Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 month ago

rossgreenburg

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to the Huddle with 15-year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! Today in the Huddle, Gus welcomes the one, the only Ross Greenburg, who served as president of HBO Sports from 2000 to 2011. Gus and Ross discuss the direction HBO Sports took while under Ross’ command, the job of interpreting multi-dynamic sports presentations and how Ross’ love of chronicling sports history really helped capture some great moments in sports. So, sit back, grab the popcorn and enjoy this very insightful episode of Huddle Up with Gus!

Hey everyone. Welcome to anotherepisode of hello up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with Gus check it out today at www. 16 31 digital newsdot com. Huddle up with Gus is brought to you by Vegas sports advantageclients of Vegas. Sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a partof the winning two. As of june 1st $100. Bettors are up $3700 500 dollarsbetters are up $18,500 and $1000 betters are up $37,000 and $5000betters are up. $185,000. Become a client today. By clicking the link inthe description below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off yourpackage today. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here, sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links we can only say welcome to this week's huddle up withgusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the gamesare one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up.Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it'skick off time. So snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with Gus two left. Mm hmm I want to ask you thequestion of basically how you fell in love with sports and when that happenedfor you. Well, interestingly, I grew up down the street from Kyle Gifford andwe played peewee football starting in third grade and we went all the waythrough high school together and he had happened to be the son of the greatfrank Gifford. And so when we were kids growing up, he introduced us to abcsports and we, you know, even in high school started doing little odd jobsfor abc at golf tournaments and whatnot. Um, and then that worked into a careerbecause when I got to college, I didn't realize, you know, mom wanted lawschool and you know, I was going that right and all of a sudden my junioryear, I have been exposed to abc sports and production and in the summer of myjunior year I talked to frank and he got me hooked up with abc sports doingmonday night football and you know some other and monday night baseball whichexisted then and some golf tournaments and uh and that was when I got hooked.That's when I said, wow, this is like going to Disney World every day andthis is the life I want. And I just, when I got out of the ground, I justgot, you know, on a car and just started my little crusade to get a job.But I never got a job at Abc Sports. It took me like nine months to land a fulljob that was just freelance, you know, and and HBO was sitting there. It wasreally a small little company and I applied for a job and I was the secondperson hired in the sports department. That's crazy. So, And you have abrother. Right, Michael. Yes, I do. So did you and my, are you close in age?Uh, no, he's four years older. He, I...

...idolized him as a, you know, he was afootball player and I did everything he did. And uh he went on to go into theentertainment division of our, you know, our world and he did macgyver for 15years and did a show, another show with Richard Dean Anderson as well. Yeah,Well I was gonna ask you like, you know, back in the day, I always talk aboutthis with all of our guests and because it doesn't happen much today, like youjust left the house that you wouldn't play it and you talked about it goingwith Kyle Gifford that you just went out in the streets and you playedfootball and you played every other sport. So what sports did you end upplaying in high school? So in high school I played golf and football.That's an interesting mix. That's, that's an interesting, interesting mix.And I played a little across uh, my sophomore year. And then when I got toBrown, I started, I played one day of football and I sat down with my buddyTony who was my roommate. And I sat outside of the facility and I said, youknow what, I can't commit to this, I can't do this. And so I ended upplaying golf my freshman year at Brown. But then I found rugby and uh, yeah,and so I played rugby from my sophomore year through my senior year at Brownand really enjoyed it. Uh Now you have two things where you have football andgolf and rugby and golf. I don't know. I don't know. How long do you have tobe that tough on the golf course? I don't know. Listen, I I used to getmore upset at golf than I did in football or rugby, you know? Yeah, alittle stupid ball all over, you know, because in football and rugby you cansay, well that guy screwed up, right, golf, it's on you or you can take itout on them. Right. Exactly. You know, with golf it's that little ball and youjust want to kill that stupid thing when it goes way, Right? So, so whathigh school did you go to? It was Scarsdale high school in Westchesteroutside of the city. Um, Yeah, that was, you know, that was yeah,new york across, yeah, Hop every lacrosse, but also, you know, I grew upin the sixties and uh in high school I was out of there in 73. That was areally interesting time to be in new york uh, in sports. You know, my dadgot season tickets to the Jets because he couldn't get giant tickets eventhough he knew the head coach of the Giants, There was a 30,030, personwaiting list. And so he got jet home tickets when Shea Stadium opened andthen two years after that they spent $407,000 and got this little knownquarterback, I'm kidding, named Joe name. And so I lived the Joe name oflife, went to every home game of Joe Willie through 72 when I went tocollege I went back to a couple games after that. My dad kept the ticketsSection 407 All the way at the top. It was $6 a ticket. And Yeah, and even at 13 years old, went toSuper Bowl three, which really yeah, which changed my life as well. Whatchanged your life? Like why did that change your life just because of thegame or the atmosphere and electricity felt No, I knew the importance of it.You know, I lived a NFL football and it was his, it was an historic game thatwill never be duplicated because it was too leaks kind of going after eachother. It wasn't two divisions, it was two leagues and you know, the underdogAfl was just carried on its shoulders...

