Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Solomon Wilcots

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining me in the huddle this week is former Nfl defensive back Solomon Wilcots. You may know him from television and radio but he played for six years in the NFL and always had a plan to be successful. My favorite story of the podcast, he tells me of his dream to play basketball but how the High School basketball coach would not let him in the gym after football season. He knew football was going to be his choice after that.   Solomon has served in many roles across the landscape of broadcast television and radio, including studio host, anchor, analyst, and reporter.  He joined CBS Sports in March 2001 as a Game Analyst, giving viewers first-hand game insights on the network's marquee sports brand, The NFL on CBS. He also has served as a live game analyst, sideline reporter, and field reporter for major sporting events which include the network's coverage of Super Bowls XLI, XLIV, and XLVII (2007, 2010, 2013), and the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship (2003-05). Having joined the NFL Network at its inception in 2003, Solomon currently serves as a studio analyst, reporter, and contributor for the Los Angeles based station, which is also Wilcots' home town.  He first appeared as host of the NFL Network program, Playbook, but is now currently seen across all of NFLN's platforms, namely, their signature show, Total Access.  He simultaneously hosts TNF Storylines, which appears on NFL Media's digital platform, and is the only interactive in-game analysis in the NFL that integrates social media.  Wilcots is also a weekly contributor for NFL.com during their Thursday Night Football broadcasts, and previously wrote columns for them as well. A versatile talent, Solomon is host of Sirius Satellite Radio's The Sirius Blitz, and co-host of their daily NFL show The Opening Drive, with Bob Papa.  In addition, since 2014 Wilcots has served as an analyst for the Cleveland Browns' preseason broadcasts.  Prior to that, he spent six seasons, from 2007 to 2012, serving as a game analyst for the New Orleans Saints' preseason broadcasts. Solomon joined CBS Sports after working for ESPN as a Bureau Correspondent and Sideline Reporter for its national coverage of Sunday Night NFL games, where he received an Emmy Award in 2000 for his live reporting.  He also covered the PGA's U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament, NBA Finals & Western Conference Finals, and Major League Baseball games for the cable network.  Before ESPN, he served as the weekend sports anchor for WLWT-TV News 5 in Cincinnati from 1994 to 2003.  Additionally, Solomon worked as studio anchor for Fox Sports Net's college football show. Solomon played four seasons in Cincinnati, with the Bengals (1987-90), where he currently resides, one with the Vikings (1991), and finished his six-year career with the Steelers (1992).  He was drafted in 1987 as an eighth-round pick after starting for two years as cornerback for his university in Boulder.  While attending school in Colorado, he majored in English Literature, and studied in the school of Journalism.  He also helped lead a program turnaround which led the team to two consecutive bowl game appearances. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joining us in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts frout, alongside my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar, where we talked to guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on our website, how up with Gustscom, where you can listen to more episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle. Hey everyone, on your host, Gust Rout, to have you back on huddle up with gusts. You can listen to us on the RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You can also check us out on how to up with Guestscom, or you can find us here in the thirty one digital new studio. We're not actually in the studio today. We're in my son's bedroom. You know, I make him look at pictures of me all the time. So there I put some pictures up behind me so everybody can check them out. But that's from when I want the MVP with the lions, when I played there one year. So today, you know, we're not joined by my cohost Dave Hagar today, you know. So I'm running this one alone and I'm speaking with a former NFL DB today, but we all know them. You'R are are going to recognize his face. He's been around and been a part of the NFL for a long time. He's reported on it through radio, through television. You know, he just has an amazing story and I think if we want to talk to somebody about how sports shaped their life, Solomon Wilcox is one of those people that we're going to talk to you today about how sports shapes of life. So, Solomon, thank you for joining me in the huddle. How are you today, Gus? I'm doing great and thanks for having me on. It's really good to be with you. Yeah, so we're excited to hear your story, you know, because we all have these crazy paths that we take in our life and choices and decisions and and I've read a lot about you and some of the stuff that that you know, you talk about in you know when I got on your website, and you talk about what your mom told you and all these things, and we're going to get into that, but let's find out about the beginning when you were growing up. What was that first moment or memory that you have where you fell in love with sports? Wow, I yeah, that's a really great question. I just remember, you know, playing basketball. I have three older brothers, right, and so I we've played basketball in the driveway and I have a really good friend down the street. He was just ten times better than I was and as my older brothers were. And you get to the point where you can actually beat those guys, you could beat older guys, you could be David, the guy everybody looked up to. You just you worked at it right, because the first time you tried it they were just kicking your buck man, and there's something inside of you it was like, wait a bit, I could do better than that. It's a you just start working at it, you get a little bit better that, you get a little bit better and next thing you know you get competent and then you become good at it and you end up beating people that you never thought you could be. And so that's kind of how sports really does help ingrain in US our competitive level. It helps us to understand how you work at something. Hey, you can get good at this, it does turn around for you and we learned it. Never take no for an answer. Right, Gussrie Mikes you know, you're gonna tell me I can't do something it. After you do something like that, we beat in your older brothers and beat the best kid on the blocks man it. Now you're convinced that you could do the impossible right, you know, and what's great about playing sports like that growing up is that we didn't have a parent, a ref or coach out there with us. We've had to figure out everything on our own, and that thought you so much about sports and I feel we miss that today. How do you feel about like the kids that just are playing single sports and they're always driving, parents are always driving around, other than going out and just picking up a basketball or a batting a ball or football and just going to play? Yeah, I think that's a that's something that has become ingrained in the culture. Right I always tell kids it's got to be your thing. I tell parents it's got to be their thing. It's got it's got to be something they want. If you want it more than the kid, that it's your thing, it's not the kids, I think, and they're going to find a way to check out. They're gonna find a way to do something that they want to do and at the end of the day when they get old enough to realize that they have some say, Soell with what they're going to do with their lives. That's exactly what they're gonna do. They're they're gonna make their own decisions, and so just make sure early on that it's their thing, that the passion is is driven internally by themselves, not by the parents saying, okay, you got to go out and practice, okay, you should be doing this. Okay, here's what's next on your schedule. You can't script their lives for them. You should be helping them to understand...

