Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 3 years ago

Ryan Fitzpatrick

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

FITZMAGIC joins the huddle as we discuss, quarterback battles, NFL locker room pranks, and his role in the Harvard band?

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

We all want health insurance, but things can get confusing and it would be helpful to have someone in your corner. That's why there's covered California. We make it easy to compare plans side by side so you can choose the one that's best for you. We're the only place you can get financial help paying for your health insurance, and every plan we offer includes free preventive care. So click the banner or visit covered seacom to see your options. Covered California. It's life care to have coverage starting January first enrolled by December fifteen. I am former NFL quarterback gusts, for I played quarterback fifteen years in the NFL. This is my show called huddle up with gusts. Each week I team up with my longtime friend Dave Hagar, and we talked with guests about how supports shape their lives. Pro Athletes, business executives, community leaders, everyone has a story to tell about sport. We invite you to huddle up with Guss this week. In the huddle. From the Hay capital of the world, Gilbert Arizona, to the ivy covered walls of Harvard to the palm trees of South Beach and seven very memorable stops in between. A former seventh round pick now and is fifteen season in the NFL, we are very happy to welcome into this week's huddle. You may know him as fits Magic Miami Dolphins quarterback, Ryan Fitzpatrick. Ryan. So what we do is we appreciate you coming on with us and what we're going to do is get in the huddle. So what we do is we get in the huddle, we break the huddle so we can go through different segments and we're going to go through your life a little bit, starting with your youth. So we're going to jump in the huddle right now with Ryan Fitzpatrick. Ryan. So one of the things we always start with is is how, when did you start playing sports and like what influenced you to start playing sports? was in an uncle, your parents, your brothers? What was it? Well, I have two older brothers that are a year and a half older and me, identical twins, and it was known from a very early age that we are going to be a sports family. I think my dad felt like that was something that was important. My brothers were very interested and so I just kind of fell in mind and that regard, but it was it was everything football, basketball, baseball, soccer. But the the unique thing, I think that we did when we were younger. My Dad like doing triathlons and races, and so we did iron kids when I was growing up. So we would do the little tryathlons, a swim, bike and run and we're very competitive and those my brothers were a little bit better than me, going to nationals and all that, but I was no slouch. And just growing up in Arizona, swimming was a big thing too. So we did summer swim team every year. Where would you guys swim? So we just kind of at the local the local there's a million swimming pulls out there, but the local team. I think we started off maybe at Gilbert High School, which is which is where I'm from, but we all swam until we were twelve and then moved on to other things. And my one older brother, the one that stuck with it, ended up being the swim captain at Notre Dame and a pretty good breaststroker, school record holder, all that stuff. So it was cool that he was able to stick with it. Woll what was your first team sport that you played? My first team score was soccer I played. I was really big into soccer up until the age of ten and that's when I made the decision I wanted to play tackle football, and so, with those two being at the same time, I kind of did soccer, which, coming full circle now, is very ironic because my wife was a soccer player at Harvard and is really pushing the boys to play soccer. And My boys are twelve and ten now and the twelve year old is kind of done with it. The ten year old is on the fence right now about...

