Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Steve Lott

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Boxing, boxing, and boxing is in the topic in the huddle as Gus and Dave are joined by CEO of the Boxing Hall of Fame Steve Lott. The three also discuss Lott's time at ESPN Films were he helped edit such documentaries as the Thrilla in Manilla, one of the most famous boxing bouts of all-time. Want to learn more about one of the world's oldest combat sports? Join Gus and Dave in the huddle and listen to what Steve Lott has to say about Mike Tyson, Muhammad Ali, and Sugar Ray Robinson among many other elite boxers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with gusts, where we talked to our guests about how sports shape their life. I'm your host, Gust Farat, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top with the sports circus and ring master, soal look for us on Am TV, a a MP tvcom. Hello everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle off with Gusts. I'm your host, Gusts Frad, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar. Hey Gus, Dave, happy birthday. Just turned fifty. You look forty. Yeah, I don't know. It's the new forty nine, I heard so. So. Yeah. So, if you like our podcast, you can find us on RADIOCOM or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and you can also find us under the big top with sal the ring master, on the sports circus and am TV, on hotel television. Today, Dave, our guest is none other than Steve Lot. Steve has been associated with boxing for a long time and started the boxing all of fame, been involved with big fights inc and I'm really excited to really hear about his passion, how it started in boxing and everyone that he knows. I'm sure that there's a quite a few famous people in his phone that we're going to hear about. So, Steve, welcome to the show and thanks for joining us in a huddle. Thank you very much for having me. We'll be talking a little bit about boxing, the sport you guys know nothing about exactly. We have no idea. We're football guys at days, of Baseball Guy. But Steve, let's start with you. where. Where are you from? Where did you grow up? What was that first time you fell in love of sports? I knew nothing about sports at all until my uncle taught me to play a sport, hold handball. This is in the late s early S, and I became enamored with the sport of handball. It's like squash or racquetball, but use your hands and very big. In the s every wine see a head courts. Young kids played outdoors. In New York City there were thousands of one world courts in the parks. So back then a kid can walk right on a board and play ball. They did not have to join a club they do not have to pay for any athletic endeavor in any way, walk on the court and when they became good, if they had the interest, they went indoors to play handball in for world courts which were around the city, and that's got got me the interest in sports. But it was just handball. I knew nothing about baseball, football, basketball, even though I went to some of the Games. We got a chance to meet some of those great players. It was handball that got me involved in the sport of boxing because the world's champion was a man named Jim Jacobs and he was my coach and he had a company with Bill Katon that owned all the fight films. So from the late s early S, from the support of handball my coach having a boxing film company, I meandered into the boxing film world and that got me into boxing. That's all. Well, handball's probably the least amount of equipment you need of almost any sport, maybe soccer and handball, or probably to the man, it was easy just to hey, let's go play handball. You didn't have to buy catcher's mask and hockey paths and everything else. That's true. Also, interestingly enough, it's one on one like boxing, perhaps a little like tennis, perhaps more like tennis, except you're on the same side of the court. And a handball, and especially for will handball, the action is very quick and you're always hitting your opponent. Your's running into the walls, you're always getting hit by the ball and it's a confrontation between two athletes that are sometimes very close to each other and the reaction time has to be very quick. In tennis you have a second or two to make a decision about hitting the ball, but a handball, your the court is very small, you're on that side, ripped your opponent and the balls coming at you. It was a terrific sport, just a terrific sport. Can Use both hands? Yes, actually the best players are ambidextrous and when you watch them play it's simply amazing what they do with they're off hand. You could not tell whether they were right or lefty. And that's the big difference between perhaps in sports they've been tremendous successes and tremendous changes. The athletes look so much better in baseball, football basketball now than they did back in the S...

S and s and handball much the same thing. The athletes today are spectacular and handball these young, young kids, they like the junior high school high school kids in basketball. I would not bet against those kids, against any proteam from the S S and s. The kids that they are spectacular and that's the way it is now in handball. The kids are really great. where's a really good handball area in the in the world? Is there a is our hot spot for handball? They used to be, of course, outdoors. Was New York City, but now that it's mostly indoors, Tucson Arizona has become a hotbed for handball. Some handball clubs, racquetball clubs that the handball players going back to. And actually here in Las Vegas there are a bunch of old timers like me that played that still play a little bit of amball. So but it's mostly Tucson Arizona. Is it a similar ball or a racquetball? The ball is little bit harder, it's smaller. It's hard if you get some players the ball hurts when hit and used to skinning the swelling up on your hand so that doesn't hurt if you get hit with the ball. If your opponent hits the ball and it hits you, that hurts. In the old days there were no eye guards. Right lead that. Kareem Abdul Jabbar was the first basketball player to wear the eye guards. And in handle now it's mandatory to wear eye guards because the balls to get hit in the eye. It's a very dangerous thing. WHO's considered the best handball player ever? Is there like a Babe Ruth of handball? The players in the S S FIF s? Most likely there would have been a player named Dick Hirshwoods who was incredible in the S and s and from Brooklyn. Today, the kids there, they're spectacular. There's a Mexican kid, Naughty Alvarado, who was spectacular and one ten national championships. They're less and less players because it's more and more difficult to get on the court. And when I'M A kid who's ten thousand twelve, if I have a chance of playing outdoors in a beautiful football field or beautiful baseball field or an exciting basketball court, or driving five miles to a ymca to play indoors, to play amball, which takes a long time to practice and learn, I go for these other sports, the other sports, the first day you can get a bad and go up there. This is not the meaning, but basketball you can bounce the ball and throw it. You know, in football you can catch it. Handball is painful, pain in the hands very much. Yeah, I am I couldn't imagine. Like I mean, Dave, you know how hardly swinging racketball, rackets. I mean just think about that, smacking with our hands. You definitely got to build up causes and all that to you know, like you said, so you don't feel the pain. Yes, it's it's quite a challenge and but you know, it's you, the ball and your opponent all in one area. It's a very exciting sport, but that's history. Now, you know, the young kids it's baseball, football, basketball and some MMA. Yeah, so, so you played handball. Where did you go to high school? I'm assuming you grew up in New York somewhere. What High School did you go to? Yes, I grew up in New York City in the Bronx and while my grades were just very average, for some reason there was a high school in New York called Bronze High School of Science and they only had the highest IQ kids over all over the city. Why I got in? I think it was because the handball coach knew of me nearby the junior high school and said I want this kid here at this school. And he was sensational, the handball coach. He was so sensational that he knew of the great handball players like this world champion Jim Jacobs. And when I mentioned the company, this is one thousand nine hundred and sixty seven. When I mentioned the company to the handball coach, he said, well, what's the story? I said, well, you know, one day I'd like to start working there. He said, let me see if I can rearrange your schedule so you can get out early and go to there and work after school. I don't know how he did it, but he got all my intellectual classes early, the last four classes in the day where lunch, Jim, study hall and recess. At one o'clock I was walking out the door of the high school. Everyone's winning. Where is this kid going at one o'clock every day? But I went to work...

