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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Solomon Wilcots

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me in the huddle this week is former Nfl defensive back Solomon Wilcots. You may know him from television and radio but he played for six years in the NFL and always had a plan to be successful. My favorite story of the podcast, he tells me of his dream to play basketball but how the High School basketball coach would not let him in the gym after football season. He knew football was going to be his choice after that.   Solomon has served in many roles across the landscape of broadcast television and radio, including studio host, anchor, analyst, and reporter.  He joined CBS Sports in March 2001 as a Game Analyst, giving viewers first-hand game insights on the network's marquee sports brand, The NFL on CBS. He also has served as a live game analyst, sideline reporter, and field reporter for major sporting events which include the network's coverage of Super Bowls XLI, XLIV, and XLVII (2007, 2010, 2013), and the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship (2003-05). Having joined the NFL Network at its inception in 2003, Solomon currently serves as a studio analyst, reporter, and contributor for the Los Angeles based station, which is also Wilcots' home town.  He first appeared as host of the NFL Network program, Playbook, but is now currently seen across all of NFLN's platforms, namely, their signature show, Total Access.  He simultaneously hosts TNF Storylines, which appears on NFL Media's digital platform, and is the only interactive in-game analysis in the NFL that integrates social media.  Wilcots is also a weekly contributor for NFL.com during their Thursday Night Football broadcasts, and previously wrote columns for them as well. A versatile talent, Solomon is host of Sirius Satellite Radio's The Sirius Blitz, and co-host of their daily NFL show The Opening Drive, with Bob Papa.  In addition, since 2014 Wilcots has served as an analyst for the Cleveland Browns' preseason broadcasts.  Prior to that, he spent six seasons, from 2007 to 2012, serving as a game analyst for the New Orleans Saints' preseason broadcasts. Solomon joined CBS Sports after working for ESPN as a Bureau Correspondent and Sideline Reporter for its national coverage of Sunday Night NFL games, where he received an Emmy Award in 2000 for his live reporting.  He also covered the PGA's U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament, NBA Finals & Western Conference Finals, and Major League Baseball games for the cable network.  Before ESPN, he served as the weekend sports anchor for WLWT-TV News 5 in Cincinnati from 1994 to 2003.  Additionally, Solomon worked as studio anchor for Fox Sports Net's college football show. Solomon played four seasons in Cincinnati, with the Bengals (1987-90), where he currently resides, one with the Vikings (1991), and finished his six-year career with the Steelers (1992).  He was drafted in 1987 as an eighth-round pick after starting for two years as cornerback for his university in Boulder.  While attending school in Colorado, he majored in English Literature, and studied in the school of Journalism.  He also helped lead a program turnaround which led the team to two consecutive bowl game appearances. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone. We appreciate you joiningus in the Huddle, I'm your host fifteen year, NFL quarterback Gasprat,alongside my longtime friend, and Co, host Dave Hager, where we talk toguests about how sports shape their life be sure to check us out on ourwebsite Hido up with Guscom, where you can listen to more episodes. Just likethis. Now, let's join the huddle yeveryone on your Oo. Have you back onHUDDO UP WITH GUS? You can listen to us on the RADIOCOM APP or wherever youlisten to your favorite podcast. You can also check us out on Hutdo up withGuscom, or you can find us here in Hixuden, ND thirty, one digital newstudio, we're not actually in the studio today where in my son's bedroomyou know I make him look at pictures of me all the time so there I put somepictures up beon me, so everybody can check them out, but that's from what Iwant to NVP with the lions when I played there one year so today you knowwe're not joined by my cos Dave higger today, you know so I'm running this onealone and I'm speaking with a former NFL DB today, but we all know M Yourarare going to recognize his face, he's been around and been a part of the NFLfor a long time he's reported on it through radio through television. Youknow he just has an amazing story, and I think if we want to talk to somebodyabout how sport shape their life, Solomon Wilcot is one of those peoplethat we're going to talk to today about how sports shapes is life. So Solomon,thank you for joining me in the huddle. How are you today Gose I'm doing greatand thanks for having me on? It's really good to be with you yeah. So we're excited to hear yourstory. You know because we all have these crazy paths that we takin ourlife and choices and decisions and and I've read a lot about you and some ofthe stuff that you know you talk about in you know when I got on your websiteand you talk about what your mom told you and all these things and we'regoing to get into that. But let's find out about the beginning, when you weregrowing up. What was that first moment or memory that you have were you fellin love with sports wow? I mean that's a really greatquestion. I just remember you know playing basketball. I have three olderbrothers right, and so I we played basketball in the driveway and I had areally good friend down the street. He was just ten times better than I wasand, as my older brothers were, and you get to the point where you can actuallybeat bellose guys, you could be older, guys Hor, you could be takin the guyeverybody looked up to it, you just you worked at it right because the firsttime you tried it, they were just kicking your bluck man and there'ssomething inside of you. Thit was like wait, a mint. I can do better than that,and so you just start working at it. You get a little bit better thet youget a little bit better and next thing you know you get compentent and thenyou become good at it and you end up beating people that you never thoughtyou could be, and so that's kind of sports really does help ingrain in USour competitive level. It helps us to understand how you work at something:Hey. You can get good at this. It does turn around for you and we learnd tonever take no for an axcert in Guthrymi. You know, you know what gonna tell me.I can't do somethingi after you do something like that. We beating yourown te brothers, a Beti. The best kid on the block man hit now you'reconvinced that you could do the impossible right. You know, and what'sgreat about playing sports like that growing up is that we didn't have aparent, a ref or coach out there with us. We've had to figure out everythingon our own and that taught you so much about sports, and I feel we missed thattoday. How do you feel about like the kids, that? U start playing singlesports and they're? Always driving parents are always driving around otherthan going out and just picking up a basketball or bat ind, a ball orfootball and just going to play yeah. I think that's a that's somethingthat has become ingrained in the culture right. I always tell kids, it'sgot to be your thing. I tell parents, it's got to be their thing. It's got.It's got to be something they want. If you want it more than the kid than it'syour thing, it's not the kids, ithink and theyare go find a way to check outthey're, going to find a way to do something that they want to do and atthe end of the day, when they get old enough to realize that they have somesay so what they're going to do with their lives? That's exactly whatthey're going to do, they're going to make their own decisions, and so justmake sure early on that it's their thing that the passion is is driveninternally by themselves, not by the parent, saying, okay, you got to go outand practice. Okay, you should be doing this. Okay, here's! What's next on yourschedule, you can't script their lives for them. You should be helping dom',no understand that they can do that for...

