Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Steve Buckhantz and Phil Chenier

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me in the huddle this week is the Duo of Steve Buckhantz and Phil Chenier. They have recently started reliving some of the good ol' days on a new podcast they started. On the Road with Buck and Phil is a relaxing trip down memory lane. I would encourage any longtime fan to check it out! Phil and Steve talk to me about growing up and how they fell in love with sports. 

Steve was the longtime Washington Wizards play-by-play announcer and a Washington-area sports broadcaster who grew up in Virginia and went to James Madison University. Phil Chenier is a former professional basketball player, a guard in the NBA for ten seasons. Born and raised in Berkeley, California, Chenier graduated from Berkeley High School and played college basketball at the University of California in Berkeley. He was also a television sports broadcaster for the NBA's Washington Wizards.

Buckhantz and Chenier were the familiar faces and voices on Bullets and Wizards broadcasts from 1997 until 2017 when NBC Sports Washington announced Chenier would not return as the team's primary in-game analyst, a role he had for 33 years. While Chenier no longer calls games, he contributes to NBCSW's Wizards coverage. Buckhantz did play-by-play for several college basketball games last season and was working as the public address announcer for the XFL's D.C. Defenders when the novel Coronavirus pandemic postponed the season and ultimately caused the league to fold.

The friendship they have created over years of broadcasting Wizards games pulled them together again to tell their many stories in their podcast. Being able to interview them together gives us a glimpse into their friendship and the incredible journey they enjoyed. 

Thanks, Steve and Phil 

...welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup. Brian. Here, sports fans. Whether your game is on the gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, Mm hmm, mhm. Welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents' passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 100 and 14 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are. One. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios. It's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us with two left. Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle Up with Gus. I'm your host. Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFL quarterback. I'm here in the 16 31 digital news studio, but you know, as you can see another week of being in my daughter's bedroom, Uh, so, um, you know I want to thank 16 31 digital news for for helping me produce a show and putting it on there. New platform. And then also, I want to thank sounder FM. Big shout out to Tim Kelly and those guys for bringing me onto their platform. Really? Like what they're doing and how they're changing the world of technology and podcasting. So today's guests I have two on, So this is gonna be a great show. Uh uh, Phil Lanier, who was drafted into the NBA by the Baltimore Bullets back in 1971. Uh, and Phil, no offense, but that was the year I was born. I have to hear that from a lot of people I played with. So I finally get to say it to somebody else. But, you know, back in 71 3 time NBA All star, uh, just amazing basketball player will go into a little bit of that and then also, Steve bucket somebody I know from my times with, uh, you know, back in Washington, d c. Who covered me and And when I was playing and and, you know, Steve was pretty good. He said a lot of nice things about me. Surprisingly, um, you know, I just interviewed Michael Wilbon Steve And I was saying like, Man, I really don't like Tony Kornheiser with all that much, and he was really meaning me. But, Steve, you were always so nice to be. And, you know, Steve, you've been doing this for so long. You guys, you and Phil together, uh, did the Wizards, uh, while bullets, then the wizards games for, like, 20 years. What a what a crew you guys made. And and now you've taken this show on the road and now you to have your own podcast because on the road with bucking Phil and I think you guys do it because there's so many things you probably wanted to say on the air but never had the opportunity. And podcasting lets you bring out those stories that you probably always wanted to say. So Phil and Steve, thank you for joining me on Huddle up with Gus. How are you guys? You were great guys. And truthfully, we do it because we have nothing else to do. Gus, that's, uh, pretty much. We find ourselves walking around twiddling our thumbs, and, uh, seriously, um, you know, we work together, obviously for 20 years and I knew Phil even before that, I used to referee in a summer league in Washington. A basketball league. I heard you gave one of these. I am a technical. Yeah, you know, I'm deserving. Undeserving. Correct. Yeah, well, I don't even know if Gus wants us to say why you you deserve the technical foul. But be that as it may, that was back in the seventies, Gus, when we had this, uh, league here called the Urban Coalition League, which was a great league. And it was a summer league, and it was in in a gymnasium at Roosevelt High School, and it was a tiny gym, and it was small, and it was hot, but all these great players played it, and the Bullets had...

...a team in there still was on it. And, you know, we had a bunch of guys that were on the Bullets team truck Robinson and a lot of these guys have played. And, uh and I refereed. So that was the first time I ever met Phil. But who would have thought that? Let's see, That was 73. And then we started working together seriously in about 97. Who would have thought that that many years later, we'd be partners, and then we were for 20 years. So, uh, you know, we we've developed quite a relationship. Very close friendship, as you can imagine. Uh, because you can't work with somebody for 20 years and not be really good friends with him. It's just not gonna last. So it's been quite a relationship, but we carried it on with this podcast for a little bit of a reunion. Well, it's kind of funny, Phil, to get to know each other very intimately. Sometimes you know their idiosyncrasies. And I picked up on some of the Steve Buchholz traits, and they're they're very, you know, interesting and stories worth mentioning. So, you know, we just thought all of that combined and he has a a super knowledge of restaurants. And he has. He has. He's gifted in the in the area of recall. He can remember things that happened 30 years ago that had have no other reason, but the fact that you know he experiences so he can recall that. So he has amazing recall and and it really helps in the broadcast to when he's doing the games he can recall stories he would call players. He can tell you what you did your first time out on the field, gusting, and it's it's an amazing talent, but it's also one, at least to some funny stories. Oh, yeah, you know, I wanted to go back because you talked about the Bulls playing in a small gym. I mean, Phil, can you imagine NBA players today going to playing a little local gym like that? No. We find ourselves talking about that quite frequently in in making comparisons. But that's all we knew at the time we played in. Roosevelt played a Dunbar mother. Where else? Spingarn High School? Yeah, yeah, I mean, we we would. I mean, each year it seemed like the league would change, and that was finally and Dusty's were hot. Jim's no air condition. It was in the heat of the summer. And but that's what we're used to. Now these guys go off to Vegas for summer league and air condition. Beautiful arenas. So when they're not practicing, obviously they have access to the city of Las Vegas. And, uh, sometimes that probably leads to trouble. Yeah, well, we've all heard the James Harden stories, right? So what would kind of shape that the referees have to be in that these old Jim's? Well, listen, this wasn't the it was fun and it was good, but it wasn't the NBA. Having said that, several of the guys that I worked with in this Urban Coalition league went on to be very prominent NBA referees. Lou Grillo, Joe Forte. Uh, there were a few others, and these were guys that back then they were doing college basketball games. They weren't in the NBA, and and and both Liu and Zhou became very prominent college basketball referees. I know Joe Forte refereed the, uh, the N C double A championship game. That was the Jim Valvano game, the N C State win. Uh, and he was very prominent, and they went on to become really well known and and great NBA refs. And so what kind of shape were we in? I don't know if I was in any kind of shape, but we we would run around in that hot Jim and you had to be in a little bit of shape because it was one time when I called a foul at the end of the game. Uh, on on. I called it on landing Elmore, who was playing for the Maryland team, and they were playing the Bullets team that had filled and truck Robinson. And, you know, some of these guys on the team. And when I called the foul truck went to the line and made two free throws to win the game. And Len Elmore just about chased me out of the gymnasium, so to run away. But it was It was a great...