...that they could do that for themselves and just see what they're passion lies and what they prefer to do and how they prefer to do it. They'll find a way, I'm telling you, kids will find a way, and that's what I found. I found that I didn't like losing and I didn't like being bad at anything, and so I was going to work my tail off to make sure those two things didn't occur the same way with me. Right, if I was bad at something, I'm like, man, I'm not very good at this, I probably won't don't want to play this right, or I don't want to be a poltist and then when I found sports that I was good at because I had a strong arm, I could play baseball, throw football, mile do those things. So those sports came more natural to me. So what other sports? What did you play when you were a child? Well, basketball is my first love. It really was. It was the sporting il all every time you played. Who Were you? who was your idol's a cool was I was either DR J or, you know, Norm Nixon, because I grew up in La as a Laker Fan. Then I you know, I pretty much I loved, you know, Magic Johnson when he came to Los Angeles. So they did. After that it was magic all the time, right. Yeah, mad were you the assist leader on your home court? Oh, absolutely, because I played point guard and the guys I played with, ire was our center and forward. Those are the guys I it was my job to distribute, get them to ball, and so that's kind of what we did, you know. So I loved basketball. It was it was always there for me, and then I later started playing football. It fell in love with it and I had three older brothers. You used to pound on me. I finally wanted to hit someone else and so I remember when I went out for football, I played, you know, run about, play a lot of different positions, but I loved playing on defense and I love playing defensive back because I got to hit someone without getting in trouble, if you know what I mean. Right, right. So do you have a memory from you when you started playing football? Like my first memory of football was not a good one. Like they put me on the offensive line because I was tall, and I remember this dude hit me right in the face. I fell back on my butt and you know, I was like in sixth grade. I hated it. I'm like, I'm not playing this game. You know, then I could figure out that I could throw the football, which then let me become who I was today. So do you have a memory of that? Like what is that play that you remember from a kid? Oh, I just remember not even understanding everything was moving so fast. I mean I'm talking in the very first game I played in. I was made twelve years old, sixth grade, and got in there and did not know what to do. Awhere to go, and it was just it was just, Hey, you know how it goes, right, and everybody me out of there. It's telling me what I need to do whatever, because I just didn't know where to even focus my eyes right, you know, because I want defense. It would have been better if I have played on offense first, but I played on defense first, and your if your eyes are in the right place, Hey, you're just gonna be lost. And so after that he put me in and I, you know, I figured it out. He kind of gave me some instruction in the game kind of slowed down. I begin to make plays. But no, the first time I ever gotten to a football game it was not pretty and I think a lot of guys would probably share the same story that you and I have. It. It wasn't you don't have to be good or great in your first experience. I think the ability to overcome some of those bad moments. That's the journey of life and, as you well know, that's also the journey in sports. Well, that's where all the adversity you learn how to deal with it right that you have bad moments and then you go back out and you try it again and don't give up on things. And so then when you get into high school, right, because we all play these sports, and then we go in the ninth grade, kind of that first year of high school. For most of us it's pretty difficult because then we're stepping up. You know, there's older kids were playing with. What was that experience for you when you go from you know your kind of I think that seventh eighty, sixth grade, that's all the same sort of but you go to that high school level, then you got to play with a different kind of older kids, right, and then you got to figure out how you keep up with them as well. Oh, that's a really good point, because I went to high school. I grew up in Los Angeles and went to high school out on Riverside California, so I didn't know any of the other kids as I was transitioning into high school. I didn't grow up with that group and everyone was a total stranger and I remember I was almost traumatizes. I walked through one of the locker rooms and a varsity player started chaining me because I'm not supposed to be in the quote Varsity Locker Room like your kid me, and I just remember that kind of sparked in me a competitiveness because we hadn't even been on the practice field yet. All right. That there it kind of threw down...

...the gauntlet right and I can tell you right now, and I hit practice still later that day. I was here hunt. I was not happy. I was angry because I felt like this guy would picking on me. I felt that I was going to show them and I felt like these guys don't know who I am. I need to show them who I am. So it was I just had a huge chip on my shoulder by the time that practice was over. I remember the varsity coach coming over see hey, you're gonna be playing with us, you know, because I I didn't know if I was going to be on the Freshman Team, the JAB team or the bars. That's like, you know what that's like. And he liked what he saw and he took up shining to me, to go lin to me, and you know, things got of worked out from there. So you go through your high school experience where you playing multiple sports. No, I wanted to play basketball. That's a whole nother heartbreaking story. And, as everyone tells you, the WHO Dream Dies hard and my died early, because I remember after football season was over, I go, you know, I just like what we did back then. You were you and all this stuff. You just the sport Paer around, you win played that sport. And so football seasons over. Now I'm going to the basketball gym, knocking, banging on the door. The door would not the basketball COO sticks his hand out of the door to what do you want? I was like we're going to play basketball, and he said where have you been? I said, well, I was playing football. He was a last and just that's where you go. I was like really, it was a hard so I'm sitting there at the door, got one of my other buddies. He wants to play too, and but my other buddy didn't handle it as well. He starts yelling at the coach and the coach slams door a boat us right he did. So by the time I try to get parents of ball all the my football coach involved. My football coaches listen, are you gonna when you go to college? You gotta play football basketball. Say I'm gonna play football. He said, so that's what we're gonna do. He said, let's not worry about that guy, you you just focus on playing football and that's what we're going to and it was like that I'm not gonna beat me not. I dreamed my whole life of playing high school basketball and now, because this coach he rather lose with the bad guys he had, then embracing all of the guys on a football team can play basketball, right, and so it. But none of us got to play because he did. He didn't want anyone who wasn't there full time. I'm sure you remember running against a few of those coaches who had it in his mind or he didn't want talented players who can play multiple sports. Well, you know, when I had left the NFL and I coach high school football coaches, Eki Elliott and for you, Lucon and John Borough School and St Louis, and I wanted our kids to play every sport, you know, and if kids had to leave football practice to go run track or get ready for it or do different things, I was completely fine with it. And then a lot of our kids they either played baseball or ran track, and I wanted them to run track because I know how much that will help your ability. Right, because the zk Elliot was hurdler in high school and he was very good and we had some fast kids. And I said, and the coach, the track coach, said, can we just get those kids that are on your football team to on the four by four, but two of them were playing baseball and the baseball coach said I can't lose them, I can't let them leave practice. I'm like, it's baseball. Let wrong, this is wrong. Let go run and come back. I had arguments all the time. Just let him do what they wanted to, let them have fun, and people don't see it that way. It's sad. It's sad because you're robbing kids of their dream and you and I know the time to dream is when you're a kid. The time to allow kids to explode or and find themselves is when they're young, is when their kid. High School is going to be the last opportunity for that. Kids are going to have to do all of these different things and if I'm not worried about my own selfish motives as a coach, as you clearly understood this, you let the kids do what they what they enjoy doing, because I'm gonna if they come to me and they enjoy playing for me, we're going to win because they're talented and the more that they can work on all these multiple talents, when they do come to play for me, they're going to be engaged, they're going to be more will rounded and were developed and in better shape. Your football players who run track. Probably we're in better shape than the guys who did it. Well, they're not going to have animosity towards me. Right, that's right. I think you fight coach the guy isn't fully in, you're not going to get the best of the ability that. Forget about it. Forget about so you're in high school now, you're playing football, you're going to your senior year,...