...and joe willie predicted it and did itand being there. You know, I felt it. Um, it was, it was magical and I, youknow, I've done a number of things off of that historically, you know, whetherit's the history of the NFL where I, you know, talked about it a lot and dida couple of other shows with steve Sable and NFL films that involve thatgame and that moment. But I think that left a big impression on me that thestoryline of that, I did the history of the Afl with john Madden for HBO and,and I think a lot of that came from my experience, you know, with the Jet.Yeah. So when you do these kind of things like what you did with johnMadden, is there a lot of direction going on, but I would, I don't know, Iwonder, I wonder how that worked when you, when you have somebody like madmenthere, do you just kind of give him a theme and just say go for it, becausehe's just so well, he worked more like him being by our side in formulatingthe storyline. Uh you know, you outline when you're doing a documentary, youkind of have to figure out how you're going to tell that story from beginning,middle to end. Um and he was just, he was an encyclopedia in terms of hisknowledge of the entire a fl story from the beginning through the end 1970. Imean, he lived the whole 10 years and and he felt the passion and you know,he understood what what what Al Davis and and you know the Hunts, we'retrying to do Lamar Hunt, it's really the story of Lamar in many ways thatyou can, I try to do a movie um and actually had a script written by agreat writer named Jim Miller and it never came to fruition, but it's itisn't, I don't want to give it away as some other producer hearing this. Right?I get it. But I actually spent time with Lamar Hunt with Jim Miller um andwe constructed the story and and it's a magical story. Yeah, I know it is, andif anybody's out there, you want to claim a spot and I'll bring you on, youcan ask russell a question yourself because I know some people ask him this,you know, they were texting me today and I was like, no you guys come on andask him yourself, I can't remember this, I got my own questions I wanna ask butum but it is amazing, can you remember like so sports was, it's such a bigpart of your life and you remember going to those Jets games now? Did yougo to yankee games or where you met scott? Yeah, I was a yankee fan um Iwas as much a met fan when I was growing up. I became a Yankee fan whenI had kids, you know born in 1988 and they were in that prime position, 1995.They were of age where they could latch on, you know, to the Derek JeterMariano Rivera Bernie Williams group and ride uh five years, you know ofgoing to Yankee Stadium for the World Series. So Yeah, that's how that works.Do you think that because when I watch like when I watched like a skip through61 a little bit but I watched a lot of it. I'm a huge card collector. So like1961 is my favorite set and I try to collect the whole set. Yeah, I lovethat set but watching 61 and seeing what it was like because it was, it wasAmerica's pastime now as we've gone through and your kids have gone throughnow, it's like it's not anymore. So if you notice that like if your kidstalked about that a little bit. Yeah, I mean, I think baseball was just part ofyour life. I, I remember flipping cards, you know, and lunch at school and bythe way when you flip cards, you lost cards and one cards And I rememberlosing mays and mantle the 61 mantle...

...card, you know, and it's gone forever.I mean, I don't have anything. We didn't need to realize what it was and,but you just knew it was a great player that, but there was a, there was apassion and a, a romance to baseball and somehow over the years I've seen itkind of flitter away for some reason, it was a generational romantic sport,Which we captured in 1990 with when it was a game, the dock you, that wedeveloped at HBO, which looked back at the game when it was this beautiful,you know, rendition of a sport. Um, and it had a simple kind of attitude andthere was a connection between the fan and the player, they used to writesubways together. It was new york and there was just a beauty to it all. Um,and I think we've lost a lot of that. Uh, and that's unfortunate. You know, Imean, everyone complains about, you know, the length of the games and howboring it is and that modern viewer can't, can't sit there for three hours.I think that's all hogwash. I think what's happened is And this is for allof sports and it works right into what I've done for 40 years. People have notallowed the content to kind of Put the interest back intosports on television. Um, and what I mean by that is there were times thatHBO along the way when we developed hard knocks or 24/7 or follow, you know,docs where we injected a new kind of energy to different sports, whetherit's the NHL or NFL, you know, and I think, um, those, there's too much ofthat now, it doesn't feel special and people like me aren't coming up withnew concepts. So I'm putting the burden on myself a little bit uh energizepeople again. Well, you know, when you have that full access, like, like a lotof your, you know, sports reality, uh, and your documentaries that accessbehind the scenes what everybody wants and like when I talk about the lockerroom and what it was like with the guys, you know, the reporters don't have thatsame sense. I've talked to many guys like Peter King and people that I'vehad him on the show where they say, yeah, like when I first started, youcould go to somebody's house and they would let you in and you ask them theconversation right now that's like awful to everyone. And I think that'skind of what takes the it all starts with that right? Every every athlete isso protected now. I know we did a we did Acosta show last week and jerryjones was our lead guest and he gets it. I mean this is his third time on hardknocks. Uh, Dallas cowboys last summer. Um, and he kept talking about thetransparency and how important it was to showcase the inner workings of theNFL to the public. You know, I think, you know, the more paranoid owners areor coaches are, the more distanced the viewer feels from the game. And I thinkif you can take people in the locker room, you can tell their stories fromtheir homes. If you can kind of get into the, you know, the emotion thatyou lived, you know, you can really, you can really kind of do somewonderful things. Well yeah, because I was watching hard knocks and it was thecowboys and I coached Ezekiel Elliott in high school and so Zeke was tryingto find his room, like his hotel room or wherever they were staying, hecouldn't find it. So he's walking on. I was laughing. I'm like that is so Zeke,that's exactly what he was like in high school, you know what I mean? Like thatthose kind of things are funny and then...