...experience for me. I think the players had fun, you know? Look, these guys like to play basketball, man. And like like Phil said, they didn't care that they weren't, you know, they just wanted to get out and play. Now, now the games are a little more structured. We have even some of the outdoor facilities here in D. C are a little nicer and all. But back then, that's where you want to play basketball. And everybody wanted to play. Yeah, no, that's that. Those are great stories. So let's get to the how you guys got here from when you were kids, right? Phil? You grew up in Berkeley. You went you went to the University of California. Tell me about the first time where you fell in love with sports. Because I'm assuming you played multiple sports when you were growing up and you probably had a great neighborhood where everybody went outside. Like I was telling something. Our parents never let us in the house until that whistle blew at night, right? You had to be outside playing. It's a lot different than today. So tell me about that, Phil. Yeah. I grew up in Berkeley, uh, fairly small community, right next to Oakland. And, uh, I started off playing Little League baseball. That was my first sport, Uh, that I loved Big Willie Mays fans. Of course, the Giants had just moved to San Francisco. So, uh, and I was doing quite well there. Uh, but it was in my junior high year. I had a teacher, and, you know, this is a longer story, really. But he just kind of took a liking to me. He took a, um he just saw something in me. And this was after the basketball season. We played eighth grade basketball, and I was walking through the gym and he pulled me over and said, Hey, you know, I think you can work on your games. Um, let me show you something. He took me out, Uh, he started me using to use my left hand, and he gave me the mic and drill, which is a big part of fundamental drills and coaching clinics will show you to do, And I always remembered that, but he also worked on a lot of other things Jazz step using your dribble, things that later on and after I really started playing at a high level in college and pros, you know, I'm reflecting back to these lessons that he taught me are these skills that he gave me and these concepts that I incorporated into my game and they just became, uh, you know, just a natural part of how I played. And that's when I started to make the transition to basketball. That was the same year I went to a high school tournament. Uh, they called it the TLC Tournament of Champions in the Bay Area, and, uh, the school that I would eventually go to play my climates High school. My climates is a school in Oakland that had put out players like Bill Russell made up Ensign Frank Robinson, Um, Joe Ellis, Paul Silas, uh, number of they called the School of Champions. And it was a great game. I loved it. I got so excited and I went out between that and this guy down, door lag, telling me about, you know, working with my skills, that's all I want to do. And I would go to the school grounds and play. I would go to the park and plays. If nobody was there, I would just use my imagination and play. So, you know, I started developing rather quickly, and by the time I got into the 10th grade in high school, I started playing varsity right away. And, you know, I just continued to grow and develop, but But I just love playing. I love the competition that I had, Um, and I like the idea of being considered one of the best, so that that attitude just kind of stuck with me. I ended up choosing Cal Berkeley because they had a couple of other players, uh, from other areas that were, uh, top notch players.

Charlie Johnson was one he went to. He grew up just down the road in Palo Alto. Another guy by name of Jackie rituals. And then, uh, Agent Lee Truitt, who played in San Francisco. So the four of us went to Cal thinking we were gonna unseat U C L. A. Didn't happen. But what? What a great experience I had at Cal Berkeley, Not just on the court, but off the court. Always had some kind of political issue that was going on. It just forced you to be socially aware of what was going on. Uh, you know, you go up and walk up and down Telegraph Avenue. I took Buck up there a couple of times. Uh, he saw the higher Christmas and the hippies up there. Gosh, I don't know. You know that. Yeah. He was a hippie, too, right? It's a fun experience. It really was. Well, I have a good friend who went to Berkeley. Mike Silver, who writes for, uh with the NFL Network used to write for Sports Illustrated. All that and we talk all the time, and I have to hear so many stories, right. I have to hear so many stories about it, So I understand a lot of that. And so we seem to put out a bunch of great football, especially quarterbacks. But we can't ever go to the Provo. Up to the, uh, to promote the Rose Bowl was a game that we used to go to back in the seventies. Oh, yeah, it was always the Big 10 in the in the pack. Eight or Nazi? What's back? 12. 13? Whatever it is, Yeah, it just keeps growing and just keep getting rid of more places and growing a couple of the big. That's the only way you can play for the national championship if you join one of these Big five, right? So, you know, which is kind of which kind of sad. So, Steve, tell me about you. You're growing up and you're a D. C. Guy. I mean, you know, you didn't leave home either. The furthest you went was James Madison in Atlanta. You know, after you graduated from James Madison, I know you went down there for a little bit, but tell me about growing up because I've had a lot of these conversations with people in your field of work what you've done. But there's always a start somewhere or somebody or as a family was in an idol. What was that? Start Few of how you fell in love with sports. Yeah, I mean, I guess you have to go way back us. I mean, I my father played, played football in high school. Interestingly enough, he went to high school at Roosevelt High School, and he was a pretty good football player. Then, uh, his gym teacher was read our back. And, uh, just ahead of him was Bowie Kuhn, who was, you know, commissioner of major league baseball for a long time. So he played football in Roosevelt and and and, I don't know, I guess sports just kind of naturally was in my genes in some fashion, but it really began to blossom. You know, he had he had season tickets to the Redskins. He had him since 1937 Gus. Well, when they when they were here and they played at Griffith Stadium before any of us were around and he used to tell me the story, he loved to tell me the story that as a kid, I guess he was maybe 15 or 16. He managed to get a season ticket to the Redskins games. Well, back then they played six home games, and he would tell me that a season ticket back then cost $6.60 our 10/1000 game a ticket, and we've had those season tickets ever since. And, um, so you know, I got thrust into being. Not at that price, though. I know it's a little, uh, charges you a little bit more now. Yeah, and he takes your money real early so that he can. There's there's slightly less people in the stands to kidding. No kidding, Gus. So, um, I got into that and then also really basketball. Um, we had some some family friends who were were part owners of the of the Bullets of felony Merle Foreman, who passed away. But he was big in sports, and he, along with a Poland, um, you know, bought the...