...themselves and to see what theirpassion lies and what they prefer to do and how they prefer to do it they'llfind the way I'm telling you kids will fight away and that's what I found. Ifound that I didn't like losing and I didn't like Beig bad at anything ind,so I was going to work my tail off to make sure those two things didn't occur.Well, that's the same way with me right if I was bad at something I'm like man,I'm not very good at this. I probably won't don't want to play this right orI don't want to be a polisist and then, when I found sports that I was good atbecause I had a strong arm, I could play baseball. Throw Football Mile D dothose things, so those sports came more natural to me. So what other sports?What did you play when you were a child? Well, basketball, WIS! My First Love!It really was. It was the sport I actali. Every time you played who were you? Whowas your idol o? I was. I was either Dr j or you know the Norm Nixon because Igrew up in La as a Laker Fan. Then I you know I pretty much. I loved you know Magic Johnson when he came toLos Angeles so didit after that it was magic. All the time rig e Mad, were youthe assist leader on your home court? Oh absolutely because I played boyguard and the guys I played with Ir was our CINTER and forward. Those are theguys it was my job to distribute, get them to ball, and so that's kind ofwhat we did. You know so I loved basketball. It was. It was always therefor me and then I later started playing football and fell inlove with it, and I had three older brothers who used to pound on me. Ifinally wanted to hit someone else, and so I remember when I went out forfootball, I played you know running by to play a lot of different positions,but I love playing on defens and I love playing defensive back, because I gotto hit someone without getting in trouble wif. You know what I mean rightright. So do you have a memory from a Nou when you started playing footballlike my first memory of football wis, not a good one like they put me on theoffensive line, because I was tall and I remember this dude to get me rightinto face. I fell back on my butt and you know I was like in sixth grade. Ihated it. I'm like I'm not playing this game. You know, then I could figure itout that I could throw the football which then let me become, who I wastoday. So do you have a memory of that like? What is that play that youremember from a kid? Oh, I just remember not evenunderstanding everything was moving so fast. I mean I'm talking in the veryfirst game. I played it. I was maybe twelve years old sixth grade and got inthere and did not know what to do arwhere to go. I mean it was just Te.was S Heyaou know how it goes right and I eer Toa me out of the air. It tell mewhat I need to do whatever, because I just didt now where to even focus myeyes right. You know, because I want deepfit, it would have been better ifID Hav played an offence first, but I played on defense versand you. If youreyes aren't in the right place, okay, you're just going to be lost, and soafter that he put me in and I you know, I figured it out. He kind of gave mesome instruction and the game kind of slowed down. I begin to make the Laghs,but now the first time I ever got into a football game. It was not pretty andI think a lot of guys would probably share the same stor tat you and I havitit. Wasn't you don't have to be good or great. In your first experience, Ithink the ability to overcome some of those bad moments, that's the journeyof life and, as you well know, that's also the journey and sports. Well, that's where all the adversityyou learn how to deal with it right hut. You have bad moments and then you goback out and you try it again and don't give up on things, and so then, whenyou get into high school right, because we all play these sports and then we gointo ninth grade kind of that first year of high school, for most of us ispretty difficult because then we're stepping up, you know, there's olderkids were playing with. What was that experience for you when you go from youknow. Your kind of I think that seven sixt grade that's all the same sort of,but you go to that Highscho level. Then you got to play with a different kindof older kids right and then you got to figure out how you keep up with them aswell. Oh that's a really good point because I went to high school. I grewup in Los Angeles and went to high school out the Riverside California. SoI didn't know any of the other kids as I was transitioning into high school. Ididn't grow up with that group and if everyone was a total stranger- and Iremember I was almost traumatized- I walked through one of the locker rooms.An the parsty player started thiding me because I'm not supposed to be in thecult farcity locker room. You kiding me, and I just remember that kind ofSparkin me a competitiveness because we hadn'teven been on the practice fill yet but right it is there. It kind of threwdown the coclet right, and I could tell...

...you right now and I hit practice stilllater. That day I was here on. I was not happy. I was angry because I feltlike this guy picking on me. I felt that I was gonna, show them and I feltlike these guys. Don't know why I am. I need to show them who I am so IA. Ijust had a huge tip on my shoulder by the time that France was over. Iremember the varsity coach coming overseeing hey, I indoyou're gonna be playing with us.You know, because I didn't know if I was going to be on the freshman team,the JM team ith, the Paria, you know what that's like and he like what hesaw and he took up Shining Tome to Galikin to me and you know things kindof worked out from there. So you got through your high schoolexperience where you playing multiple sports. No, I wanted to play basketball, that'sa whole, another heart breaking story and, as everyone tells you, the WHODream Dies hard in my died early because I remember after footballseason was over, I go yet I just like what we did back. Then you? U and all this stuff, you just the FortPan around. You went playd that sport and so football seasos over now, I'mgoing to the basketball gym, knocking banging on the door. The door withnopen the basketball coat sticks his head out of the door to what do youwant? I just like we want to play basketball and he said where Dav youbeen, I said. Well, I was playing football. He was so assing, just that'swhere you got. I was like Really Owa, so im sitting there at the door. Ione of my other buddies he wants to play to and but my other buddy didn'thandle it as well. He starts yelling at the coach and the coast, slams DooraBot, ous right. He did so by the time I try to get parents involved in myfootball coaching Fal, my football cous. Just listen. Are you go when you go tocollege, you Gonto play football. An basketball, SAI GOTTO play football. Hesaid so that's what we're Goingno do. I I let's not worry about that guy you.You just focus on playing football and that's what we're going to, and it waslike that. I'M NOT gonna e Medrink, my whole life of land, high schoolbasketball and now because this coach he rather lose with the bad guys. Hehad then embracing all of the guys on a football team could play basketballright, and so, if Wen, none of us got to play because he he didn't, wantanyone who wasn't there full time N, I'm sure you remember running against afew of those coaches who had it in his mind and Eidn what talented playersthat Coan play multiple sports. Well, you know when I left the NFL andI coach High School football coaches, Eq Alliat, Foya, Lu, con and JohnBurohs School in St Louis, and I wanted our kids to play every sport. You knowand if kids had to leave football practice to go, run, track or get readyfor it or do do different things. I was completely fine with it and then a lotof our kids. They either played baseball orrandtrack and I wanted themto run track because I know how much that will help your ability right,because the Glliot was hurdler in high school and he was very good and we hadsome fast kids and I said in the coach the track coach said: Can we just getthose kids that are on your football team to run the four by four, but twoof them were playing baseball and the Baseball Code said I can't lose him. Ican't let them leave practice. I'm like it's baseball, not a Ron. This is runlo, go ron and come back. I had arguments all the time. Just let hem dowhat they want to do. Let them have fun and people don't see it. That way. It's sad!It's sad because your robbing kids of their dream- and you and I know thetime to dream- is when you're a kid. The time that to allow kids to exploseor and find themselves is when they're young is when theyrekid high school is the Goin to be the last opportunity for that kids aregoing to have to do all of these different things and if I'm not worriedabout my own selfish motives as a coat as you clearly understood this, you let the kids do what they what theyenjoy doing, because I'm gonna, if they come to me and they enjoy playing forme, we're Gonto win because theyl tallent it and the more that they canwork on all these multiple talents when they do come to play for me, they'regoing to be engaged, they're going to be more, will rounded and more developedand in better shape your football players who re UN track, probably we'rein better shape than the guys who did it well, they're not going to haveanimosity towards me right, that'Seguy Ist Uyin you're not going to get thebest of this ability. Aot Forget ABOUTT, Forgetso you're in high school, nowyou're playing football you're going to...