...continuing to play soccer or making the jump to tackle football. So we're at that stage in my life with my kids right now, which is interesting. That's really interesting. Ryan. It that you know going through that because your wife was an athlete in a different sport, in you're obviously an athlete in football and and you know, we'll find out, I guess, over the next couple of years, who wears the pants in a family. I think, is what we're trying to figure out really. But anyway, so I want to go back to your childhood a little bit there right. So when you started playing youth football, did your brothers play with you or was it just you by yourself. So they, both my older brothers, played and one of them, one of them, broke his hand, I think the second year that he was playing and decided that it wasn't for him and that was that was fine with my parents, but in not playing tackle football, he had to find another sport to fill it with. So we are always active and that regard wasn't for my brother Jason, but my brother Brandon, his twin, played all throughout high school and he was a quarterback. So you know, he always wore number eleven and he was two years ahead of me in school, so I always wore number eleven and kind of followed behind him. So I think that brandon playing quarterback shaped me a little bit in terms of my interests and what I wanted to do. Now that that that's great. So we're your parents, like, did they push you to player? They just said, whatever you guys want to do, we just want you to play sports and be happy doing it. Yeah, I don't think they. They pushed us and encourage us to play sports and I don't think they cared what we did. You know, we whether it was golf, tennis, you know, we did some of that. Stuff in the summer to keep busy. No matter what it was. They just wanted us busy and active and certainly at that time there wasn't even a question of okay, well, you're going to focus on this sport and play it year round. We just did everything as a seasons came up and just did all of the wreck leagues. You know, there was no real travel or pressure to play on any of the travel teams or anything, and essentially it was just staying active and you know, we loved I loved every time football season would come around and I loved every time we get into basketball season and baseball and swimming and it was it was a fun little cycle that we had going on. But they encourage us to definitely play team sports and you know, it's just something we always kind of found something to keep us busy. So so if, like you, got hurt right. So, when I got hurt when I was in eighth grade, I know I hurt my foot really bad. Went Home and I said Dad, I don't know if I could play football. I hurt my foot really bad. He said, well, I just bought you those brand new cleats and I'll be damn if you're not playing football, so tie your shoe tighter and get back out there. And then I find out the end of the season that I did have a broken foot. But that was my dad right. We're your parents like that, or just like if you got hurt, that they push you to fight through it. Well, I think I think the example of, you know, if we're ever committed to something, they would make sure that we finished it. And you know, I think one example would be my older brother decided he wanted to wrestle, wrestle freshman year high school and realize right away it was a big mistake and didn't want to rest. But you know that are my dad especially. There was no there was no quit you once you once you decided you're doing something, you're going to stick it out for the whole time. So there is encouragement in that regard. You know, maybe a not a gentle nudge but a two handed Seo to stay out there, but that's that's just how it was and my house and once we committed something, we did it and I don't remember having too many, too many injuries growing up. But the other cool thing, I think, just as we're talking about this...

...and I'm thinking about it is. My Dad was there for everything, you know, and having four boys, the commitment that he had to making sure that he was working a job that he was going to be able to go to every football practice and every baseball practice, and he wouldn't necessarily the head coach or the manager, but he was there watching and he was very involved in what we're doing. And you know, the car rides home, whether it was from practice or games, after a good practice or game, you kind of enjoyed it. After a bad one, you knew you're in for a couple laps around the neighborhood and stirring talking to and that's the funny thing. Now, if my boys is I'm the exact same way. You know, they sometimes don't want to get in the car with that after a game, depending on how it went. But I felt like that was the key part of my childhood and what's made me who I am today, especially with competitiveness and sports, and something I really enjoyed that my dad did. Let me go quick sidebar on my mom real fast. The story I was just remembering. So a swim team in the summertime. Sometimes it was waking up at thirty and going to the pool and swoon for two hours and I think I was eight or nine at the time and I try to pull fast one on my mom because I didn't want to swim and, you know, my brothers were there and I forgot my suit, which I didn't really forget my suit, I just didn't put it on. I had some sweat pants on and she looked at me and she said, well, hopefully remember it next time and I swam the whole practice of sweatpants on because fast though the pretty big mistake. But Ryan, beside your father as an influence, was there a coach that stuck out that you remember is being a real motivator for you to, you know, continue to be good and continue to play on? I think I had. I had a lot of good coaches growing up. That was something that I just think in terms of my dad's presence and being there, he always made sure that a lot of them we're friends of his, but they were guys that were there for the right reasons and really there to teach the kids and trying to enjoy the whatever season it was. But my high school football coach, Mike Reardon, he was a guy that I really appreciated. We want to go onto your high school years, you know, being the big man on campus in Gilbert Arizona. What was it like grow growing up in Gilbert Arizona? Gilbert has changed a ton and the last twenty years just in terms of even just the population, in the growth and how many people are there. But it was it wasn't necessarily small farm town when I grew up there, but, as I like to explain it, behind our house there was a cornfield and you know, every Saturday, every other Saturday, the cropped uster would come right behind our house and it's probably what you have a nicer beer on their watch to drop chemicals on the plant. So it wasn't an enormous place but you know, it's it's it's a great place to raise a family. We have a home there now and eventually end up living there again. But high school was a lot of fun for me. A lot of great friendships and I was a football player, basketball player and did track as well. So just kind of kept busy, you know, with sports and academics throughout the year and fit some fun in there too. I made one trip to Gilbert in high school, coming up from Tucson. We're following our basketball team going to the state playoffs and they've never remembered being homered any worse than raths from Gilbert to the boys from South Point Catholic down in Tucson. I'd never seen any like it in any sports I've ever watched since. But it's just a side note. But it's still it's still a little bitter. As you there's not a lot of people that live in the valley that like the people from Tucson that are coming up. You know. Well, I probably don't want especially the referee. Well, I...