...you're getting recruited. Tell me something, but you're recruiting stories that you had. Well, it's started that summer after my junior year in high school and my coach, it was me and one other guy who was he was we both were defensive backs in our second are. I was one corner, he was the other. And my coach he says, look, we're going to go to the summer camp. You guys are going to play in the camp, but you're also going to be counselors there. It's like, okay, whatever your coach told you to do, you did right. Right, how it works? Right. So I grew up in southern California. So where? And we go down to San Diego, river sides all about hour and a half from San Diego. We go down the coaches rookets his camp. He's running the Camp Sid Gilman. Of It's said Gilman About Sid Gil but I'm a fifteen, sixteen year old kid. Said is just great to me. He's got guys like Marcus Ali coming over to the camp, Ronnie Lot coming in the cafe. Ronny Lot went to high school in the inland empire and Southern California and so we could spend time with all these guys. I get to spend time with some of the coaches and they're talking to me and we're just having fun and we're watching tape and I remember said Gilman said what school do you want to go to? And I said now I would have us where in the Midwest. I grew up in California, lived in my whole life. I didn't want to go school in the pack team because I just knew all those schools. I wanted new, fresh experiences. And but I do know when this was all over, I was getting calls from all of those coaches because some of the coaches have coached there over the summer were guys like Brian Billick. All right, John Fox Sean Peyton. I mean they were just young guys right they they were taking aready beginning their journey as coaches and many of them had jobs at colleges. They were coaching in college and they started recruiting me, and so that's kind of was the beginning of this recruiting frenzy that you will know begins to just become way too much for any kid to deal with. And I remember, you know, getting recruited. I went to the University Colorado on a trip and then when I was my last visit and I knew I was going to go to school in bold a, Chuck Fairbanks, who lived in an NFL coach, he was coaching there at the time, off from me a scholarship, and so I'm sure Sid Gilman had something to do with that. I don't know, but I do know that as I remember get home and my phone rang and it was the coaches from U and LV and they wanted me to come to UNLV. Run Randall Cunningham was the quarterback there at the time and I remember talking to Jerry Tarkanian while I was there on my recruiting ship. And so I remember I talked to my mom when I got back from the UNLV trip and I said I think I want to go to school, and you enough me. She says we're you're not going to school there. And I see, mom, you said it would be up to me, that I would get to decide. She says you can't decide, you're just not going to go to school. She mixed that deal right away and I was just really telling you know I wanted to have the conversation to see what she thought about it, and I found out right away and she was more pleased when I said I wanted to go to University of Colorado. She certainly approved of it, and so then that's how I end up at the University of Colorado. There were other schools that I had visited that were hot and heavy on me, but I didn't really like a lot of that attention. I wanted it to be very simple and I wanted to go to a place, in a school, in a location that I felt I could change the trajectory of my life with education and Sports, and the University of Colorado was a place. Yeah, so you told us about going to ninth grade and that because as a whole new school in a whole new situation now, going to college is very similar for you. What do you think you took from that situation you went through in ninth grade and then you put it towards going to a new school, going to a whole new experience, going from California to Colorado. That's not an easy move. No, yeah, it's far away from home and I had no idea would still be. has its own set of challenges, right, being so far away from everyone. But I remember my you know, we sigh signed the papers. I was at my coaches house that morning. My mom was there, and I remember my coach said that my mom, don't worry about this one. He'll be fine, you know, and I my mom that made her feel better because she was like, you really likes you and and so. But he knew something about me, because one thing I love more than anything, Gust, was winning. I mean, I loved winning and I loved just doing everything that it took to win, and I know that you have to be a good teammate. If you want to win, you got to help other players develop. Yeah, you've got to really dig down deep and terms of your own personal development and make all...

...the workouts, do everything that you need to do, but you gotta drank teammates along sometime. You and I both know the team of a lot of guys. We had a hundred guys at the University of Colorado and now everybody wants to work out every day. Not Everybody wants to show up to the to the weight room every day, but somebody's got to be there more, not just the coaches. Right, even when we would be maybe at a bar hanging out as players and you see a teammate that you know is valuable to what you need to do on Saturdays to win games and he's going down a road that's going to get himself in trouble, get kicked off the team or maybe get suspended or maybe not going to class. You like, Dude, what are you doing? We need know, we need to win games. Right. So I was always that guy. You know that. People will like, Oh, here comes solve it, but I wanted to win. Yeah, I wanted the best for them, I wanted the best for me, I wanted the best for us. I knew if we won, good things would happen for all of us. Yeah, so your first year and Colorado, you guys didn't win. I think you won one game right now, you're right. Now, even bad. Right, you're a three, you pretty good. That's right. It was horrible. We're not telling you. There were challenges, because you know where I was in high school. We want every game. I ate why it was winning. Look deep. So now you get to this program and these guys don't even want to play, let alone win. Yeah, we have some guys who were great, who could play and would, but we did have enough because we're going up against the Braska Tom Osborne, the Oklahoma Berry switch, right. I mean these are the days of Marcus Dupre right here. It's like we've got a we got a work cutout for us. And and so, you know, just overcoming those early years of maybe not having enough guys, not maybe not meaning enough, but I know it Admitt to me to win and I knew it. I was willing to do to win. I was looking for other guys like that. I remember going to my coach, Bill McCartney, who had come from Michigan. He had been with both Shin Beckler. He knew what it was like to win. He brought a winning coach are there and man, I was all in on what he was selling. And so my deal was. I told her. I said, coach, you know, I grew up in Compton, California before I went to rear sign. I say you let recruits, some guys from La will win, will beat o Clona, will beat the brass. I tell you right now. FRE Some guys in. They're not freak. I said, will win games. And he didn't have to take it a few one of Chee and he's got like well, so I got to recruit all the guys, you know, who would come out of La and there were some very talented players that we would bring out of there and obviously from other locations. And so I every week I was hosting, you know, these layers and I was like I was like the Guy Selling the program and trying to get the best players to help us win. Well, that's it, you know, players who believe in the program are the ones that really sell the program because when they bring the recruits in, you know, the coaches go out with them, the players are like yeah, that's cool, whatever, but when they want to go out to the other guys, right, they want to go out the other players to really find out about the program, the culture and all those things. So one thing I want to ask you is, you know, winning takes a lot of drive, a lot of work. Being in college is a job, basically, for when you play football, you know how much work it makes, not only on the field but in the weight room, in the meeting room, everything else that we do. So tell me about your drive off the field and in the classroom, because that is so hard for a lot of people to understand. that. How how guys, as you know, they just think that we go to college and play football. But you had an innate drive in the classroom as well. Tell us about that. Yeah, I did. You know, I grew up my father as a baptist preacher. So I grew up in church my entire life, right, did every single weeks. It was Sunday. So I love going to church. I love reading the Bible and studying the Bible and I learned from that. I loved history and I loved literature, and so I'll get teased a lot by teammates because I love reading Shakespeare Right, and so that was that came natural and more easy for me as I was studying literature at the University of Colorado. Well, I had great college professors and I had a couple of them ask me, what do you really want to do and a city? I would love to work in broadcast journalism. I Love Covering Sports, I love storytelling and love writing and love history, and so I had always followed the NFL like I was a history I knew everything about the league. Ever, you know, from time I was kid right through high school a through college of me. I knew all about all the Greek players. I knew about how the League was founded in one thousand nine hundred...

