you think back.I'm sure you You go back and you have all these thoughts about when you weregrowing up. And now I get to meet these guys. Now I get to talk to him. I getto go and interview them and do all these things. Um, were you kind of like, uh, I was thereone team that you really wanted to do? I know you did the n b A. And you didan outstanding job with the Wizards forever. But, like, was there anybodylike was there a favorite team? Was basketball is your favorite? Was thatfootball? Was that baseball? What did you really want to do when you wereyoung? Yeah. I mean, first of August, that you brought up a really goodbecause in our business, you know the news business or we did the sports onthe news every night. Um, and I did that at five different stations in fivedifferent cities. I met all those cities. So very rarely are you born andraised in a place where you get to go back to as you said to do the news. Uh,you know, you don't find a lot of you find more now than you used to. Youused to have to travel around to all those small places. Like I went toChattanooga and Nashville and then Atlanta, Big City. And before you couldget to a big market like Washington, which happens to be the news capital ofthe world. So I was fortunate to be able to be born and raised here andthen do TV here. And that doesn't happen to a lot of folks. Um, and andso when I came back here, obviously. Listen, I had worked in Atlanta for 3.5years, so I became a falcon fan, and, you know, Yeah, As you know, Gus, youinteract with these players, you become friendly with them. So a lot of mybuddies were in Atlanta where, you know, Tim Mazzetti is one of my closestfriends and he was there, Placekicker and Steve Bartkowski and WilliamAndrews. And you know all of these guys that played, you know, for the Falcons.And then I come to Washington and now I started developing relationships withguys Who again, and this is a great part about this business is that evenwhen you're out of it or you're done, you still have these relationships withguys like yourself. Very close friends on Jeff Bostic and Joe Jacoby and BabeLaufenberg. And you know all of these old Redskins, Donny Warren, These guysthat are still live here, You know Gary Clark, who went to James Madison, allthese dudes. So coming back here was a really great bonus for me. And it was,you know, like, you know, you almost have to pinch yourself because you'reright. As a kid, I'm growing up watching the bullets and the Redskins,okay? And and I don't know any of these guys. I'm a kid. I'm watching them andI'm a fan and then eventually wind up here doing sports, covering these teamsand getting to know these players. And like you said, it's you almost have topitch yourself. You know, sometimes Phil and I would be standing out on thecourt, get ready to do a game open, and I'm standing out there, first of allwith Phil, who was one of my favorite players ever. And, you know, I have topinch myself sometimes. Just because I knew I was standing next to fill, butthen sometimes he would pinch me, you know, just because he loved me, and Ibrought what's so cute? Um, that's the...

...public people knowledge about, uh, thepaper on the podcast. Yeah, and I'm standing there, you know? Listen, 2002,you know, Michael Jordan comes to play for the Wizards. Now I'm standing outthere and I'm thinking I'm you know, I'm standing out here and right next tome is the greatest player of all time. And, you know, we got to know MichaelJordan because of the situation we were in, and every once in a while I wouldjust kind of sit back and say, Damn, I'm I'm in an elevator with MichaelJordan, or I'm on a golf course or I'm at dinner or I'm a training camp orsomething and we're an interaction with him. It's like, This is unbelievable.So, um, there wasn't one sport. I mean, I love basketball. Obviously, I lovefootball, too, and I love doing by play for the Naval Academy that, you know,football play by play, especially on the radio. Yeah, we is, is, is almostthe most fun you can have now. Basketball play by play on the radio,which I've done a lot of, is also a lot of fun. I think radio play by play isalmost more fun than TV. They're two different animals. You know, you withTV, you're obviously you're looking at the game, so you don't have to calleverything. You get a chance to express yourself a little bit more with radioplay by. You have to paint a picture, obviously have to paint that picture sowell that people can visualize the game being played. Uh, so it's a little bitmore of a challenge, and to me it's a little bit more fun. But I love doingfootball. I love doing basketball. Those are my two real big loves.Obviously, golf is great. I've never really done golf on TV or anything, but,uh, you know. So that's what I enjoyed doing. And and to do it at a level likethe NFL on Fox, you know, the first game I did was a Redskin game 94. I didthe Redskins at Tampa Bay. My color guy was Meryl Hodge, who played for theSteelers, obviously, and the first play of the game, the very first play of thegame. To kick off, Brian Mitchell gets knocked unconscious by a guy namedTerrell