...it just people too like like people,you know like the players and there's so much other more than and then justthem being something in fantasy football or or like that. Yeah, I meanI that's I how did my team, the Jets for two years before I finally got themto do hard knocks and it was at the time where they had hired rex Ryan andwe knew Sable and I knew that as soon as we lit up the camera for him, youknow, because he wasn't going to change who he was, that it was just gonna beunbelievable television, you know, you know, that would be a great one, youknow, and it was, it turned out to be one of the most revered hard knocks weever did. Um I mean it was at the core of it before I want Jonathan to comeand ask you a question, but before we do that, if you could go back and doone of those old teams and have hard knocks, follow them around, who wouldyou want that to be a no brainer? And you know, Sable did it in the sixties,he put a camera and he put microphones on Vince Lombardi and he shot Lombardifor basically a year with the idea of doing a documentary about him. Now wedid a Lombardi documentary, you know, I called him one day and I just, you know,he picked up the phone, I was at HBO and I just said, I didn't even say hi,I just said Lombardi and he goes done let's do it and easy is that and weused a lot of the footage that he had shot, you know, after championship gamein his, in his, uh, study with a bunch of people over at the house. He had wonthe championship game. But he's like, he's like an animal. He didn't evenenjoy himself at that little party that was thrown. You know, and you could seethe intensity of the man, you really got to feel him, but he would have beenjust spectacular. Listen, I'm sure Belichick would be spectacular. I'mthinking of like the old Raiders to write when, you know, that was going touse some of those guys Maddon. Oh my God, I mean, these rex Ryan Times 10with success, you know, Rex had over two years. But other than that, youknow, he didn't have the Madden Super Bowl ring. Yeah, great. I don't thinkhe had quite had the person. I mean, rex was good, but I don't think hequite had the personality of Mad neither. I mean I can't man being in apractice and what it was like, you know, because I'm sure there was, it was alot like game day and some of those, some of those guys, but hey, I want tobring Jonathan, I'm gonna bring him out here. Hey, can you hear me? Yes,Fantastic. You have a question for us. Yes, I do. Um, well, first and foremostwhere you're going to make a documentary on john Madden becausethat's something I would love to see. Well, I'm not gonna talk to his age isany monetary and there's a documentary in the first week now that willprobably here next year I think, or even sooner it's being done as we speak,your wish. That's fantastic, I would say, from like, you know, from myperspective, at least, like, you know, I'm 27. So some of those moments like,you know, that I've kind of learned about through documentaries, a lot ofthe stuff that you've been involved with, the thought, You know, on thehard knocks side, you mentioned the 24/7. But even like that, like howwould you compare the uh you know, some of the methods you did with producingand everything for these documentaries compared to what's being uh I would saydeveloped today and like some of the netflix stuff as well, as I would say,even more um like 11 netflix example, for instance, the untold documentaryseries, where they're kind of covering some of the darker stuff. I know, w whe has their dark side of the ring...

...stuff, like how would you, like, youknow, some of the stuff you did compared to what's coming out on allthese uh you know, uh platforms these days. I I think that the stuff you'rementioning, drive to survive My words spectacular on netflix. Um and theother untold stories I'm told a few of them are really good stories and reallywell done. Uh it doesn't bother me the subject matter um being a little bitnegative. I mean, I, you know, I did a documentary on Lawrence phillipsbecause I was just fascinated with his difficult story and gus is shaking hishead because he knows that's a that's an unbelievable story. Um so I've heardthat is really well done. So I'm, I'm encouraged by, you know, what's beengoing on. I mean, some of the people that worked me, the HBO were behind theLast Dance and the O. J. Series and you know, there's a lot of great stuffthat's coming out. Um and I'm encouraged that we're getting more andmore of an opportunity to produce things for all these streaming networks.You know, it's really an amazing opportunity to blow it out and reallyhave content everywhere. So we're, I'm excited by it and I think that the, thetechniques, uh some of them are familiar, which is a nice, nice thingto see. Um but I think there's always a way to do things differently. Uh no oneperson or one group of people have a kind of, the way to do any particulardocument. I mean, I've stolen stuff from ken Burns and he knows it, youknow, talk to me so uh you know, it's just it's, you know, it's like I always,I always explain it as documentarians are people that do this kind ofprogramming or like artists, they're given the palette and the paintbrush isand then, you know, the impressionists all looked at each other's art and said,well that's an interesting technique, I'll use that. And then they shapetheir picture the way we shape our documentaries and but it's all abouttelling a good story, finding the good story and just telling it. Hey, heyJonathan, thank you man, I appreciate you coming on. Um yeah, no, I think what Jonathansaying is content, right? We're all looking for, for good content. You'veproduced so much content over your time. Um, do you have a plan? Like when you hear,like you just said, Lombardi, did you already have a plan in your head? Youkind of do those things as you go and say, I want to change this. I'm surethere's a little bit of that, You probably have a game plan in your head,you do have a game plan. Um, and then the more you research it and the moreyou get into telling the story and the more you find out little tidbits, youhave to kind of reshape where you're going now and then, But the basic, youknow, idea Is sitting there, you know, I think of 61, like you said, a miracle,you know, which I did, There's, there's a story there that's the basics of theUnited States hockey team being formed, You know, they're Cold War being on thethe, the tremendous upset after the difficult times that these players hadtrying to form themselves as a team with their mighty coach, Herb brooksleading the way you knew all those elements but you didn't really knowthat there was a Minnesota boston rivalry on the team, you know, which wefound out early and we started the movie with that kind of tension. Wedidn't know that her brooks was basically fighting for the job andreally was taken as a little zany by the U. S. Hockey group. So you find outthose things and you incorporate them...