...bullets and brought them to Baltimore in 1967. And so that's when I first started, you know, going to those games because of this fellow Earl Foreman. And I was friendly with his sons and all of that, so my parents would drive us to the Baltimore Civic center to see them play. And that's when I first saw Earl Monroe and Gus Johnson and what's Unsettled and Kevin Lottery and Jack Maron and Don OHL and all these great old Bullets players. And then eventually, obviously, Phil came. But this was a little later. I was in college when Phil came, and so this was 19. I was in college. You graduated 77 from Madison, but that's when I got into to sports and following sports. But what was interesting to us is that it all kind of mesh meshed with television. Um, I would watch the news every night and I mean, I was a junkie. I would watch the news, and we had a sportscaster here in Washington when I was growing up, a fellow named Warner Wolfe who was very famous. And in fact, if you Google him and go back and some of your viewers and listeners should probably do this, he really he started what everything you see on TV. Chris Berman is basically a Warner Wolfe clone, and Carmen watched Warner Wolf when Warner left D. C and went to New York. And what you see on ESPN and some of these other sports channels in some way, shape or form. These guys are doing Warner Wolf. He's the first one that started, you know? Hey, get out of here. You know, boom of the week and all this stuff. And he became legendary, and I used to watch him and all the other sports guys in town right up until the fact when I got my first job in TV, which was in 77 down in Harrisonburg, I was watching the local sports guys here, Glenn Brenner, who was the best I've ever seen. Um uh, you know, George, Michael eventually was here also, But we had a guy named Nick Charles who was a great sportscaster. He passed away, but he was fabulous. We had a bunch of them in D. C. So that's sort of how I, you know, I knew I was going to go to college to get into broadcasting. I applied at AU American University, James Madison, which back then was Madison College and the University of Miami in Florida. Got accepted at all three, which was that would never happen today. And and I ended up going to Miami, actually, for a semester, and it was so I couldn't get into the campus radio station. And it was just crazy. When I transferred to Madison and I played football in high school and I was a kicker. I was pretty good. In fact, I'll show you this. I keep this in my office. This is my square toed. Oh, yeah. This is the same shoe that Mark Moseley had when he kicked with the Redskins. And back then, Gus, A lot of your listeners and viewers won't know this, but kickers did not kick soccer style. There were no soccer style kickers back then and, you know, discuss. But everybody was a straight on kicker. Mosley. George Blanda obviously was one of the best ever. I was in high school, too. Yeah, you were, too. So I did that, and my my high school football coach had then gone to James Madison to be an offensive line coach, and he helped me transfer from Miami to Madison, thinking that I would come there as a punter to and I was pretty decent punter. And, you know, I was thinking that I would punch at Madison. So I got there to Madison and I never I wanted I went right to the campus radio station. And that's how I got into sports there. So I worked there at the campus station. Does that look familiar? Yes, it does. Ladies and gentlemen, that's uh huh. Spring of 74. Yeah, I didn't. 27. Uh, yeah. You feel like that's my...

...favorite part of the little blood. A little stash? Yeah. Oh, my God, That's horrifying. Then TV in Harrisonburg and from Harrisonburg. I went to Chattanooga from Chattanooga to Nashville from Nashville to Atlanta and then from Atlanta to D. C. And I came up here in D. C. In 1984 worked at the Fox stations for 14 years, did a lot of freelance play by play. Did I did Navy football for seven years on the radio. I did some NFL on Fox games. A lot of college basketball filled in for a great play by play guy that did the Bullets named Mel Proctor. And that's how I got into doing the bullets games. 1996 97. He was. He had left to go to San Diego Padres baseball and I had done some fill in for him and I had worked with Bill C near you know, on those filling games and that last season I filled in for the last 20 games with another fellow named Dave Johnson. We alternated and he does the radio now. And the following year was when I got the Bullets job and I left Channel five. So I did 14 years of Channel five covering the Redskins, obviously, and you and then, um, in 97 the year you went to the Pro Bowl, I I left five to go do the bullets and did that for 2022 years, 20 with Phil and two with Carol often. So that's how I got into it. And it started way back as a young Bullets fan, covering or not covering the team but watching the team when they were in Baltimore. Well, you know, that's amazing because, you know, I look at like, Phil. He grew up in California. He probably would have loved to play for, you know, professionally for one of those teams out there. I always look at myself. I grew up in Pittsburgh. I'm here now. I would have loved to play for the Steelers that never happened for me. And there you are. You get to come home and do what you do. Yeah, and and you And then you're falling. Everybody you love, you know, like my number 12. My whole career because of Terry Bradshaw, right? Phil, I'm sure you you had some idols growing up that you were saying about We were talking about like I had that, You know, I always wanted to play for the Steelers, and I grew up watching them in the seventies, you know? And it was just something I wanted to be home. But you were saying about California that necessarily that might not have been the case for you. Oh, yeah. I was saying that at that time, numbers didn't I mean, again, I was a big Willie Mays fan. So number 24 was kind of like 23 is today, right? Right? Yeah, definitely. You know, And then the other thing you got to think about, especially in high school, and probably at that time, even in college. But I know in high school you had limited numbers. It was like, how many players did you have? 12. So the numbers were one through 12. You really didn't have a whole lot of selection, right? Even when I came to the bullets, you know, I was just given number 45. I've worn in high school. I've worn 30 in college. I wore 31. Um, and that's just by chance that that's the number I was given. So when I came here and with the bullets, they didn't ask me. Even what number do you want? That gave me 45 I was just happy to have a uniform. Whatever number they gave me, they gave me a triple digit number. I'd have been happy with that. So But today, obviously, things are a lot different. Guys are a lot more selective. They're a little bit more superstitious about numbers and all that. So it does come into play. And then, of course, when you look down the line, you're talking about packaging. You're talking about branding yourself. That number is a big part of players brain. Oh, it's It's huge. Now the Jersey sales alone people make people a ton of money. So when you left California, I mean, you're playing for University of California. You get drafted by Baltimore. Here's the West Coast guy coming to the East Coast in Baltimore and D C area. You know, major areas that's completely different than California. Did you take you some time...