Buckley, who hit him like right under the chin. And now I'm sitting uphere with this guy, Meryl Hodge, and the reason he's in the booth and notplaying because he suffered six concussions, right? We were able totalk about it, you know, really, at nausea and so doing, doing TV play byplay at that level for the NFL on Fox, that's That's a little differentbecause you've got, like, 50 people on site, and their whole job is to makethat broadcast perfect and make you look really good. And that's whatthey're trained to do. And so you get this. It's like playing on a team 52guys. Everybody's playing together to try to you know to protect you as aquarterback. So, um, that's a really I could have used a little more of thatwhen I was playing. Listen, you were You were the guy that ran into the, youknow, to the Ivy at the after the touchdown, too. So I wish there was Ivythere might have helped me. Yeah, I'd like to hear more about that. I'm sureyou've talked about that just But I'm sure you ask for another show. Really?Really? Yeah. So hey, everyone, we're talking with Steve, But cancer Filsonhere they have a new podcast out cut on the road with Bucket Phil. So, Phil,how long was it in the booth before you had to put Buck in his place? I knowyou started out, and you're like, Okay, this guy I've played this game buck at,You know what I mean? And and I know there's a point where you said allright, I gotta I gotta show Buck who's the boss here. To be totally honestwith you, I would refer because this was bucks live. This was bucks, right?Uh, career. This was something that he had prepared for for a very long time.It's interesting. That's the first time...

I heard the story about Buck with hisfootball. I always thought that always heard Buck tell me something aboutplaying baseball and I don't know where why you lied to me about playingbaseball football, but anyway, uh, So, uh, no. I would really depend on Buckfor guidance and input. And he was always very, very giving in that way.So I was appreciated that and we just had a very good friendship now where Iwould have to set it, set him straight, is outside of the arena. So there hehas. Like I said, he has these little idiosyncrasies and, uh, these littlepatterns, uh, where he has to have the best room. So one day I told him I hada sweet and he got upset. So he decided to come and see my sweet because Ididn't have a sweet I just told him that, but he was so start on havingwhat I had that he ran up to my room. I gave him a phony room and he ended upwaking up. Some 90 year old woman could have gotten thrown out of the hotel forthat. But, you know, he just you know, he's got to have these featheredpillows when he's when he goes to sleep. So those those are the things that thatsometimes you have to pull him aside and set him straight. But as far asduring the broadcast, I would really depend on him for guysbecause, like I said, he had a lot more experience than I did. I was. I was,you know, working my way. And as I had never done anything other than beinginterviewed as a player, so this was this was a whole new stratosphere forme and, uh, you know, like he said, I I worked with Mel Proctor for about thefirst nine or 10 years, and he was also excellent, very good. And then whenBuck came in, uh, it was like we didn't miss a beat. He stepped right in, andas book said, we knew each other from before. We had done some games beforethat I didn't really care for him as a referee. I thought he stunk in thatdepartment, but as a broadcaster, he's and a friend. Uh, I couldn't ask foranything more. It would let me straight just when I purported to know moreabout basketball than I really did. And I would offer my opinion, and Philwould just look at me and say, Well, I don't agree with that at all. I wouldthen have to defer to him because obviously he was the expert and Iwasn't. But we had a great relationship, a great friendship, and again, I thinkit showed, uh, in what we did. We continue to hear from fans about thefact that we had really good chemistry and they like what we did. We wouldboth still like to be doing games, but that wasn't our decision. So, uh, wecontinue this relationship through the podcast and before the pandemic, youknow, we get together and go to dinner with our wives and, uh, be on vacationtogether and whatever. So play golf when Phil was playing and all of thatstuff. So we've had a long, long time in a long term relationship for, uh,well, over 20 years, obviously. Yeah. No, I see that, but you know, it doestake a special relationship to be together for that long. In the boothcalling games. It's not like you guys are just, you know, the NFL. There's 16games basketball. There's so many games that you guys gotta call. You gotta beon the same page with each other. Um, so I mean, there does seem to be likethat special relationship, because you don't see it happen that often wheretwo guys stay together in the booth that long together because there isprobably sometimes that you know, no offense. You probably get a little sickof each other, but you guys probably seem to have such a good relationshipthat you can kind of work it out.

