Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Steve Gavatorta

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining us in the Huddle this week is Steve Gavatorta. Steve is a fellow Pittsburgher and has some amazing stories about his time growing up in Burgettstown, Pa. He went to Allegheny College to play football and missed his Senior year due to his "summer of Hell" which is also a chapter in his new book, In Defense of Adversity.  A consultant, coach and public speaker, Steve empowers his clients to identify, develop, and exceed their performance goals. Steve is heavily involved in Muay Thai and Yoga and tells Dave and I that he is in the best shape of his life. Check out Steve on his website: http://www.gavatorta.com   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joining us in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback, gusts rot alongside my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar, where we talked to guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on our website, huddle up with Gustscom, where you can listen to more episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle. Welcome everyone in another episode of huddle up with us. I'm your host, gusts fur ad, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and you know, we just have such a good time on this show and for a while now I haven't had my cohost with me, so now back joining us today on huddle up with gusts, where you can find us on Radiocom or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Or you can find us on huddle up with Gustscom and go there and find all of our podcasts and all of our previous shows, and soon enough we're going to be on sports circus presented by amp TV. But joining me in the huddle today is my co host and longtime friend Dave. Dave, how you doing? I haven't seen you know. Wow, what's going on? Well, it's great to be back. It's only been about three months, but it seems like an eternity. So I'm been longing to give about you Hershel Walker on the other week and that's one of my all time favorite athletes. I'm sorry I missed that, but you know, we're I'm excited to be on today and let's go for it. Yeah, so, Dave joining us today is a another Pittsburgh boy, you know. I think that you know, he grew up here. He understands what the mentality of Pittsburgh is all about. You know, from a cold town in Burgettstown, PA. I can't pronounce the other part where he was from. Langeloff, I think that. But Steve Gavitor's got to join us today. Join US Today on huddle up with Gus. Steve wrote an incredible book in defense of Adversity. Steve, thank you for joining us. How are you doing? Some other pittsburghers users, so to speak. So, yeah, yeah, I love, I love talking Yinser language. So, even though I've been all over the place, how's your NSER language down in Tampa? I think I think I've lost it, but everybody I talk to still says I have it. So when I do work, it's funny when I do workshops and what my business. It never fell. Someone will come up to me after the workshopper going the break and they're like are you from Pittsburgh, and I'm said yes, I am. Please let me just tell me I didn't say young's and I'll be okay. So, yeah, it's still follows me around, I guess. Well, there's a lot of steeler bars still in Florida. I know for sure. Like we've Gustin. I have a good friend that lives down there, Jason Swartz, and I know he's always bouncing from steeler bar to steeler bars. So there's Pittsburgher's everywhere. Than absolutely we travel. Well, yes, we yes, we do. So, Steve, one of the things we always talked about when you were growing up in Burgerstown and you were a little kid. What's the first memory of why you fell in love with sports? Yeah, I think probably my parents. My Mom and dad ran teenage dances of all things, on Saturday nights. In fact, my dad was very good friends with Porky Chad. What you like that little tidbit. But anybody made porky I like right, he actually has. My Mom and dad's dances were actually advertised on Lambo and seriously they were out of times on the Lambo and my dad was good buddies with Porky Chadwick that they did these teenage dances on Saturday night, and on Saturday night my uncle's. My uncle played what was called the Midget League football, and my those my grandmother's sound, obviously, so she was used to take me with her and man, I just fell in love with the bright lights, the colorful uniforms, the athleticism, and it's just that was my first probably love of sports in general and started my love affair with with football and that, I think. After that, the next day, Sunday mornings, there were either Notre Dame highlights, Penn state highlights and grambling tiger highlights, and I wanted to play for the grambling tigers. I thought I was going to be the first Caucasian up that ever wanted to play for grambling until I fought at all. My other buddies and friends wanted to play for graph playing as well too. So it's two combinations. Probably you know the Saturday nights. What Saturday nights watching Moncle, then watching the highlights of Penn state or Notre Dame or grambling, Sunday mornings, right and then then you know, Sunday afternoon to one o'clock, here comes the steelers, and then when you're troupy, cold to Sunday at mornings. Also had the old, the hot football highlights. What they play, the classical music? I can't John Fasenda, I think, did the play by player what Ando? Just the...