...to, you know, kind of transition to a different. I mean, it's a different lifestyle. That's a real good question. Uh, Gus and I didn't I didn't have the time to make adjustments because I came out a year earlier. That was the first year the NBA established what they called the hardship case. That was the first year the NBA allowed underclassmen to be eligible. Before then, you had to wait four years after your high school class. So but what was happening was the NBA was losing players to the A B A. And, uh, they said, Look, we we better get in on this package. Plus, there was already the Spencer Haywood lawsuit that was coming at them that I think they saw that it was just a matter of time they were going to lose that case. So they jumped on this, Um, I decided I wanted to take advantage of it. I have been part of the pan American trials in, um um in Colorado, Colorado Springs and did well. I got a lot of notoriety there for their number of teams that were interested in me. So I came out a year early, but because it was so I don't want to say dysfunctional. But it was It was so new that the NBA didn't know how to handle it. So what they ended up doing was they had a subsequent draft after the regular draft, and this draft was like in I want to say in August. So, you know, you got drafted and you had, you know? I mean, the season was getting ready because at that point we started training camp in September back then and so I didn't have no time. Plus, I was supposed to be drafted by the Chicago Bulls. Something happened. Well, Bob Perry tells the story. He liked what he saw, but he wasn't one of the guys that that got, uh, got in touch with my agents, and so they were not aware of the bullets being interested in me. I was supposed to go to Chicago like I said so now were thrown back again because I have to have a contract negotiated before I go to camp. So by the time they negotiate a contract and we signed, it's a week before the season. So I come into camp. You were like it was the coach, and I mean, they were still doing double days. They do. At that point, they did double days for for 28 days. And, uh so those last five days, I came in and I had to do double days. I was I was tired of going out. Put it that way. Oh, no, no, no. So and And that was when they had Earl Monroe, they had, uh, uh, Kevin LA Cree Freddie Starter. Um and so they Within the first day or two, they made the trade to bring Archie Clark in, and they traded Kevin, Low Calorie and Freddie Carter. And then Earl decided that he was going to go. He played a game or two, and then he went AWOL. He wanted to be traded. He wanted a new contract. So that opened the door for me. All three of those guys were gone, and for a couple of games, Archie even held out. So I think we had a starting backcourt of myself and Rich Rinaldi. And, uh, you know, we we have fun, Jack and those shots up because, well, it's funny. I was reading one of your cards. I don't know what year it was, but it said I like reading the back of the card because they have little snippets of people, right? And it said in the back it had a little like they drew a little guy on there shooting the ball, and they said, uh, Phil Shamir has the best shot in the NBA. So I was like, That's awesome. Like if they're saying that on the back of the card that he...

...did and we compare it, you know, when we were doing the games, you know Bradley Beal, who has a again, a perfect jump shot. We would often compare Bradley Beal's shot to Phil's because, you know, we we referred to it as just the sweetest jumper you ever saw because it was perfectly, uh, you know, shoulders were square straight up, follow through, just like Bill and Phil had that shot man, and nobody had a prettier jump shots and filled it. I bet fills left hand was way better though. Yeah. So, Steve, you know, you grew up in in D. C. And you got to, like, watch all these teams, and then all of a sudden, you're talking about all these teams and your sportscaster for all of them, and it's got to be kind of like a dream come true. Like any kid you think back. I'm sure you You go back and you have all these thoughts about when you were growing up. And now I get to meet these guys. Now I get to talk to him. I get to go and interview them and do all these things. Um, were you kind of like, uh, I was there one team that you really wanted to do? I know you did the n b A. And you did an outstanding job with the Wizards forever. But, like, was there anybody like was there a favorite team? Was basketball is your favorite? Was that football? Was that baseball? What did you really want to do when you were young? Yeah. I mean, first of August, that you brought up a really good because in our business, you know the news business or we did the sports on the news every night. Um, and I did that at five different stations in five different cities. I met all those cities. So very rarely are you born and raised in a place where you get to go back to as you said to do the news. Uh, you know, you don't find a lot of you find more now than you used to. You used to have to travel around to all those small places. Like I went to Chattanooga and Nashville and then Atlanta, Big City. And before you could get to a big market like Washington, which happens to be the news capital of the world. So I was fortunate to be able to be born and raised here and then do TV here. And that doesn't happen to a lot of folks. Um, and and so when I came back here, obviously. Listen, I had worked in Atlanta for 3.5 years, so I became a falcon fan, and, you know, Yeah, As you know, Gus, you interact with these players, you become friendly with them. So a lot of my buddies were in Atlanta where, you know, Tim Mazzetti is one of my closest friends and he was there, Placekicker and Steve Bartkowski and William Andrews. And you know all of these guys that played, you know, for the Falcons. And then I come to Washington and now I started developing relationships with guys Who again, and this is a great part about this business is that even when you're out of it or you're done, you still have these relationships with guys like yourself. Very close friends on Jeff Bostic and Joe Jacoby and Babe Laufenberg. And you know all of these old Redskins, Donny Warren, These guys that are still live here, You know Gary Clark, who went to James Madison, all these dudes. So coming back here was a really great bonus for me. And it was, you know, like, you know, you almost have to pinch yourself because you're right. As a kid, I'm growing up watching the bullets and the Redskins, okay? And and I don't know any of these guys. I'm a kid. I'm watching them and I'm a fan and then eventually wind up here doing sports, covering these teams and getting to know these players. And like you said, it's you almost have to pitch yourself. You know, sometimes Phil and I would be standing out on the court, get ready to do a game open, and I'm standing out there, first of all with Phil, who was one of my favorite players ever. And, you know, I have to pinch myself sometimes. Just because I knew I was standing next to fill, but then sometimes he would pinch me, you know, just because he loved me, and I brought what's so cute? Um, that's the...