That's a that's a real good point in.But I think the fact that we we really like each other and we have a lot ofsimilarities that kind of bind us together, even off the basketball court.Um, keep in mind, I mean, we're traveling at that time, were travelingwith the team, so we're spending a lot of time together and we're getting toknow each other, and I get to know his moves and you know, he knows my moves.He knows that I have a I have a problem with punctuality and time, and I knowit upsets him. He's a heavy sleeper face, you know. He's a real happysleeper gush. In fact, I had to wake him up to tell him about the birth ofhis first grandchild. We were in Seattle we were staying at. I forgetwhich hotel. It was really nice. Hotel, obviously. You know, the league getsthe nicest hotels, and we had rooms across the hall from each other. And Iget a phone call at six o'clock in the morning, which is nine o'clock D C time.And it's his daughter and she says, Could you go wake up Phil? Because I'vecalled him and he doesn't hear the phone ringing, which in six inches fromhis head. So I gotta across the way I got a bathrobe on. I think I had abathroom on. I'm pounding on his hair. Was all this shoveled? He hadeverywhere and didn't take the lock off the door. I just opened the crackbecause he looked like a crazy man. Yeah, who is this guy coming on my door?I could fill Answer your phone. You just had a had a grant. Your firstgrandchild. So that's how that happens. So that's how close to this whole thinggets. But, you know, like I said before you and you're right because a lot ofguys change, whether it's the the the analysts, the color commentator or theplay by play guy. To find some two guys that have been together for that longis very unusual. Um, and the people that kept renewing our contracts eachyear for the longest time obviously thought we were good at what we did andhad a good chemistry and that people liked us, and we developed a goodfollowing around here until we finally got the one guy or the people thatdidn't think that and then that dissolved that partnership. But itlasted for 20 years, and we became good friends. And as you know, you know, youget to the point where you know somebody so well that you can you canfinish their sentences. There'd be times during a game or something wouldhappen, and we both knew that we weren't going to comment on it. But wewould look at each other and could read each other's minds and know exactlywhat we were both thinking, and, you know, and that happens on and off thecourt. But it was a real and even the guys we worked with you. It's a smallgroup, our producer or director or graphics guy. We traveled together fora lot of years. Like Phil said on the team plane, we'd sit in the samesection together. We stay at the same hotel, we go to dinners together, youget a camaraderie with that group of folks, and it's pretty cool. And, uh,and you get to know somebody very, very well. Yeah, we're standing golf. Bet.Well, listen, Phil, Phil, Phil was like a lot of athletes, Um, that play golf,Gus. Now, look, um, what's your handicap gusts? Are you playing? A lotin eight is an eight, so he's very good and for some reason, and Gus, maybe youcan help me with this. Why is it that so many quarterbacks seemed to be sogood? Now let me let me throw some names at you thighs. Mons. A prettygood golfer. He probably talks a better game than his actual golfer, but he's areally good talkers, shows a good golfer because He loves himself. Yeah,yeah. Um, Suzanne Humphries was a great golfer. Martin. Great golfer. All thesequarterbacks were great golfers. So, um,...