...can the feelings are mutual. Yeah, I know, I know that goes both ways for sure. So fits what you run in track, what you do and try. Were you javelin guy? So they didn't have the Javelin. I was interested in it, you know. I just did it really to stay in shape, and so I remember one of my math teachers, Mr Scholtz, I believe his name was, was so excited to get me out there. He's got it's got an athlete out there, the quarterback of the football team. So he throws me in the triple jump and immediately he realized that was a bit of a mistake and I wasn't the athlete he made me out to be. So I switched to the four hundred meters and really it was just to stay in shape. So I ran my rand my first meet, I think two weeks after we started training, and you know it heard the four hundred was a tough race but didn't think much of it. was beating everybody in the first two hundred and feeling really good about myself and then the proverbial what are we the monkey jumped on my back, or elephant or whatever it was, and I came to a screeching halt and essentially got beat by ten seconds by almost everybody in the field. So I learned a good lesson there and it really was just to stay in shape. I'm not any sort of track as fleet, but you know, it was a just have a fun time with my my buddies and to be out there doing something. And remember yelling at you a couple times when we'd have to run sprints at the rams, about slowing down. So I don't want to hear about these fast starts and the monkey jump on your back because, like, I think that carried through your whole career, where you start really fast, you know what they'll guess I'm feeling it now. I'm at the point that you were when I was a rookie, and now the rookies are running by me. So I know exactly why you used to get mad at me. Now. Yeah, well, I was really mad at you. I just I just had to have somebody that to gripe about. So, you know, because I was mad at myself for still having to run at that thirty six years old. So so fits. What what year were you when you started getting notice, as like understand that colleges were interested in you and and you really wanted to go to college to play football. So junior year of high school was the first season that I had started on Varsity and I got a little bit of interest after my junior year. Started getting some letters. My Dad was very proactive in terms of you know, we took we took some trips and took a trip to the east coast just to kind of check out schools and get a feel for and you know, I'd never I'd never been that way. So just to get a feel for that side of the country and you know, the just different schools other than Arizona State. And you have a and Ay you because those were the those are the three that everybody kind of did coming out of Arizona. And so I was, you know, continue to get letters, but when it came senior year to people actually putting an offer on the table, didn't get any. Didn't get any. Had A couple maybe's, but eastern Washington, out of the Big Sky, was the only school that offered me a scholarship. You know one Doaa School, which I guess FCS now, but that was it. And so I still had held out hope that maybe I could be a recruited walk on and go to a school, a bigger school, whether it be a, you know, Arizona State or a Notre Dame Stanford cal. I started looking at academic schools at that point and then, you know, I had some letters from his Ivy League schools and truth be told, that no idea, especially my junior year, that Ivy League schools played football. And so once I once I knew that no scholarship offers were coming my way besides eastern Washington, which which I went out there on a visit just to see it, because...