...public people knowledge about, uh, the paper on the podcast. Yeah, and I'm standing there, you know? Listen, 2002, you know, Michael Jordan comes to play for the Wizards. Now I'm standing out there and I'm thinking I'm you know, I'm standing out here and right next to me is the greatest player of all time. And, you know, we got to know Michael Jordan because of the situation we were in, and every once in a while I would just kind of sit back and say, Damn, I'm I'm in an elevator with Michael Jordan, or I'm on a golf course or I'm at dinner or I'm a training camp or something and we're an interaction with him. It's like, This is unbelievable. So, um, there wasn't one sport. I mean, I love basketball. Obviously, I love football, too, and I love doing by play for the Naval Academy that, you know, football play by play, especially on the radio. Yeah, we is, is, is almost the most fun you can have now. Basketball play by play on the radio, which I've done a lot of, is also a lot of fun. I think radio play by play is almost more fun than TV. They're two different animals. You know, you with TV, you're obviously you're looking at the game, so you don't have to call everything. You get a chance to express yourself a little bit more with radio play by. You have to paint a picture, obviously have to paint that picture so well that people can visualize the game being played. Uh, so it's a little bit more of a challenge, and to me it's a little bit more fun. But I love doing football. I love doing basketball. Those are my two real big loves. Obviously, golf is great. I've never really done golf on TV or anything, but, uh, you know. So that's what I enjoyed doing. And and to do it at a level like the NFL on Fox, you know, the first game I did was a Redskin game 94. I did the Redskins at Tampa Bay. My color guy was Meryl Hodge, who played for the Steelers, obviously, and the first play of the game, the very first play of the game. To kick off, Brian Mitchell gets knocked unconscious by a guy named Terrell Buckley, who hit him like right under the chin. And now I'm sitting up here with this guy, Meryl Hodge, and the reason he's in the booth and not playing because he suffered six concussions, right? We were able to talk about it, you know, really, at nausea and so doing, doing TV play by play at that level for the NFL on Fox, that's That's a little different because you've got, like, 50 people on site, and their whole job is to make that broadcast perfect and make you look really good. And that's what they're trained to do. And so you get this. It's like playing on a team 52 guys. Everybody's playing together to try to you know to protect you as a quarterback. So, um, that's a really I could have used a little more of that when I was playing. Listen, you were You were the guy that ran into the, you know, to the Ivy at the after the touchdown, too. So I wish there was Ivy there might have helped me. Yeah, I'd like to hear more about that. I'm sure you've talked about that just But I'm sure you ask for another show. Really? Really? Yeah. So hey, everyone, we're talking with Steve, But cancer Filson here they have a new podcast out cut on the road with Bucket Phil. So, Phil, how long was it in the booth before you had to put Buck in his place? I know you started out, and you're like, Okay, this guy I've played this game buck at, You know what I mean? And and I know there's a point where you said all right, I gotta I gotta show Buck who's the boss here. To be totally honest with you, I would refer because this was bucks live. This was bucks, right? Uh, career. This was something that he had prepared for for a very long time. It's interesting. That's the first time...

I heard the story about Buck with his football. I always thought that always heard Buck tell me something about playing baseball and I don't know where why you lied to me about playing baseball football, but anyway, uh, So, uh, no. I would really depend on Buck for guidance and input. And he was always very, very giving in that way. So I was appreciated that and we just had a very good friendship now where I would have to set it, set him straight, is outside of the arena. So there he has. Like I said, he has these little idiosyncrasies and, uh, these little patterns, uh, where he has to have the best room. So one day I told him I had a sweet and he got upset. So he decided to come and see my sweet because I didn't have a sweet I just told him that, but he was so start on having what I had that he ran up to my room. I gave him a phony room and he ended up waking up. Some 90 year old woman could have gotten thrown out of the hotel for that. But, you know, he just you know, he's got to have these feathered pillows when he's when he goes to sleep. So those those are the things that that sometimes you have to pull him aside and set him straight. But as far as during the broadcast, I would really depend on him for guys because, like I said, he had a lot more experience than I did. I was. I was, you know, working my way. And as I had never done anything other than being interviewed as a player, so this was this was a whole new stratosphere for me and, uh, you know, like he said, I I worked with Mel Proctor for about the first nine or 10 years, and he was also excellent, very good. And then when Buck came in, uh, it was like we didn't miss a beat. He stepped right in, and as book said, we knew each other from before. We had done some games before that I didn't really care for him as a referee. I thought he stunk in that department, but as a broadcaster, he's and a friend. Uh, I couldn't ask for anything more. It would let me straight just when I purported to know more about basketball than I really did. And I would offer my opinion, and Phil would just look at me and say, Well, I don't agree with that at all. I would then have to defer to him because obviously he was the expert and I wasn't. But we had a great relationship, a great friendship, and again, I think it showed, uh, in what we did. We continue to hear from fans about the fact that we had really good chemistry and they like what we did. We would both still like to be doing games, but that wasn't our decision. So, uh, we continue this relationship through the podcast and before the pandemic, you know, we get together and go to dinner with our wives and, uh, be on vacation together and whatever. So play golf when Phil was playing and all of that stuff. So we've had a long, long time in a long term relationship for, uh, well, over 20 years, obviously. Yeah. No, I see that, but you know, it does take a special relationship to be together for that long. In the booth calling games. It's not like you guys are just, you know, the NFL. There's 16 games basketball. There's so many games that you guys gotta call. You gotta be on the same page with each other. Um, so I mean, there does seem to be like that special relationship, because you don't see it happen that often where two guys stay together in the booth that long together because there is probably sometimes that you know, no offense. You probably get a little sick of each other, but you guys probably seem to have such a good relationship that you can kind of work it out.