Phil, we and we played a lot. Like ifwe we would look at the schedule as soon as the NBA schedule came out inAugust. And when we saw a day off in Phoenix or L. A or Orlando or Miami, weknew we were bringing our sticks with us on the plane because we werearrangements to play golf and we played at some spectator. Did some greatcourses stop at What's the bet, though, is it? Who's paying for dinner? Is itthe beer? What is it, bucks? Too cheap to do that? We just had fun, Gus. Sweettime. But I feel like I love it. He would be one of these guys where if heconnected, you know, if he kept it in the fairway. It was a mile. He killed amile. But if he was errant, it was a mile in another county, you know? So weboth played kind of that way. I mean, neither one of us were like 18handicaps or whatever, but we had fun and we got to play these unbelievablygreat courses. And what was the course we played that that we drove to in PalmSprings that time of my buddy? That was a big horn. Remember? They used to havesomething called the Battle of Bighorn, where they light up after course andplay in the evening. But that was to me that was the most decadent golffacility I've ever seen, Gus. It was like playing in somebody's living room.There was a carpenter, and it was just phenomenal. You're almost afraid totake a divot. A guy with you, a four caddy. And he was picking up that divotand fixing it, you know, and the whole facilities to courses was just amazing.And then fill loved Riviera where they just had a tournament recently. Uh, andwhen we played there, Gus, uh, we played there a couple of times, and onetime when we played there are Caddy was Flip Wilson's son. Really, it washysteria. He was just like a spot there. And we're on the golf course, and ofcourse, he's pointing out all of these, um, famous all these movie stars thatlive on the course he say Mel Brooks lives there, and Michael Keaton livesthere. And, you know, um uh, Warren Beatty lives here, or Shirley Maclaine,whatever, brother and sister who happened to go to my high school inArlington. Uh And then So we're coming off the ninth t 1/9 green, and he says,Come here. I want to introduce you to somebody and we walk over and he says,This is Johnny Mathis was like, Holy shit. Wow. And then take another partof the course. And he says, This is Robbie Krieger, who was the leadguitarist of the Doors. He's introducing us to all these movie stars,and and so we feel. And I were privileged to be able to get on some ofthese courses and just, you know, look, it's like, you know, when you're aprofessional athlete, you get to do and see things that the normal fan oraverage person doesn't get to experience. You know, you we have thatprivilege. And, uh, we had that privilege for a lot of years to do thatkind of stuff. Yeah, I know. I love that I love, and that's what it has tobe like you guys have to spend that time together because if you went toplaces and you went 11 film and another, it wouldn't make it work in the booth.I don't think I think. And it got to the point where even if we didn't hangout with the other three guys in our group as I mentioned the producer, thedirector and the graphics guy, we hung out together. I mean, yeah, there werevery few times when we would get to a city like the first thing we do is pickup the phone and say, You know, when do you want to eat or where do you want togo? Or I would make reservations gusts, because if I didn't make reservations,we were eating it. I okay, right? Well, but he loves waffles, heard heroes that.But I knew the really good restaurants. And so, uh, and like I said that that,you know, we pick up the phone and said,...

What are you doing? The only time thatdidn't happen really was if we were going to San Francisco. Obviously, Philhad his family and and people in in Berkeley and and and there were timeswhen I go with him and meet people and and I got to know his friends reallywell and become good friendly friends with these people. But there were timeswhen he would see somebody or I'd be in a city. And I go, you know, meet mybuddy. I had a buddy to a couple of guys in San Francisco that are my closefriends. You know, my friend and I grew up here with you, Sattler and DaveFeldman, who did sports at Channel five and he's in San Francisco, and I wouldmeet these, you know, we meet them on the, you know, on the road somewhere.But for the most part, Phil and I were hanging out. Let me tell. The storyabout this is Gus. This is one of my favorite all time days. We happen tohave a great West Coast trip that we had three days off in the Bay area. Andnot just because I'm from there, but you know that that's a beautiful city.Beautiful area. So we're staying over. We were staying at the Four Seasons,right, But in San Francisco, in San Francisco. Yeah. And, uh, so I had areal good buddy. I rented a car and a real good buddy, Then Carry that livedover there on the Marine side and Buck had Steve Sadler that that he was with.And so he went off with Steve and it must've been about three or fouro'clock. I get a call and I picked up my buddy carry and we were right therein Sausalito and we were sitting down having a beer, looking across at SanFrancisco Bay Bridge, the East Bay, and I mean, it was a beautiful day. Blueskies. We're seeing the water. Alcatraz is out there and I mean, it was just anatural high. Excuse me, I get this call and it's Buck. He said. What areyou doing? I said, Man, we're in God's country. I'm sitting here looking atheaven and he said, Where are you? I said, We're in Sausalito. He said,Where about? I said, We're right on Main Street right there. And so he said,We'll be there in five minutes. I told him I told him the name of the bar thatwe were at because we were sitting outside. The next thing I know he andSteve Sattler pull up and we sit out there and watch the sunset, the four ofus having beers and talking. And but it was just one of those moments that Ijust I just never forget. It was just a beautiful time out there. And those arethe kind of things that we're talking about that we were always seem to beconnected. We'd like to play golf. We like sports. We like to go to musicalvenues. Uh, so, so many things, not just basketball that we're We'reattracted to that, Uh, you know, that we could could share together. And itjust made the relationship that much tighter. It was one of the situations,Gus, where you say to yourself, man, I can't believe they're paying me to dothis, right? Yeah, I've been to get it. So you guys go through this where youyou have this great experience for 20 years and you're calling the games. Andyou guys just talked about all the experiences you've had together. Nowit's over. What do you guys sit down? And how do you come up with startingthe podcast? Like, was it because you wanted to connect with the fans. Still,And you wanted to tell these stories that nobody's ever heard? Or is it justYou guys want to still hang out? Because we're buds and we love doingthis. All of those things got all those things. I mean, we talked about it fora while, you know, We you know, Look, first of all, I don't know about yoursituation, but we ain't getting rich from this, you know? I hear you look atmy studio. I c e o. So we were You know, we've we've been to dinner, you know,with our wives. And we, you know, we kept, you know, talking about thepossibility of doing this. And we knew why we wanted to do it. For the reasonsyou mentioned. We wanted to do it because it would give us a chance toget back together again. It would give...