...highlights from the previous week. So all those things, being from Pittsburgh, really kick off my love of sports. That really football was my favorite sport. That's what I always wanted to do when apply at one in the play. So I'm still hoping I can up fifty seven. I still hope I can grow a few more inches and I still have hopes for playing for Penn stake. So well, you always wanted to be a nittany line. Huh. No, never pit, not a pit fan man. I probably the Sunday mornings watching Joe Pin and there was something about the area of Penn State that discipline, the plane uniforms. They were just hard nosed and no flash, and I like that. That's that's how burdetts tell people are and I like that. That's my type of ball, my type of football. So I was more of a Penn state he's Steve. What do you think about the speaking of Pitt and Penn state and that they they're not really playing anymore like and it's going to be a long time. What's your opinion on that? I think they need to get back to that. It would that was a great rival where you have the most of the crew done in western Pennsylvania, the WPIL for those players. So while those players playing that game played against each other in high school. So I think that's a rivalry that definitely needs to continue. Absolutely yeah, now that that's true. So when you were growing up in Burgenstown, because Dave and I love talking about this, when we were kids and in our neighborhoods and going around and you just have pickup games of every sport, you know, that's kind of how I learned to play a lot of sports. was was we just were out with our buddies, you know right. We just went out and played. There was no risks, no parents, no nobody else around, and you had to deal with all those situations. So tell us a little bit what that was like for you in your neighborhood. I thought it was fantastic. You know, I was listening to your interview with Peter Voss a few weeks ago and I think he was stating something about let kids play, let them develop their leadership skills, let them learn what it's like to fail, let them learn, you know, basics of athletics or human human wife while they're playing in sports. But yeah, there was nothing like playing pickup football games. Again, that's where I love. That's where I honed my skills in football. We play pick up baseball games. We actually created our little baseball field. We had different, different friends a mine. Their fathers did obviously different jobs and whatnot. We would take a little bit of what Santo's father can provide us for our own field. One of my best friends was a his dad owned a lumber yard, so we were able to get lime, we were able to get wood and we would build our little stadium. Man. Yeah, yeah, so, Steve Tun Brady, did you ever play whiffleball to dead little with the ball and stickball? Yeah, that's the day when I yeah, they mans been huge. Yeah, you've been able to you know, you could play with a lot of whiffleball back in the day. You know, we're you're not losing the ball. A lot of times we played baseball as kids. You lose that ball, that's the only one you had. Yeah, yeah, that's right, that's right. Well, we had some fairly have good open field, so we didn't lose too many balls. So that's what that was. The Nice thing about bird centers. A lot of country there as well too. So you know, we didn't lose too many balls, thank goodness. But they may not have been the best balls after a few, you know, few games or whatnot. So and then, you know, back then athletic equipment wasn't rather easy to find. There were no dick sporting goods. The closest place that we could go to is in Washington Pennsylvania, which was eighteen miles away, and you didn't go there every day. You didn't have access to your parents cars. So if you had a bad baseball you kind of had bad baseball for quite some time. So yeah, bad baseball, bad clove, bad, bad, bad football, whatever it was right, you just had to deal with it. That's a dodg Ben. That's a good way to home. Your second persons goes playing without a glove. So right, you're talking a lot of baseball. Will you a pirates fan? And that would have been in the late S, early s probably. Yeah, I was all things Pittsburg. Definitely a Bakos Fan. I mean they were good. I think was one thousand nine hundred and seventy two. A Steve Blast if I'm not mistaken, seven one or seventy two. I think they won the world series and then the late seventy and you wanted. Yeah, so I was good. I was a pirates fan as well, to absolutely all things Pittsburgh except pit except bit. So you go on and you've played multiple you sports. You probably played the Little League, Youth Football. Then you go on through to high school. Was it Burgettstown was at the high school ys? Yeah, used to be actually called Union high school because Burnettstown high school consisted of all these little townships. Langlaf as you mentioned, was one of those little townships. So we were actually called Union high school and then probably about ten, ten years before...