...when you see the drama and that'sthat's what you do with everything. Well you know the part in the moviewhere her brooks is making them do the sprints. I mean obviously you do andhe's saying who do you play for and all that. Like I'm like man we need some ofthat so much today, you know what I mean? Like it's like they came togetherand that's what it comes together, whether it's a team of city, whatever,you know um you have that part. Yeah I can turn that around with you becausethat that scene was absolutely critical to the entire movie and that that wasthe scene where they jelled and came together and it was a true story, youknow, I've done a documentary on it and we knew that he had they had turned thelights out and he was unsatisfied with this tie that they had over there in anexhibition game and that he had basically had them do Herbie's, they'recalled back and forth on the rink basically for an hour after they turnedthe lights out and too good a story. But you know, you put it in the contextof the overall story, then it becomes really important to the film or thedock you that you're doing. So you look, you had, I'm sure that when you, let'ssay you had a successful season, there was one point in that season where youknew you were in a scene where this team is coming together, right? Yeah.And the thing about it, it wasn't always during game day. No, you knowwhat I mean? It's those moments where you don't see, right, that nobody sees.Yeah. You know, and that's that's what's great about it and there'ssomething that brings every team together. It's a moment that you don'trealize it until it's kind of you've gone through and seen that we kind ofcome over the hill. But imagine that I was I was talking toyou, let's say you were on that hockey team and I was talking to you aboutthat story, I'd have to somehow remind you of that or draw that out of you inorder to even because you wouldn't even realize that that scene of doing thatthose sprints after, you know, the coach was supposed to shut down thepractice, You wouldn't even realize that it was as significant as it was.Well yeah and you might have just not left it out. Well that's because everycoach you've ever had made you do sprints right? They were always youknow like basketball, football, whatever it was, if they got mad, youwere on the line and you were like so you were used to that as an athlete andI can see how that would get overlooked because the bigger vision is to win amedal right to go on and and and represent the U. S. Um So I got terryon here which you know terry and she she her question is you have produced100 plus sports documentaries. Which one is your favorite and why? And whatis Floyd Merryweather like in person? Well the first question is a difficultone because you know they're like all your kids so you don't pick out one kidand say that's my favorite. So I have a little, when everyone asks me thatquestion, I usually have a list of the four or five that are closest to myheart. One is we've talked about which is do you believe in miracles becausethat spawned the movie miracle. So that and I thought we really told that storywell brian highland and and others um Magic and bird I thought wasbeautifully told by Ezra Edelman uh who directed it and went on to do the O. J.Series for ESPN But that was a really well told story when it was a game,which I encourage people. I think you can youtube. It even really started itoff for me in developing a style of how to produce a doc you because beforethat it was like you go do some...

...interviews, you put some highlightstogether and then you develop a story and that's about it. But with when Iwas a game I told you before we kind of stole, I stole a couple of ideas fromburns. He had done uh civil war around that time in the late 80s. And so allof a sudden I got some ideas from him on, you know, putting foley sound onold footage and and doing readings from actors of old baseball writers. Um soso I'm trying to say that that one was one of my favorites only because Ithink we did something really special that will live for hundreds of years ofpeople bother to watch it and don't forget about it. Um and then uh I don'tknow a couple of others come to mind. Um certainly 61 and miracles stand out.They're not locking memories, but as you know, because they were movies,they stand out. I love 600 one on the women who in 1999 de China and theWorld Cup and really transform women athletes in this country. The brandyChastain mia hamm team julie foul and I'm making a movie off of that fornetflix because it's such a great story. It is a great story. So who is your,which one is your bad child? No, no, none of them. None of them arebad kids. I can't think of any. I think there are a couple that we could havedone better. None of them broke curfew ever. No curfew want any other Actually,you worked through the night, A lot of people work through the night on mostof them. But the other thing on Mayweather, There's about sevenMayweather's uh, first of all, he's the cleanest living boxer other than MarvinHagler and that I've ever been around and Marvin ended up having a littledrug issue. Um, but obviously Mayweather had some difficulties withwomen, so I don't want to use that behavior, but a very personable,energetic, um loyal, Honorable guy who I got to know very,you know, when he was 19 years old, I was in in Las Vegas for a fight. And AlHaman who took over his career after, after Arum had him come visit me when Ijust got the job in 2000 as the president of HBO sports because youknew, You know, Mayweather needed to meet me in order to be seen andMayweather was 19 years old and it just started, he came up to me goes ross,I'm going to be the greatest fighter you've ever had on this network, pointshis finger at me 19 years old. Okay, Floyd. We'll get you the opponents willline them up and you can prove that to me now. I had known he was a goodfighter, uh, had done some nice things, you know, uh, in the Previous two years,I think he was about 20, maybe 18 and o or something, You know, was beatingsome pretty tough opponents even at a young age, maybe he was 21. And, and he,uh, he just said that to me and then we had this wonderful relationship, I,even when I left HBO, You know, I helped get him over to showtime andworked with him at showtime. So, we kept a very, very good relationship,right in watching 24 7. That one part, you know, you guys showed how he givesback to the community to, he's, you know, he followed him in the car goingto different spots. He's big about that. Yes, he is big about that. He has a bigheart. He loves people about as sociable as anyone you'll ever meet. Um,the other great thing is that, you know,...

...he got a lot of grief for not fightingthe great ones. He ended up fighting most of the great ones in his time. Um,beat them all. Uh, I think over time, people will start to respect how greata fighter he truly was. You know, a lot of times when you see the news andthings, they're showing, uh, problems he's had or you know, hey, it's aboutthe money and all that, right? And I think that's a persona that he playsfor. You know, that people want to fight him. Like that's how he keepsthat. That's that, like you said, that's one of the seven of the merryrockers, right? You know what I mean? Like, I think you're right. Like I playwith randy Moss. I know what he's like and people make a big deal of what hewas like when we played against the packers and he did the, that's like,that's not who he is at all. I know, and actually he's showing that now ontelevision, right. What kind of honorable, good, solid person he is. Um,but sometimes the image gets bigger and you know, Floyd did it? I mean 24 7 lithim up. He wouldn't have in Floyd, Mayweather if we hadn't concocted thatseries and we didn't even know we knew it was a great character. We didn't, wethought Delahoya was the bigger personality then that show hits the airand it took over the american public's imagination and all of a sudden we hadall these young kids that were attracted to boxing. That's what I saidabout content possibly energizing a sport if it's done, right? And it hitsright, that 24 7 was revolutionary. That really lit up the all access thatin hard knocks when we premiered that in 2000 lit up the whole access worldthat we live in. Well, I, you know, like hard knocks. I watch a little bitof it. I don't watch at all because I done it for a long time. But my son'slove it. Like everybody I know loves to watch it. So that's uh it's a greatshow and it just takes people into the background of what happens day in andday out, which is awesome. So I got Devin on here. Devon as I call themmoose wants to know what was it like to work with live Schreiber and was hisnarration inspired by john Facenda. Yeah, well his, his, he wouldn't saythat his narration is inspired by john Facenda, I would say Devin you haveidentified the two greatest narrators in the history of sports television. Umyou know, I grew up with Facenda and it was funny in in the mid nineties and bythe way, it was an anticipation of doing the history of the A. F. L.Documentary. I'm sitting in my living room and I didn't have a narrator forour dock use at that point. And I was looking for the right narrator and Iwas watching a series called the History of Rock and Roll on PBS which Iwouldn't normally watch. So I don't even know why I was watching it and I'mhearing this voice and I'm going, my God what a great narrator that is. AndI'm thinking this is the guy, I'm getting him for a F. L. I wait for thecredits and it's Liev Schreiber. I dig it out the next day and I look for hisagent, call his agent say I really want to usually have you know, he hadn'teven done any movies of note at that point, right? I thought he was 60 yearsold, I thought he was John Facenda reincarnated at 60. And so the nextweek we're doing the narration and I he comes into the office, he comes walkingdown the hall in those days, you could smoke a cigarette, smoke signals inthose days, He's 26 years old. And I said you're Liev Schreiber. He goes yesfrom that voice and he's he's an incredible actor. And it was clear thenthat I had found gold. And uh at HBO he...