...us a voice, even though who knew howmany people were actually listening. You know what the hell you never reallyknow, Uh, and and And also we thought, Listen, we've been at this a long time.I mean, I've been in this business for, like, 46 years, and Phil played for allthose years and he's been doing TV for a long, long time. And we thought toourselves, You know, what between the two roller Dex is that we have, whichyour listeners might have to look up. What a roller Dex is. Uh, we can comeup with some really good guests to make it, isn't it? This that's what a rollerDex is that it is now, Gus. Exactly. But I have an old role of checks in myoffice. So and and the other thing Gus to was and we and I said to fill,Listen, you know, listen, we got so many stories from being on the roadwith traveling with Michael Jordan and stuff that happened and I said thiswhen we first started, I said, Look, they used to tell us what happens onthe plane stays on the plane. True. Well, that statute of limitations is upnow, and you know, one of us is beholden to anybody. So we're tellingstories that you never heard of before and stuff that's really fun. And again,I think the fans appreciate it. So that's why we wanted to do they Wait,Buck, I got a question for you. You've been on an NFL plane. You've got twogames on on the when we charter flight. What is the difference between being onan team play in the NFL and a team play in the NBA? That's a good question. Nowagain, when I was obviously traveled on, first of all, when I was in Atlanta, wedid travel on the Falcons team plane. I don't recall being on a Redskin teamplaying very often, but, uh, you know, first of all, you got so many guys onthe football team that the planes filled with people on a basketballcharter you might have. There might be 40 people total, you know, maybe 30 35.You know you got 12 or 15 basketball players. You have coaches, you've gottrainers. There's a lot more now because of social media. You havedigital and all the back. When we first started, we didn't have that. We justhad the trainers, the equipment guys and the broadcasters of which therewere There were a total of five of us and the two radio guys. Um and I wouldsay this to dust the food on the basketball charters alot better than the football charters. Don't ask me why. Maybe the football,Maybe the basketball players, have a little more cachet. Maybe they can.Maybe they're They're C B A. Their collective bargaining agreement demandsa little bit better stuff. I know clearly with the hotels they stay in.They can only be in a four star hotel and nothing else. That's part of theiragreement. And we, of course road there, You know, coattails on that. But thedifference, Um, you know, that's about it. I mean, listen, of the four sportsthat I covered through all those years in the five different cities, the the the most, um, the most friendlyathletes that I dealt with. Of those four major sports, I would say we'rehockey players because they just there's such blue collar guys. Theycome to work, they do their job, they go home. Very few people actuallyrecognize who they are unless their name is the Budweiser drinkers. Exactly.Great guys, really nice dudes down to earth, that kind of thing. After that,I would say probably football players, because they're just a bunch of big.You know, guys that are having fun and and I enjoyed those relationships thenI would say basketball players who seem to be pretty intelligent and know whatthey were doing. And this that the other thing and the worst players Iever had to deal with were baseball players. Hands down. No doubt they were,you know, and my roommate in college was drafted by the Texas Rangers, and,you know, we were great. He was a great...