...your senior year, you're gettingrecruited. Tell me something, but your recruiting stories that you had well. It start it that summer, after myjunior year in high school and my coach, it was me and one other guy heas. Hewas we both were defensive, backs in our Secondar. I was one corner, he wasthe other and my coach, he says, look we're Goinna go to this summer. Can youguys are Goin to play in the camp but you're? Also Goen counsilors there I'slike okay, whatever you coast told you to do. You did right right. Thatitworks right, so N. I grew up in southern California, so,where we go down to San Diego River sides, only about an hour and a halffrom San Diego, we go down the Coachens Ruckin. His cap he'srunning the cat said Gilman hop, I Shi Gilit. I know anthing bout, it Gi anI'm a fifteen sixteen year old, kids Sayn, it's just great to me- he's gotguys like Marcus Alley. Coming over to the camp. Ronny lock coming in the KIF.Rodding lot went to high school and the Inlan enpire an southern Californiaand.So we could spend time with all these guys. I get to spend time with some ofthe coaches and they're talking to me and we're just having fun and werewatching tape, and I remember Sid Goand said what school do you want to go to,and I said now I want to go sowhere in the Midwest. I grew up in California.Lived in my whole life. I didn't want to go to school in the pack Tam,because Ihad just knew all those schoods. I wanted ie new, freshexperiences, and but I do know when this was all over. I was getting calledfrom all of those coaches, because some of the coaches and coach there over the summer we're guys, like BrianBillick, all right, John Fox Sean Patn- I mean they were just young guys right,theyrarted, beginning their journey is goaches and many of them had jobs atcolleges. They were coaching at college and they started recruiting me and sothat kind of was this beginning of this recruiting frenzy that you will know,begins to just become way too much for any kid to deal with, and I remember you know getting recruited. I went tothe University Colorado on Ta trip and then when I I was my last visit and Iknew I was going to go to school and Bot a chuck, fair banks who have beenin nfld coach. He was coaching care at the time off, fom, be a scholarship andso I'm sure sit. Gilmer had something to do with that. I don'tnow, but I doknow this. I never get home and my phone rang. It was the coache FOM UNLVand they want to bet come to younlv run.Randal Cunningham was quarterback there at the time, and I remember talking toJerry Tarcanian whin. I was there on my recruiting ship, and so I remember Italked to my mom when I got back from the UNLV trip, and I said I think Iwant to go school and you noand, she says were you're not going to schoolthere and I said mom. You said it would be up to me that I would get to decide.She says you can't decide your just not going to go to school. She Mik tand right away, and I was justreally telling you know e wanted to have the conversation to see what shethought about it. I found out right away and she was more pleased whun. Isaid I wanted to go to University of Colorado. She certainly approved of itand so Han. That's how I end up at the University of Colorado. There wereother schools that I had visited that were hot and heavy on me, but I, I n, 'really like a lot of that attention. I wanted it to be very simple and Iwanted to go to a place, an a school in a location that I felt I could changethe trojectory of my life with Education and sports and the Universityof Colorado was that place yeah. So you told us about going to ninth grade andthat because AAs a whole new school n, a whole new situation now going tocollege is very similar for you. What do you think you took from thatsituation? You went through ninth grade and then you put it towards going to anew school going to a whole new experience going from California toColorado. That's not an easy move. No It's far away from home and I had noidea. It would still be, has its own set of challenges right being so faraway from everyone, but I remember my you know: We Si signedthe papers. I was at my coach's House that morning my mom was there. Iremember my coach aid, my mob! Don't worry about this. One he'll be fine Yoand. I my bom that made her feel better because she was like yeah reallylike you and and so, but he knew something about me because one thing Ilove more than anyhing gus was winning. I mean I loved waining in I loved just doing everything that took to win,and I know that you have to be a good teammate. If you want t win, you got tohelp other players develop, yeah, you've got TA, really dig down deep andterms of your own personal development.

Make all the workouts do everythingthat you need to do, but you got ta drag teammates along some time you andI both no o a team with a lot of guys. We have a hundred guys at the iverse ofColorado. Now everybody wants to work out every day. Not Everybody wants toshow up to the othe weight room every day, but somebody's got to be thereMnot, just the coaches right, even when we would be maybe at a bar hanging onas players, and you see a teammate, and you know it's valuable to what you needto do on Saturdays, to win, games and he's going down the road it's going toget himself in trouble, get kicked off the team or maybe get suspended ormaybe not go in the class you' like Dod. What are you doing? We need know. Weneed Yo, weird games right, so I was always that guy know hat peope re likehere Osbut I wanted to win and I loke at the best for Teil. I wanted the bestfor me. I would have the best for us. I know if we won good things would happenfor all of us yeah. So your first year at Colorado, you guys didn't win. Ithink you won one game right that you're right now it wasbapretygoodthat's right. It was horrible. When I tell you there werechallenges because Ou Kno, where I was in high school, we want every game. Ihat wait was winny lookde. So now you get to this program and these guysdon't even want to play. Let Lo Wi yeah. We had some guys who were great, whocould play an with, but we didn't have enough because we're going up, againt,Nebraska, Tomosborn, loo, Oklahoma, Berry swittzright. I mean these. Werethe days of Marcus. Do pret right, hereit's like we've got, we got a workHott for is it, and so you know just overcoming those early years of maybe not having enough guys, not maybenot meaning enough, but I know at it meant to me to win and I knew what Iwas willing to do to win. I would look for other guys like that, and Iremember going to my Coachbil McCartney, who had come from Michigan. He had beenwith Bolshimback like he knew what it was like to win. He brought Awanycoacher there, man, I was all in on what he was selling and so my deal was.I told e Cressit goat. You know. I grew up in Compton California, before I wentto reverside a you e recripsone guys from La well Wa will be Oklahoma. I bet thebras ill. Tell you right now. I freak you guys in they're, not afraid I saidwe'll win games and he di no have to take it a few on Chand he cot like Wato,so I got to recruit all the guys. You know who would come, ont, O la andthere were some very talented players that we would bring out of there andobviously from other locations, and so I every week I was hosting youknow the Laer and I was like I was like the Guy Selling the program in Tryig toget the best players to help us win. Well, that's it! You know, players whobelieve in the program are the ones that really fell the program, becausewhen they bring the recruits in you know the coaches go out with them. Theplayers like, yes, is cool whatever, but when they want to go out with theother guys right, they want to go out the other players to really find outabout the program. The culture and all those things, so one thing I want toask you is you know, winning takes a lot of drive. A lot of work being incollege is a job basically for when you play football, you know how much workit makes not only on the field, but in the weightroom in the meeting room.Everything else that we do so tell me about your drive off the field and inthe classroom, because that is so hard for a lot of people to understand thathow how guys you know they just think that we go to college ton play football,but you had an innate drive in the classroom as well. Tell us about thatyeah! I did. You know. I grew up. My father is abaptist preacher, so I grew up in cuarch. My entire life right did everysingle week every single Sunday. So I love going to church. I love readingthe Bible, atd studying the Bible and I learne from that. I loved history andI' Love the literature, and so I get T ased a lot by teammates because I lovereading Shakespeare right and so that was that came natural and more easy forme, as I was studying literature at the University of Colorado. Well, I hadgreat college professors and I had a couple of them. Ask Me: What doyou really want to do it an yo? I would love to work in broadcast journalism. Ilove covering sports. I love story telling and Love Writing Love History,and so I always followe the NFL like I was a history. I knew everything aboutthe league ever you know from a time. I was kid right through High School NtoCollege Man. I knew all about all the great players I knew about how theLeague was founded in one thousand nine...