I graduated, did transition into Burgettstown high school. There was already union high school up in Newcastle. So I think Burgettstown wanted to be a little unique. So it's Burgettstown junior senior high school and we were called the Blue Devils, the Blue Devil. So what sports that you play once you got to high school? I played football and baseball and wrestled a little bit, but I was I was a little guy. Actually. I was it in seventh grade. I'm not sure if you can get a gage on size of people, but seventh grade I wighed seventy five pounds. I started wrestling in seventh grade. I was the first guy on deck. Seventy five poles. So, but I still love football, so I wrestled for three years that. I always wanted to gain weight because my love, absolutely love a lot of football, and the good thing was I was a hitter man. Even as a little guy. I love physical contacts. I went back down. I was fast and I knew I'd make it. I just needed to get a little taller and gain some weight, and that's why I stopped playing. Play shot wrestling, but I stuck with baseball and football. Yeah, no, so those sports are so intertwined in Pittsburgh. Back in the day, I mean growing up we didn't have soccer, we didn't have lacrosse. We didn't have a lot other sports. You played baseball, basketball and then football and probably ran track or you wrestled, right, right, yeah, yeah, but it's on it wrestling. So yeah, well, a lot of western Pennsylvania's big into wrestling. I think there's a lot of incredible wrestlers that have come out of western Pennsylvania. So you're in high school, you're going through all this, you're playing sports. What positions did you play when you played football? Running back, a halfback, and defense, a back, a corner. So you grew up in the air where you played the whole game on. Yeah, absolutely, the whole game. Yeah, unfortunately, my senior year, I think our first game was on August thirty one and I had it was against Carlington. Carlington was our rivals. There was bad blood there, there arrivals. If we're going to win one game that year, we wanted to beat Carlington and it was on August thirty one, I think. First Half, I think I ran for about fifty two, seventy two yards. The second half I was on the bench the whole game. The coaches were trying to get get me salt or get me. I was cramping up. I mean by Hay bomb was just I was stiff. So I played a little bit defense at game. I didn't play any more offense. At second half I would have over a hundred yards. But yeah, we played the whole game and you haven't. You better have enough water in you that are beaten enough bananas prior you're going to be hurting. So, Steve, did you have a coach on the when you're in high school that really inspired you and that you still kind of remembered some of the life lessons and were taught to you in high school? Yeah, his name was I. He was my defensive back coach and on offensive quarter or Terry. Him Alca was at his name problem. Terry was probably the best athlete to come out of Burgos town high school. Played at Willy. Been married back in the day when women Mary actually played pit he had he had a covered Gordon Jones, if I remember correctly, when they played that. After Terry graduated he came back to Burgot's town and he he coach, started coaching and I just admired him. Great Defensive Back, great athlete and just a great coach. So Terry was one of my definitely from a coaching perspective from Burnett's town my biggest role model. Aside from that, there were always Burgetts town. My father or my friends fathers were very influencial. A lot of my friends father's coach me through baseball or football or eat wrestling, and they were great influences on me as well too. So what was that like? Then? You're in you're in high school, you're having a good high school career. How did you get to alleghany? What was it? Did you get recruited? What was that process like for you? Yeah, I got recruited. As I said, I wasn't a big guy, so I jove Paul never did come knocking on my door, but I was recruited by a lot of dthree schools and a few division two schools. So I actually was leaning on towards which coaches were giving you the best love letters. So at that time Edinborough was giving me the most attention. It was a coaching Dennis Creehen, and Aliganey was second. They were hitting me up with a lot of letters and whatnot. But Dennis, I wanted to play that Edinburgh Dennis Creehen's letters to me we're outstanding. So the day I had to go visit edinborough. There were a lot of other athletes there and Dennis greeted all these athletes at the table. So I should without the shake, shake his hand and he goes, who are you and I said Steve Gavatura, and you can see he is. I guess I looked taller on film, let's just put that way. Say on or me the rest of the weekend up there. Both my my heart. So I end up the second best level over his voters. I got was from alleghany college and it was a lot. There was a...

...history with Burgett's town at Alec and Alleghany College, and so that's what I chose and I felt I could play there a lot faster. I started as a freshman. The coach it recruited me was a gain in Dan Slovak and he really wanted me bad and he during summer camp of in alleghany. You actually they tried. They had to go both ways to see if you know where you'd be a good fit. And almost immediately, I think, offense was blue shirts, defensive we're gold shirts. Immediately, Slovaks like you're not wearing a blue shirt anymore. You're wearing goals. So that was my career. alleghany started off as defensive back. So Steve WHO's alleghini's biggest rival at that point and maybe these still are. I'm just not super familiar with the conference and everything I know it's that the corridor going up seventy nine is there's a lot of schools. But at that time who was the big rivalry? Sorry about the ours an amber lark back there. I don't know if you hear that. Probably Washington Jefferson and Carnegie Mellon, although the Carnegie Mellon we didn't win most of the rivalries. Unfortunately they were pretty tough. But probably W and Jan Carnegie Mellon. Some of the other schools in Ohio were competitor a two bit again, some of the Penn State pit dynamic. A lot of allegheny athletes, wnj athletes and Carnegie athletes were played against each other in a wpil. So once again when you go to your playing these guys, you're playing against guys you played with in high school. The quarterback for Carnegie Mellon was a got NAM. David Zero was quarterback for mcguffe when we played. When we play them at Burdett's house. So probably win J and Carnegie Bell and W J was a a little bit more of a equal matchup. However, my sophomore year we slaughtered them. My freshman year. Sophomore year they at they brought in a new coach, shut I think his last name was a lockhart, and he immediately turn that program around and they've been winners ever since. So so yeah, you me and so you make this transition from high school to College. Tell me about the most adversity that you had to face when you got to college. Was it during sports or afterwards or