...and twenty at an automobile dealership and Kenton, Ohio, Noky, you got. I was like a nerd beyonce with I get teased by by team. They like, dude, you know stuff nobody cares about. It's so but any way, that was my passion in the classroom. I loved English literature and Love Reading and writing. I Love Greek mythology and love renaissance period reading and so just pulling all that together, it's kind of what helped me to just have this love for broadcasting and storytelling and it worked well for me in the classroom. But I just remember one of my I remember one of my professors of saying you know, you don't you don't speak the way that you write, and I was like what do you need? They were like your writing's good, but when you talk you sound like you're from the neighborhood right, and I was like Oh really, and so she begin to tell me that if you if you can, if you need to clean up, just your presentation. She said, you can make it in it as a reporter, as a sports reporter, you could do really well, she said, but I know how it is. You're in the locker room with all the guys and you got to talk one way to be pleasing in their eyes, she said, but those days are gone. You've got to begin to Polish up your language, Polish up your presentation. And she impressed that upon me. And you know, she was one hundred percent right because later when I would go working in local television and Cincinnati Ohio, I remember my news director having the same conversation, which I had improved by there but still needed to improve further. Once he said it's it, hey, we're going to get you a voice goes to work with. We're going to invest in you because we think you have great potential. Hell Man, I was all in. So yes, my endemic experience of Colorado was a phenomenal yeah. So, hey everyone, where you are talking with Solomon Willcott's Solomon was obviously you've heard some of his story from through college. We're going to take a short break, but you can find us on am TV and you can also find us on six thirty one digital news RADIOCOM APP or you can check us out on huddle up with gustscom. I also want to send out a shout out to all the people that take part in huddle up with gusts. Terry Showman, thank you for all these finding our guests and booking them, and kids, who does our social media, thank you so much, and Sonar, who's working all the magic behind the scenes today at AMTV. Thank you, son our. We're going to take a quick break. Will be right back to hear about Solomon's adventure in the NFL. Hey listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, huddle up with Gustscom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad. Once again. That's huddle up with gustcom. Now let's get back in the huddle. Hey everyone, welcome back back. That was our little halftime break. We had to go in and talk to our coaches. We weren't tackling very well, so we got our expert tackler here with us, who was a defensive back. You know, he played at Colorado. Now we're going to hear about his journey into the NFL. So, Solomon, tell us about your senior year, how you're feeling? Tell us about that, because people don't understand how exciting that is for a player in college to get to the ultimate spot. Right, that's what you thought about. You obviously were a somebody who learned about the NFL from when you were young. You loved watching, hearing about the history, learning about the history. Now you're going to get to go do it. What was that like for you? Yeah, it was great. You know, I'm coming off this final season at the University of Colorado. We go to backtoback bowl game, something that hadn't occurred or the previous ten years. We actually do beat the Braska for the first time and in quite some sometime. And so whenever you I think you can lift a program, I think it shows something about who you are as an individual and as a person. And so when my name was called in the eighth round of the one thousand nine hundred and eighty seven draft and I heard Dick Labou on the other ends and you're going to the Cincinnati bengals. Can't wait to coach you. Yeah, I didn't even know where Cincinnati was. You know, I grew up out on the west coast that never been east of the Mississippi, to be honest with you. But I do know that they had good players. I remember I knew about Anthony Muyos and Max Montoya because they are from Southern California, played at USC and Ucla. I knew about Chris Collins worth, the bloomers, Sia said, and Eddie Brown's really talent, talented, often two players. So...

I was like hey, you know, it's got it's an opportunity. I'm going to give it my best shot. And if you will know, in those days you never twelve rounds in the draft and if you made the roster, I think there were fifty two players. They would keep five Thousan two hundred and fifty three, but there was no developmental squad. There was no practice squad. You made the team. Are they since you all right? Water and so made the team. But remember, eighty seven was a strike year. So two games into my rookie season are celebrating that made team. Are Got this great dream job right as an NFL player. Now I'm out of a job because we're on strike and I'm getting pressure from the team to cross the de Pict line play with the replacement players. I'm like, I'm not doing that, and so I became very discruntible. You know what? I told myself, Gust, I'M gonna go get a real job, and that's what I did. I went and started interviewing for work. I found a job working for in a management training program for an Assurance Company right here in Cincinnati, and then I we weeks later we were back at work and you know, I finished off my rookie season, but I am telling you that I had a bad taste in my mouth about this NFL thing because it's highly uncertain. Right. We know that. What thing is certain is that it is a hundred percent injury prone. So I was like, I need to get a real job and I decided football would be my part time job. I sometimes I still second guess that because I'm like man, I could have probably been a better player and I invested more into it, but it was something I just did a trust and I knew that I would have to eventually go get a real job and so I could see to work every year in the offseason and when I felt was going to be my full time job for the rest of my life. Yeah, but I think that it's important for what you do currently that you did play in the NFL because you were in you were ingrained in the thing and and that created relationships and gave you opportunities so that if you did want to go interview somebody that there are like, oh, yes, allom and played. It's a lot easier for us when we go and approach people that have played in the League or want to go talk to coaches and things like that. So I'm sure that your experience as a player helped your experiences later on when you became a broadcaster and doing everything else that you've done. Oh absolutely, and I still had this love for football and I still wanted to play. I wanted to be out there and that's why, you know, the very next year I'm the starting free safety for the Cincinnati Bangles and we go to a super bowl. And so I was still about winning. I'm still about formulating great relationships. And and Dick Lebow who still one of my great mentors of all time. You know, I got to work with him. I got to work with really good players and go play on a team in Minnesota with the Vikings, which had for five hall of famers on it, from Chris Harder to Chris Dohman, unfortunately passed away this past year, but John Randall, Randall mcdaniel, some truly great players. It never got to go to Pittsburgh and good rod woods. It's still a great friend of mine. We still have formulated a relationship that still lasted this day. He's a NFL Hall of Famer. And so got blaze, some great guys three different teams. It builds great relationships and so, yeah, I had a wonderful time. I always believe, though, man, I could have got more out of it, could have went longer. I thought. We all kind of feel that way, but it's all over. Yeah, so tell us about I think one thing people, you know, we everybody obviously watches the NFL. I think the ratings are still high. You know, it's eighteen out of twenty of the top shows and people love it. You had an experience like I never got to experience what you got to experience going to a super bowl, right. So tell us about that journey going up to the Super Bowl. Then you get to that week and what it was like for you, because you know you got to be excited and nervous, all these things put together. Yeah, you know, you know how it is. been a super bowl seasons just knda. It just becomes it takes on a life of its own. And I remember for us, who's probably weak, two or three we were going out to play the Philadelphia Eagles, and those are the days of Buddy Ryan was the coach of the Eagles. They had randall, conny Hammock quarterback, and they had Chris Carter and Keith Jackson tight end. Why Receiver? My Quick Oh, they were talented man in defense. I mean Reggie White's Rome Brown seth joint or Flight Simmons Man. They had phenominal defense. Let's so was ricky waters the running back? Then Ricky wasn't there yet. Now he wasn't...