...hundred and twenty Aan aunomobiledealership in Kentn Ohio, not Eimnot, you got, I was like a nerd te as wich.Is I get keys by my tm? Like you know stuff nobody cares about, and so but anyway, that was my passionin the classroom. I loved English literature, Love Reading and writing. ILove Greek mythology and love reaissance to p period reading and sojust pulling all that together is kind of what helped me to just have thislove for proadcasting and storytelling, and it worked well for me in theclassroom. But I just remember what my I remember one of my professors, asaying you know you, don't you don't speak the way that you write and I waslike what do you think it wes like your writings good. But when you talk, yousound like your from the neighborhood right, but I was like Oh really, and so she began to tell me that if you, ifyou can, if you need to clean up just your presentation, she said you couldmake it in as a reporter as a sports reporter, youcound, do really well. She said, but I know how it is you're in the Lockroo,with all the guys, and you got to talk one way to be pleasing in their eyes.She said: Ut those days are gone. You've got to begin to Polish up yourlanguage, Polish up your presentation, and she impressed that upon me, and youknow she was one hundred percent right because later whenr I woul go workingin local television in Cincinnati Ohio. I remember my news director having thesame conversation which I had improved by the but still needed to improvefurther once he said it and said: Hey we're going to get you a vaist coast towork with we're gon to invest in you, because we think you have greatpotential buol man. I was all lid, so Yeasol, my academic experience ofColorado was was a phenominal one yeah! So hey everyone! where? U aretalking with Salomon Wilcotts. Solomon was obviously you've heard some of hisstory from through college we're going to take a short break, but you can findus on MTV and you can also finhd US on N Snd, Sixhundred D. Thirty one digitalnews, RADIOCOM Apper, you can check, is out on hutdle up with Gus Com. I alsowant to send out a shout out to all the people that take part and Huddl up withGos Terry Shoman. Thank you for all was finding our guests and booking them ekiss. Who Does our social media? Thank you so much and sonar who's working allthe magic behind the scenes today at MTV. Thank you soar. We're going totake a quick break. Wil Be right back to hear about Bolmin's adventure, anAnifa, hey listeners, thanks for joining Dave,and I in the huddle we invite you to join ourchcusive huddle through Patreon,where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself, headto our website, huddloe up with Guscom and hit support our podcast on the popup ad. Once again, that's huddle up with gusscom. Now, let's get back inthe huddle, everyone welcome back. That was alittle half time break. We had to go in and talk to our coaches, we weren'ttackling very well. So we got our expert tackler here with us. who was adefensive back. You know he played at Colorado now we're going to hear abouthis journey into the NFL. So Solomon tell us about your senior year. Howyou're feeling tells about that? Because people don't understand howexciting that is, for a player in college to get to the ultimate spotright. That's what you thought about. You obviously were somebody who learnedabout the NFL from when you were young. You love watching e hearing about thehistory learning about the history now you're going to get to go. Do it? Whatwas that like for you yeah? It was great. You know I'm comingoff this final season at the University of Colorado. We go to back to back bullgame, something that hadn't occurred over the previous ten years. Weactually do beat Nebraska for the first time in quite some some time, and sowhenever you, I think you can lift the program. I think it shows somethingabout who you are as an individual and as a person, and so when my name wascalled in the eighth round of one thousand nine hundred and eighty sevendraft, and I heard Dickla Bau on the other end, an you're going to theCincinnati bingos wherit can't wait to coach it yea. I didn't even know whereCincinnati was. You know. I grew upout on the west coast that never been eastof the Mississippi to be honest with you, but I do know that they had goodplayers. I I knew about Anthony Muyo and Maxmontoya because they are fromsouthern California play tat, USC and Ucla. I knew about Chris Collese were theboomersiacidand Eddi browns, really...

...tanu talented, often to players. So Iwas like hey. You know, hat it's Ki, it's an opportunity, I'm going to giveit my best shot and, as you will know, in those days you aveer twelve roundsin the draft man. I if you made the roster, I thinkthere were fifty two players in Kfif hudred and fifty three, but there wasno developmenl squad. There was no practice Quak, you Madtean, I thinksincyou all right, yeaand so made the team, but remember eightyseven was a strike year. So two games into my rookie season IM celebratingthe lake team. I got this great dream job right as a dinifo player now out ofa job because we're on strike I'm getting pressure from the team to crossthe the picket line play with the replacement players. I'm like I'm notdoing that it a I became very descrumbined. You know what I toldMyself Gust, I'M gonna go, get a real job and that's what I did. I went andscarted interviewing from work. I found a job working for in a management train program for eInsurance Company right here in Cincinnati and then five weeks later wewere back at work and you know I finished off my rookie season, but II'm telling you mat. I had a bad taste in my mouth about this NFL thingbecause N it's highly uncertain right. We knowthat what thing is certain is that its a hundred percent injury prom. So I waslike I need to get a real job and- and I decided football would be my parttimejob. I sometimes I still second guess that, because I'm like man, I couldhave probably been a better player and I invested more into it, but it wassomething I just didn't trust and I dew that I would have to eventually go geta real job, and so I continue to work every year in the offseason and what Ifelt was going to be my fulltime job for the rest of my life yeah. But I think that it's importantfor what you do currently that you did play in the NFL, because you were inyou were ingrained in the thing and and that created relationships and gave youopportunities so that if you did want to go interview, somebody that they arelike. Oh yes, Alman played it's a lot easier for us when we go and approachpeople that have played in the League or want to go talk to coaches, andthings like that. So I'm sure that your experience as a player helped yourexperiences later on when you became a broadcaster and doing everything elsethat you've done. Oh absolutely, and I still had this love for football. Istill wanted to play. I wanted to be out there and that's why you know thevery next year, I'm the starting free safety for the Cincinnati thing wasGoan. We go to a super bowl, and so I was still about winning. I was stillabout formulating great relationships and and Dick Lebo, who still one of mygreat mentors of all time. You know I got to work with him. I got to workwith some really good players and go play on a team in Minnesota with theVikings which had four five callof famors on it from chrisa harder. Chris Doman, unfortunately passed awaythis past year, but John Randol Randam mcdaniel, sometruly great players, and now I got to go to Pittsburgh and good Aron Woodson.Still a great friend of mine, we still have formulated a relationship thatstill lasted this day, he's a nfl all of famor, so God blaves Om, great guys,three different teams, an guilt of great relationships and so yeah. I hada wonderful time. I always believe, though man I couldhave got more out of it could have went longer. I thought we all kind of feelthat way, but it's all over yeah so tell us about. I think onething people you know we everybody obviously watches the NFL. I think thathe ratings are still high. You know it's eighteen out, F, O twenty of thetop shows and and people love it. You had an experience like I never got toexperience hat. You got the experience going to a super bowl right, so tell usabout that journey, going up to the SUPRBOWL. Then you get to that week andwhat it was like for you, because you know you got to be excited nervous. Allthese things put together, yeah. You know, you know how it is and Super Bowseasons just kind of it just becomes it takes on a life of its ALLN, and I remember, for us isprobably week two or three we were going out to play the PhiladelphiaEagles and those were the days of Bunny Ryan was the coach of the Egles. Theyhad ramble Cunningam at quarterback and they had Chris Cara Keith Jackson Tighten why receiver Mi, quick, oh they were talented man. An defense I mean ReggieWhite, Rome, rown, seth, Joynor, pliht, Simmons Man. I have nominal defenselet', so was ricky waters a running back then...