...literally did any doc u I could findfor him. I mean then he did most of all of them. There were there wereexceptions where some producer would say to me, I'd really like to use, youknow this voice or that voice. We did the history of women in sports and weyou know, I used someone else. Um Susan um ever saw his wife, Susan Saint Jamesactually did that. But my point is that he was gold. He there's no one, look Iuse a lot of different narrators now. I have always there have been moments inthe last 10 years since I left HBO where I tried to get Liev to do acouple of things, it just hasn't worked out. But now I think we're on the cuspof getting back together um Are you ready? Yeah it would be wonderful. Butback to the original Demon answer is you know I don't think Liev wasinspired by john Facenda but I was inspired by both of them right? Theyjust had like they have that voice that that just keeps you engaged in whatyou're listening to. You know what I mean? Like um Yeah so I interviewedMatthew McConaughey right? And he put a new book called Green Lights. Well Istarted reading a book and I was like oh this isn't like whatever but then Ilistened to it on audible uh and he's the narrator right? And he has thisengaging voice and I'm like I listened the whole thing because it was hisvoice that kept me like in the certain parts he knew where to. Yeah yeah andit was better and that's I'm sure that if you had somebody else doing some ofthose documentaries it might not be as as good you know what I mean? No Ialways I always said that things like music and narration. All the littleelements are the icing on the cake and if you don't have those to finish itoff. Um Yeah it can wreck and I mean I've used narrators in the past. Ididn't do a good job, have current events affected the ability for you topay your bills. Has your credit card debt overwhelmed you? Has your incomedecreased because you're working less or have you lost your job? Credit cardof America may be able to help you find a solution to this problem. We offer afree no obligation consultation to learn how you can cut your payments byup to half and potentially lower your interest down to zero. Credit card ofAmerica is an a plus rated non profit company that will work on your behalf.Credit card of America is licensed in all 50 states and has counseled overone million consumers struggling with debt. Just like you, let us help youanalyze and prioritize your debt, negotiate with your creditors to reduceinterest and payments. Set up one affordable monthly payment and provideongoing education and support. Call now for a free no obligation consultationand learn how you can become debt free call. 807 to 58904. That's 807 to 58904,807 to 589 04. Do you use Viagra or Cialis? Have you been thinking abouttrying Viagra or Cialis? What if we could promise you the same results forless than $2 a pill. If you're paying $20 a pill for Viagra, you're beingtaken to the cleaners are pill delivers the exact same results for less than $2.We'll do the math for you. You save more than $16 a pill for the sameresults. Want more. We'll give you 45 blue pills or 45 yellow pills for $99and add five more pills free. You save more than $500. You don't have to be arocket scientist to know what to do next. You need to call us at 807 26 6314 and get your 50 pills for just $99. Stop over paying for Viagra, call usand start saving a ton of money for the exact same results ordering is fast andeasy with your pills delivered to your door in an unmarked package. Call usright now. 807 - 6 63 14, 807 - 6 63 14.