doing while? I'm get all of them. Well, you're there. Well, yeah, that's an interesting I'm not sure if you had a chance to read my book, but I dedicated a chapter to that year. The chapters called my summer from l but the end of my but in the end of my junior year I joined it fraternity and allegheny and then in my junior year, with springtime, the years almost over, and someone comes out of my fraternity house and says, Hey, your mother's on the phone. You know, we didn't have cell phones in and I was kind of surprised if my mother never never called me. So I pick up the phone and she's crying. So I'm immediately shocked and she said I want, want you to know, before you hear from anyone else, that we've lost our house. And I'm shocked. I'm thinking, did my dad we owned a produce market. I'm thinking, did my dad getting a bad business deal? You know what would happened here? The night before they were watching TV and all of a sudden they start hearing these cracks and creeks, the ceiling was starting to crumble and they could see cracks in the wall every going everywhere. So they had no idea what was going on. They left the House that night stayed with my grandmother. They came back the next day at our house had sunk three feet, unbemownst to us. Our House was built over a coal mining room. It's something called mind subsidence and it essentially that house didn't collapse in it just the the foundation cracked into and that insult injury. Homeowners did not cover that and my parents only had two more house payments to pay that, to pay that house off. So yeah, so this was probably in May. I come home over the I mean it made the Pittsburgh News and everything. I come home for the summer. My parents are in the produce market, so we're living in a one bedroom apartment. I'm sleeping on the floor. We're dealing with the hout. Essentially, what happened was the government came in and they said if you rebuild on that property, will fill the hole and we're still the whole. You rebuilt on a property, will give you a two percent loan. So that's what my father took. So I come home that summer living in a one bedroom apartment my dad. We're deal with the house. I start working with my father. Two days there he starts complaining about his his chest hurting. They later he's in the hospital, his lung collapse from some sort of calcium deposit slicing as lung. So here are, nineteen year old kid. Were what are we going to do at a house my dad's laid up? I felt like the world was on my shows thought my head was going to explode for a little bit. After about five minutes...

...of utter panic, I really caught my bearings and I started thinking, you know what, my dad has been preparing me to run this business. Every year I work for him, so I knew what to do and almost Obeli I got a strange sense of calm and as my father recovered, he took care of the house. I ran the market that summer, so and and by the end of the summer I had missed all the physical training leading at the football camp. I could not play football my senior year because I had run the family store until scolies, till school started. But that summer, which I call the summer from Hell, was by far the biggest adverse situation I faced, doring ring my calls times. In many ways that situation really made me a man. It may be the most influential thing that happened my entire life. Well, I think that, you know, everybody, as they becoming adult goes through some type of situation. Maybe not a severe your Steve, but we go through some type of adversity, some type of situation. It takes us from that zero responsibility to hey, I got to go do this now, it's all on my shoulders. So I think it's really powerful that story and I think that's a good spot where we're going to take a little break, because I think I got to really think about the summer from hell here. So everybody hang on in there. We're going to come right back or to take a little little pause here and then we'll be right back on huddle up with guns. Hey listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, huddle up with gustcom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddle up with gustcom. Now let's get back in the huddle everyone. Welcome back to huddle up with Gus. I'm joined by my longtime friend of CO host Dave Hagar again, and also we're joined by Steve gathered toward us. Sorry, Steve, you know it's like my name. You know these Pittsburgh names. You got to say I like twelve to two thousand times to get used to him. But Steve Old an amazing book called in Defensive Adversity. We just hooard heard his story about his adversity went through in college the summer from heroll. Which is which chapter, Steve? It's that. I think it's chapter three or four. I can't remember exactly. Your for it this book. But you know, Steve, we all go through some type of adversity. I mean you just you just gave us the ultimate story of adversity. So I'm sure that led you down the path. I mean you talked about it made you a man, but it maybe gave you a sense of what you really wanted to do in your life. Is You know, is that kind of true? It did. I mean, there it matured me more than anything that I think going for years of college could not do, let's put it that way. And I kind of had to deal with I guess I didn't have to, but I often think about where my life would have gone had I panic, had I not done that, had the family had to close down the stool that year. I mean, I hate to say it, I might be back in Burget style, come and gass. Who knows what I would have been doing. But it is roughly took a true je trajectory for my life. In fact, end of my senior year, when I was interviewing for companies for jobs, I had almost the most job offers from any of the senior class, primarily because when I was in an interview, people asking, you know, tell us a little about your life to just like you did, tell us about the difficulty you faced and build. I hit him with that story and bag they you know, I gave out every attribute or componency a company would want. Leadership, communication, skills, facing obstacles, responsibility, people, management. So all the attributes I learned during that time were very relevant to a lot of the companies I was interviewing for it. Then you add the fact that I played, I was a three year letterman in football and all the learnings responsibilities that you gain with football. So through the combination of football, my education and that life experience, I had a Plecora of a real world skills and componencies that I could bring to a company and I could talk about them to you know, I if a someone said, you know eggs, are you a leader? Yes, I'm a leader. Getting an example, I could you know, I didn't just sales a leader. I was an elected captain because I was popular. I was an elected captain because it was my turn. I had actually exhibited leadership skills, you know. So that is very valuable to a company. So that really did kick off my life going forward absolutely and and help me realize again. I think that our most difficult times in life are ultimately our best times as well, to...