...rickie wasn't there yet. No, he wasn'ttherehe still at noter day and he was getting ready to Joi them, probably Veoo San Francisco first, but yeah to this was like a eighty eight, and so I justremember that Wuld Bein a slop fest of the game and we end up winning. I wasat old, Veneran Stadium. We and we walked off the field that day, becauseyou know how this is. We we all thout to feel that they said we're a goodteam, because we just beat that tin and we felt like after that game there wasnobody, Whocu Bat usand, so that kind of confidence just started feeding onitself and next thing. You know with two and three and e four and fiveor sixin now, and we end up. You know you know, going get come Fou advantage andplayoffs now we're down in Miami getting ready to play the forty Nineisin the Super Bowl and our hid coape San Wis used to Coachwoodfield wash in SanFrancisco. He hoped develop in groom, Jo Moten, so we're going up against SAforty nine. I sceen that we felt we messed up against really well and sothat week was going along way until the night before the game, we had a playerby the name of Stanley, willison decided he was going to be doingsomething in his room and and next thing you know men Theyhad- to go in and get hem andit was horrible. He was doing drugs in this room right and e. He had he hadpassed out in his room and someone had come to get help and so why they weretrying refine him. Sam Wis comes lost and say guys. We lost Stanley becauseStanley had been suspended the previous year, the entire season for drug use.So it's like you knew this thing was haunting him just didn't know if he would Hav relapstat night before the game, so lose him he's a really good player and he's afriend we so our minds and hearts were with him hat did serve as a distraction.I don't care how you look at it, but we had to overcome it, go out and play andthen early in the game, one of our favorite players, Tom Chrome, Riethe,breaks his leg, compoul Fratur, I os horrible. So we lose him and now manwe're just battling. You know this game comes down to fine em seconds.Obviously one of those Joe Matana Game War. Hedrives. He goes ninety yards and the final fory seconds they scored touchdown and they beat us. I think sixteen thirteen or no wo thosand and sixteenby four points or whatever, and but that's the that game still lives in mymemory in my mind, but what a week, what a great experience to play on thatstage and just be Planne again some of the greatest players the game has everknown. It was you. No. I still pinch myself because Inever saw myself being there and even now, and I think back ARD. I still haveto pince myself to say and ask myself: Did it really happen right and do ou?Do you have those dreams like man? We were so close. You Non'te you so closelike it's like what was the game at Russell Wilson? They just beat thebikings right. They Giv the ball in the rain e. like he's, got a chance and youjust feel like. If he's got a chance, it's going to happen and Jet Lantanawas probably the same way. You know didn that dry, that last drive for youguys and you're like I just got to make a play and it just seems like t itdoesn't come together. It's crazy how that always happens, and even the greatquarterbacks like there's at some point on a drive right, they're, going to give you a chancethey're going to give you a chance. BCO They're, not perfect, right and sothey're goingto throw one at you and you better catch it you'r right, but itknow you dropp the inerseption and Youre. Like that was your chance, you know, there's always an opportunityhat, there's a fumble by a player and guess what they they recover. It youdon't that was your chance Yoa. I remember thinking that theentire weeks Alin just do what you need to do. Stay in control, just be ready foreverything, and it's and all you can do is- can control what you can controleit. The opportunity is going to present itself and you got to take advantage ofit. You just don't know when it's going to come or if it's going to be you oryour teammate, but somewar goingto have a chance to slam the door shut, and ifyou don't do it man, the great players are Goin to beach, because you cannotgive a guy like Joe Mytana a second chain. No, you can't yeah know and thatthat's what makes the Gran game great right and that that's what theannouncent we're talking about after that biking, Seattle game last week,was that this is what the NFL was all about. Given you know, it makes thegame why everybody wants to watch. It's the ultimate team Sport Rossel Wilsoncan make unbelievable place, but he had to have somebody make to catch as well,and then the defense gets chance to stop them right. Thet Vikings can saywhatever they hav their opportuny, but...

...you got to give them chance to stopOmka Ito ti e to times they got hem into fourth down and could not get astop so right, yeah. There you go so you go through this amazing career. Youhad on the field now you at some point. You say: Okay, I'm at Hem in Pittsburgh. What was e the kind of the mindset tosay? Okay now I need to transition to where I am not going to play the gameanymore, but I want to work. I want to stay in this game for the rest of mylife and I have an opportunity to do that. was there? Was it a conversationwith somebody, a friend, a mentor, your mom, anybody that really helped youslidify, where you're gon Ta Trans Transition into it was a combination ofthings at one I had an injury, it wasn't a real, traumatic injury or onethat could have prevented me from coming back to play. But I was I was anable t play so I went home my I was planng an Pittsburgh. My wife and kidswere in Cincinnati and at the funt time te found out. We were praygin it, so Ishe was having some test done. Those tests showed some significant thingswhen it came to the health of the BABYSO. I came back home to kind ofcare for that and then I just end up. Staying off. I didn't know that I couldgo back and play while leaving wife and kids. While we were expecting a thirdtile d. You know how you get those life choices that you got ta come to, and Idecided you know, I'm Gonta move on I'gotTA. You know I was one of thosethings and I had already had a job right. I already had my job, and so Idecided I was going to move on and give up plants of my last seasonwas in in ninety three, with with the Nie two excuse me with the Pittsburghsteelers. This would have been the ninety three season, and so we end uphatting our baby by babys is perfectly born. It was okay, even though we weretold it, it was going to be otherwise, but we were very thankful. It's Iwant't go to look a gift to Er, Somi'm, just Gong to glove forward and so andthen, as I was working in insurance, I got an opportunity to move over intoto work in local television here, the Cincinnati area with the NBC affiliateand Hane, and I loved it so much and was the only thing that I found thatdrew for me the same fassion that I had from plan and you know how it is Gusslif athletes find something like that that that the same git of passn thatthey had when they played the game. Oh, my goodness, you can't you becomeunstoppable and that's what it was like for me when I walked in a local TVstation kN. I was a good writer, so I worked as a writer producer editor.Then I became a reporter then became a local sports anchor and it just kind oftook off very quickly. So how do you? How did you take your love and passionfor winning into you know? Being a broadcaster, a journalist, a writer allthat like because you know it's hard to say I'm winning at this right, becauseit's there's no final score R. Anything like that, so you've been doing it fora long time and I obviously think you are winning. But how did you take thatpassion and convert it into what you've wanted to do? That's me were mytraining when I was in e management training program working for einsurance farm. It was a lot of the training that we got there really built on our competitive skillsas athletes. It was really important Bo shimfact t an. I was on the Board ofthe company that I worked for. I had great mentors in that company and theywere all athlete they were all former athletes, and so we would spend a lotof time sort of talking universally about the things the lessons we learnedin sports and how to take some of those things and how to use it in business,and so one of the things that I did when I went into local television is, Iwas able to keep score because it was mind job up to make the televisionstation money hthey Weren' Gonto they weren't gonna, put me on air if Icouldn't draw ratings, if I could o ties right by presens there, so I makesure I went out o talk to local sponsors got the sponsors for theprogramming that we wanted to do. I wanted to do certain programs and I wasa very creative person. I loved writing treatments. I covered collegebasketball covered Major League baseball on the local, the reds. Here Icome it. The universy of Cincinnati, bear cats and Bob hugins and savior andskip the proster. was there and lot of great players who are who went on playthe NBA? I'm covering these guys, so I just loved writing it's telling stories,and but I knew I had to help make the station money, and so I was able tokeap score much money. I was making up and O thiorprogressing for me and building relationships, and so all of those things just came togetherand it brought out the best to me because I got up every single morninglooking forward to going to work, yeah...