...part time at this fight film company. Just again an idea of what it was like and it was very exciting. That's like a high schoolers dream schedule. Like yes, to be out. I mean I'm sure you had. Some friends are pretty jealous. Yes, they would jealous. Actually, the school actually had a four wall handball court in the school, is very, very rare, and outdoors they had about twelve one will handball courts. So big handbull school at that time. But it was really the brains why they wanted me. I think I graduated with the lowest average in the history of the school but I was the number one handball player there. So yeah, that's great. What's important, you know? Just yeah. So what was your first job when you leave school? What was your first job at big fights? What would you do for them? The company, their job and their endeavor was buying all of these legendary fight films. And this is now before social media, before pay per view, before cable TV. This is when editing was done on a reel, with film, with one hand crank to another hand crank, looking through a viewer, movie school viewer and watching the film and then cutting a section and then cutting another section and splicing it all together and have that ten minute highlight reel of a onehour fight send somewhere the actual film reel itself. There were like books on a shelf. There were five copies of each fight and they were being sent to TV stations around the world and it was a very big business because in the s there was no cable TV. Yeah, very little baseball, football, basketball, of high quality content. And of course, even then the screens, the the lenses on the cameras weren't sophisticated enough. Where in baseball, football, basketball they were a little further back, you really couldn't get an intimate picture of the athlete right but in boxing the ring is square, there's not a lot of stuff happening outside the ring. The camera can get very close and you can see the fighters very and that's what happened in the s fifty s. The films showed very intimate shots of the fighters and that's what the TV stations like after the Monday night fights and the Wednesday night fights and the Thursday night fights, the live fights on TV, these legendary fights, was shown of Dempsey, Lewis, Marciano, and was a very big business. But my job was cutting the films and figuring out what was the best ten minutes to put in from a onehour fight, and I it was painful for me. My my boss, Jim Jacobs, finally said to me Steve, whatever you leave out, no one will know it's missing. You understand, right, and to that point I've in fifty years, no one has ever set to me, Steve, you cut that Ali frasier fight, the third fight, but you didn't show part of round six. Well, it's you know, no one has ever said that. Right to fight, the introductions, the action, the knockout, the decision at the end, and they're satisfying. Nowadays the attention span is even shorter. So whenever I added something, it's very short highlight clip and the fans enjoyed. Yeah, you have like a minute a most right. that the I mean, because they're scrolling through the social media. They want to quick clip, they want to move on. David, I know that well the podcast, because that's why we record all of our shows, so that we could show people when we ask we think is a great question, but it's even usually a better answer by our guests, that you know, we could show our fans a quick clip of all that, and so it's pretty interesting. You know that that we don't have to use tape displace it all together. We use premiere pro and there's all these crazy apps out that you can just put the film in and and it does it for you. So it's pretty amazing. Now I couldn't imagine what you would have done if you would add that there's no actual cutting room floor now. Yeah, well, now, with the with video and electronics and PC it's easy, but back then, reel the film, cut it with a pair of scissors, splice it with with adhesive tape, with glue and then go to the next one. Glue, make sure it will works, make sure it doesn't pull apart. Put on a real the real ghost to England, France, Germany. That was the way it was fifty years ago. Now, with eddying an electronics, you can edit within ten minutes and email the file across the world and thirty seconds later. Back in the old days, as the company got involved with live fighters, which was really exciting.

Back then there was no way to take a digital photograph and send it to the photograph on negative film. The film had to be developed. Then you get the contact sheet back, you pick out the photos you want to send, you send the Vid, the negative, back to the lab. They make those prints for you. A couple days later you have to mail the prince to England, France, Germany, magazines around the world where it was ring met a physical print in an envelope, just like the videos, and so versy. It was a different world, but that's that's the way it was. So when you would send out a highlight video, like say you made a ten minute clip of a fight that just happened, from the time the fight ended till let's say somewhere in England could watch that highlight clip. How long of that? How long would that take? That probably seen you cutting it, putting it in the mail, getting over there, somebody being able to see it. Ninety nine point nine percent of the time these were fights at took place years before. Oh yeah, it was Ali Lewis Dempsey, Marciano Robinson that I had in the cabinet and was a whole fight and edited down. Okay, the company was hired by promoters, top ranked king dunking productions back at then without pay per view. What was done? A lot of the time a fight was filmed, it was edited overnight and then brought to the movie theaters the next day as a highlight reel so that guys who, men, women, who would not spend twenty thirty dollars to see the closed circuit TV. That's when they actually showed the the image on a big screen in front of him in a movie theater for people who don't want to spend the thirty dollars, the next day, for two dollars they could see a highlight film. So in that happened once and perhaps once a year. The fight took place. I go to the arena the fight took place. Back then it was a huge video tape and the s that was given as called two inch quad weighed about fifty pounds. The video it set that to a laboratory. They transferred from video to film the entire fight with sound. The film came back. This is at one o'clock in the morning. Start editing the film to where it's now a twenty minute version or movie. Theaters send this twenty minute version of a positive original film back to the lab. They make what's called a thirty five millimeter blow up negative like you'd see from great motion pictures. It's thirty five millimeter. Then they saw making prints from that and those prints were sent out that next morning. So within twenty four hour hours the fight was shot, the fight was transferred to film, was edited and then shipped out thirty five millimeter prints, which are huge prints throughout the world. But that would happen within twenty four hours because the next day guys want to see that fight. They don't want to see it a week later, they want to see it the next day. Did you ever, did you ever get grief from maybe promoters or managers or the fighters themselves about what you choose? Chose to put into the package, like it might not depict exactly what went on in the fight in their opinion, it would have been incredibly rare that a promoter or the manager of the fighter or the fighter himself with a tre anyone in the press would say, how can you left out that shot? Its not something that the promoter was only interested in how much money came in. The fighters were only interested in who won who lost. How much money did I get? The journalist would write up about how wonderful the fight was, but I would real I would think that very few of them would have gone to the theaters the next day to see a highlight reel. Right, they just remembered the fight. It was great. Hopefully it was great, sometimes it was not, and and that and that was it. But no one ever complained well, you're probably doing a good job to got to tire yourself on a back for that. Well, I wish that was the case. If I was editing Joe Jenkins versus Tommy Smithers, I think some people might be upset. But right, it's Muhammed Al Ali. Great that with Muhammed Ali doing anything right, walking into the ring as some of the stuff he did was so incredibly entertaining and funny and stuff, you know, but that would that was rare. Will never be another, another Ali, but that's the advantage I had. It's like I'm going to use a bad analogy, walking into a restaurant with Jenny Jenkins or walking into a restaurant with Jennifer Lopez. Person Rights. Okay, no one's going to be upset with me with Jender, would Jaylo? You know right, with Ali, it was Ali. We did a couple sugary Leonard one...