...they were the one that offered me, the one school that offer me, I took some visits to some Ivy League schools, Harvard Princeton, we did some MON officials or my dad took me out there and I just decided that I was going to try to go to the best possible academic school that I could go to, and that's why Harvard went to the top of the lift and I was a big reason why I chose to go there. I remember on my recruiting trip out there, the Charles River was frozen over in January and people were walking on it and me being a kid from Gilbert, Arizona, I didn't even know their rivers could freeze over. So that was a new experience for me. But I knew that if I was, you know, I enjoyed it in January and the weather was probably the worst, you know, I would I would probably have a good time there. But in hindsight, thank goodness Arizona State didn't offer me, because that would have been there and heartbeat and my life would be significantly different now than if I would have gone down that put. You know what, the funny thing was Dirk Cutter, I think it was his first year as a coach when I was a senior in high school, and so dirk didn't recruit me at all. And then, you know, twenty, let's see, two thousand and six, two thousand and seventeen, rolls around. I get a phone call with Dirk as the head coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, interested in bringing me on as a quarterback for their team. So I told him he was fifteen years too late, but decided to go with them anyway and have a good friendship with Dirk. Now, well, let's how the fits magic happened. Dirk brought the fits magic. I just think if he would, it's magic could have happened so many years ago if he would have just brought you into Arizona State. And so so go. Devil's fork them, Devil's Heyker's shaking his head over here. He likes to bear down a little bit. Fitzy and I who was that person in your household that pushed you to be great in academics? Well, I think again, the same with the same with sports. You know, both my parents were just they encourage us. I think my brothers a little bit. I Fed off of them in terms of their success and it was always just an expectation in the household that you're going to come home with straight a's and if you didn't there was a problem, and so I just think there was a good example set for me. And you know, it was just school for a while came very easy to me. So like that, that was part of it as well. But I think the the work ethic that was instilled in us and really just the expectation as well that bees were not good enough from a young age set me on the right path. Ryan. Now you've transitioned into Harvard. You left the sunny, warm, just feeling of Arizona. Now you're in Cold Boston and and what was your first time on Harvard's campus like that fall? Well, I you know, I went out I think two weeks early maybe, for for camp for football before school had started, and it was a rude awakening because, yeah, Boston gets cold in wintertime, but it can get pretty toasty, pretty humid and the in the summertime and none of the building set are conditioning. So that one to me, coming from Arizona and thinking that you could actually build a dormitory or, you know, any sort of place permanent establishment without air conditioning was a big shocker to me. So I sweated a little bit for the first a few months, but once once school got going, boy I thought he's a route awakening to get in. You know, you start your football stuff, you feel like a fish out of water. You're trying to meet new people and then to get all the academic stuff thrown on you. If your classes and a competitiveness. It's a tough that first semester, such a tough semester to get acclimated and try to figure things out. But you know, I think again alluding to coach Murphy and the...

...job that he does and the way that he helped guys out and tried to set you up for success. Learn some time management skills right away. That helped me throughout, and I would also say before school started, when we're out there for camp, I got the first glimpse of my now wife, Liz a lies a barber at the time and it took me a full two and a half years to say anything to her, but she certainly caught my eye that day. WHOA that early? I didn't know that. Yeah, right away it was like, you know, the soccer team and the and the football team kind of ate eight our meals at the same place in Dunster. Hall and and Yeah, so you guys heard it on as it ends, of the hall eating and then, like every like couple weeks, you'd move a little closer. It took about two years to actually sit beside her. Yeah, that you know. I yell her name and hide behind a tree and there snowball, that adder and and then, you know, two and a half years later, just just really swept her off her feet. You know, quite the romantic he had note. We all know the importance of health insurance, but it's not always easy to afford. That's why there's covered California. We are the only place you can get financial help to pay for your health insurance, and this year there's more financial help available than ever before. So, even if you haven't qualified in the past, be sure to check and see how much you could see. Our experts can help find the best plan for you. So click the banner or visit covered Te Acom to get started. Covered California. It's life care to be covered by January first can roll by December. Fifteen choice. She had no choice. That's awesome. So your parents followed you a lot, like you were talking about how in high school they went to everything. They were really involved with you and your brothers lives. So then you're going how far is Harvard from Gilbert? It's like threezero miles. There's a long, long flight. Yeah, the direct flight, I think the direct flight going from Phoenix to the east coast is probably five hours or so and then maybe six on the way back. So how often did your parents get to come see you your first year? So I have a younger brother that was in basically mirrored me. So when I was a freshman in college, he was a freshman in high school, four years younger, and so he would play on Friday nights and with my games would obviously the Saturday afternoons and so my mom had to stay home a lot of the time with my brother. Sometimes she would come and watch my games, but my dad never missed one. So my dad would go watch on my younger brother on Friday night top on a red eye and then he land, one of my roommates would let him into our dorm. He'd try to sleep for an hour, maybe shower up a little bit and then head to the field and watch my game and then flat home on Sunday. So that was really special to me, you know, for him to especially as you get older, I think you start to really appreciate some stuff. But he made it a point to not miss any of my games and whether it was a home or in away game, you know, he made sure that he was there and my mom made the most that she could with a another youngster at home. But so the other guys I want to know about or your your roommates. who were your roommates and who were the guys that helped you get through college? Man, I don't mean they probably hindered they probably hindered me more than they helped me in terms of the amount of halo that we played and the parties and things we went to. But I'll say I'll say a couple things about him. Most of them were football players with me, and a few of them were football players by our senior year. A couple of them were not. But I had seven roommates and just from all over the country, from different backgrounds, but we all had similar passions...