...friend, but But I have known thesebaseball players since high school, and they were a real clique ish group. Theydidn't like the media back then. Uh, I'm not sure a lot of athletes like themedia back then because they always thought we were trying to get them insome fashion. And I used to tell the guys, Listen, I'm here for, you know,fun stories and pretty pictures, and I'm not here to create controversy andmake you look bad. I would rather have fun with it. But baseball players seemto delight in, uh, you know, throwing towels interviews when we were doingstuff and they just, you know, having said that, the two nicest professionalathletes I ever met where baseball players Phil Niekro, who just passedaway, was one of the nicest man you'll ever meet. And Dale Murphy, who playedfor the Atlanta Braves, was nice. Nice dude. But at any rate, those were myrankings for the fourth sports. So your question began with what what betterteam plane is to be on. Ours was pretty sweet, man. We I would if I could letme jump in. I was gonna say, I guess that you know, these NBA plays planesare reconfigured for NBA teams. So you have basically about 50 seats. They'reall luxury seats. Of course, the 14 that they have a front for the players.Uh, most of those actually forward. Did you say up front? Yeah, that's wherethe players are in the middle section. You have the coaches where they havetheir tables and whatnot, and we have basically what amounts to first classseats. I mean, we have good spacing in between, but the point I'm getting atis you have far fewer people that the attendants have to deal with. So whenyou talk about the food that you know, as opposed to serving maybe a couple of100 at least. You know, with the players, the coaching staff, thetrainers and the equipment people of the press, it's got to be well over 100people for NBA player game, Uh, NFL flights. So now you're talking about,you know, a larger group that you have to get around and serve so with. Yeah.I mean, when I was a rookie, when I was a rookie, they put the rookies. Youweren't allowed to have a space in between your seats. Remember? One gamewe flew, I can't remember what game we flew to. I sat between Trey Johnson andJoe Patton. Oh, my God. Like I was like, our flight. I'm like this. I got to getout of this. I can't sit like those. Two dudes are £300 easy. So it was 3.50 protected. Yeah, this point is correct. Uh, so we you know, you get onthe plane. I mean, most people didn't never, never even heard this kind ofstuff, but it's sick. First of all, you pull up at Dulles Airport, and I knowthe skins flew out of there, too. You have your own private parking area andyou walk to the plane, which is maybe 100 yards from your car, so that before9 11, there was no security whatsoever. You just got gave him your bags you goton the plane. You get on the plane now. And depending on who was catering theplane, it could have been Morton's PF Chang's Cheesecake Factory. Whatever ithappened to be, you get on the plane and, like Phil said, we would go to oursection, which was the back. Everybody had their own first class seat. Nobodysat next to you and they had ordered is out or, you know, whatever. So you goto the back and you would get whatever that restaurant was serving. You know,if it was more, you get scallops wrapped can make crazy. It wasunbelievable. And and cheese trays and sandwiches and whatever you wanted todrink, we get any of that stuff while the plane was on the ground while youwere waiting for everybody to get going. So now they pack all that stuff up, youtake off. And once you got to altitude, then they came by with an actual mealservice like. So, Morton. They had filet. They had chicken, Christopher.They had always had some kind of fish. Then, like I said, they had all these,you know, big salad. And yeah, the best...

...male. Steve, the best meal I ever hadwas going to play the Raiders coming out. And there's just in and out.Burger is about 500. You can take as many as you want it. After you playedgraders, that was the best meal we ever had. The NFL. What? What? Hey, howabout the fact that with all this going and this is every trip, this is everytrip. How many times have we seen players get on with the McDonald's bagor a way for a price? Yeah, You got all these great food. So yeah. So tell mebefore we got to go here, tell me a little bit about your podcast and whypeople should listen to it and how our guests can find you guys. Well, listen,I'm not technologically savvy, Gus. So I just tell people Google on the roadwith bucking, filled I don't know about going to apple or Spotify or whatever,but if you Google on the road with bucking filled, you will find ourpodcast and then you click that on and you can listen to any one of theepisodes in our first season. We did. I want to say 26 episodes right throughthe NBA bubble in Orlando. Then we stopped for a few weeks to gatherourselves, and we picked it up again. You know, four or five weeks ago, Um, Iwould say, you know, you know, listen, if you want to hear stories like we'vebeen talking to you about stuff that fans never heard about hotels andrestaurants and players and things that went on in locker rooms and that kindof stuff And also for us, the guests that we've had I mentioned are rolling.Next. You know, we've had a fabulous guests or that that have made impactfulstatement. We had Mark Cuban on Gilbert Arenas, Earl Monroe, Sam Jones, ScottVan Pelt, Gus Johnson, Michael Wilbon Christine Brennan. Uh, David Aldridge.Uh, Eddie