...at one or two, but mostly Ali in the s valet. Stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation or call one two hundred and thirty six, two four one thou and ask for Promo Code PSF. So you were with big fight sink after high school. Did you just start working for them full time? Then it's full time. I loved editing the films and then in the during that time period in the Skat and Jacobs were funding the training camp for Custom Odom in upstate New York. They would pay the rent, they would pay the food, fighters would come and go transportation and during that time period that's when Jim and bill began to think about managing fighters and by the late s they had a couple of great fighters in the s add one fighter that they were co managers of and that was a fight named Eugene cyclone heart from Philadelphia. Very exciting fighter, and we would go down there watch the fights, but they really weren't in complete control of the fighter. But it wasn't until the late s that they began to get involved heavily with fighters and that's when it really became a lot of fun. Yeah, so then did you did they always use cuss for everything? If a fighter was starting out or very early in his career, they would head to catskill or they'd be induced to go to catskill to work with cuss. Once in a while, one of the fighters that Jim had and bill had. Once in a while they would be sent to catskill just to train for the two weeks or ten days before fight, but they really weren't up there to learn anything, to be drilled on any thing. If cus had a very young fighter, a young amateur, he would drill them on certain things. But from now, looking back in his eyes and looking back in the way I've seen boxing, it's incredibly rare that a professional fighter and go from one trainer to another and change in any perceptible way whatsoever. Impossible. It's you know, once they get the habit of doing something, they may be able to change it in the gym with no pressure and just as squire partner and may be able to do what the trainer want them to do that he never did before. But in a professional fight. When the bell rings around one and the pressure is on, the fighters revert to what they do in their whole history. It's impossible to change. So what was cuss known for? Like like? There's I guess there's all the kind of different styles. You know, they talk about Southpawny, different styles. What was he known for for teaching that Fund Foundation to the fighters? What was he actually like? What was he known for, because I know he worked with Tyson a lot of other people. It's an interesting point about trainers and I think there's a misconception about trainers. A fighter, a kid who's eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, who runs track in the morning, who is athletic, who's tough, gets up in the morning, wants to learn and wants to become a boxer. If that kid is brought to a gym and gloves are put on him and he's put on the heavy bad and there's other kids in the gym that are training, if that young kid is by himself on the bed and someone says just copy what you see, in six months he's gonna have a Jab, he's gonna have a right hand, he's going to have an upper cut, left he's gonna have everything. There's nothing whatsoever. Zero. That, though, trainers instill in the fight, because when you watch boxing, every fighter has a jab, every fight has a right hand, every fighter has an uppercut, every fighter can move around the ring a little bit, every fighter has some combinations. They all do exactly the same thing, except for the two most critical things in boxing, the two most critical, and that's what costs. Would draw on the two, because everything else the fighter is going to pick up by him right. And those two things. When I tell fighters or trainers there in disbelief that it's like when you make a funny noise at a dog and you make the noise and...

...they like turn their head like what the heck is that? Yeah, that's what these trained that. They have no concept of what it is. The two things. Number two on the list. Hands Up, not the bullshit you know, may weather, but hands up, maybe here, here, here's even better. Why? Because you don't get hit with the hooks. That's right. First important thing. Okay, and there's nothing that prevents you from throwing those punches. I've heard trainers say, well, you can't throw the jab from here and you can't not correct Mike Tyson had no problem throwing jabs or right hands from the hands up position number one on the list. If you and I, the three of us, went to any gym in the history of the world and watch the trainer and the fighter, there's one thing that you'll ninety nine point nine percent of time you will never hear. That is, move your head. Move your head. Let's go to the Mirror on a practice now slipping. Let's try that. Not a million times. Okay, now we're going to practice weaving a million times. Now we're going to practice the JAB and slipping a million never happens. I've been to gym's with champions and their trainers. They get to the pads, fighter punch, punch, punch, punch, punch and never moves his head. When you watch boxing, professional boxing, it's incredibly rare that you'll see the fighter slipping punches and we as mat fact, weaving. I dare, or I should say I challenge anybody today to show me a video in the last twenty years where fighter weaved under knee and came up punching. Never Tyson, all the time, Rosario, Henry Armstrong Shaves, yes, but today not one fighter would weave. That's when the bombs we on. The Need Bank right back. Doesn't happen. Fighters full back, they hold hands up, but they don't do what is most unnerving for the other fighter, and that's one of the things that trainers don't understand, is not only do you want to attempt to beat the fighter physically, your opponent, but you want to try to beat them mentally and emotionally. That's just as important as beating him physically. And cuss knew that. The Hands Up, the head motion, but also instilling in the fighter the knowledge that he will be nervous in the ring. That's normal. But now how do you transplant that onto the other guy? How do you how do you get that on the other guy? And that's the same as in tennis. A guy has a great serve but he's playing against the player who was a tremendous return of sir. The player with the great serve serves the ball, but the other guy hits a winner of the line. The server thinks, what the heck was that? That's never happened to me before. The server serves again. Bang, the other guy hits a winner of the line. The server now says, I can't win. This guy's too good. That's exactly what happened in many fights when fighters are so good the other guy. He does and show it. He doesn't say it, he doesn't tell it, he doesn't write it, but mentally he's saying this saint at the word, I'm not going to win. That's what you'd love to have your fighter force on the other guy the belief that he can't win, and that's what Tyson did and what cuss knew would happen with fighters. What's the first time you ever saw Tyson? CUSS got Mike up in cask on nineteen eighty and much like the fighters from before, because probably called Caton and Jacobs and said I got a kid, you know, and the s he'd call I got a kid. They said, great cuss, keep us up to date on what the kid is doing. And nothing ever happened. One thousand nine hundred and eighty I got a kid. It's name is Mike. Tyson's gold be something. They probably said, great cuss, let keep us up to day. I met Mike briefly and in eighty two or eighty three he had hurt his hands and he came into a meet with a doctor in New York and mental for two minutes and I didn't know anything about him. Not One manager was interested in Mike at that time, not one trainer, not one TV station, not one promoter, because he was just an amateur. Since as amateur, but cuss had that vision. But it wasn't until Mike began his pro career that he came to the city often, and that's when he began hanging out at my apartment and spending a night. Every two weeks he fight. He'd have one night in between, but that's when I started to really get to know him. In early eighty five, so he would have been about what age at that point? He was eighteen. Okay, at eighteen at that time, you know, and...