...there. He still having Notre Dame and he was getting ready to join them. Probably got to go to San Francisco first. But yet. So this was like an eighty eight and so and just remember that would be in a slump vessel of the game and we end up winning. That was that old veteran stadium. We and we walked off that field that day, because you know how this is. We all out the field that day said we're a good team because we just beat that team and we felt like after that game there was nobody who could beat us. And so that kind of confidence just started feeding on itself and next thing you know, with two and undred and three, at a four and all five, at O, six and O, and we end up, you know, you know, going get home field advantage of the playoffs. Now we're down in Miami getting ready to play the forty nine is in a super bowl. At our head coach, Sam wish, used to coach with Bill Walsh in San Francisco. He helped developing groom Joe Mon town. So we're going up against a forty nine is seem that we felt we messed up against really well, and so that week was going along well until the night before the game we had a player by the name of Stanley Wilson decided he was going to be doing something in his room and and next thing you know, man, they had to go in and get them and it was horrible. He was doing drugs in his room right and he had he had passed out in his room and someone had come to get help. And so why they were trying to revive him. Sam Wise comes to us and say, guys, we lost Stanley, and because Stanley had been suspended the previous year, the entire season, for drug use. So it's like you knew this thing was haunting him. Just didn't know if he would have a relapse the night before the game. So lose him. He was a really good player and he's a friend and week so our minds and hearts were with him. It did serve as a distraction, I don't care how you look at it, but we had to overcome it go out and play. And then early in the game one of our favorite players, Tim Crom Righte, he breaks his leg, compound fracture, horrible. So we lose him and now, man, we're just battling. You know, this game comes down to the final seconds. Obviously, in one of those Joe Montana game when he drives, he goes ninety yards the final forty seconds they scored touchdown and they beat us, I think sixteen thirteen, or no, two thousand and sixteen, by four points or whatever. And but that's it. That game still lives in my memory and my mind. But what a week, what a great experience to play on that stage and just be planned again some of the greatest players the game has ever known. It was I I still pitch myself because I never saw myself being there and even now, and I think back on it, I still have to pinch myself to say, and ask myself, did it really happen? Right and and do you do have those dreams, like, man, we were so close. You don't give you so close, like it's like, what was the game at Russell Wilson? They just beat the Viking. Right now they give the ball in the rain the like he's got a chance and you just feel like if he's got a chance, it's gonna Happen. And just my dad was probably in the same way. You know he wants in that drive, that last drive for you guys, and you're like, I just got to make a play and it just seems like it it doesn't come together. It's crazy how that always happens. And even the great quarterbacks like there's that some point on a drive, right, they're going to give you a chance. They're going to give you a chance because they're not perfect, right, and so they're gonna throw one at you. You better catch it. Yeah, but you know who dropped the interception and you like, that was your chance. You know, there's always an opportunity. There's a fumble by a player and guess what? They they recover it. You don't. That was your chance, you know, I remember thinking that the entire weeks, all the just do what you need to do, stay in control, just be ready for everything and is and all you can do is can control which you can control with the opportunity is going to present itself and you got to take advantage of it. You just don't know when it's gonna come or if it's going to be you or your teammate. Someone's going to have chance to slam the door shut and if you don't do it, man, the great players are going to beat you because you cannot give a guy like Joe Martin a second chance. No, you can't. Yeah, no, and that that that's what makes the great game great, right, and that and that's what the announcemers we're talking about after that biking Seattle game last week was that this is what the NFL is all about, given you know, it makes the game why everybody wants to watch. It's the ultimate team sport. Russell Wilson can make unbelievable place but he had to have somebody make the catch as well, and then the defense get a chance to stop them. Right, the bikings can say whatever, they have their opportunities, but you got to give them a...

...chance to stop them. So then get two times. They got them into four down. It could not get a stop. So right, yeah, there you go. So you go through this amazing career you had on the field. Now you see at some point you said, okay, I'm at the Mint Pittsburgh. What was the the kind of the mindset to say, okay, now I need to transition to where I am not going to play the game anymore, but I want to work, I want to say, in this game for the rest of my life, and I have an opportunity to do that. was there? Was it a conversation with somebody, a friend, a mentor your mom anybody that that really helped you solidify where you're going to transition, transition into. It was a combination of things. At one I had an injury. It wasn't a real traumatic injury or one that could have prevented me from coming back to plaque, but I was I wasn't able to play, so I went home. I I was playing at Pittsburgh. My wife and kids were in Cincinnati and at the front time we found out we were praying it. So I she was having some test on those tests showed some significant things when it came to the health of the baby. So I came back home to kind of care for that and then I just end up staying all I didn't know that I could go back and play while leaving wife and kids, while we were expecting a third child. You know how you get those life choices that you gotta come to, and I decided, you know, I'm going to move on, I'm going to you know, it was one of those things and I had already had a job right I already had my job, and so I decided I was going to move on and to give up plan. So my last season was in ninety three with with the ninety to excuse me, with the Pittsburgh steelers. This would have been the ninety three season. And so we end up having our baby by babies as perfectly born. He was okay, even though we were told it was going to be otherwise. But we were very thankful, and so I want to go look a gift to us. I'm just going to move forward. And so and then, as I was working in insurance, I got an opportunity to move over into to work in local television here in the Cincinnati area with the NBC affiliate and one, and I loved it so much. It was the only thing that I found that drew from me the same passion that I had from plans and when you know how it is because if athletes find something like that that they have the same kind of pass that they had when they play the game, oh my good is you can't. You become unstoppable. And that's what it was like for me when I walked in a local TV station. I was a good writer, so I worked as a writer, producer, editor, then I became a reporter, than became a local sports anchor and it just kind of took off very quickly. So how do you? How did you take your love and passion for winning into, you know, being a broadcaster, a journalist, a writer, all that like, because, you know, it's hard to say I'm winning at this right because it's there's no final score or anything like that. So you've been doing it for a long time and I obviously think you are winning, but how did you take that passion and convert it into what you wanted to do? That's we where my training when I was in a management training program working for an insurance firm, it was a lot of the training that we got there really built on our competitive skills as athletes. It was really important. Bullshit. Back when I was on the Board of the company that I worked for, I have great mentors in that company and they were all athlete, they were all former athletes, and so we would spend a lot of time sort of talking universally about the things that their lessons we learned in sports and how to take some of those things and how to use it in business. And so one of the things that I did when I went into local television is I was able to keep score because it was my job to make the television station money. They are they were going to they were going to put me on air if I couldn't draw ratings, if I could monetize right by presidents there. So I made sure I went out and talk to local sponsors, got the sponsors for the programming that we wanted to do. I wanted to do certain programs and I was a very creative person. I loved writing treatments. I covered college basketball, covered major league baseball or the local the raids. Here I cover the universe of Cincinnati bearcats and Bob Huggins and Xavier when skip prosser was there and a lot of great layers who are who went on to play in the NBA. I'm covering these guys. So I just loved writing and telling story reason, but I knew I had to help make the station money and so I was able to keep score with money I was making up and how they were progressing for me and building relationships, and so all of those things just came together and it brought out the best to me because I got up every single morning looking forward to going to work.