...and that, you know, we love sports. It didn't necessarily have to be football. A lot of them, you know, we're baseball guys or basketball guys or whatever, but we all kind of had that competit in this in a and which made for a lot of late night Halo Games. And thing I'll say, though, as I am so glad that social media didn't really exist, you know, when I was in college and the camera phones and everything. It's just started coming out, but we're very pixelated with the pictures because, you know, we had a lot of fun and luckily none of it was really documented, you know, and a lot of it can just kind of live in memory of the things that we did. But a lot of great guys and guys that I still keep up with to this day and you know, they're all it's pretty neat now to see them having a lot of success in their careers, as we're coming up on about fifteen years out of school and everybody building families and doing that. So guys I still keep up with this day and will for the rest of my life. So then, yet you guys all play together, you're enjoying your time at Harvard. You guys. You were just one of the greatest athletes ever to come out of Harvard and just had some incredible experiences. I can't I mean you set records there and and I'm I'm assuming most of them still stand. I mean you don't know if there's any quarterbacks rushmore for more yards and you at Harvard. Some of them do. Some of them, though. You know, I think the Games change in a little bit. But that mean the thing that I'm proud, very proud about when I was there and my senior year, you know, me and the guys that I was talking about and all the guys that came into buy class, that senior class, we would send and know and and won the Ivy League title, and that's something that was a great memory because, you know, the different thing about Harvard from a lot of these other colleges, especially the bigger schools, is, you know, I am the exceptions. I mean there aren't very many guys that go on to play in the NFL, and so that last game versus Yale your senior years so meaningful because it's it's the last game you're probably ever going to play, you know, in terms of competitive tackle football in a game that means something. And so that's such a such a big one for us to be able to send everybody off with such a positive memory, because it is I've been very fortunate to do what I do, but for all of them, I mean it was their last game right, and I understand how that feels. And you know it's funny, Ryan is, I've played with three Harvard athletes, you, Matt Burke and Isaiah Hasavinsky. So I there. I'm sure there were a few other ones, but it's a it's a football factory. Now, guess I know there's more dudes from Harvard and the League and Tulsa. I'll tell you that. Yeah, I heard coach Murphy's building the big bubble now and, like you, guys are actually getting their conditioning in the dorms, all those types of things. So, Brian, you go through, you have his great career in Harvard and and you finish your your career against jail and, like you said, you win the Ivy League. When did you realize, like the NFL was actually gonna Happen? For you? All this was this was a funny story because I had my junior my junior season was the first season that I was the outright bona fide starter. There was a guy, Neil rose, my first two years there that was a great player and we had kind of split time a little bit his last few years. The junior year for me first year I've ever been the true, you know, ten game starter or whatever, and had had a fine year. I think we went seven and three, and that professional football was not on my radar at all. I mean not at all. I starting to go to some of the different things that they had on campus for recruiting and looking at you know, well, if I go to New York, which banks can I work for? And San Francisco and Chicago,...