...we learn the most through our difficulties more so than we do through our success, as I believe right. So, Steve, you have a lot of interest from the perspective employers. What was your first job then out of college? That was a company called Beecham products. I sold aqua, fresh toothpaste, crushed off drops and yeah, I had a company car and everything. Yeah, I had many a job offers and the reason I took Beecham I I was actually all set to take a job of northwestern mutual life. They were given they were like Dennis cree had at Edinburre. They were given me the the love story, all that good stuff, ready to go to work for northwestern mutual life and I had a final interview on a Friday. They were going to make me the job offer. Leading in that week my father call talk to me and he said, Hey, there's this company called Beecham products. They have an opening. Are you interested? And I said what do they do? And he said, you know, they sell toothpaste. They said what do you think? He said, well, they have a company car. So God made him happy. Being that he was an entrepreneurs whole life. So he said, you know, what the hecks, why don't just woke into it? So my first interview of Beacham was with this gentleman, a Pittsburgh Guy, North Hills guy. You're going to love this name, Santo Lack Quatra, actually literally means the fourth saint in Italian. So I meet this Santo La Quatra Guy and Santo just blew me away just what a great guy, just as charismatic guy, formal football player, play Football Cornell actually, and with it was worry with the high school and after I left m I went to northwestern mutual. They offered me the job and all as I can think about was shlepping toothpaste for this guy named Santo. So I end up took take of the job with beacham products and Santo became my mentor. He still is my mentor to this very day. And through him, through this job at Beacham, all the upper level managers were former proctor and gamble guys, former proper and gabble leaders, and they brought them in a beacham and they in the day procter and gamble had the cattle. They were the cadillact of training. They train their people on selling skills, tent set call procedures, how to handle objections, how to deliver a presentation, and I had all that training and that's so that first job, Natalie, was not only that I learned about Santo and be able it was able to sell toothpaste, but I gained some very valuable skills in that first job out of college that really sustained me through my entire career and planted the seat from my love of professional and personal development, sales training, leadership training, because I at that in that job, I understood what how important that foundation was to your success in corporate America. Yeah, so, Steve, I think one of the things that's interesting is you go from college. Obviously you had the summer from Hill. You go right into business this. What did you do as far as Rick Sports like? What was your your release, you know, because you were so busy. You know, back in the day there were softball leagues and all those things. What did you do on the side? But I was always very healthy. I mean I hit the gym, I do my cardio, I do some running, I do some weight with thing. Back in the day we played some flag football, I would place, softball and whatnot. So I was always very active. I always had some sort of area of competition in my life as I entered Corporate America. So flag football, softball, whatever that was, and just personal keeping my body physical and healthy. Now, however, at age fifty seven, I've decided to take on something else called Marie Tie. I'm not sure if you know what Molle tie is that it's up. It's a kick boxing and it's tie boxing, basically also known as the art of Eight Lens. So you use your fifths, use your elbows, use your knees and use your feet, and I am I started this about six years ago. I'm addicted to it. So in my s I decided to start sparring and fighting. Not Not in not in a reign with anyone or anything that sparring learning, learning a little bit about stand up, kick boxing and whatnot. So always love that competitive bench, always loves staying active. So really transition from the basic sports of flag football to softball to now on martial arts of all things. So how does martial arts keep you in shape? Is it pretty into all? Yes, you do some sparring for about five minutes where with it punching, kicking, elbow and and now to push you out to get you in shape. One of my coaches is guiding Dan Rawlings. He was a professional fighter. He actually fought in what was called the World Combat League.