That's a that's a real good point in. But I think the fact that we we really like each other and we have a lot of similarities that kind of bind us together, even off the basketball court. Um, keep in mind, I mean, we're traveling at that time, were traveling with the team, so we're spending a lot of time together and we're getting to know each other, and I get to know his moves and you know, he knows my moves. He knows that I have a I have a problem with punctuality and time, and I know it upsets him. He's a heavy sleeper face, you know. He's a real happy sleeper gush. In fact, I had to wake him up to tell him about the birth of his first grandchild. We were in Seattle we were staying at. I forget which hotel. It was really nice. Hotel, obviously. You know, the league gets the nicest hotels, and we had rooms across the hall from each other. And I get a phone call at six o'clock in the morning, which is nine o'clock D C time. And it's his daughter and she says, Could you go wake up Phil? Because I've called him and he doesn't hear the phone ringing, which in six inches from his head. So I gotta across the way I got a bathrobe on. I think I had a bathroom on. I'm pounding on his hair. Was all this shoveled? He had everywhere and didn't take the lock off the door. I just opened the crack because he looked like a crazy man. Yeah, who is this guy coming on my door? I could fill Answer your phone. You just had a had a grant. Your first grandchild. So that's how that happens. So that's how close to this whole thing gets. But, you know, like I said before you and you're right because a lot of guys change, whether it's the the the analysts, the color commentator or the play by play guy. To find some two guys that have been together for that long is very unusual. Um, and the people that kept renewing our contracts each year for the longest time obviously thought we were good at what we did and had a good chemistry and that people liked us, and we developed a good following around here until we finally got the one guy or the people that didn't think that and then that dissolved that partnership. But it lasted for 20 years, and we became good friends. And as you know, you know, you get to the point where you know somebody so well that you can you can finish their sentences. There'd be times during a game or something would happen, and we both knew that we weren't going to comment on it. But we would look at each other and could read each other's minds and know exactly what we were both thinking, and, you know, and that happens on and off the court. But it was a real and even the guys we worked with you. It's a small group, our producer or director or graphics guy. We traveled together for a lot of years. Like Phil said on the team plane, we'd sit in the same section together. We stay at the same hotel, we go to dinners together, you get a camaraderie with that group of folks, and it's pretty cool. And, uh, and you get to know somebody very, very well. Yeah, we're standing golf. Bet. Well, listen, Phil, Phil, Phil was like a lot of athletes, Um, that play golf, Gus. Now, look, um, what's your handicap gusts? Are you playing? A lot in eight is an eight, so he's very good and for some reason, and Gus, maybe you can help me with this. Why is it that so many quarterbacks seemed to be so good? Now let me let me throw some names at you thighs. Mons. A pretty good golfer. He probably talks a better game than his actual golfer, but he's a really good talkers, shows a good golfer because He loves himself. Yeah, yeah. Um, Suzanne Humphries was a great golfer. Martin. Great golfer. All these quarterbacks were great golfers. So, um,...

Phil, we and we played a lot. Like if we we would look at the schedule as soon as the NBA schedule came out in August. And when we saw a day off in Phoenix or L. A or Orlando or Miami, we knew we were bringing our sticks with us on the plane because we were arrangements to play golf and we played at some spectator. Did some great courses stop at What's the bet, though, is it? Who's paying for dinner? Is it the beer? What is it, bucks? Too cheap to do that? We just had fun, Gus. Sweet time. But I feel like I love it. He would be one of these guys where if he connected, you know, if he kept it in the fairway. It was a mile. He killed a mile. But if he was errant, it was a mile in another county, you know? So we both played kind of that way. I mean, neither one of us were like 18 handicaps or whatever, but we had fun and we got to play these unbelievably great courses. And what was the course we played that that we drove to in Palm Springs that time of my buddy? That was a big horn. Remember? They used to have something called the Battle of Bighorn, where they light up after course and play in the evening. But that was to me that was the most decadent golf facility I've ever seen, Gus. It was like playing in somebody's living room. There was a carpenter, and it was just phenomenal. You're almost afraid to take a divot. A guy with you, a four caddy. And he was picking up that divot and fixing it, you know, and the whole facilities to courses was just amazing. And then fill loved Riviera where they just had a tournament recently. Uh, and when we played there, Gus, uh, we played there a couple of times, and one time when we played there are Caddy was Flip Wilson's son. Really, it was hysteria. He was just like a spot there. And we're on the golf course, and of course, he's pointing out all of these, um, famous all these movie stars that live on the course he say Mel Brooks lives there, and Michael Keaton lives there. And, you know, um uh, Warren Beatty lives here, or Shirley Maclaine, whatever, brother and sister who happened to go to my high school in Arlington. Uh And then So we're coming off the ninth t 1/9 green, and he says, Come here. I want to introduce you to somebody and we walk over and he says, This is Johnny Mathis was like, Holy shit. Wow. And then take another part of the course. And he says, This is Robbie Krieger, who was the lead guitarist of the Doors. He's introducing us to all these movie stars, and and so we feel. And I were privileged to be able to get on some of these courses and just, you know, look, it's like, you know, when you're a professional athlete, you get to do and see things that the normal fan or average person doesn't get to experience. You know, you we have that privilege. And, uh, we had that privilege for a lot of years to do that kind of stuff. Yeah, I know. I love that I love, and that's what it has to be like you guys have to spend that time together because if you went to places and you went 11 film and another, it wouldn't make it work in the booth. I don't think I think. And it got to the point where even if we didn't hang out with the other three guys in our group as I mentioned the producer, the director and the graphics guy, we hung out together. I mean, yeah, there were very few times when we would get to a city like the first thing we do is pick up the phone and say, You know, when do you want to eat or where do you want to go? Or I would make reservations gusts, because if I didn't make reservations, we were eating it. I okay, right? Well, but he loves waffles, heard heroes that. But I knew the really good restaurants. And so, uh, and like I said that that, you know, we pick up the phone and said,...

What are you doing? The only time that didn't happen really was if we were going to San Francisco. Obviously, Phil had his family and and people in in Berkeley and and and there were times when I go with him and meet people and and I got to know his friends really well and become good friendly friends with these people. But there were times when he would see somebody or I'd be in a city. And I go, you know, meet my buddy. I had a buddy to a couple of guys in San Francisco that are my close friends. You know, my friend and I grew up here with you, Sattler and Dave Feldman, who did sports at Channel five and he's in San Francisco, and I would meet these, you know, we meet them on the, you know, on the road somewhere. But for the most part, Phil and I were hanging out. Let me tell. The story about this is Gus. This is one of my favorite all time days. We happen to have a great West Coast trip that we had three days off in the Bay area. And not just because I'm from there, but you know that that's a beautiful city. Beautiful area. So we're staying over. We were staying at the Four Seasons, right, But in San Francisco, in San Francisco. Yeah. And, uh, so I had a real good buddy. I rented a car and a real good buddy, Then Carry that lived over there on the Marine side and Buck had Steve Sadler that that he was with. And so he went off with Steve and it must've been about three or four o'clock. I get a call and I picked up my buddy carry and we were right there in Sausalito and we were sitting down having a beer, looking across at San Francisco Bay Bridge, the East Bay, and I mean, it was a beautiful day. Blue skies. We're seeing the water. Alcatraz is out there and I mean, it was just a natural high. Excuse me, I get this call and it's Buck. He said. What are you doing? I said, Man, we're in God's country. I'm sitting here looking at heaven and he said, Where are you? I said, We're in Sausalito. He said, Where about? I said, We're right on Main Street right there. And so he said, We'll be there in five minutes. I told him I told him the name of the bar that we were at because we were sitting outside. The next thing I know he and Steve Sattler pull up and we sit out there and watch the sunset, the four of us having beers and talking. And but it was just one of those moments that I just I just never forget. It was just a beautiful time out there. And those are the kind of things that we're talking about that we were always seem to be connected. We'd like to play golf. We like sports. We like to go to musical venues. Uh, so, so many things, not just basketball that we're We're attracted to that, Uh, you know, that we could could share together. And it just made the relationship that much tighter. It was one of the situations, Gus, where you say to yourself, man, I can't believe they're paying me to do this, right? Yeah, I've been to get it. So you guys go through this where you you have this great experience for 20 years and you're calling the games. And you guys just talked about all the experiences you've had together. Now it's over. What do you guys sit down? And how do you come up with starting the podcast? Like, was it because you wanted to connect with the fans. Still, And you wanted to tell these stories that nobody's ever heard? Or is it just You guys want to still hang out? Because we're buds and we love doing this. All of those things got all those things. I mean, we talked about it for a while, you know, We you know, Look, first of all, I don't know about your situation, but we ain't getting rich from this, you know? I hear you look at my studio. I c e o. So we were You know, we've we've been to dinner, you know, with our wives. And we, you know, we kept, you know, talking about the possibility of doing this. And we knew why we wanted to do it. For the reasons you mentioned. We wanted to do it because it would give us a chance to get back together again. It would give...