...and starting to do some of that stuff and think about it, and then I started getting calls from agents and I just when they started calling me, I'm thinking, what do they have the right number, like what? What do they watching here? And truthfully, like that is the first time that I ever thought about it. Agent started calling me and I said, I'm showing up on some of these lists and showing up on everybody's radar as at least a potential prospect, and so at that point, you know, I deflected all those calls to my dad. He narrowed it down to a couple agents that at the end of my senior year we would meet with, and I made it my goal at that point say, Hey, let me throw everything I can into this and see if I can at least get a shot at playing in the NFL. So I went out and had decent senior season and try to do some Allstar Games. At the East West Hyne game, get the Whoa Bowl, was able to them the combine and yeah, and then that. That would have concluded my college career. So I won't talk about anything else until we get to the proper Dave. Getting other questions for Ryan? Well, I was just going to say we're going to break this huddle, but when we come back we're going to hear about gusts welcoming you to the rams and how that all went. You know, I came in and kind of had some fun with yeah, I did guys treat you? He was the old savvy that you know. He's been in the League some time at that point. was there any hazing or how do you treat the young guy who was potentially going to take his position? I would tell you what I went through my first year and didn't really receive any sort of hazing or you know, I had to do. I had a few rookie duties, but nothing, nothing crazy. You know, they made fun of me that I went to Harvard and called me you know when all that I'll that stuff you'd expect. So I skated through rookie year thinking, man, you know, people tell these horror stories and talk about, you know, getting bullied and picked on and it was nothing, what a cake walk. Well, I was a little bit wrong, because then my second year starts up and we've got a new coach, Scott Linehan, who decides to bring in one of his guys that he's worked with, gusts frock. So gust comes in immediately, takes my Jersey number without telling me and switches my jersey. I think I went from eleven to twelve or twelve to eleven. It wasn't real meaningful, but he set the tone early with that one. And then I'll tell you what. We'll get into some of these stories, but you know, gusts and I became really close and it was always all these stories, I think at least. You know, he convinced me that they were out of love for me, but for all the things that he did to me, he really you know, we would have dinner over at their house all the time and hang out and he was he was a huge influence on me, especially early on in my career. Can you tell us the story about your wedding rings, because to me that that's that's so important, and I think you knew that from the first time you ever saw her, but you didn't know that that's the way it was going to go. But tell us a little bit of about that background. What are you talking about? The actual proposal? Are you just talking about wearing the wedding ring when I play, which, yeah, so that that story is amazing. I mean, I don't really want to tell people how you proposed her in a McDonald's. I mean we want to we don't really want to talk there. Yeah, I want you to tell why you leave your wedding ring on all the time. Well, I just it was actually when I was in Cincinnati, I accidentally left it on for a practice and it didn't bother me for then I started really thinking about it and, you know, thinking about what it would mean to me. You know why I would take it off, what it would mean to me and what would mean to her to leave it on. And so from I think it was at some point in two thousand and...

...seven, we've been married in two thousand and six, when I just meant the decision like this, this wedding rings never to come off my hand and it has nothing to do with throwing it in anybody else's face. It's just a personal decision for me and something that I feel like is important for me to show lies of that, you know, it is forever and it's always on my mind. And then I do love her each and every day, and that's that's a lot of the reason why I don't take it off. But it seems like every place you've gone you've guys. You guys have a kid to match. Right, so that's seventeen. If you're seventeen, just as your ace now, is there going to be another child after this? This is are going to be an eighth child. I know you just had jake, right. Yeah, we just so. Jake's three months old. Now we've had seven kids and seven different states, and so I think the saving grace here for not having another one is I'm moving in state from Pampa to Miami. So we'll see. We'll see if it matches the states or if it matches the teams, but I think right now we're thinking that it's going to match the states and stay at seven, but we'll see. We still got some time to the side. Yeah, you've made so many transitions in your job and your line of work, from youth to high school, to college, to the pros and to eight teams now. Just give her audience a bit of how you can do that all the time and over and over and over again. Well, I think there's a lot of parts of that question. The first thing I would say, and just about family and having to constantly make that transition, is we've always made it a point to stay together. You know, whenever I've made a move, and this is and this is something you know that you did as well. You know, especially in the early parts of your career and again for me and the early parts of my career, every time we moved we stayed together and we moved together and you really try to become a piece of the community that you're living in and and even if it might be putting roots in the ground for for one year or for two years, or you my longest stops for years, you try to become invested and involved as much as you can in that particular community. And that's what we've done and we have so many great friends now that we have made from the places we've lived in. And we also look at every move as an adventure, you know, and so as long as we're we're keeping a positive outlook and shaping these things in the right way, our kids have always followed along. I mean my wife, wise, is one of the most positive, you know, people you'll ever meet, and so our positivity, and especially through her and the way that she is on a daily basis, is really trickled down to our kids. And looking at each move as an adventure to attack that at another angle. Transition for me and having a move just, you know, careerwise, and being in different spots and different roles, back up starter, you know, fighting for job. I've always had to have the utmost confident to myself and, you know, I've believed in myself every step of the way and if I didn't, then none of this would have been possible and none of it would have worked. And it gets hard at times, especially as a as a quarterback in the NFL. But this is for you, you know, any any job that you had, you get beaten down a little bit. You know, mine might be in a little bit more of a of a setting, but ultimately there are certain core values and beliefs that you have to rely on and you really learn a lot about yourself. And so you know, I've been through a ton of adversity of my career. But for me, I've never lost belief in myself. I know my my family has never lost belief in...