That was actually subsidized by Chuck Morris. So Dan Rawlings fought in that and will call that league and he's one of my instructors and I spar with him and he's just a beast. You're supposed to do three five minute rounds when we spar and I've talked him into just doing one minute rounds, like five one and it around, because the first round, you know, I'm hanging in there. I'm able to lease block and protect myself. The second round, same for the first half of the second round. Second half of the second round I'm running away from him. Third Round I'm totally running quick because I can't even protect myself anywhere. I'm just trying to survive. So I'll tell you what, since I've started martial arts, I have the utmost respect for martial artists, UFC fighters. There's two guys from the gym I used to work at are now in the UFC. The former owner was in the UFC and I have the utmost respect for these athletes. The hard work, the dedication, you know it, before they make the UFC they're playing in some podunk little talent in the lobby or the at the ball room of a hotel with a hundred fans and they that they do it for the love of it. And then when they finally make it, I find UFC fighters I've met, I want to say thirty in person, the nicest, most approachable at pro athletes I've ever met. I played tennis this weekend with a guy who's a martial arts instructor and trains. You have see guys also, and I'm a slab byself, but he ran me off the court in his conditioning. I don't think he had to drop a sweat. I fully respect the conditioning that goes into all that whole field that. It's amazing flexibility. I mean it was like playing a cat, it was. He was so quick. Why? Tell you what? I'm made in many ways. This is in my adult life. I made in better shape that I've ever been in my life. I do might tie. I do yo hot yoga as well too, so those two combinations of hot, the hot yoga, boy tie, the hot yoga really keeps you flexible, in fact enhances your flexibility. Then when you're going the might tie here kicking, you're striking, you know you have to. You do head kicks. Your kicking pretty high. I in many ways in my adult like this may be the healthiest I've been and I'm addicted to it. I just want to keep going and don't going at as long as possible and unfortunate in Morey time, like most sports, has a short it's going to have a shelf life. That's going to end because you're not going to be able to do that, you know, in your ses. Let's put away. Yeah, so, Steve, so, you know I think that what you're doing right now, at this point in your life. We all talk about how exercise is so important for mental health and just doing something like that. So can you talk a little bit about when you're healthy like you are and you're doing these things, how it works when you have adversity and you have to face those things in your life? I think you understand that more than most, but can you explain to our audience why that is so important? Yeah, I think the number one thing for people to be able to successfully face, overcome and learn from adversity is to have a clear mind. If we are functioning in a clear mind, what I call our rational brain, our cortex brain, we're going to be able to stay calm when adversity strikes, we're going to be able to make wiser decisions, say the right things solve problems when we have that clear head. And I think when we're healthy we get that. We just feel better. We're not worried about disease, we're not concerned about being overweight or active or out, and I think that whole thing about your adrenaline rushing, getting that blood flowing in your keeps that brain functioning, functioning an optimal level, is well to so there's a correlation between our physical development and how our brain function functions as well too. So I think that's our health connects to our or mental health can connects to our physical health. There's no doubt about it. Well, I know I was talking to my wife about this last week. We were thinking of like the successful people we know, CEOS and powerhouses in the world of business. There's very few that aren't in good shape. I mean it seems like that's a common denominator good shape. You don't smoke their discipline. You know I mean there's it's that's no accident. Well, I think in many ways, when we get stressed we need that relief. I know I do. When I'm stressed, I my atency, when I'm frustrated and I may be falling into my emotional state. I will shut down, I won't be able to think anymore or think clearly, won't be able to solve problems as effectively as I am when I'm clear headed. So nothing...

...like going and lacking some mets, going for a run, doing some hot yog. That really clears the head. It gets me away from, you know, where I was. It gets me functioning back in that CORTEX, a rational part of the brain. So for me, gives me that downtime, that escape to get away, rejuice so I can see those previous adverse situations or those obstacles in a New Light, much more clear than I had been when I'm more when I'm frustrated. So yeah, so you're saying that instead of me going promnities or Ben and Jerry's, I should go for a run now, that that would help. I think. I think that promantic Sanich is going to be much better because it's less guilt ridden after you, after you've exercised the leak. So Hey, I'm no in no issue with you know, get a muit tie work out and then and doing a from any sandwich afterwards. That's no problem. So that's true. There tell. So can you achieve belts? Just like in karate and stuff? O, there different colors of belts as you move up and we dont have belts. been by I did a little bit of Brazilian Jiujitsu. So BJJ does belts. Karate will do belts. Other type of I think taekwondo, they do belts as well. To particularly Muit tied that you do not do belts. Yeah, so, so, Steve, let's get into what's going on today. Right we got this crazy virus going on. People are out of work. There's so many millions of Americans going through crazy adversity right now. Your book hits at a great time. Talk About Your Group, your company, and how they can, how you can help people and how you see people moving forward through covid yeah, it's interesting. One of my you know, I do a lot of sales training and whatnot. That's part of my my calling as well too, but unfortunlenge, you can imagine, not a lot of copies are looking for sales training right now. But what's turning to a very popular Webinar for me now is something very, very much based on my book called learning and leading and self managing through adverse, ambiguous times. So what I talk about, kind of what I was alluding to earlier, is understanding, one how we perceive, helping people understand how they perceive adversity, and I talked about two parts. Number one is accepting adversity, except that adversity is a part of life. It's not going to wet, going to go away, it's it's thing. Bad things are going to happen, change