Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 3 years ago

Rocky Bleier

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

4x SuperBowl Champion and Vietnam War veteran, Rocky Bleier joins the huddle to share stories from his life about where he got his name, being drafted to fight in Vietnam, and his inspiring career with the Pittsburgh Steelers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I am former NFL quarterback gusts for as I played quarterback fifteen years in the NFL. This is my show called huddle up with gusts. Each week I team up with my longtime friend Dave Hagar and we talked with guests about how sports shape their lives. Pro Athletes, business executives, community leaders, everyone has a story to tell about sport. We invite you to huddle up with gusts this week in the huddle. Today our guest is a rocky Blyer, the rocky Blyer, thank you for coming on and joining us to day. Yeah, meet, yeah, so rock this is Dave. So you know, you can't really tell them a part over here, right, right. So, so now we're going to get in the huddle with rocky. We're going to start peppering with some questions and here's some great stories maybe you've never heard before. So, rock this shows all about how sports and shaped your life as you were growing up, and so one of the questions we like to start was, who was that influential person from the time you can remember of playing sports that really developed your love for the game? You know, I think it's so the love for the game. It you know, it just happens you start playing, you know, Reis it start. So really was my nextra neighbor, Paul striker, and and Paul Father also owned a bar. So there's two bars together. And so we grew up together, went to great school together and so on, and because of that we were neighbors and so we would we'd always play. I mean we play, we'd play catch, we'd play basketball, and he would help organize. I mean I can remember our first organized team. We're in the fourth grade at the time, and so Paul was the one that pulled together. So it is Joey bowers. So it was Paul Schreider. Then my brother in law. Now, if my brother in law, who Paul Reckner, is his name, and so pusy that was his nickname. So puxy we brought. He was in the second grade. So we brought him and the reason is because he had a basketball and a pretty good court, you know. So that was one ye, it's all. I had a basket. But but, but it was like growing up. So you grew up in the Midwest and grew up in Appleton, Wisconsin and so and so in the s and you know, it was a period of time where, you know, the neighborhood was the neighborhood and you just picked up you'd pick up teams, you played in the backyard, you played against one another and there there wasn't there wasn't a little league. It didn't exist at the time. They Ruth did not exist at the time. No organized sports except for the Grade School. But by the time you get there, so you know, in the fifth grade, sixth grade, did you start playing? Then done, by the ninth grade you're out. Then a new high school came and then we when we went out. But it was all was all about the neighborhood and growing up. In that regard, it so what like. So all those, all the sports, you know, I did the same thing. Right, we'd all like I'd go to my buddies house, we get his bike and we go to the next day house, get that guy, then we go get the guy who had the ball and then we go to the field. But so, out of all the sports you play when you were young, right, right, because even like for me, football wasn't it? Because you know, yeah, and I played a lot of difference for yeah. So yeah, and you know football. It's so when you're young, you. So we would. You played to play baseball, that was the biggest one. Or and then you played basketball, because we're so easy just to get a couple guys together and you play horse and you play in the backyard, whatever that might be. Yeah, football, we didn't play really until the fifth grade. Fifth Grade was the first time that I played organized football and then I didn't play again until I was in eighth grade right, which was fine, and then went on to high school and then in played in high school and it's so the importance of sports was something to do, but ultimately what you learned, as we look back now on it, are different skill sets that compliment one another, no matter what the sports is. So when, when, in today's society where where everybody's concentrating, you got to go to this camp be playing this and you can really play one sport. You're going to play baseball, you're going to play football, you're going to play basketball and you can't do multiple sports, I think it's really injustice to a young athlete because I think that he really needs to be able to experience all those other sports. The tie into one another, high high hand coordination, the ability to dribble a foot a basketball, you know, the h hitting of a football. Moven for not turn out. Standpoint. You've burned out. All. That's right. Yeah, so in all you got to do is you know. So if you just concentrate on one sport, you're going to get burn on, you're going to have some chain. You're right. So I can still remember one of my favorite things was my dad gave me a broom handle and he brought a piece of big felt home and he said just tape it up as a beer ball and I'm like what and it literally we went out my backyard. That's what we used to play because you could...