...me and I've, you know, always decided to make sure that I focus on the things that are positive and make sure that I focus on things that are important, and so nothing's more important to me than my family, you know, and we've we've had a great ride. But I also continue to love playing this game. I love the adversity and you know, every other year getting on a new team and trying to figure out with a new set of guys. I mean, I really excited for my opportunity this year and now I feel really old in the locker room. But with with age, I guess there should come some wisdom. So hopefully I can impart some wisdom on these guys and, you know, we'll be able to handle the adversity. But just the last thing here, the the biggest thing for me, I think as a player, and you know, I always want to be respected by the guys that you play with and against, but certain the guys you play with, because they see you on a daily basis as I try to be the same person every single day, whether you know, we're on a ten game win streak or a ten game losing streak. Try to attack the day the same way, prepare the same way, treat people the same way I and that's gone a long way for me in my career. One last thing on your in your career. You've been in the NFL for what, fifteen years now? Yep, same as you gut. Fifteen. You're getting ready to beat me, though. You're going to be two years in Miami. So, but what is your favorite, what was your favorite of all the Times you've had in the NFL? What is your favorite on field playing experience so far? Who maybe rookie the week? This is a tough this is a tough question. There's a lot of them, you know. I think when you say that, the things that pop into my head my first ever game. You know, we're, I was, it's not nos, fourth stringer to start the year and then, I think it was in November, get thrown into a game down twenty one and we end up coming back and win in an overtime. I had no idea what I was doing. I think about when I was in buffalo and we had a hot start to the season and home game against the Patriots where we beat them. Just a feeling in that stadium at that point something that I've never, ever, ever leave me. You know, I had some great memories in New York and some of the Games that we had down the stretch. They're just with that group of guys. That was a really special group of guys. And then they start in Tampa last year was so much fun. So there's I mean there's a million memories that I have, but those are a few that pop into my head right away. All right, great, Dave. Anything else? And Ryan's pro career? Well, I think we get back on our no huddle segment. We're going to ask Ryan for his best gust story and vice versa. Well, yeah, Ryan, so what we do is the no huddle. We usually ask questions, like stupid questions, like, you know, what is your favorite food? And for you it'd be all everything. You're just like me, so it doesn't really matter. So anyway, we're going to break the huddle come right back with Ryan Fitzpatrick. All Right, Ryan, this is our no huddle segment. What we do usually is ask some crazy questions. But instead of that, I think that what we should do, since you and I know each other so well, is is while you go first share your favorite gusts Furrat story and then I'm going to share one of, maybe a few, of my favorite Ryan Fitzpatrick Stories. Yeah, I mean I'm going to leave the best one for you because I know which one you're going to talk about and it was an absolute classic. But there was one I was telling the other day. I mean just it was little stuff on a day day basis. But you know, Guss and I didn't realize that at the time, but in preseason, you know, I'm a size thirty six, waste and get ready for your preseason football...

...games. You know, my whole future and career is on the line each and every one of these games. I'm battling out, I think it was with Dave were going at that time, for the third string spot on the on the rams. You know, guess was certainly the backup and Boulger was the starter. So there were three jobs and I was battling for that last one, you know. So it's a serious time for me. preseason game one feel good game to my pants start feeling a little bit tighter, but I don't think anything of it. You know, third game, I didn't really play in the game. Starting to feel a little bit tighter, but again not thinking anything of it. But I learned later on that gusts every week would take my pants. I was down two sizes and so I went from a thirty six to thirty four, to thirty two to that last game being in something close to a thirty and being a young guy in a rookie not really saying anything but Josh, feeling like either I was gaining a bunch of later that my pants were getting smu, you know. So playing with my life on the line, gust toying around with me. And then the other thing. I know two things that used to do as well. One as he would you know, we had the radios in our helmet. He would take the radio while I was on scout team, they're in practice, and just start talking to me and saying weird things that I was up the line of scrimmage trying to call Kate. That was funny. And then another thing I remember him doing again going out there playing for my life, you know, ready to ready either win or lose the job. And you know, asking me if I was ready to go. Yeah, I'm ready to go. You've got a water bottle in his hand, thinking, man, that's the Nice guy going to give of water, and then he squirts it all over my crotch. So I run out the huddle looking like I had tea in my pant. But he was he was able to help me keep things in perspective and keep it loose. So those are a few of my friend. Well, I'll tell you. I'll tell you Ryan. Through all that stuff, right, there was a guy that was in the background and he was fist pumping every day, right, and we still I still call him fist pump right. So Ryan's Dad. He becomes our two day practices. He'd be standing in the end zone and we'd be in practice and Ryan would throw a touchdown to receiver and you just see his dad just in the background, fist pumping up in the air, throwing it up and and Boulder and I caught wind of it and it just happened. And and but you know, that goes back to everything Ryan talked about about how his parents were there for him through thick and thin, supported him through everything, and they still do that to this day. And and you know your values came from them and it's just an amazing story. My Ryan Fitzpatrick Stories, probably my favorite one, I still try to share with most of the most of the teams you go to. I don't know if I said it to anybody in Tampa Bay, but I did send it to Nick Mangold, your center when you were with the jets. So Ryan obviously went to Harvard. We heard that story and so Ryan, I was doing an interview. I don't know if you were doing it, I was doing it, but I expressed that you know Ryan, how Ryan got into Harvard and people want to say, well, he was recruited there. I said, well, no, that's not really that. What happened. You know, what really happened was Ryan was in the band in high school. He got he was a really good trumpet player and he got recruited by Harvard to be in the Harvard band. And so when Harvard Sam what kind of athlete he was, you know he made the football team and that's kind of my story. So one Christmas, look, is not true. It's not true, and thought true at all. Like we know that's not true, but I was just having a lot of fun with it, and Ryan was great sport, you know. And Ryan, if you weren't such a good sport about all this, I'll probably would have quit in the first one. But you really do, really enjoyed it for some reason, I don't know why. And Boulder really enjoyed it too, I think right. So, so I get our photographer to take a picture of Ryan and his Harvard uniform, right, and he's throwing a football from one hand to the next like this in his hands are up in the air, and our photographer for the rams takes that picture. You know...