...then nineteen he was a of course, of pro. And at twenty, as when he fought Trevor Berwick and became the youngest champion, you know. But it was a lot of fun with Mike early on, even when he was a professional. Turning pro the amateurs who won the Olympics and eighty four became the superstaris that's right, tyrol biggs, fornell, whittaker, Mark Breeland van only field. They began their career on network television at mats the square going. Mike began his career in the boondocks and Albany and a little arena would no TV, but couss had that visions, very tough that that vision of what the fighters could become next month, the month after the month after that, and and it was accurate with me and Mike. Mike would chill out on the couch after each fight and come in for a day and hang out. As the weeks and months went by, I come out of my bedroom and there's Mike Tyson, my buddy, but just the four round fighter. As the weeks and months went by he was a four round fighter, six round, eight, ten and contender. And then one day, of course, I came out of my bedroom and they're in the colleges the heavyweight champion the world. That's like having Mickey Man Loui Maye. Right, right, yeah, and he was the most terrific kid, the most terrific kid. And Jam and bill at that time had some great, great fighters also in Ed Rosariel, he was a lightweight champion and Wilfred Benitez was a triple crown champion and Mike had the advantage, or should say the opportunity, to watch all these films of Ali Lewis, Dempsey, Marciano, Robinson Armstrong, and he became a master of history. Like clus he absorbed because his love for the fighters of the past and having the films to look at, in addition to the books to read. A picture is worth a thousand words, and once Mike saw a fight of a fighter that became indelible in his mind. He knew exactly what the fighter was. He looked at the book to see when the fighter fought, who he fought, how much he weighed. I would dare say there are not many people on the planet who know more about the history of boxing and mic his memory is absolutely spectacular, he adored it so much. Who is his favorite boxer? I've heard him switch once or twice and I think that Henry Armstrong what was probably at the top of the list because of Henry's aggression in the ring. Yeah, and anybody who scores over a hundred knockouts in their career, you know I mean, you know in fighting. I think in one nine hundred thirty seven, Armstrong Fort Fifteen Times in one year. And of course he was a triple crown champion, you know, featherweight, lightweight and well to wait and came that close to winning the middleweight championship, also becoming a four time champion. So for Mike he added all the fighters. He had the Jack dempse haircut. He cut his hair very short on the sides right put in the goal tooth which fighters had in the teens, in the s. That was a mark of wealth to have a gold tooth like some of the fighters had. So he just became enamored. And it's interesting with some of the journalists that he spoke with in that time, perode a six hundred and eighty seven. They would mention something about a fight that happened in the s of s and Mike would correct to know that wasn't gold feeling about it. That was tonopop. That was a year before nineteen. They would be blown away, you know, but that's how Mike loved that sport. What was the I believe I'm right on this. He didn't wear socks, did he? I don't know how it evolved without the socks. I know that with the trunks, early on he was wearing different colored trunks and I had asked Jim Jacob's wife one day. What color do you think would be a great color for Mike to wear too, so it would be continuous, so it would be the same look every time. And she said black would be a great color. and Boom it was black trunks. I found these two patches once at go America. One said USA with a flag. Put them on there on the trunks. You know, I thought that subconsciously. For the press at Ringside, when a fight is wearing USA, oh, go America, it's tough to say negative things about the fighter. Yes, Mart it's a mental thing. It's...

...nothing that's that the pay attention to, but it's something that may may be an inducement to being neutral. Is Fine, but I didn't want to have anyone ride Mike. You see the guys who come into the ring today with all this stuff on them and everything. I can just picture if I ask custom out of cusps, what do you think about this outfit this guy's wearing into the ring in when like at it all? Well, Mike didn't even wear a rogue, did he? He just walked out right. That was his thing. I don't know why, but the black shoes, no shocks, the the trunks that was his idea. No row. Why I don't know, but it became a thing. It became a thing. No Robe, no socks. Jim Lampley on HBO every time saying and Mike Zentering as usual. No Robe, no socks. No, what the word? Noah Koutraumont was the wordy. Nothing. But I think that goes back to the intimidation factor that you talked about getting into the other boxer's head. I mean that was one of the things. I think that he was great at everything that you read about them and and listen to the other boxers, a lot of them always knew that he was a heavy hitter, he did all these things, but those little things that you were taught, just talking about those getting their head, you know, and and if you have any doubt in your mind going into that ring, I'm sure you're not going to have a good night. Well, you know, early on, the while, managers, promoters, TV did not know of Mike. This is eighty five, March apeel made June. The fighters knew of him. The managers, the trainers knew that this kid was a big puncher. So those early fighters, they may have been intimidated to some degree as the Fox, really big championship. You know, those guys were pretty tough. You know they've been around Berbick Smith, Thomas Tucker and they came to fight. If they were intimidated, they didn't show it. They had already seen Mike come into the ring over and over and over. You know, they were concerned with their own thing, lending the JAB. You know they're not going to just be flush stood and just walk out of the ring. They took their beating. Some of them, like Mits Green, stood in there for ten rounds till it's put on a tremendous show against Mike back in eighty six. You know, James Bone crusher Smith, when twelve rounds. They may not have come out blistering these other fighters, but they weren't going to quit right. It weren't they may have been a little reserved. The one thing that they didn't like, that they were uncomfortable with, was the fact that they knew inherently that they threw a punch and miss the getting hit back right. That's something as a Boficer, you don't like. It's never happened. You throw a punch, either you miss or you hit the other guy and he throws a punch that he misses or he hits you. But it's incredibly rare that you throw a punch, the other guy misses and you get hit back. That's incredible. That's very unnerving. And then when you throw a big Hook and the guy like a Mike Tyson, reeves and comes up punching, that's very under that doesn't happen in the gym. Didn't happen another fights, and that's what bother the fighters the most. They didn't show it, they didn't say it. The trainers probably saw it as well, but they didn't want to reinforce that fear into the fighter. But that's what made fighters uncomfortable is throwing punch, not getting the punch over, but getting hit and returned. So you you've been in the ring with Mike when during matches, right correct, working the corner? Yes, yeah, it work in the corner. So when that happens, now you know, coming from the football world, there's a thousand coaches, everybody's telling you what to do. You got other players out there, the boxers by himself and you're trying to tell him what he needs to do. Does he give you any feedback or is it just the trainers and the people in the corner telling him here's what we need to do, here's how you need to adjust, or is he given you any feedback while you're in there? Well, the two things. Number one, might never gave feedback and I've seen, you know, fight films for the last fifty years. One sound on film became big in the s and then video in the s with the kinescopes of watching BBC fights Monday Wednesday. I've never heard a fighter say that the trainer. I don't think that's the way it should be, or I had. I've never heard that before and it's one thing Mike would never have done with Kevin Rooney, not with custom Otto and not with Kevin Rooney, because he knew that the information being given to him was in his best interest. That's a critical thing for anybody, whether your celebrity, whether you're an executive of corporation, if you know that the information is being given to you is the best that can be and you're not an idiot,...