...807 - 6 63 14. Texting enrolls you intoa re occurring automated text messages, message and data rates may apply. Comeon one more rep. You got This 10 there? It is. Nice work. You're a beast.Thanks man. I feel better than I have in years and I got to tell you takingnew gen X. Makes a huge difference for me. Eugenics. That's the testosteronebooster with tv ads with frank thomas. The big hurt. Right? Oh yeah. Thepatented key ingredient is testament which helps boost free testosteronelevels and increase lean muscle mass. Well it's clearly working for you heyare they still giving out complimentary bottles for people to try forthemselves? Yeah eugenics is a great way to increase lean muscle and feelstronger with more energy and endurance. And I need to get a complimentarybottle of eugenics. No problem. You just got to send him a text text gritto 4 to 4 to four right now for your complimentary bottle of new gen X. Thenumber one selling free testosterone booster at GNC plus text now and we'llinclude a bottle of new new gen X thermo, our most powerful fatincinerator ever to help get you back into shape fast? Absolutely free text G.R. I. T. 242424. That's grit to 4 - 4 - four. And you know it doesn't itdoesn't make the doc you better, it makes it worse on by the same talk andJeffrey Wright, who I've used is incredible and lifts the dock you upanother level. It just depends. So you left HBO after a long time. What wasthe decision? Was it just because you wanted to go out on your own or youknow it was a combination. I mean look boxing. You know when I got into uhwhen I became president of HBO Sports I knew I was in the fish bowl with with abunch of sharks and I knew that it's almost like being a head football coach,you know, there's gonna be a day when this isn't gonna work anymore, too manypeople coming at you. Um, and it's, and it's, it's a shark infested water. Imean boxing is really tough to negotiate and I, you know, and I had to,I had to buckle down and do that. I did it for 11 years, but after 11 yearsthere were too many promoters that wanted fights and I didn't have enoughdates and they were on my butt and it just became intolerable and I wasn'thaving any fun, you know, in the job and HBO was, you know, ready to move onto, I'm not going to kid you that, you know, it just didn't work. And so atthat, you know, when I knew I was going to leave, I said, you know, this is, Iwant to start my own production company because my passion was always makingdocumentaries and hard knocks and you know, access shows and, and you know,the cost to show and things like that. And so I've kind of, the last 10 years,I've recreated all those shows on all bevy of other networks. Oh yeah, a lotof, a lot of networks, so when you do like real sports withBryant gumbel, is that your idea? Or does he come to you and say, hey, Ihave this great idea. Did you know him before? All that? No, actually, um,that was my idea because I had, I had loved 60 minutes, uh, and always feltlike there was, there was a world of sports stories that weren't being toldthere, that could be told in a similar fashion and I wrote it up on loose leaf,I saved the note that I wrote um that I sent off to the head of sports at thetime and, and Michael Fuchs who was running HBO and I just had the conceptto make the show and uh, and then I searched for a host. Um, and uh, andbrian ended up being the host, how many, how many people interviewed or try itout for it. Actually, no, no tryouts just went through a, you know, I wentthrough a couple of phone calls, got to...

Bryant and he got the job. That's nicethat you didn't have to stress over that, you get the guy, you know, whenyou get them to, right? Yeah, it was a perfect fit. He was doing, you know,NBC's today show at the time, so it wasn't so easy to get them, you have togo through a lot of red tape, it would be like, you know, I think I want tombrady, you know, and uh Bruce Arians to let them let them play for another team,right? We're starting this new team and we want tom yeah, you have to, you haveto, you know, let make tom want to come there to, you know, so did Bryantreally like, I assumed he liked it because he could, you know, with HBO,you could kind of say and get into the topics that you couldn't get into onlike a go and things like that, You're absolutely right. I mean, Costas feltthe same way it took me two or three years to get Costas um and he was justlike a kid, you know, in a cage, he just had so many things he wanted toget off his chest um and you're right, I mean brian felt similarly I think,although, you know, he was pretty bold on the Today show and it wasn't aboutsports, you know, he still had his passion for sports so it fit to come toreal sports but cost us man he was just ready ready to rumble and and now it'sfunny 10 years later, I'm back at HBO executive producing Acosta show and andit's the same thing, he's been bottled up for another 10 years and now we're,he's coming on like lightning and uh and teeing it up every three or fourmonths with some big name guests and how talking about a lot of tough issues,yeah, there are a lot of tough issues today in sports, right? We see him allthe time. How old was he when he interviewed mickey mantle? How longwhen, what year was that interview? Nineties, mid nineties. He interviewedman just before he died, probably a year or two when I got to know mantle.Um he was sober for those two years. He interviewed him right at the right timebecause mickey was totally, had just gotten sober. He hadn't gotten the, uh,the liver cancer, so, But just past two, right? Uh, his son, Mickey son. Nickyson. Yeah. It was a very difficult life for Mickey. You know, that's why the 61was so important to kind of understand who he was a guy with a huge heart,loved people, you know, just had demons. You know, just, it was sad, but, butyou know, at the end, I always felt we ended up doing a doc, you on him at thevery end, once he had gotten sober, his life kind of became beautiful. Again,he reconnected with his boys, you know, and in a good way, and he had resolvedwho he was and and ended up dying with a lot of dignity and and being loved byall. Yeah. And I mean, you talk about bob Costas and sitting with a legendand asking him tough questions. I mean bob was right in there doing that. Ohmy God, I've seen it. I've seen it time and again with bob, it's unbelievable.It's unbelievable. I've never seen any, there's no greater interviewer in thehistory of television. Forget sports, as far as I'm concerned, you know,Oprah does great. I I grant that and Barbara Walters was great. Uh, therethere have been great interviewers. I'm sure Edward r Murrow and his day wasgreat. But geez Costas, he asked the toughest questions. You know, a guylike bud ceiling after getting drilled for 20 minutes, will stand up and shakehands and go, thank you bob. That's...