...us a voice, even though who knew how many people were actually listening. You know what the hell you never really know, Uh, and and And also we thought, Listen, we've been at this a long time. I mean, I've been in this business for, like, 46 years, and Phil played for all those years and he's been doing TV for a long, long time. And we thought to ourselves, You know, what between the two roller Dex is that we have, which your listeners might have to look up. What a roller Dex is. Uh, we can come up with some really good guests to make it, isn't it? This that's what a roller Dex is that it is now, Gus. Exactly. But I have an old role of checks in my office. So and and the other thing Gus to was and we and I said to fill, Listen, you know, listen, we got so many stories from being on the road with traveling with Michael Jordan and stuff that happened and I said this when we first started, I said, Look, they used to tell us what happens on the plane stays on the plane. True. Well, that statute of limitations is up now, and you know, one of us is beholden to anybody. So we're telling stories that you never heard of before and stuff that's really fun. And again, I think the fans appreciate it. So that's why we wanted to do they Wait, Buck, I got a question for you. You've been on an NFL plane. You've got two games on on the when we charter flight. What is the difference between being on an team play in the NFL and a team play in the NBA? That's a good question. Now again, when I was obviously traveled on, first of all, when I was in Atlanta, we did travel on the Falcons team plane. I don't recall being on a Redskin team playing very often, but, uh, you know, first of all, you got so many guys on the football team that the planes filled with people on a basketball charter you might have. There might be 40 people total, you know, maybe 30 35. You know you got 12 or 15 basketball players. You have coaches, you've got trainers. There's a lot more now because of social media. You have digital and all the back. When we first started, we didn't have that. We just had the trainers, the equipment guys and the broadcasters of which there were There were a total of five of us and the two radio guys. Um and I would say this to dust the food on the basketball charters a lot better than the football charters. Don't ask me why. Maybe the football, Maybe the basketball players, have a little more cachet. Maybe they can. Maybe they're They're C B A. Their collective bargaining agreement demands a little bit better stuff. I know clearly with the hotels they stay in. They can only be in a four star hotel and nothing else. That's part of their agreement. And we, of course road there, You know, coattails on that. But the difference, Um, you know, that's about it. I mean, listen, of the four sports that I covered through all those years in the five different cities, the the the most, um, the most friendly athletes that I dealt with. Of those four major sports, I would say we're hockey players because they just there's such blue collar guys. They come to work, they do their job, they go home. Very few people actually recognize who they are unless their name is the Budweiser drinkers. Exactly. Great guys, really nice dudes down to earth, that kind of thing. After that, I would say probably football players, because they're just a bunch of big. You know, guys that are having fun and and I enjoyed those relationships then I would say basketball players who seem to be pretty intelligent and know what they were doing. And this that the other thing and the worst players I ever had to deal with were baseball players. Hands down. No doubt they were, you know, and my roommate in college was drafted by the Texas Rangers, and, you know, we were great. He was a great...

...friend, but But I have known these baseball players since high school, and they were a real clique ish group. They didn't like the media back then. Uh, I'm not sure a lot of athletes like the media back then because they always thought we were trying to get them in some fashion. And I used to tell the guys, Listen, I'm here for, you know, fun stories and pretty pictures, and I'm not here to create controversy and make you look bad. I would rather have fun with it. But baseball players seem to delight in, uh, you know, throwing towels interviews when we were doing stuff and they just, you know, having said that, the two nicest professional athletes I ever met where baseball players Phil Niekro, who just passed away, was one of the nicest man you'll ever meet. And Dale Murphy, who played for the Atlanta Braves, was nice. Nice dude. But at any rate, those were my rankings for the fourth sports. So your question began with what what better team plane is to be on. Ours was pretty sweet, man. We I would if I could let me jump in. I was gonna say, I guess that you know, these NBA plays planes are reconfigured for NBA teams. So you have basically about 50 seats. They're all luxury seats. Of course, the 14 that they have a front for the players. Uh, most of those actually forward. Did you say up front? Yeah, that's where the players are in the middle section. You have the coaches where they have their tables and whatnot, and we have basically what amounts to first class seats. I mean, we have good spacing in between, but the point I'm getting at is you have far fewer people that the attendants have to deal with. So when you talk about the food that you know, as opposed to serving maybe a couple of 100 at least. You know, with the players, the coaching staff, the trainers and the equipment people of the press, it's got to be well over 100 people for NBA player game, Uh, NFL flights. So now you're talking about, you know, a larger group that you have to get around and serve so with. Yeah. I mean, when I was a rookie, when I was a rookie, they put the rookies. You weren't allowed to have a space in between your seats. Remember? One game we flew, I can't remember what game we flew to. I sat between Trey Johnson and Joe Patton. Oh, my God. Like I was like, our flight. I'm like this. I got to get out of this. I can't sit like those. Two dudes are £300 easy. So it was 3. 50 protected. Yeah, this point is correct. Uh, so we you know, you get on the plane. I mean, most people didn't never, never even heard this kind of stuff, but it's sick. First of all, you pull up at Dulles Airport, and I know the skins flew out of there, too. You have your own private parking area and you walk to the plane, which is maybe 100 yards from your car, so that before 9 11, there was no security whatsoever. You just got gave him your bags you got on the plane. You get on the plane now. And depending on who was catering the plane, it could have been Morton's PF Chang's Cheesecake Factory. Whatever it happened to be, you get on the plane and, like Phil said, we would go to our section, which was the back. Everybody had their own first class seat. Nobody sat next to you and they had ordered is out or, you know, whatever. So you go to the back and you would get whatever that restaurant was serving. You know, if it was more, you get scallops wrapped can make crazy. It was unbelievable. And and cheese trays and sandwiches and whatever you wanted to drink, we get any of that stuff while the plane was on the ground while you were waiting for everybody to get going. So now they pack all that stuff up, you take off. And once you got to altitude, then they came by with an actual meal service like. So, Morton. They had filet. They had chicken, Christopher. They had always had some kind of fish. Then, like I said, they had all these, you know, big salad. And yeah, the best...