...so you're going to work in You'R inCincinnati, which you probably love, this Gig you're going out and yourtalking sports and you're interviewing some great programs and all the playerswithin that program and coaches. But then you want to take there's alwaysanother step right. There's that next level- and you know that's kind, Ithink is- is where you really started to excel was when the NFL network cameout right and then you took that next step. What was that next step to dayrecruit? You did you go looking for them? How did that work? Well, it wasfunny because I remember I was at a a night- have been a Thursday night orMonday night game. The bangals were playing at that time. They wer theHouston heoilers and I ran into a couple of ESPN guys Chris Bermin atmy Terico, and they ad saw my show by now m the sports anchor and I thinkthat's Sunday night. I was doing my show on Sunday night and they were intheir hotel and they must be watching by sportscast, and I was reallycreative doing my higherlights, I'm having Ford Soim Downn, the fieldandFir Burmins Oo. I saw you show you w great yeah, my thregos, like that's howwe all started. We started doing ATP as well. Yeahi didn't get the big offers,like you know, all the other guys oe Armin boomers like you out to beworking with us. You know, and then I think, one year later, theres a wholeanother year. Leer get a call from me. SPN I go out y audition, I auditionwith Steward Scott. We were on the desk and the audition went. Great stew wasgreat to me and I end up going there as a reporter. So remember. My First Lovewas basketball, so I always cou basketball locally. I cover theuniverse, yf Kentucky we Rick Cotino was there and they had those GreatKentucky teams playing in the tournament, and so I got to cover a lotof college. Hooms I got to you know, be a real bobby night, an Mi Asheky. It isus o, Livin, the Lihe. So now I'm going to his friend Er, I cun do more of that,and so three years later make alone story short. I went int IMMI as hesideline reporter, covering Sunday night football with Joe thisman andPaublic Ire and those guys it was Greay at then I go to work for CBS. I get toactually move into the booth to call games, and so, while I'm doing that theNFL network starts and they you know they were like hey. Would you like tocomework with us we're Goin to be doing things? You can still call your game.She CBS, so the people at CBS was great. Shamic mads was awesome about. It waslike yeah sure he could still do that and we love having you to call games w.They don't care if you go, do stuff for NFL network as well or, and that was areal blessing. So that's how I end up working simultaneously for CBS and NFNetwork for fifteen sixteen year Ron Right, you're, winning right, you Nowi,that's waiting, Gyou Wuld, the things to win, and I love that about it andthat you've had an amazing career doing this, and I think that it's not to be undersold that how muchyou love the history of the game has helped you when you go out and report on the game,because a lot of people don't know the history, so those little antidotes thatyou come up with when you're on the sidelin or in the booth or you'retalking in the studio. They just come to you naturally, because you know itso well, and that is hard for people to do. I mean I wach Aoto guys like men. Idon't know this. Guy knows what he's talking about in the booth. You know weseen the FT coming all the time, but you have it an ability, because youunderstand the history of the game and Youve studed it to talk to about reallyhow that whole time frame of you, growin up and all your experiences havereally led you to where you are today yeah. I think it's a really good point.Is You know mouth of gladwilt says thatwhen you have your ten thousand hours, you could become proficient at what itis. You Do, and I just felt like you know my whole life. It kind ofprepared me for a story as a storyteller right assomeone who loves the NFL loves the history of the NFL, what it representsand all of the key figures in terms of whether your Vinculin Bardy and whetheryou're George Halis on Tall Brown and Ar Sik Gilman right and how they fitinto the landscape of the National Football League and how these are whatwe call foundational figures and our suport are built upon these very important people that wewouldn't be here as e league if it were for these people and but it really doeshelp to know those things, because it puts into context man of the thingsthat I was covering on a datadat basis. When I went to go put together a turtlestory, real quick on the sideline many...