is going to happen, adversity is going to happen, failures going to happen. Our ability to look at that as as a non surprise will help us in turn, solve that. We don't so when adversity structure, we're not surprised, we don't get frustrated, we're basically aware of that, hey, this is a part of life, so accept that adversity is going to happen. Secondly, acknowledge that adversity is brought into our lives to actually help us grow, transform and evolve into the people we were meant to become. So that helps us understand when adversity strikes, we're not surprised and we're immediately realizing, Hey, I'd have to face this, hopefully I can overcome it, that at the least I'm going to learn a valuable lesson from it to help me become better down the road. Being football players, what did we do? We played football. We played our Saturday night high school game or college game on Saturday night. We did we do on Monday or Sunday? Watch film. We were basically learning value the lessons from that game to help us that next game. That's the same thing in life. Our obstacles are placing in our lives. If, even if we have a perceived failure, we can leverage that opportunity for similar type times down the road. So I hope people understand what is their perception of adversity and help guide their thought crousts around that. Secondly, I help people understand how our brain functions under stress, and I alluded to this a little earlier. There's two important parts of our brain. One is our Olympic system, also known as our emotional brain. The Olympic system, that's what we're born with. It that does not grow, transform or evolve through time. When we're stuck in that LIMBIC system, or Drumm starts rushing and our response to adversity is going to be free spider flight or some combination of those three. As you can imagine, when you're facing an obstacle, when you're facing change or the unprecedented, at times like we're going through now, you don't want to be in freeze, tighter flight. Our Olympic system was meant for us when we were babies, when we were hungry, we cried, we are parents fed us. Or when we were cave men and women, dinosaur came, we need to run. But that was good then. It doesn't serve us as well now. So the...

...other part of our brain is our CORTEX, that is known as our rational brain. That does grow, transform in evolved through time, through our education, through our life experiences, both good and especially bad. When we're in our CORTEX part of the brain, that's where rational thinking lies. That's what we're getting able to take, connect dots between learnings and events, solve problems. So what I try to help my clients do is function in that cortex part of their brain when adversity strikes. So the most important thing when adversity strikes are changes hitting are you're in something uncomfortable place. You want to prevent the transfer of authority from the cortext for the LIMBIC system, meaning stay in that rational state, because once I'm angry, I can't get on. I'm mad, once I'm shot down, I can't get on shot down, I might stay up in that, in that mode for a while. So, while and in that mode, I might make bad decisions, I might say something I'm going to regret, I'm not going to be able to solve problems. So I work with my customers to help them understand their perception adversity, but also how they, as a leader, can better self manage themselves and their teams as they go through these times, leveraging the strengths of the teams, keep them them all running. All that optimal brain functionality, a state of B this is huge in sports, keeping athletes in that cortex part of their brain especially. Think of a quarterback. You know you throw an interception, you know if you're in that frustrated mode. You go to the sideline, you're angry or shut down, a coach is yelling at you. Will Guess What happens? Defense gets an interception. You've got to go back into the game. Are you back in that cortex part of your brain or are you in that limbic system? So it's impaired in especially in football, for coaches for themselves to stay in that rational part of their brain. But know they're athletes and keep them in that rational part of the brain. Is Your quarterbackers, your athlete a fighter? Does he get angry? Is He a freezer? Does he shut down? So one of those things that can set that athlete in that emotional state. How does it manifest that athlete and how you as a coach can you know, keep your players, you yourself functioning the keep your players right, Eddie, and in that mental part of the game as well too. Does that make sense? Yeah, no, it does. It sounds like you can almost be a marriage counselor as well. It's fun. You're seeing that. I did a podcast with a lawyer recently and he does devote. He's a divorce attorney and he's like, I need to bring you in any mediation. So you're on something us. Well, you know, my wife always said I can ever change and I said no, that's not true. I can change and and now I got something. You know, hey, it's my courtet to my rational thinking and I've changed over time. Right, so now I go back and tell her why I've changed. So, you know, I think what you're doing is great. I'm sure you've been doing a ton of virtual keynote speeches now because you can't go in front of people. What has that before we get to our two minuture? What is that been like for you to do most things virtual now instead of being able to show your passion and be in front of people? Yeah, I'm Italian and I'm doing what God meant me to do. You talk a lot with your hands. Why is that? But I love I am blessed to do what I was brought here to do on earth and when I do it it just comes out natural for me and I think, yeah, it's a little tougher to do it on a Leblar and whatnot, so I do mess. I'm fortunate, I'm lucky. I'm grateful that this topic leading and self managing to addverse and ambiguous times has been so popular because so many people are looking for this. So I'm really stoked. I'm really excited to be delivering this content to people in need. is they're going through this. So I'm really risk, really a static about that. But I am missing that, that human interaction. I was a static on Friday. I have bought I to program scheduled for September and I inquired to the to my contact. Is this thing still happening? Number One, and number two, are you going to do it virtual? You guys still want to do it in person? And they're both in Tampa, same company, and she shot a note back you said in person please, and I'm like, AH, thank you, thank you. So I don't know what that what the parameters will be, social distancing or if I'm gonna wear a mask or what's going to be, but I can't tell you. It made my entire weekend that that I'm able to do some workshops in person. I that's that's where I I just flows those hands, those hands will be flying. I'll tell you that. It's funny, you know. I the feeling I got walking on...