...like they're best friends. And I'm like,how does he do that? That's what I was just gonna say. Like, he asked thesecuffs tough questions, but like, you can't get mad at him, right? It's like,it's not like jim Rome asking you a question and you want to rip his headoff. It's like, it's like, okay, last week, last week he interviewed jerryjones as I said at the top of the show and I escorted Geri out and he lookedat me at the end as we're walking out the door. He was those were some toughquestions. I said, yeah, but you handled it jerry, you did a good job.And you know, that's the fifth or sixth time we've interviewed jerry, you know,bob and you know, he'll come back because you know, first of all, youhave to have the attitude that you're not scared of bob Costas is questionsand if you're smart and you're jerry, you can answer, you know, you have ananswer, the key is to have an answer, right. And I don't think that like,when bob asked the questions there is, there's not like a, like an evil orsomething behind it, you know what I mean? Like yes, I did something wrongand sometimes they just want to dig at you, you know, I've had, I've hadthings happen in my career that people don't let go and you do get angry, butI would, you know, but you can watch bob and his interviews, he never,people don't get like that with him, you know what? And we're finding alsoafter all these years is there's an honor to being interviewed by him, youknow? Um people will do the interview just because it's bob costas and theyfeel honored by it. I remember when I was just starting out at abc sportscasal had that where if you were being interview whether john Carlos, Tommiesmith or Muhammad ali or Bill Russell, if you were being interviewed by umHoward, That was that was an honor. Uh you know, and so he would ask all thosetough questions just like bob uh and he wasn't, he did have an edge, but it wassuch an honor to be with him. Yeah, I don't know, I think his voice justkinda laud you away like, was that a tough question? I'm not sure, you know,that's kind of like in your head, you're going through that stuff. So, sothen you start your production company and then how long into your productioncompany before you started like kind of venturing out again into really helpingall these other because from what I saw, it's like HBO Sports, you start yourproduction company, you're trying to expand what you're, you know, all of asudden, you know those restraints anymore, you go wherever you want andthen you start doing all these other, immediately jumped in with NBC. MarkLazarus took me in, gave me a deal. Showtime was a year later uh Epics camearound and wanted some product and I sold them a bunch including thatLawrence Phillips Stock and a dock called forgotten for about the fourblack football players that integrated pro football a year before JackieRobinson. And then, you know, started up with CBS did a Mayweather Dock youfor them and I just kept rolling um and found my way to show time in a big way.Uh and now even HBO and then I now found netflix uh doing a couple ofthings for netflix. Um it's just all about the, the ideas, you know, andthen you just kind of look for the home, that makes sense. And uh the streamingis huge. Now it's huge. Absolutely huge and it's gonna eat up a lot of contentand it's the best thing for the american public uh it's like right,like it's like somebody tells us about a new show to watch and my wife arelike, so don't netflix, hulu amazon or on tv. I don't know, you know where HBOlike they're all all these different...

...things. Um, but so are there any likekind of comedy? Like so ted lasso, have you watched any of that? I haven'twatched it and I'm gonna watch it. I've been told by too many people I have towatch it. Well, the thing I like about it, it comes from the point of view,like we're talking about it's behind the scenes is how a coach reacts anddeals with players and it's not really about is part of it's on the field,right? But it's more about the coach and his personality and it's somethingthat you rarely see, but it's a lot of fun. There's good, there's, there'shappy, they're sad parts. But it made me think like when I started to reallylook into your career what you do and it said, I'm like, oh, this is like apart of it. Like that would be really cool because to, to get those behindthe scenes look, you don't ever get those right. It's dramatizing, yeah,the access. Um and yeah, it's a great concept. I wonder if they would havehad it, you know, it came out of a, it was a promotional campaign that uh hehad done Jason Sudeikis had done for NBC sports when they did, they got thepremier League. It was his idea to become that was all his idea as apromotional gig. They did like 32nd spots and then he said, he said tohimself, well this is a series for television and then he developed it. Soit came out of nowhere. Not actually, it didn't come out of nowhere. It cameout of his head. Um, and probably being influenced by our all access shows.Right? Yeah. It has to be right. Like, yeah, it's fun. So I think there's,there's a whole world out there. You're, you're starting like, you know, KingRichard is out in movie theaters on serena and venus is early life. Um,It's just gonna be one after another. Sports is so rich for storytelling andpeople take it for granted well, and it never ends right every season and nextseason. Um, you know what I mean? Like football, you might have a couple ofthe same players, but every year is a different year always has been alwayswill be and you just never know look at this year, what's happened with theRaiders? Those are head coaching and their star receiver. Yeah. And it'slike, you probably could never write that that that would ever happen. Likeno, something like, yeah. And it's all tied, you know to some pretty weirdstorytelling. I mean, Gruden firing, there's a, there's a documentary inthat, you know? Oh my God, just about him writing a few emails. No. Yeah,that's 10 years of stuff. That's, that is crazy. So, you know, you've had suchan amazing career? And do you feel like it's worked for you? Like, do you eversay like, I just need to stop and get out of this and go golf every day? Well,you know, it's weird. Um I do enjoy golf sometimes. Um I don't know whatkeeps me going other than just enjoying doing the work and the ultimate goal ofmaking something, you know, a documentary or a series or somethingthat is going to really affect people's emotion and when they watch it, they'regonna cry. And I'm an old model that I've always used, make them cry, makethem laugh, make them think. And You know, I feel like it's my calling in away again, it's like the artist who had 7-66, which is what I am sitting in a,you know, a on a stool drawing his art. So that's when I feel like I am doing.And so I don't know when you get on, I...

...mean, I have to slow down. It's silly.I'm not gonna I've got a grand kid that just showed up a month ago and I've gotanother congratulations, grow up in about a week. So you gotta put yourpriorities in perspective. So I can see myself cutting down maybe doing maybeone or two projects a year Instead of four or 5? Yeah. And maybe that'll beenough, right? Yeah, that's that's still a lot, right, for what you haveto do. I mean, it still goes on every day. Have you ever been out to eat andjust had an instant inspiration? Like something hit you. I gotta write thisdown on a napkin. You know, that's a great question. And it really hasn'thappened that way. It's usually just walking around walking the dog. Um, andthen some something will pop in my head, usually from an experience readingsomething or, or witnessing something happening. Um, You know, but thingslike, you know, doing the dock, you on the 80 hockey team just popped in myhead. Real sports popped in my head. I can't even remember where or when butit's not, it's not usually sitting at a desk and thinking, okay, what's my nextidea? You know, something just get presented to me and hey, I have an ideafor this. You want to get involved. And I say, oh yeah, I love that. You knowthat what was now the A. F. L. Doc came about because uh Madden had approachedme and said, why don't we do a documentary on the A. F. L. Or or I might have, I might have, I don't know, I don'tknow if he thought of it or I thought it doesn't matter who thinks of it.It's all about the other thing because that I'm a big believer in and you canrelate to this big time. You develop a team. I always feel like a head coachputting a team together and putting the, uh, the piece of art, you're doing thestory and the documentary or the series or whatever, the talk show on apedestal and everyone on the team working for that, the way a team wouldwork to get to a Super Bowl and win it, win it all and check egos at the door,right? It's moving the head coaches check everybody's ego at the door andeveryone's involved on, on this. You know, this beautiful, you know, that'swhat I was going to ask you. What kind of head coach would be if you were thehead coach at told everybody they can go do what they want. But then you haveto go make sure they're doing it right. Or do you say I trust you guys and gogo ahead and do it and then we're gonna put it in there. You know what I foundout after all these years, you've got to find the best offensive coordinator,best defensive coordinator, You've got to find the best people right in everyposition. And, and once you identify who those people are, man, you latchonto them and you, you know, you give them a vision and let them do theirwork because if they're the best, you know, center in the NFL or the best, uh,wide receiver in the NFL and a quarterback that you believe can getthe ball to that wide receiver. You know, it'll work. It'll all work. Andso for me it's like getting the best shooter, the best editor, the bestmusician to do the original score. The best narrator. If it's liev to narrateit, putting that whole group together, just like a head coach does. Right.Right. So what's your next project? What's something that you haven't done?Like, have you done rugby? Because you played it? So I never did a thing onrugby. Maybe that's an idea. You know what? You can steal it from me. But no,I love like, uh, um, what's her name down in? Um, New Zealand's the, is itthe blacks? Like, you know, I mean...