...you take it in. You've known, you've trained like that, you've known you for like that. Doing that in the real fight is the challenge. But you're not going to say I don't think I'm a throw that you have this around, I'm gonna throw the right hand. That's never happened with mine. I think that's just the trust factor that working with people so closely in anything that you do in life, if you have that trust, it's just kind of come out way better and you and then you can really take that information and listen and and put it forth and whatever you're doing. I think I think that's what it was. It sounds like probably it's a good point. Probably fifty percent is trust and the other fifty percent is the experience of knowing that that's worked, the success of the technique, the success of that particular time in the ring, that punch, what the effect is, what's going to happen after that. So while in the corner I'm sure that Mike was thinking about what Kevin Rooney was saying, but it was something that he would have said in training for four year to year to year. Right. It wasn't a magical thing. He would just say you know and he would do something that cust invented. That is the most brilliant thing. And as a football player you'll know the number system for punches each punch had a certain number right, so that when a fighter began learning to punch, learning to fight, you wouldn't have to remember the name of the punch. The number would be associated with the punch, which made it very unique in the corner to tell a fighter five, five, six instead of saying left, took to the body, left, hook to the body right. Or when the fighters in the fight actually fighting. It's against the rules. Some degreedy yell out instructions, but when a just yelling out five, six, one, two, boom it will be. Commission is really not react, but the fighter knows exactly what's going to happen. So football, you the playbook. I don't know anything about football, but you got to be a nuclear scientist. Three that. Now you don't. I played. You don't have to be. Believe me, that was a quarterback to if every once in a while I flip the channels watch football and the coaches that they have these playbooks for everything. A lot they have guys in the stands with but I'm sure what binocular Oh yeah, and the headsets and you know, wide right Z on to following boxing trainers move, move with what? Yeah, punch, punch, punch, one. That's not was cus five, six, one two, exactly what to do. Spice its one two, five six, one two, one two one to fight exactly what to do. It was a mechanical process that the fighter did not have to invent any football in Hollywood movies the coach saying to the quarterback, who told you to run that play? That doesn't happen. I'm sure in football the quarterback is given a certain play or he knows a certain play, and everyone in the field knows a certain play and that's the play they do. It's not like, well, today we're gonna do something different. That's what happens. Ninety nine percent of the time in boxing to fighter doesn't really not know what to do. He's not instructed what to do. Be Much easier for the trainer at ringside to tell the fight, almost like having a switch on the wall right a fighter what to do. And that's what made Mike and it's not something that is so many variables. There's so many only so many punches in boxing. Yeah, thats right hand upper cut, uppercut, but it's not like football with his seventy seven guys in the field. Oh yeah, it's crazy. I don't even know how to bother. Just Punch and move your head to MP Stop Punch. Movie at that's died. Might ever give you a fake five six one too, if he likes you. If he liked you, he just take this finger and take it and put underneath your rib because that's where you would hit guys with a body shot and we just take this finger, you know, put I go. Come on, Mike Man, it hurt. Just push. He liked to pick on you a little bit. Up like you, but when he liked you and eat have a lot of friends, but the friends he liked, he would do something that is very rare in United States. Probably doesn't happen too much in foreign countries either, but this was big in the in the s s, especially in England. Men would walk arm in arm down the street. Anyway. You see Jack Dempse, Joe Lewis on arm and art and that's what Mike did here in the United States with his friends. He did the head will arm in arm down the street. I wasn't going to be the one. I don't know if anyone's going to come up to mics. A man, you shoulddn't walk like I don't think they to do that one, Mike, you know.

But he had that incredible sophistication, that confidence. That was a part of what he loved about the old time fighters and the old days that a guy can walk ham and on or even better yet, if you liked you, he put his arm around you walk down the street. No hanging that like. That's something you really got to see with anyone sports guy's celebrities. You just not. But he had that confidence and that love for the past. That's what fighters did in the past. Right Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and suits and enjoy breakfast or two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US each day you stay for reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Mariottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and asked for a promotional code S for B. I don't think I saw insurance. I don't think that would work with me, but it helps to be might tell you to beat up in the elevator doing that. So big fight sink has a lot of film. Obviously you've process you've made clips of it. What is the all time best film that you guys have in your in your library? What is your favorite film you have in Your Library? The fight that that really that I admire the most, the fight that I wish I was at. You know, I was very lucky with the fighters that Jim and bill had and the opportunities they had to film the fins. I got a chance to meet all these great fighters, from Dempsey, toney, Walcott, sharky smelling, Patterson. You know, of course, Ali Frasier, foreman, some of the fighters who died Mons on Griffith. You know all these. But the one fight I wish I would have been at that was filmed was the second lewish smelling fight. This is one thousand nine hundred and thirty eight. Joe Lewis is now champion. Right two years before he had been knocked out by Max smelling, but now he's champions. Beginning of World War II. The pressure is enormous. SCHMELLING, coming back to challenge for the Championship Matt Yankee Stadium Pact with seventy FIVEZERO. People couldn't imagine that President of the United States Holding Joe Joe with depending on you. That's pressure. It's one thing if you have the TV station come and saying you're gonna have to come in two minutes later, but the President United States calling you and tell you with depending upon you and his performance in the ring. I wish I was at ringside to see that two minutes of incredible ferocity from Joe Lewis. And from what I've been told and read is that in Germany, of course, now it's for five of the four o'clock in the morning. They turned off the radio broadcast because they didn't want the German people to hear that Matx smellie was getting knocked out. But that's the one fight I wish I could have been at is to see that that second Joe Lewis smelling fight. Be Interested is, and maybe you know this, but the propaganda from the Germans after the fight was over. Did they just not talk about it, or was there a spin to it that they put or you know, yeah, after the fight. I'm not sure what the public sentiment was outside United States. In the United States there is Newsreels Harlem people dancing all over, you know, and you have to remember that in the Yankee Stadium much like today. And Mike Tyson use the funniest line ever. I had taken them to a health club once and it was a New York City and we got the early, about thirty before everyone started to come in. And now people coming in at thirty were on the bi like biking, and it's white people, white people, white people, very expensive, but white. After about two minutes Mike looks me says not a popular place for the brothers. You know. I said no, it's not, in a pocket place of it. So Yankee Stadium, remember, seventy fivezero. White people, not right, white people. Okay, I went to been very lucky Masson Square Garden. Allie Frazier, second Allie Shavers, white people. Okay, I'll e norton. Yankees State What in Manila? It was very lucky to go to Manila for the third Allie frasier fight. You know. So the Yankee Stadium, you know, it's white people, black people, Green. They loved Joe Lewis. And when sometimes I'm asked who's the greatest fight of all time. It's very tough to put a definition on greatness.