...to a football field the lights on a Friday night. That just that feeling. I have the same feeling when I walk into a meeting room at a hotel where I'm going to speak, where I'm, you know, a ball room where I'm going to speak. It's that same excitement. That is my new football film, that is my new arena. So that speaks to why I missed this even more, not being able to, you know, have that rush that I have, you know, being able to do that all in yeah, it's not the same in front of a computer. All right. So, Hey, sonar, we're going to get ready for this two minutes. Jo, you ready, buddy? Let's do it. All right, put the clock up all I don't know when the last time you were in a two minute drill, Steve, but here we go. All right, would you rather drive a gas or electric car? Oh Gasp, I Steve, fly or drive? You know, I'm a driver. I love that's who I decompress. I love long drive. So that's my down time. I'm going to say drive. All right. What's your pet peeve, oh my goodness, oh my that. There's a lot of those on Italian, forcing me to make a decision, forcing me to have to decide. Now I'm a I like to think things through. So That's a big Pet pee, making me force, forcing me to make a decision, the quick one. Click. We we talked Penn state earlier. Your Mount Rushmore Penn State football. My what your Mount Rushmore of Penn State Football? Well, I don't know what that means. I'm sorry. You know, like Mount Washington, Mount Meult rushmore with the for presidents. Who are your for Penn State people on that mountain? If there was one, oh my goodness, there's so many of a Curt Warner, Shane car and then maybe Shane car and Shank call and Shank calum and all hot and cold. Steve, butter cold, will you like Ha hot? Hands Down Favorite sports movie warrior. It's a martial arts movie. All right. What's your favorite? What do you play now? Recreational Sport you play now? I would you consider more a tennis I actually start tennis with my girlfriend. If you could change places with one person in the world for one day, who would that be alive? If it's, if that's not a lie, could I say Winston Church Hill? Yeah, perfect, awesome. Good. All right, down to three seconds, Steve. This is your chance to make a field goal. We drove the ball outfield. Who is your favorite quarterback? QUARTERBACK GUSS for lot to for to today. Can't believe it. I know I didn't go to paid state, so I don't know how I got so lucky. I know the Horst Man. Yeah, there you go. Hey, that's our two minute draw. I really appreciate everybody joining me to the Steve. Thank you so much. Everyone go out and gets these book. Steve. Where can we go find your book in it in defense of adversity. Best places as Amazon, paperback, hard back, audiobook and eat book as well too. All right, Steven, where can we find you? How can people find you? You know, on social media or your company. Everyone on social media feel free to Google me. My I'm out there on a public domain. Out A lot of great contact content on Youtube, Wat free content on Youtube. If you want to reach me directly, Steve Act gather a TORTOCOM. My website's my domain name gap a tortcom. My emails will still simple. Steve Act Gaba Tortacom. Awesome. Thanks for all that information and and if you'd like to find Steve, please go to Steve at gattaturacom. Dave, I really appreciate you being back on the podcast with me. How do you feel coming back? A little choppy, still getting used to the tacking aspects, but it's great to be back, great, great guests and Steve Tos at hell yet. So, Dave, what do you think about you and I go and do a little Moi Tai? I'm going to have to start stretching now to even come close to Moi getting in the Mui Tai Room, I think. For you and I was thinking a little more Thai food. What do you think? Maybe we try that first? All right, everyone, thanks for joining us on huddle up with Gus. You can find US said huddle up with Gustscom and then look for us soon into future on the sports circuit presented by amp TV, a MP tvcom. Thank you again for joining us on huddle up with gusts and we really appreciate you listening. Thank you for joining David I in the huddle. We hope you enjoyed...

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