...now today I probably could edit it myself, but I had no idea what I was doing back then. And he put trumpet in one hand a bouquet flowers into the other hand and it said Mary Christmas from the Harvard Band on it. And so we made this picture. Mark Boulder and I went into the to the room where all the copy machines were and we literally made copies for everyone in the building. And Roan, you could tell me if I'm wrong, if I'm I mean I've been hitting the head as many times as you. But so I had I mean so I had no idea this is going on. And you know everybody's festivate in the holiday spirit. So I'm walking around, well, I don't one's Ram Ram's part what we are, going up to meetings, right to quarterback now going up to meetings, and people are, you know, from secretaries to people in the corporate par to ticket sales. You know, they're all coming up to me to thank you so much, trying. Thank you, Mary Christmas, you know, thank you so much. Marry Christmas, and I'm just I'm feeling great about myself. Boy, I might I must just exude. You know, the Christmas spirits, you said, like baby lies. I sent out like Christmas cars everybody. Yeah, like, I'm thinking boy lies. Of It's really on top of her stuff. And then we get to the meeting and guess and mark are giggling like two school girls. And you could finish it off, gus. I mean that well, I think the kicker was when we were walking down the hall and the One I don't know where where she was, she was a secretary for something. She came up and she said, Ryan, when you sign my Christmas card, and that she had it to you and you looked at it and then you immediately turned around and Boulder and I were lists laughing our heads off and there's the picture of you. It's an eight by ten the heart Mary Christmas from the Harvard Band. I think you signed it for but that's when you really realize what we did. And actually we put one in Georgia frontier, he's office to and I think she got one as well. Yeah, I'm sure she loved it. So liked it. That's my right, Fitz Pat. I'm there's so far others I could tell, but I got to share those, but that one another was a lot of fun. And Ryan is just such a good guy, great family guy, great son, great father, everything that that you want to be, and I hope that that you guys, you know, take some of his stories and take him to heart and can really listen to him and put them into your life somehow, because he is an unbelievable person, you know, just from his beginnings and Gilbert to get into Harvard and doing what he has done in the NFL and all those transitions. And Ryan, we appreciate you coming on so and you know, do you mind if I may share that that picture for my no huddle saying out. Yeah, if you still have a guest, throw it out there right. It's on my phone. It's your screensafer, of course. So I can't tell you how much it means for me to for you to come on our show, and so we really appreciate you spend the time with us. Well, thank you for having me. I appreciate the opportunity and it was fun catching up with the guy. Well, I look forward to you going Sixteen and Oh and Miami this year and and and watching the run. I'll be down to watch several games, so enjoy it, Dave. Getting last words for for Ryan. Just worst of luck to the sun devils, but it's great talking to you. Yeah, and I tucking to you guys. All right. See Ryan. All right.

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