I'd rather break it up a little bit and say most famous fighter of all time. Of course Muhammad Ali, loved and adored by public, Y Ali, but Joe Lewis and that time for was loved and adored. Most exciting. Well, and that's when you turn off the teeth, Moue, turn off the sound and the TV said and make believe you don't know who's watching and say, okay, who's the most exciting fighter? Will that be a toss it up? You know Mike Tyson is going to be right up there somewhere. And Number One and then the best one or the most interest team. One is pound for pound bridge fighters, the greatest full time pound for pound, and that's something that has to do with putting together some different facets. Meaning if sugar a Leonard, at one hundred and forty seven, was instead six foot four and two hundred and forty, he would have been heavyweight champ about fifty years but he was only one hundred and forty seven and and and six feet on the opposite side. It's little. I don't want to be you know offensive but Ali. He was sixty two and fifteen, but if he was one hundred and forty seven and five hundred and eleven, he would not have made it. He just wasn't a big enough puncher. He just will and have that stuff sugary Lenon at one hundred and forty seven was a monster puncher, monster puncher. Okay, so some guys, you know, a Dran at six two and two hundred and forty would have been a monster. You know of Vander Holy Field. If he was, you know, one hundred and seventy five and six feet, he would not have made it as heavyweight. The guys today debyweight. It's not that they're good, it's just that it's so damn big. Six six and two fifty and six five and two hundred forty five, you know. But if you took any one of them and made them six feet in one hundred and forty seven, they'd be driving taxis into Moin Right. Well, who's the last guy? That one, the heavyweight, the what's his name? Tyson fury, is the big, big name now. Well, he just got beat right by well, he beat Dante Wilder. So he's the big name Tyson fear beat beat, yeah, but he I mean he's got to be what two hundred and sixty? I think you're right to six, six, seven to sixty. You know, you know, and that's fine, that he's champion. He's done it, you know and but you know, if he was six feet and and, you know, one hundred and forty nine, one hundred and fifty, he would not have been known. No one would ever known him. The heavyweights today. It's just sad that all of the young kids today in United States or ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, they're not going into boxing. The father takes him to the football field as a beautiful football field. Then he says, let's check out the baseball field. Takes a ten year old kid to the baseball field. It's beautiful, it's white as clean. You know. Let's check out basketball. To go to the basketball court. As beautiful, it's white as clean. The Girls Pom Pom. You know, son, if you become heavyweight champion, you will make more in one fight and new making your whole career. Let's check out the boxing. They drive twenty miles to a dark, dirty Jim with spit buckets and the kid looks round and sees the guys that I don't think so, no thanks. You know, any one of those kids today on Televis vision dice playing high school, Junice School Basketball Football. These kids are monsters. They'd beat incredible fighters, incredible, but it's tough to start. It's not a fun like baseball, football, bat it's not clean, it's not pretty. So and that's why all the great fighters are the smaller guys, because they can't play baseball, football basketball. They're two small right. That's why all the heavyweights come from Europe, because there's no baseball, football, basketball and they're not playing soccer. They go into boxing. You know the Clich goes and the Lennox Lewis's and the Tyson furies, but you know, it is just that they're big. The Not that good, but they're big. Well, in television coverage to has to be. So you know, used to be ABC and a Sunday you can watch Tyson one thousand nine hundred and eighty six or whatever. You know, it's different now, I think. To write. Yeah, it's the competition for the viewer is very tough. Back, of course, in the S. Yeah, there was some baseball, football, basketball, but, as you said, boxing was on network television. Yeah, Saturday afternoon you can watch Muhammad Ali or Alexisir Guaya or Buda Duran or sugary Leonard. But now baseball, football, basketball is huge and takes up a lot of the time on network television. Also,...

...the fighters are just not that quite exciting and you have tremendous competition from the UFC. Yeah, key and boxing is getting that young audience and a young audience if they watch MMA and boxing. MMA is more exciting couple reasons. Number One, anything go the guy can get bit and get kicked in the grinding again, busted up on this base and no gloves. That's number one. It's more exciting physically. Number two, the fights are short. It did something brilliant and making the fight short the attention span by in boxing. By time he gets around eight, nine ten, young people have turned out. There is no way they're going to watch right in UFC four rounds. They'll stick out for the four rounds and boom, another fight comes in and then another fight. So that was the brilliant thing that the UFC did, is the fact that anything goes but the fights are short. That was brilliant. Well you. I think what's brilliant is what you've done now is you've taken all those films, you've created the boxing hall of fame and you've given an opportunity for a museum something like that, so fans that still love boxing can go somewhere and watch all this because, even though you can catch it up on Google and everything, it's just something special when you go to a place like you've created in Las Vegas to be able to go see all that stuff right. Well, we don't have a physical place yet. It's it's kind of getting a little tougher because the hotels have very little space. And what I had to learn from young people can even twelve thirteen, is that what's just as important as having a physical space is having the Social Media Presents and the gentlemen and women that I started to work with on this boxing hall of Fame Project. Because there was in space available, we concentrated on social media, facebook mostly, and Youtube. On facebook, now we have almost seven hundred thousand followers, wow, which is more. It's more than the baseball whole fame in the football hall of fame combined. Yes, why? Because in baseball football not at DISPARAGY, but they put a picture of Mickey Mantle holding a baseball back and that's their post for the day. That's wonderful and Mickey Mantle, to me, is better than ninety nine percent of the boxers. But in boxing we put on a field, go it's not there, and that's what gets people to come back again and again, that action. So you know the the other thing we did in boxing whole of fame is that we didn't want to put a spotlight on those that were not fighters. We want to put a spotlight on just the fighters. So while every whole of thing has what they call non participants, right, is aners this we don't. We just have the fighters, because without the fighters there would not have been any promoters, there would not have been any trainers, there would not have been any cutmen. No, I would not be sitting here with you there wasn't for Mike Tyson and who've had been, need is, and then I would not be sitting here. So every promoter, every manager, it's incredibly rare that a fighter has a someone around him. That can be considered a plus, a tremendous plus. In some way. Most fighters have guys around them that have no concept of business, no concept of television, no concept of revenue. That's what made the fighters around Jim Jacobs and Bill Caton very special. They, those fighters, had incredible brilliance. Looking down upon them with custom model, almost like a doctor looking under a microscope at a certain facet of the body of the blood rst Jacobs and Caton would look the most innocuous things were under a microscope, and that's where the things that they instilled in me in traveling with Mike, I asked for the position and they gave it to me to be in charge of Mike for the time period before each fight, the five or six weeks. So, in addition to Mike staying in my place and living a sitting on the couch the moment the fight was signed, Steve Mike's Fighting Tony Tucker in Las Vegas in August. So I get everything ready. That was six eight weeks before the fight. Travel, medicals, old the press, getting to Las Vegas, making sure Mike was fine. The pressure was, it was it was enormous. The pressure was looking back was very exciting, but their concept of looking under a microscope, that's why I did all the time. I didn't show Mike that I was doing that. I didn't show Kevin Runey that I was doing that, but it was being observant to make sure that every facet, no matter how small, was, was looked at and addressed. The one...