...times you don't get to write it down.You've got T, conceive it in your mind and they're going to come to you andyou've got to be able to tell store you gotto be able to do it right. Rih Timelive action, you're. Looking into that Lis, GIV a rebite on top of it. It's go!Tim Man, you Gota, go and so yeah, so I think a lot of my time as a reader, ana lover of history and then later became a writer, but Ialways Wen I'm talking to young people, and I talked to them about storytelling,her about being a good writer being able to generate your own offense as astory. Teller right, you got your reader first, you know. Reading is likemaking the deposit and writing is when you go to make a withdraw, and I think today, when Weo know as welook across the landscape of our country, and a lot of people want to beheard. A lot of people want to speak up on issues and politics or whatever inbusiness. You'e got to be a lover of knowledge. First, before you havesomething to offer. If you can't take into information how you're going todispense new information, that's going to be new and formative andentertaining okay, so you know we gotto be able to take it inand that's how it kind of changed my life, that's how I've been able to gofrom some kyof growing up in Compton California, it was a high school playerRiverside California, then in college at University of Colorado. Is thatalways loved learning ore always love taking it new information, because it'shelped me to become much better at the things that I do every single day yeah. I knew really good at it. So tellme about what's the next step for Solomon Wilcots, what what you know,because you have a drive that you know a lot of people understand your somepeople get compy. They just want to do the same thing. I understand you assomebody when I read your resume and look at your bio you're, always lookingfor something else like the next great thing that you want to do. You've beena part of companies. You've been part of broadcasting and radio. What is yournext step? That you say man. I really think I can go do this. You know fortwenty twenty five years I worked as a reporter broadcast. I spent a whole lotof time on the road and you know I've been calling games for CBS for sixteenyears, and you know I've never got into this because Col I want to be on TV. Icould just lat out T wa, it wasn't in my scope. I wantedto just be a journalist. I wanted to be a storyteller and hen now, I'm workingwith people and for people and it's always become pliche football player onTV, and nobody knows how you got there. Nobody even cares how you got there.They just like tell you what to do. Tell you what to say and I'm like.That's, that's not why I got into this and so glad te Gon to sort of diversifyterms of what I wanted to do and do some things that were more meaningfuland more subsetative for me, and I begin working with good friend througha public relations agency were based in New York and we work with biotech andbiopharmaceutical companies. We lonst the campaign to try to help it role,paces for a clinical trial for all siners, and I just got into it to helpout, and what I found out is that it was all part of Storytalin ats aboutmessaging. It was about putting together developing message to helpinform people, while it's important to get tested for mild, cognitive,imparament, and so what we did is we were able to enroll eleven hundredpatients in eleven months, weseveral record for a clinical trial study andthe time that we were able to roll that number of people, and so now I findmyself in New York we're going to New York, winning a public relations owarthat something I nee even thought id be doing. Ih we were able to grow thatbusiness and I still work with ruse partners we're based in New York. Westill do public relations work. I also do work with Chris Collinsworth Company.Pro Football Focus may have heard of him anfelt. Basically, all it is is adata analytics company and we do data analytics and we use it to help peoplebe more informed about decision making within the world of football ecase. Youand I both know when we play everyone was running the football on first day.The TAT is guess that you're going to be more productive. If you throw onefirst back and now you see more teams doing that when we were playing more toEverythan, you get the fordown, no matter where you are on the field. Youare punting every kin, funit, you go let in the box ravens one year ago,Guss. They used our data to leverage that information to understand that incertain situations you don't want to...

...give the Balt back to the opposin team,go for it on fourth pound. It's almost like getting a turnover right and solast yea the braivens converted. Seventy five percent of theirfourthdown plays when they went for it, and now they were able to Leav theleague and Scoryn. They were the only team last year to have it thirty ormore points, and they did it with primarily by one of the football not bythrowing they're russing team, anety thirty points and more. It was thefirst time we seen that happen in the whole history of our league. So I'mreally passionate about Dat, analytics about being smarter and seeing the gamethrough a different lancs. I told you I'm a lover of learning. I've alwaysbeen a curious souland when I'm learning new stuff, I'm having fun a soas you can see I've, I found something again that I'm just as passionate as Iwas when I actually played the game. I lost that passion working as atraditional broadcaster, but now I have that passion back yeah now you're backto winning. I love it. So that's the thing about it. Is You KN? Last night Iwas listening to. I was watching the game. I don't know if you watched itlast night between Tennessee and buffalo right, so buffalo scores Tha'regoing to go for two points. They run a little half roll out and I think JoshALN throws it away, but the announcer goes right after that. You know whatthe percentage is of plays that score. The most on two point: Conversions andthe other guy was like no. I have no idea and he said it's a draw and he I,if you think about it, a draw score. Sixty two percent of the time wherethese half roll ots fore like fifteen percent- and I guarantee probably gotit from PFF yeah- Is there's no doubt now. Here's athing, the drawplay isn't a hundred percent. Is it Rightitso? So there havebeen times winit's when it's not work, but it's been stocped now you wouldknow this. I think this is where dad, combined with the knowledge that youhave as a player tha two, both both of them together gets you closer to thesweet spot of where truth truly loves so think about it. How many times thatyou're on the two to yard line and you go empty? You motion people outthe linebackers, go weather right, well, Yoa, so quarterback whoto takes a threestep droping in plungees, tother, Gallup Dude. You can score a lot thatway. That's why you get that number to that. Sixty percent number, but you'renot going to get that if those lineback is go vacate, so there has to be a way of getting tothe more favorable situation that allows a drop later work and that'sreally where football knowledge combined with the Dada together. Gidgives you the answer that you're truly looking for it's not as simpl is justrunning the droplay. Every time you get down there right, you got to look torun the draw play again: AE more favorable situation and down on the twoyard line. Anyone can get two yards on the draw when you have no lineback eshat the second life right, Youj'St got to find the whole so hes Oso. One lastthing I want to ask you tell me about how dita analytics like for me when Iplayed. I can remember all the the offseason conversations with coachessaying: What do you need to do to get better? I said I don't know what I mean,I'm always going to work on footwork and you know accuracy different thingslike that. So tell me how an individual can use their data throughout the yearto become better, because I knew that I could throw the ball. My best.Completion percentage sometimes were dig routes and comebacks, and thingslike that. I was not as good on checkdowns and things, so those arethings that I had to work on, but that is all data right. I know that if I canget my completion percentage up to sixty percent and higher that I'm goingto have a better game. So tell me how players defensive and offensive IFE canuse that data to improve their skill, set very good question by the way. So,first of all, you use the data and say: Okay, where are my week, plants where?What does the metric say my week? Plants are, and so if the metric saysthat my week points are on Shetdowns, okay are on the inmore intermediateroutes of tin yards from the from the from the line ofscribise to ten yardsare behind the line. I really do need to work all thosethings because here's, why that's what the opponent knows about me also andthe opponent is going to try andbel ballot check. You hear this all thetime he makes players play left hand in our teams play left and what that means.It's going to force you to do the things that he knows. You don't do welland the things that you know you don't do well or no. You don't want to it.Rit If you don't become good at those Thingsi that'll be te. Sometimes youget inthe games. That's becomes your...