Jordan, all of these you know, we've had Brian Mitchell on. We've hadX Redskins and coaches and Gary Williams. I could go on and on and onof all these great people that we've had on, and each one of them, I think,has something really impactful to say. So for me it's a It's a combination ofstill, and I just telling stories and then doing these interviews with thesewith these people, Yeah, I think it's just an extension of, uh, you know,Buck covered it for the most part. But I think it's also just an extension ofthe two of us and and, you know, like Buck said, we've had a lot of peopleover the 23 22 years that we work together that, you know, reallyfollowed us and got to know us. Or at least from their perspective,perception perception, you know, no us pretty well. And you know, betweenthese stories between our opinion of current events and current sportingevents, for the most part, you know, they, you know, like to tune in. Andthat's what we try and do. And, um, you know, I constantly learn things. We hadDave Bing on the other day, and there was something that he said that I hadjust found out for the first time, and Dave Bing is very, very close friend ofmine, you know, So in, in in in this conversational format, you constantlyfind yourself, uh, hearing and learning new things. Like today. I really didn'tknow that Buck played football. I always thought it was a baseball thing.He never showed his shoe. Square shoe. You ought to bring that one back. Fuck,yeah. Look at that. We got to see some old time video that I know. There'ssome out there. I got some. Well, I don't know about video, Gus. Back thenit was film. There was no video, uh, black and white film. But I do havepictures of me kicking, which is kind of cool, but, uh, yeah, I don't knowhow you got that impression. So I I did play, you know, you know, baseball, youknow, little league and that kind of stuff, but never took it any further.So when I got to high school, I played junior high basketball. But then Irealized when I got to high school, I...

...was way too short and, you know,squatty to play that game. But I did manage to play football through highschool and and and and our high school had some great players who came out ofthere, including Jake Scott, who was Super Bowl M V. P. Played for theDolphins and the Redskins and went to my high school in Arlington. And we hada bunch of other players as well. Eric Sievers, who played for the um SanDiego send. Send the Chargers and they go charges and a bunch of guys. Butthat's what we did, Gus. And we just we like, you know, it's fun to do. Youknow, your podcast is great and it's a different format. And listen in thistime, this day and age with black lives matter and the social justice that work,we're all focusing on, we also get a chance to ask a lot of our, I guess,about that situation, and it's it's very enlightening. Let's put it thatway. So I think Phil and I have gleaned a lot from our guests, and, uh, it'skind of interesting. It's more than just sports really now. Yeah, no, that's probably stuff thatyou guys have always wanted to talk about. But you just can't do it on abroadcast, right that you bring these things out through your show that thatmeans something to you that you want to express. And, you know, if on Stationis gonna say no. Don't you know we don't want to go down that road? Mhm. What? What? What? What hit you here? Sothat that's that's great. And, uh, you know, I appreciate you sharing yourstories of your transitions through life about how sports helped you get towhere you guys are today. And it doesn't matter if you have a lot ofsports, it's going to lead you down the right path. And and obviously you guysare testament to that. And I appreciate you joining me today on how to up withGus. Thanks, man. I appreciate that. Listen, it was fun for me to cover youryour team's. Those were the Listen, those were some of the great oldRedskin days, You know, we call them the Washington football team now, butback then, when you guys played and all of those guys and the hogs and all Iwas, I was privileged to cover, you know, three Super Bowls and the JoeGibbs era, and that's something very special to me. And and the teamobviously since then hasn't done do well, but maybe they're on the righttrack. But those were beautiful days, man. Memories you can never take awayfrom me. And I know Phil has some of the same memories with his great teamsand a world championship. And the fact that we get to do it together again,even on this format is is a beautiful thing. So thanks for having us. Yeah.Thanks, Phil. Hey, Phil. And we got through without Buck picking his nose.So that was good thing. Give it time, I'm sure. Thanks. Thank you for joiningme on. Huddle up with Gus. Steve. Podcast. Phil. She near It was awesome.Everyone check out their podcast on the road with buck and fill. You canprobably find anywhere you can find mine. Um, if you wherever you listen toyour favorite podcast and then you also I want to thank you for joining me inthe 16. 31 digital news studio and thank you to sounder FM for for hostingme on their platform. Have a great day, everyone. And we'll see you next week. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanksfor joining in the fun at the 30 one Digital studios for another to huddleup with Gus, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Theron, Huddle Up withGus, is proudly produced by 16 30 one digital media and is available on Applemusic.

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