...thing I didn't want to happen is for the call from New York from Kate no Jacobs to say, Steve, how did that happen? That's right thing in the world. Yeah, and and if you're with them that was on the phone. But if you're with them and they brought that up also, they wouldn't say anything. They would just look at you and I'd be like, what do you mean, Steve? Yeah, you, I'd be had to figure it out. It's crazy because I knew they were right and I hated making mistakes. But after a while you start and that's the beauty of having worked with Katon Jacobs and cuss I never thought what should I do? I always thought what would Jim do? No, no, what would the way sick? What would cust do? Right now? Then it became easy. Right. So, so how can everyone see? So they go to YouTube. Where can they find you? The the most exciting place to go would be facebook. It's boxing hall of Fame Las Vegas and usually put on five or six different videos a day. Usually just stay in boxing history. There's always a Muhammad Ali fight or Joe Louis fight or ejectives. You fight a short sequence fighters. The fight is on. People right in, how that was a great fight. I saw a Joe Lewis or sometimes the dad's of the kids would write in, yes, I was at the fight with Ali and this like that, but it would be facebook boxing all the thing, Las Vegas. Right, awesome. Okay, so one last little singment we do Steve Is. We call it the no huddle. So if if you're familiar with the two minute draw or the no huddle, we're going to move the ball down field. So Dave always starts us off. We ask you some questions. You can fire back really quick we asked, you know, quite a few here and we have some fun with it and we would just want to remind all of our guests that you can find us on Radiocom or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, or under the big top with sal the ringmaster on the sports circus. So Dave, once you fire and start the no huddle. Okay, Steve. So you know a lot about like free fight e's. Like you said, Tyson, live with you for eight weeks before we read fight. What's the most overrated leading up to a fight training tactic and what's like the least underrated? Well, the most overrated thing is a food. You know, back in the S S S of food, they they ate anything. Now you got to eat this and this, and this means absolutely zero, because the most important thing is not getting hit right, not getting here, and that means moving your head right. Food, not the training, not the weight. It's not running up downstairs training learning not to get hit. That's good. So we know you've been around boxing. You've been involved in boxing for a long time. What is your mount rushmore of all the boxers who to the top for you putting out there? Well, I I love Joe Lewis, then Muhammad Ali, you know, Henry Armstrong, Shulgar Robinson. I want to take out of that for a second, Mike Tyson, only because as an emotional attachment, but those four fighters you know, especially Joe Lewis. It's a great mountain rushmore about. Okay, I'M gonna ask you one more Mount Rushmore question. The Mount Rushmore boxing movies. They've been more films made on boxing in Hollywood than any other sport, you know, from beginning of the century, especially because, once again, the cameras in Hollywood can focus it on the ring. We're at football best pull in the teens s. It look like midgets running around the fright. So it's so of course. You know the first rocky is the one film that made it huge. Of course, one the Academy Award, the AFI. This is just in the side. The American Film Institute every ten years rates the top hundred films of all time, and for the last twenty years they've been about the same. There are six films and top hundred that have to do with sports. Six films and top hundred. Of course, the number one film is always Sisson Kaine and then Casablanca and then God fought sikes films, five of them a boxing wow. One was not buck. The five not in particular order, but I'll try to get raging bull is going from number eight but eighty. It's number five now all time wow. Then on the waterfront with course mall and Brando, even though there's no boxing in their city lights. Charlie Chapman, piece of boxer who helps a blind girl by getting her money for an operation. Okay, then there's pulp fiction. Of course Bruce Willis is the boxer in the very beginning...

...of the film. He's a boxer. And of course rocky, the only other film that's not boxing film. It's forest gum. He plays table tennis and he plays a little football. Those that's the only other film that has any sports in it whatsoever. So it's boxing plus forrest gump. So for me, Hollywood, it's still be rocky. Yeah, that's a that's a great one. So what is Your Biggest Pet, pee Steve? My biggest pet, peeve, the fighters are so special. They're so incredibly special. They fight to get hit. They don't know why they get hit and they still fight. The trainers are so incredibly inept at being able to teach the fighter not to get hit. That's two critical things. Number One, it protects the fighter, number one. But if fighter knew he wasn't even to get at get hit, the fight had more confidence to throw zone punches and right staying back. If he in there coming in. That's what the crowd wants to see, that's what the public wants to see. That's why every move, every movie in the in the theaters as science fiction or or horror or monsters, is going to be very rarely go to get a titanic number one anymore or the terms of endearment number one anymore. Pete young people, you don't want to see action. So my pet peeve would be that the trainers, it's on Youtube, Mike Tyson, slipping, weaving, slipping, waving, Armstrong slipping. They don't do that at all because it doesn't do anything for the fighter to make them more aggressive and that aggression in a fight would make them more entertaining. It would be better for young audience and make the fighter more money. Right, okay, Steve, Tommy Morrison, and if you've had some experience of Tommy Morrison Radom wonder a hundred as a fighter and then one nder a hundred his potential, that maybe he didn't live up to. Tommy. You know, it's interesting that there is very few white heavyweights anymore. You know, Tommy was a very exciting fighter. He was white, he was great grand nephew of John Wayne, but most of all he came out puncher and that's what the crowd wants to see. They've been great fighters, but no one will ever want to watch their fights again. I don't want to mention names, but their guys. We've had twenty title defenses, but no one will live it watch the fights again because they won, but they were born. Mark when he walked in the ring it's like, honey, I'll be in a few minutes, wait a few. That's like the Tyson type fights. You know, honey, I'll be in a few. That's a type of fighter that attracts the audience. So for Tommy Morrison, he was that type of fighter. He was getting better and better. He was starting to learn and he learned quite well the slipping, the weaving, but he started to go off on his own a bit and when he after the George Foreman fight where you wont, he took a very bad fight against the fighter by name of Michael Bent and while the fight was in something that the manager, Bill Kate, wanted, Tommy decided to take it and he was knocked out and that became began to slow decline in his career. It's very important for a fighter football team to listen to the coach so the coach can relate to the quarterback. They don't have the coach there for nothing. The coach is seen a billion plays and has a computer in his brain. Okay, and that's what you want as a manager in boxing. You want to manage who has a computer as a brain and it's going to do what's best for the fighter. If you don't have that, you're going to error. And if you error in football, if you are in football, you can maybe make it up with another touchdown in some way, shape or form, but in boxing you make an error, the ball game is over. Right, Games over. So if you were boxing commissioner, if you ran all of boxing and you could change one rule, what would that rule change be? They do a pretty good job of the rules. What the what should be done is to try to attract an audience. That's the most critical thing. You know. I don't know about all the medical testing. I'm sure that's good. You know, of course the blood would be the most important thing. Right, at least other tests? I don't know. I don't know. I don't know if the public, outside of a few boxing offficionado's, whether the huge amount of tests would be of consequence. The public wants to see boxing. You know, I don't know how many tests facebook, football, basketball players go under. I just don't know. But in boxing the commissions, every commission is different. What they should do...