...male. Steve, the best meal I ever had was going to play the Raiders coming out. And there's just in and out. Burger is about 500. You can take as many as you want it. After you played graders, that was the best meal we ever had. The NFL. What? What? Hey, how about the fact that with all this going and this is every trip, this is every trip. How many times have we seen players get on with the McDonald's bag or a way for a price? Yeah, You got all these great food. So yeah. So tell me before we got to go here, tell me a little bit about your podcast and why people should listen to it and how our guests can find you guys. Well, listen, I'm not technologically savvy, Gus. So I just tell people Google on the road with bucking, filled I don't know about going to apple or Spotify or whatever, but if you Google on the road with bucking filled, you will find our podcast and then you click that on and you can listen to any one of the episodes in our first season. We did. I want to say 26 episodes right through the NBA bubble in Orlando. Then we stopped for a few weeks to gather ourselves, and we picked it up again. You know, four or five weeks ago, Um, I would say, you know, you know, listen, if you want to hear stories like we've been talking to you about stuff that fans never heard about hotels and restaurants and players and things that went on in locker rooms and that kind of stuff And also for us, the guests that we've had I mentioned are rolling. Next. You know, we've had a fabulous guests or that that have made impactful statement. We had Mark Cuban on Gilbert Arenas, Earl Monroe, Sam Jones, Scott Van Pelt, Gus Johnson, Michael Wilbon Christine Brennan. Uh, David Aldridge. Uh, Eddie Jordan, all of these you know, we've had Brian Mitchell on. We've had X Redskins and coaches and Gary Williams. I could go on and on and on of all these great people that we've had on, and each one of them, I think, has something really impactful to say. So for me it's a It's a combination of still, and I just telling stories and then doing these interviews with these with these people, Yeah, I think it's just an extension of, uh, you know, Buck covered it for the most part. But I think it's also just an extension of the two of us and and, you know, like Buck said, we've had a lot of people over the 23 22 years that we work together that, you know, really followed us and got to know us. Or at least from their perspective, perception perception, you know, no us pretty well. And you know, between these stories between our opinion of current events and current sporting events, for the most part, you know, they, you know, like to tune in. And that's what we try and do. And, um, you know, I constantly learn things. We had Dave Bing on the other day, and there was something that he said that I had just found out for the first time, and Dave Bing is very, very close friend of mine, you know, So in, in in in this conversational format, you constantly find yourself, uh, hearing and learning new things. Like today. I really didn't know that Buck played football. I always thought it was a baseball thing. He never showed his shoe. Square shoe. You ought to bring that one back. Fuck, yeah. Look at that. We got to see some old time video that I know. There's some out there. I got some. Well, I don't know about video, Gus. Back then it was film. There was no video, uh, black and white film. But I do have pictures of me kicking, which is kind of cool, but, uh, yeah, I don't know how you got that impression. So I I did play, you know, you know, baseball, you know, little league and that kind of stuff, but never took it any further. So when I got to high school, I played junior high basketball. But then I realized when I got to high school, I...

...was way too short and, you know, squatty to play that game. But I did manage to play football through high school and and and and our high school had some great players who came out of there, including Jake Scott, who was Super Bowl M V. P. Played for the Dolphins and the Redskins and went to my high school in Arlington. And we had a bunch of other players as well. Eric Sievers, who played for the um San Diego send. Send the Chargers and they go charges and a bunch of guys. But that's what we did, Gus. And we just we like, you know, it's fun to do. You know, your podcast is great and it's a different format. And listen in this time, this day and age with black lives matter and the social justice that work, we're all focusing on, we also get a chance to ask a lot of our, I guess, about that situation, and it's it's very enlightening. Let's put it that way. So I think Phil and I have gleaned a lot from our guests, and, uh, it's kind of interesting. It's more than just sports really now. Yeah, no, that's probably stuff that you guys have always wanted to talk about. But you just can't do it on a broadcast, right that you bring these things out through your show that that means something to you that you want to express. And, you know, if on Station is gonna say no. Don't you know we don't want to go down that road? Mhm. What? What? What? What hit you here? So that that's that's great. And, uh, you know, I appreciate you sharing your stories of your transitions through life about how sports helped you get to where you guys are today. And it doesn't matter if you have a lot of sports, it's going to lead you down the right path. And and obviously you guys are testament to that. And I appreciate you joining me today on how to up with Gus. Thanks, man. I appreciate that. Listen, it was fun for me to cover your your team's. Those were the Listen, those were some of the great old Redskin days, You know, we call them the Washington football team now, but back then, when you guys played and all of those guys and the hogs and all I was, I was privileged to cover, you know, three Super Bowls and the Joe Gibbs era, and that's something very special to me. And and the team obviously since then hasn't done do well, but maybe they're on the right track. But those were beautiful days, man. Memories you can never take away from me. And I know Phil has some of the same memories with his great teams and a world championship. And the fact that we get to do it together again, even on this format is is a beautiful thing. So thanks for having us. Yeah. Thanks, Phil. Hey, Phil. And we got through without Buck picking his nose. So that was good thing. Give it time, I'm sure. Thanks. Thank you for joining me on. Huddle up with Gus. Steve. Podcast. Phil. She near It was awesome. Everyone check out their podcast on the road with buck and fill. You can probably find anywhere you can find mine. Um, if you wherever you listen to your favorite podcast and then you also I want to thank you for joining me in the 16. 31 digital news studio and thank you to sounder FM for for hosting me on their platform. Have a great day, everyone. And we'll see you next week. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 30 one Digital studios for another to huddle up with Gus, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus Theron, Huddle Up with Gus, is proudly produced by 16 30 one digital media and is available on Apple music.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (167)