Yeah, so you're going to work in you're in Cincinnati, which you probably love this Gig. You're going out and you're you talking sports and you're interviewing some great programs and all the players within that program and coaches. But then you want to take there's always another step, right, there's that next level, and you know that's kind of I think is is where you really started to excel was when the NFL network came out, right, and then you took that next step. What was that next step? Today, recruit you? Did you go looking for them? How did that work? Well, it was funny because I remember I was at a might have been a Thursday night or Monday night game the bangles were playing at that time. They were the Houston the oilers, and I ran into a couple of ESPN guys, Chris Berman and might Tariko, and they had saw my show. By now, I'm a sports anchor, and I think a Sunday night I was doing my show and Sunday night and they were in their hotel and they must be watching my sportscast and I was really creative doing my highlights. I'm having fun. So down the field, Chris Berman's all I saw. You Show you who great O. Yeah, my three Goos like that's how we all started. We started doing looking TV and that's well, yeah, out of here. I didn't get the big offers like you're. All the other guys are. They're Bermit boomers like you. Ought to be working with us, you know. And then, I think, one year later, it's a whole another year later, get a call from ESPN. I go out, I audition. I auditioned with Stewart Scott. We were on the desk and the audition were great. Stew was great to me and I had up going there as a reporter. So remember, my first Love was basketball, so I always covered basketball locally. I covered the University Kentucky with Rick Pettino was there and they had those Great Kentucky teams playing in the tournament, and so I got to cover a lot of college rooms. I got to, you know, be around Bobby night and my Sheshefsky. It is I was living alive, and so now going to his prey and where I get to do more of that. And so three years later, make a long story short, I went and am as a sideline reporter covering Sunday night football with Joe Deisman, Paul McGuire and those guys and it was great. And then I go to work for CBS. I get to actually move into the booth to call games. And so while I'm doing that, the NFL network starts and they, you know, they were like, Hey, would you like to come work with us? I'm going to be doing things. You can still call your games from CBS and tell the people at CBS was great. Shaw. Mcmahannis was awesome about it. was like yeah, sure, you could still do that and we love having you to call games. We we don't care if you go do stuff for interfil network as well or that was a real blessing. So that's how I end up working simultaneously for CBS and in a film network for a fifteen, sixteen year run. Right, you're winning, right, you know that's waiting. You were doing the things to win and I love that about it and you've had an amazing career doing this and I think that it's not to be under soul that how much you love the history of the game has helped you when you go out and report on the game, because a lot of people don't know the history. So those little antidotes that you come up with when you're on the sideline or in the booth or you're talking in the studio they just come to you naturally because you know it so well, and that is hard for people to do. I mean I want a lot of guys like men. I don't know. This guy knows what he's talking about in the booth, you know, we see coming all the time, but you have it an ability, because you understand the history of the game and you've studied it, to talk to us about really how that whole time frame of you growing up and all your experiences have really led you to where you are today. Yeah, I think it's a really good point. Is You know, Malcolm Glad Wilt says that when you have your tenzero hours you could become proficient at what it is you do, and I just felt like you, you know, all my whole life it kind of prepared me for storied as a storyteller right, as someone who loves the NFL too, loves the history of the NFL and what it represents and all of the key figures in terms of whether your Vinculambardi and whether you're George Hallis, a Paul Brown and are sit gilman right, and how they fit into the landscape of the National Football League and how these are what we call foundational figures and our sport or built upon these very important people that we wouldn't be here as a league if there weren't for these people. And but it really does help to know those things because it puts into contexts many of the things that I was covering on a daytoday basis when I went to go put together a turn the story real quick on the sideline. Many times you don't get to...