...is make it more exciting for the public. The boxing commissions to permit winner take all in boxing, because then when the announcer both fighters have to agree and announces and this is a winner take all match, that would get more people watching because even for a moment they say win a second this is when to take all. I want to see what happens here. And the other is bonuses for knockouts. That's something that I don't even think the commission has to approve, but it would be something exciting where of a fighter the wins by a knockout, they get a bonus. I think more people would watch. So with commissions would be something not really technical, but the money part. Now that's true, and I think too is if I was commissioner, I would say kind of what you're talking about. Like Ma it's a little shorter. I know boxing three minute rounds and you can go up to twelve rounds, fifteen for the heavyweight. Really knockdown dragouts. But, like you said, that that young group, how are they going to want to watch that for fifteen rounds there. Their attention span is so quick and for me, I think I would really love to be able to, you know, see those rounds quicker. Give more incentives, like you said, for a knockout, you know, because if you give an ascent of for a knockout, you're going to have more punches, you're going to have guys like Tyson coming in and trying to lay those things down. I mean, that's what people want to see. Yes, you know, that has to be some incentive. You know the fighters, they are brave, they're courageous. If they were a little bit more entertaining, right, that's what you know. By the way, in Hollywood there are some actors that are Whitney Academy Award the spectacular actors, Gary Oldman and Kevin Space is, but they don't pick and get the type of money that the rock makes, right, Kevin Hart makes, and those guys will never win Academy Awards. Right. To do with entertaining the public. Boxing is very it's a sport, but it's more critical to be entertaining. Okay, it especially now because the audience of MMA is pulling away from boxing. The baseball, football, basketball of very exciting, pulls that young contingent away. So boxing needs everything you can get to be more exciting and that has to do with the trainers instilling in the fighter and aggressive attitude. Is could be very rare that a fighter becomes a super superstar running around the ring and boxing and moving that right anymore. It got has to be theire six foot nine and to hundred and ninety or kid who comes out there winging shots. Right. So Dave two more God, have a bad yeah, I know it was a battery issue. My apologies. Okay, now kind of along as plans this a little bit. As far as ring entrances go, like who was the great? WHO's a super entertaining, great flamboyant but still a great box or with a great ring and trance? It's a very small world where the entrance of a fighter is so unique that someone would remember it after the fight took place. I'm using my I've seen more fight films or as seen as many as anybody and I'm trying to remember anything in the past that was of any consequence. It wasn't Jack Dempsey, it wasn't Jack Johnson, it wasn't great Robinson. They got in their way. There is once every generation someone who does something unusual and in the last twenty five years that was a fighter from England. His name was Prince Na seem Hamed, and when he went into the ring he'd walk up to the ring side, he stand on the Ring Apron, he'd hold his hands on the ropes and do a backflip into the ring. That was half as and he could fight. And now I don't know if any of the fighter wants to try that. I personally, I can imagine. I can imagine having gone to Caton and Jacobs back in eighty seven, was Mike was heavy with champ and saying to them, Hey, I got a great idea. What's that? If Mike can do a flip into the ring. I'm sorry, what was that again? Yeah, like if he does a flip, it'll be more exciting. You know the steam. Go downstairs, have a glass of water, will be down in the second okay, yeah, they're going to give you that look now for not seen, okay, but for if I'm the manager of the heavyweight champion the world, I'm going to take every precaution to make sure he gets in the ring safely and do something. Does have to stand out. Mike, Happen to do it with just the appearance. Are the fighters, the way, the robe? There's nothing special about them. Now they're wearing all these crazy outfits. I don't know whether in ten years people remember that, but the entrance not seemmed. The flip.

I like it. Like it all right. Last one. I got one that's not boxing related. Who is your favorite group? If you had to put on your headphones, headphones to listen to music, what group are you going to when you taking your walk in Vegas? Well, that's pretty easy because I grew up in the S. well, it's not easy, but it would be led Zeppelin, I. You know, classic. Yeah, and the interesting thing is that the groups from back then, the S, every acid rock group. MTV Did the history of rock and roll back in the in the S and they interviewed all these acid rockers from the s and s and these guys came on. You wouldn't let these guys shine your shoes little over the way. Everything okay. Then they started talking about the how they got involved in music, the history that they knew, the chords from, from this musician from one thousand nine hundred and twenty three and see, holy macrol, you know, mind you, Mike Tyson. They would just brilliant. They would just brilliant. Today, I don't know if any of these young singers play Mut play instruments. I don't know if any of them, the ones I see it, and I'm not a rap rb type guy, but you know, I don't see them playing instruments. The guys in the S S S, every one of them. Zeppelin, the WHO, Jeff Rowtell, iron butterfly, every every everything. They played instruments. They would brilliant. You Know Bohemium rhapsody? Oh, yeah, you know the musicians behind the scenes. Incredible. So, but it would be let Zepplin, stay away to heaven is always rated the number one. So your favorite led Zeppelin Song? Yeah, and you know the Kennedy Sender Honors Honored led Zeppin out. Yeah, go and if you go on Youtube to watch it, these two women from a group called heart. Yeah, and see Wilson did the song. I watch that. Unbelievable. YEA, and so be led Zepplin. Yeah, we just heard that, Helen, I just had that on as it's a great rendition of it. Oh, it was the killer. It is really good. Well, Steve, thank you so much for joining Dave and I am the huddle today. It was a pleasure having you on. Hopefully, when we are the episode that that you'll like it and share and put it out on your youtube channel so that we get more fans liking us like they liked you right now. So we really appreciate you have coming on and taring your story with us. Thank you so much. As soon as it's edited, our send it to Jennifer Rode, because you know I have a single you know well. I mean in my mind anyway. Right. Well, we'll take that low we don't have to cut it anymore. We have premiere prone now, so we can edit it a lot faster. Okay, thank you so much. All right, thank you, take care all, see day. Yeah, Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on Hoddle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shape your life. As always, I'm joined by my great friend and Co host, Date Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with gusts and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

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