...blacks, The all Blacks, They do thedance before. Yeah. And that is like one of my friends, that is one of myfavorite things to watch. Yeah, well there's a, there's a culture to rugbythat people aren't aware of and the rugby, rugby has wanted to go behindthe scenes. I've been approached once. But yeah, that's a great concept. Sothe things like that will pop up. If I have a passion for it, then then I'llstart listening and go, that's an interesting idea. I can just see likeat the end and the credits, like produced by Ross Greenburg and thenhere comes your rugby picture up from when you were in the ground. I have myjerseys. I got everything. Rugby is a great sport because everybody, I knowthey played rugby, they get together afterwards and they have a drink. It'slike, it's like I used to carry the kegs across campus. Oh really? And itwas, it was before they had handles like impossible. But that's what Iloved about rugby too. It's like, yeah, we battled out there. But theneverybody together was after the other team. Yeah, with the water team. Thatwas great. That's a great experience, right? That you can, it's like beingable to argue and then bring it back to normal. Yeah. Yeah. Let can you justgive our fans an update on everything you're doing and maybe what your nextshow is. Yeah. So Costas is ongoing every quarter on HBO will start upagain next year on january. So that's exciting. There's a documentary thatI'm doing right now. I can't really talk about that should come out in amonth because for some reason they haven't even announced it yet on ESPNand the network. Um There's another documentary I can't really tell youbecause they haven't announced it. It's a big documentary as series will befour hours on a huge, huge name in sports that deserves this kind oftreatment on netflix And then I have the movie on the women's soccer teamfrom 99 that will be on netflix probably at the end of next year,sometime next year. I hope we're in the script form of that right now and we'rereal excited about the way that's coming around. Um so, and a coupleother projects in the works, but I've got, you know, right now, I'm jugglingthree at the same time, so that's plenty for really. If you includeCostas. Yeah, that's a lot. I mean, you know, to keep doing it, I mean, youlove it, you have a passion for it, it's awesome and you produce someincredible, incredible documentary series, film, whatever you want to callit, you just, it's just incredible. Let's see. Before we go, I want to seeuh oh wait, let's go to question. Devin has one more question moose consumesall your stuff. I call him moose. And so moose wants to know, he says in myopinion, Gadi vs Ward one was the greatest fight of all time. Did youexpect the outcome when signing this about absolutely devon uh a guy namedLou DiBella had Lord and we knew Gotti and we knew that those guys wererelentless in the ring and that they were gonna pound each other and neitherof them could have cared less about defense and boxing. They had hearts thesize of watermelons and they, we knew going in, we all knew going in, this isgoing to be a war and it ended up being more than a war. It was absolutelybrutal. Um but I will say this devon Leonard hearns one was the mostbeautiful and biggest event that I've ever been involved in. It kind ofstarted us at HBO sports in a way uh in boxing and it was a three act drama. UhIf you look at that fight again, look...

...at it one day because you probablyweren't even born yet. I hate to say 1981. But uh yeah, but it was it was abeautiful, beautiful fight, it wasn't brutal in many respects, but it waswhat boxing should have been, which is an art form. Yeah, no, so um thank youfor that and one last thing my buddy runs the PBR which is the bull riding.Yeah, that's what I'm going to get you to do someday. Okay, you got it on thebull. I'm not getting on the ball. No, I'm not either, I'll shoot it. But I'veseen a £2000 bull trample, a guy that was like £130 and I'm like yeah, I'llnever even get close like that something, but it's the same thingyou're talking about. Not a lot of people like there are people that watchit but there's a there's a whole human element that people don't get this intoit, so it's really cool but man ross it was awesome to meet you. Hopefully wecan do this again someday because there's still much more that we cancatch up on. Yeah, there's a lot and um you know next time we'll have even morefun, so thank you for joining me. Thank you had a lot of fun. Alright,appreciate it. Hey everyone, that's another episode of huddle Up with Gus.I want to thank Super Dot events. I want to thank uh, sounder FM and I wantto thank all my sponsors credit card, the little blue pill, which is Viagraand Eugenics. 16 31 Digital news. Thank you and also Vegas sports advantage.Use my code, Huddle up and save 20% and and hopefully go win yourself somemoney. So ross. Thank you again, everyone, thank you for joining me.Thank you for coming on. You got a question from our audience and Ithought it was a great show, so I appreciate you so much for joining us.Thanks all right, see you everyone. And that's a wrap sportsman, Thanks forjoining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another actually, huddle upwith Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus, parent huddle up withGus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on applemusic.

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