...write it down. You've got to conceive it in your mind and they're going to come to you and you've got to be able to tell a story. You have you able to do it right, right time, live. Actually looking into that lends wing to real light. On top of it, it's go time and you gotta go. And so yeah, so I think a lot of my time as a reader and a lover of history and then later became a writer. But I always when I'm talking to young people and I talk to them about storytelling, her about being a good writer, being able to generate your own offense as a storyteller. Right, you have your reader first. You know, reading is like making the deposit and writing is when you go to make a withdraw. And I today, when you know, as we look across the landscape of our country and a lot of people want to be heard. A lot of people want to speak up on issues and politics or whatever business. You've got to be a lover of knowledge first before you have something to offer. If you can't take into information, how you're going to dispense new information that's going to be new, informative and entertaining? Okay, so you know, we got to be able to take it in and that's how it kind of change my life. That's how I've been able to go from some kid growing up in Compton, California who's a high school player of Riverside California, then in college at the University of Colorado, is that always loved learning and always love taking in new information because it's helped me to become much better at the things that I do every single day. Yeah, I knew really good at it. So tell me about what's the next step for Solomon will cuts. What what you know, because you have a drive that you know a lot of people understand you're some people get company. They just want to do the same thing. I understand you as somebody when I read your resume and look at your bio you're always looking for something else, like the next great thing that you want to do. You've been a part of companies, you've been part of broadcasting and radio. What is your next step? Do you say, man, I really think I can go do this? You know, for twenty, twenty five years I worked as a reporter broadcast. I spent a whole lot of time on the road and I've been calling games for CBS for sixteen years. And you know, I've never got into this because, quote, I want to be on TV. I could just flat out it was. It wasn't in my scope. I wanted to just be a journalist. I wanted to be a storyteller. And now I'm working with people and for people and it's always become cliche. Football player on TV and nobody knows how you got there. Nobody even cares that you got there. They just want to tell you what to do, tell you what to say, and I'm like, that's that's not why I got into this. And so I had begun to sort of diversify terms of what I wanted to do and do some things that were more meaningful and more substantive for me, and I began working with the good friend through a public relations agency. Were based in New York and we work with biotech and biopharmaceutical companies. We lost the campaign to try to help your roll paces for a clinical trial for all signers and I just got into it to help out and what I found out is that it was all part of storytelling. It's about messaging. It was about putting together developing message to help in form people while it's important to get tested for mild cognitive impairment. And so what we did is we were able to enroll eleven hundred patients and eleven months we set a record for a clinical trial study and the time of that we were able to roll that number of people. And so now I find myself in New York. We're going to New York winning a public relations award. That something Mary even thought I'd be doing. Right. We were able to grow that business and I still work with Roussel partners. Were based in New York. We still do public relations work. I also do work with Chris Collinsworth company pro football focus. You may have heard of them, DFL. Basically, all it is is a data analytics company and we do data analytics and we use it to help people be more informed about decisionmaking within the world of football. As you and I both know, when we played, everyone was running the football on first down. Datas yes that you're going to be more productive if you throw one first down, and now you see more teams doing that. When we were playing, more to every team. You get the fourth down, no matter where you are on the field. You were plunting. Everybody. Punt it, do you go? Let at the ball. For Ravens one year ago, Gust they used our data to leverage that information to understand that in certain situations you don't want to give the ball back to the opposing team.

Go for it on fourth dound. It's almost like getting a turnover right and so last year the Ravens converted seventy five percent of their fourth down plays when they went for it, and now they were able to lead the league and scoring. They were the only team last year to average thirty or more points, and they did it with primarily by running the football, not by throwing. They are rushing team age thirty points and more. It was the first time we seen that happened in the whole history of our league. So I'm really passionate about dad analytics, about being smarter at seeing the game through a different lands. I told you, I'm a lover of learning. I've always been a curious soul and when I'm learning new stuff I'm having fun. And so, as you can see, I've I found something again that I'm just as passionate as I was when I actually played the game. I had lost that passion working as a traditional broadcaster, but now I have that passion back. Yeah, now you're back to winning. I love it. So that's the thing about it is you. Last night I was listening to I was watching the game. I don't know if you watched your last night between Tennessee and Buffalo. Right. So, buffalo scores, they're going to go for two points. They run a little half roll out and I think Josh Allen throws it away, but the announcer goes right after that. You know what the percentage is of plays that score the most on two point conversions? And the other guy was like, no, I have no idea, and he said it's a draw. And he said, if you think about it, a draw scores sixty two percent out of the time, where these half rollouts for like fifteen percent. And I guarantee. Probably got it from PFF. Yeah, there's no doubt. Now here's the thing. The draw play is in a hundred percent. Is it right? It's so, so, there a bit times when it's when it's not worth when it's been stopped. Now you would know this. I think this is where data combined with the knowledge that you have as a player, that to both both of them together gets you closer to the sweet spot of where truth truly lies. So think about it. How many times that you're on the tot yard line and you go empty? You motion people out, the linebackers go with them. Right. Well, yeah, so quarterback, who do who takes a three step drop it in, plungers to want to go. Dude, you can scorel up that way. That's why you get that number, to that sixty percent number. But you're not going to get that if those linebackers don't vacate that I have tell him. So there has to be a way of getting to the more favorable situation that allows a draw play to work, and that's really where football knowledge, combined with the data together get gives you the answer that you truly looking for. It's not as simple as just running to draw play. Every time you get down there, right, you got to look to run the draw play again some more favorable situation and down on the two yard line. Anyone can get two yards on the draw when you have no linebackers at the second left right. You've got to find the whole. So he's not all right right. So one last thing I want to ask you tell me about how data analytics like for me when I play it. I can remember all the offseason conversations with coaches saying what do you need to do to get better? I said I don't know what I mean. I'm always going to work on footwork and, you know, accuracy, different things like that. So tell me how an individual can use their data throughout the year to become better. Because I knew that I could throw the ball my best completion percentage. Sometimes we're dig routes and comebacks and things like that. I was not as good on checkdowns and things. So those are things that I had to work on. But that is all data, right. I know that if I can get my completion percentage up to sixty percent and higher that I'm going to have a better game. So tell me how players, defensive and offensive, why I can use that data to improve their skill sets. Very good question, by the way. So first of all, you use the data and say, okay, where are my weak points? Where we're what does the metrics say my weak plans are? And so if the metrics says that my weak points are on checkdowns, okay, are on the inmore intermediate routes of ten yards from the from the from the line of strips to ten yards are behind the line, I really do need to work on those things. Because here's why. That's what the opponent knows about me also, and the opponent is going to try to and build bellot check you hear this all the time. He makes players play lefthanded. Our team's play lefthanded. What that means is going to force you to do the things that he knows you don't do well and the things that you know you don't do well or, no, you don't want to do, and if you don't become good at those things, that'll be the sometimes you get into games that's becomes your only...