...only option because they're going totake the other things away from you. So the data suggests that, if this is yourarea of weakness, that's where you need to spend a lot of time working on thoseareas. So thet you bring that area weakthess up to the other areas ofstrength. That's not help you to be acome, AF, more well rounded player andnow teams can't target your area of weakness, because there are note- andthat's where Dan analytics it can help you to understand. Where do you need totarget and where you need to really focus your energy? Just like whenyou're studying your opponent, you know what they do in certain things, certainareas of down and distance fit certain personnel grouping. The lawprobabilities is they're going to do this, so that's another way that we useanalytics to at least understand what the probabilities are, and we can usethat knowledge to our advantage. We call it leveraging information to makebetter decisions. Do you think that's where, when announcers or peoplecalling the game are talking about, when a quarterback gets a matchup, youknow he's going there right that guy, the starting Qarner got hurt the backupcomes in, they throw a go rout right away or they're, throwing at them allthe time, because they understand that that data shows that this guy, thestarter, may have made the play. Sixty percent of the time the backups onlymaking. I thirty percent, so we're going to go after them. That's right,because when you think about moving the ball down the football field, it's likeit's quarterback n. He needs players around and he needs he's got a lotreceivers got ta tie it in he's. Got He's, got the guys resources. Thoseplayers are his resources. It's about the division of Labor. How do you getthe ball down the field we got to divide up? These plays Al Gotto, giveit to the running back. ALVA COMERA I gotta get into Mike Thomas, becausehe's my go to Gosh you get into certain situations. You Cun see the productioneven coming into the game who they want to go to in these certain situations.So, as the defensive back as a free safety, I got to use that informationto my advantage, knowing that, in this situation, this down e distance unthird down with this formation andthis personel grouping he's going to Michael Tops ow. Why would I si wait?I'm jumping that Rout Gus, I'm chopping it man, you know and that's all greatplayers Cet make plays by using that knowledge. You and I know this- We hadto study a lot of this stuff, and so I think, dad analytics I'll, give youone for fo quarterbacks that you'll love, because we have a data metric.This called TURNOVA worthy Clat, so say I'm thinking about signing aquarterback in free agency and both quarterbacks everybody thinks they'reboth equal, whether it was Ryan, Leag, pink manic coming out in te draftingright right, the Best Oth, the two you'r. So you look at the box score and thenumbers look almost idenfical. You look at the tape. Can't make up your mindwhen we have a metric. Thi Is turnup a worthy PLAC. Have you ever thrown aball to a receiver gust, the BOSL skips off the hand of the receiver and itgets interceptev Re tarn for a testdown, Oh yeah, and but by your name, this isintersumption Pixi. It's all the coach is looking at the set she said Gosthrough for interceptions that year for retur for Touchtan. Well, we have acategory that cals a turnoverworthy playes. If that way wasn't worthy of aturnover and by your responsibility and your performance on that play, itshould not have been a turnover well. Ile. Quite go ave been trying to getthat change forever. That's right because you threw right to the receiverand in Haneshi is nooo. So we have metric that clearly and more accurately sort of illustrate the trup offormanceof players, including quarterbacks, so that the evaluation process can be morecomplete and more accurate, and so we want to rightfully assign the evaluation or how a player perform.We want to get that as Apurate as possible, so the players and coachescan make better decisions when signing player and free agency or who to draft,and so I think I think, quarterbacks really like that Oturnoverworthy Plat,that that Blad was not worthy of a turnover and these per how you performand executed on that specific clasp, all right, laugt one- and I know thisis big because everybody is doing it now. There's gambling there's fantasyfootball and the data and analytics and the outh of AI and all that have tocome from somewhere and I'm sure that your ANALAC, your data, is used for allthose types of things, because people...

...that make our game great are all thefans right. We have obviously great town out there, but the NFL wouldn't bewhat it would be if we didn't have the fans- and you guys were giving them away to use that data to whether whatever they needed for fantasyfootball. I'm like LAST IN MY DIV my league right now, but you know what areyou going to do so? I need some help in that data. Bu Know You guys are helpingwith that. So talktos a briefly about that and then let ut all of our fansknow Solomon how they can find you how they can follow you where you're goingto be next and what the best way is. You know what charities you're dealingwith all those types of things appreciate it and obviously you canfind all of our data just go to pffcom. You want a subscription to pro footballfocus at pffcom because we have Green Line. Our Green Line is our gaminginformation that if you go there as a subscriber, you get all the informationn help you with your decision in terms of how teams are evaluated, why theyperform and how they stack up against the competition. For that week, we havea fantasy line. We have that vertical, where you can subscribe to our VanFanasy Information College, when you're trying to draft players and understandwho are the best players, we've got all these verticals and all thisinformation and the subscription is really very much affordable. But it'sgreat information, particularly if you are a Gamer you're. If you do want toplace e Bat- and I talked about having worked in insurance many years ago, when I worked as anunderwriter and as you will know, if you are twenty five year old college,gratuate you're going to pay a different premium for your insuranceand the guy who's. The twenty five year old guy who y have dropped out didfinish high school he's going to pay a higher braving because we metrics hismatrics and your matrics are different. That's what Dava Ataletic is. It'scalled actuarial science, so data atalymics has been around that long.It's been used by assurance companies toto establish the price of premiums.Those same kind of metrics have been used by casinos. Okay, this got anactualariof science, which we now know today is dad analytics have been used.It was first used by insurance companies. Secondly, used by casinos.Okay, don't understand probabilities, oay this game versus that team. What'sthe chance of this team score, O their very first possession against thisdefense? That's given them thirty points a game. These are all datapoints to help go into formulas, to determine probabilits and that's whatthat analytic says and that's Lhi E. Those who use it are going to besmarter than those who don't it's just right. You'RE gonna be able to make aninform decision, and so I don't gamble, but I do know peoplewho say look. They coal be sitting down black to that table and they'll say Idon't gather other people get. I don't gamble and the reason why they'resaying they don't Gab us because they know they're making an informeddecision ther. This is their making come with knowledge. They have certaininformation, they're, smart enough. They know them Mat, they can do themath in theyre her very quickly and then they can make a decision on whatthey're Goingno do. So that's what dat analytics is all about, and so forthose people who are gamers. If you can't do the math in your hand, let usdo it for you. All you got to do is Gor PFFCOM and sign up for a Green Lineproduct and you get all the help and all the information you want for thework that I'm doing. If you go to Russo partners, llccom Yo see all the workthat we're doing with our public relations firm and space, biole techand bio pharmaceutical companies. We do everything from advestor relations tohelping with clinical trial recruitment. I love the work that we're doing thereand also with Seris Xm NFL radio, where you can hear me every single morning oninffi channel. Eighty eight, where we're hosting shows from seven am toten aof eastern time this morning on is on with former New York giants offence.Ivvinent David Deal tomorrow, Lon with former difver broncos whyle receiverant mccafferey's a great guy to work with, but heach stay at home withsomeone differently, but I'm the lead host on the show hat. We talk in a filmfootball, so, as you can see, cause onweare many hats, I'm very busy, butI'm winning right, I'm with it right Wen it well t at that comes from a longbackground of winning so Solomon. I think you and I could talk all day. Iappreciate you joining me in the huddle. It was a great way to catch up with youto find out about your life. These stories, I think, are important for ourwhole society here that that we all can...

...change. We all can transition, and youknow what my favorite thing about the whole show was you got to put theinformation in before you could take it back out right, you got to read and theway you put it. I don't remember exactly how you put it, but it wasawesome. That's what our fans need to do. You got to look at the data you gotto bring it all in before you can put it back out so Solomon. Thank you forjoining me on the huddle up with guss. I really appreciate it. I appreciateyou to, and you can follow me at Solomon's wisdom at Solomon's, wisdomon twitter, so thank you. Gus Greatly, Appreciateou, all right, everyone! Youcan check out and find your wisdom. If you follow Solomon's wisdom he's goingto lead you in the right direction because he knows way more than anybodyelse. I guarantee it so everyone. I want to really thank you for joining meon huddle. U, with Gulson listening to another episode check I out on Huddo up,I GCOM you can check us out on the RADIOCOM appor wherever you listen toyour favorite podcast, and also on the new sixteeen thirty one digi on news sohave a great day everyoneon. He check you out next week. Thank you for joining Dave and I in thehuddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast if you like, to hear more podcast, justlike this go to huddle up with Guscom, where you can find our social channelssubscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join our excusivehuddle through patreon. Please doin US next week when we talk to more guestabout how sports shaped their life.

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