...option because they're going to take the other things away from you. So the data suggest that if this is your area of weakness, that's where you need to spend a lot of time working on those areas. So then you bring that area of weakness up to the other areas of strength. That's going to help you to be become a more well rounded player. And now teams can't target your area of weakness because there are not and that's where down analytics. It can help you to understand where you need to target and where you need to really focus your energy. Just like when you're studying your opponent, you know what they do in certain things, certain areas of down a distance, with certain personnel grouping. The law probabilities is they're going to do this. So that's another way that we use analytics to at least understand what the probabilities are and we can use that knowledge to our advantage. We call it leveraging information to make better decisions. Do you think that's where when when announcers or people calling the game are talking about when a quarterback gets a matchup, you know he's going there right that guy the starting corner got hurt. The backup comes in, they throw a go route right away or they're throwing at them all the time because they understand that that data shows that this guy, the farter may have made the play sixty percent of the time, the backups only making a thirty percent. So we're going to go after them. That's right, because when you think about moving the ball down the football field, it's like it's quarterback and he needs players around and he needs he's got a lite receivers, got a tie in, he's got it, he's got the guys resources. Those players are as resources, and it's about the division of Labor. How do you get the ball down the field? We got to divide up these plays all. I got to give it to the running back, Alvin Camera. I got to get it to him, Mike Thomas, because he's my go to. Gosh, you get into certain situations, you can see the production even coming into the game, who they want to go to in these certain situations. So as it defends back as a free safety, I got to use that information to my advantage, knowing that at this situation, this down, at distance, on third down, with this formation, this personnel grouping, he's going to Michael Thomas. Now right, good, I wait, I'm jumping that route, Gus, I'm jumping it, man, you know, and that's all. Great players can make plays by using that knowledge. You and I know this. We had to study a lot out of this stuff, and so I think dad analytics. I'll give you one for four quarterbacks that you will love, because we have a data metric that's called turnable worthy Clat. So say I'm thinking about signing a quarterback in free agency and both quarterbacks, everybody thinks they're both equal, whether it was Ryan Lee Peinte Matti coming out in the drafting right, he's the best of the two. You so if you look at the box score and the numbers look almost identically, you look at the tape, can't make up your mind. Well, we have a metric. This is turnable worthy plays. Have you ever thrown a ball to a receiver? Gust the boss skips off the hand of the receiver and it gets intercepted, return for a testdown? Oh yeah, yeah, but by your name is says interception, pick six, and so the coach is looking at the statue. She'd said he we'll gust through for interceptions that year for a return for touchdowns. Well, we have a category that calls a turnover worthy plays. If that play wasn't worthy of a turnover and by your responsibility and your performance on that play. It should not have been a turnover. Well off quarterback has been trying to get that change forever. That's right, because you threw it right to the receiver. Any man hands this shit is not a bit of turtle. So we have metrics that clearly and more accurately sort of illustrate the troupe of formants of players, including quarterbacks, so that the evaluation process can be more complete and more accurate. And so we want to rightfully assign the evaluation or how a player performed. We want to get that as accurate as possible so the players and coaches can make better decisions with signing player in free agency or who the draft. And so I think. I think quarterbacks really like that returnover worthy play, that that play was not worthy of a turnover, and these per how you perform in executed on that specific clasp. All right, last one, and I know this is big because everybody is doing it now. There's gambling, there's fantasy football, and the data and analytics and the use of AI and all that has to come from somewhere, and I'm sure that your analytics, your data, is used for all those types of things, because people that make our game great or all the fans right. We have obviously great...

...talent out there, but the NFL wouldn't be what it would be if we didn't have the fans, and you guys were giving them a way to use that data to whether whatever they needed for fantasy football. I'm like last in my division, my league right now, but you know, what are you gonna do? So I need some help in that data, but I know you guys are helping with that. So talk to him briefly about that and then let all of our fans know, Solomon, how they can find you, how they can follow you, where you're going to be next and what the best way is. You know what charities you're dealing with, all those types of things. Appreciate it and and obviously you can find all of our data. Just go to pffcom. You want a subscription to pro football focus at pffcom because we have Green Line. Our Green Line is our gaming information that if you go there as a subscriber, you get all the information help you with your decision in terms of how teams are evaluated, why they perform and how they stack up against the competition for that week. We have a fantasy line. We have that vertical where you can subscribe to our Vampi fantasy information college when you're trying to draft players and understand who are the best players. We've got all these verticals, all this information and the subscription is really very much affordable, but it's great information, particularly if you are a Gamer your if you do want to place a bed and I talked about having worked in insurance many years ago when I worked as an underwriter. And as you will know, if you are twenty five year old college graduate, you're going to pay a different premium for your insurance in the Guy who's the twenty five year old guy who may have dropped out, didn't finish high school, he's going to pay a higher premium because metrics, his metrics and your metrics are different. That's what data analytics is. It's called actuarial science. So data analytics has been around that log it's been used by assurance companies to to establish the price of premiums. Those same kind of metrics have been used by casinos. Okay, this kind of actualarial science, which we now know today is dad analytics have been used. It was first used by insurance companies secondly used by casinos. Okay, to understand probabilities. Okay, this game versus that team. What's the chance of this team scoring on their very first possession against this defense that's given up thirty points a game? These are all data points to help go into formulas to determine probabilities, and that's what Dada analytics see is and that's why those who use it are going to be smarter than those who don't. It's just right. You're going to be able to make an informed decision. And so I don't gamble, but I do know people who say, look, they can be sitting at a blackjack table when they'll say I don't gather. Other people can, I don't gamble. And the reason why they're saying they don't gambles because they know they're making an informed decision, that all this is they're making. Come with knowledge, they have certain information, they're smart enough, they know the man, they can do the math in they're head very quickly and then they can make a decision on what they're going to do. So that's what Dada analytics is all about. And so for those people who are Gamers, if you can't do the math in your head, let us do it for you. All you got to do is go to pffcom and sign up for a Green Line product that you get all the help and all the information you want for the work that I'm doing. If you go to Russo partners llccom, you see all the work that we're doing with our public relations firm and space biotech. At Bio pharmaceutical companies. We do everything from it investor relations to helping with clinical trial recruitment. I love the work that we're doing there and also with serious exit nfil radio, where you can hear me every single morning on nfil channel eighty eight, where we're hosting shows from seven am to ten am eastern time. This morning I was on with former New York giants offensive line at David Deal. Tomorrow I'm on with former different broncos wide receiver Ed McCaffrey's great guy to work with, but each day I mom with someone differently. But I'm the lead host on the show that we talked NFL football. So, as you can see, because I wear many hats, I'm very busy, but I'm winning right, I'm with it right, winning well. That comes from a long background of wedding so Solom and, I think you and I could talk all day. I appreciate you joining me in the huddle. It was a great way to catch up with you, to find out about your life. These stories, I think, are important for our whole society to here that we all can change, we all can transition. And you know what I'm my favorite thing...

...about the whole show was you got to put the information in before you could take it back out. Right. You got to read and the way you put it. I don't remember exactly how you put it, but it was awesome. That's what our fans need to do. You got to look at the day that you got to bring it all in before you can put it back out. So, Solomon, thank you for joining me on huddle up with guess. I really appreciate it. I appreciate Youtube and you can follow me at Solomon's Wisdom, at Solomon's wisdom on twitter. So thank you, gust greatly appreciate all right, everyone, you can check out and find your wisdom. If you follow Solomon's wisdom, he's going to lead you in the right direction because he knows way more than anybody else. I guarantee it. So everyone, I want to really thank you for joining me on huddle up with gusts and listening to another episode. CHECK US out on huddle up with guestscom. You can check us out on the RADIOCOM AP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and also on the new one, six thirty one digital news. So have a great day everyone, and will check you out next week. Thank you for joining David I in the huddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast. If you'd like to hear more podcast just like this, go to huddle up with Gustscom, where you can find our social channels, subscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join our excusive huddle through patreon. Please join us next week when we talk to more guests about how sports shaped their life.

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