...swing and hit. It feel like almost like a bit, but it one goes far, right, right. It was a lot of fun and we just but that's how my dad was a milk guy, worked for PPG for forty two years and we didn't have a lot of money, but you had ye had a manufacture things to go out and play and we did it all the time, you know. And I think one of the not to take a bed. I think one of the experiences that you have was when you organize yourself amongst you, when once your peers, well, somebody's got to take charge. Somebody's got to make a decision. How do you choose teams? You know who, and then you got to make up your own rules because you don't have enough people to cover everything. So it was like, okay, if you got, if you got seven guys. So we got three on one side and for in the other. So you got a picture, you know, and in the other guy would the other team would catch for you or launchers and watch that serves sometimes. So buddy backs, right, but when it's done for you, you know whom. You don't. You don't learn those skills of very want to negotiate or what's you know who's going to make what team and what's out, what's not out, what's fair or not fair, and you know. And so you can't hit to this field because we don't have anybody over there. So right. So it was all, yeah, it was like the shift back in the day, right, like yeah, when you played, because we don't have enough guy, so you're not a hit it over there. That ever won't give the ball back. Yeah, don't go off, don't go that way. But you know, and and and not to live in the past. And that's not where, but it, but it, but but it makes you who you are or, you know, gives you a lot of skill sets that sometimes, I think today, you know, our young athletes don't have a chance to be able to hone and and have experience it. So you played baseball when you were younger. Who did you have, like a team that you rooted for? Our favorite player? So it's so, it is. So I got to go. So we go back into the s again and and then the Milwaukee Braves were big. They back in five thousand six hundred and fifty seven. So so we had Eddie Matthews, was probably or our favorite player on that day on the team, and young hoole care he would have been yeah, yeah, yeah, early, yeah, and so and not that you would, you know, we'd listen my grandfather, you know, so let's stop over see graph and Grahma, and so he would sit on the porch and he have the radio and he'd be listening to the price game. So you'd sit there and how you doing? Graham's fine, you know, with he listened to a part of it and it was part of, you know, part of getting to know your your grandparents at the time. But those are memories that you have and so that was it. And you know the packers, the packers really didn't come into you know, come into vogue until went on. Barty came in fifty eight, you know, fifty eight and sixty when they won their first championship, right, and then moved on and people started getting you know, getting excited, but you know not to say well, here's an old guy. But you know, television, you only had three channels, or three stations I say, and it closed down at midnight and they weren't it was a regional game at one o'clock every Sunday afternoons. Yeah, I kind of liked it better because I find myself, I always surfing, like there's some better on and there's like a thousand channels. Then you just watch what you watch. And listened baseball the radio is still one of the greatest things. I love that whole feeling listening to a game on the radio. You know, turn off the TV and listen to the right yeah, it's it. And so yeah, because it was all about the announcer, you know, and how exciting he made the game seem at the time. And so I grew up in Arizona and but we could on a clear night we could get ellie dodger game. So it's then scully was Oh, yeah, it was great. Yeah, you, this is during that was legless. That would be a good one. So so your dad was owned a bar. You guys? Yeah, did you wre'd you live? Did you? So we lived there. So we lived there at the bar. So Dad bought the bar nineteen forty five, and so I came the following year, in one thousand nine hundred and forty six. But the bar was an old inn and there were rooms upstairs and there was a there was a kitchen and living room in the bedroom, you know, behind in the back of the bar, same building, but that was that's where we grew up and on the ultimately, by on nineteen fifty seven or so, they remodeled the upstairs and I so up until that point of time I grew up with four guys for guys that lived upstairs with us, I mean had bedrooms upstairs. So it was an old end. It was a boarding room, you know. So yeah, there was a joe and God who else was there? WHO's don't anyway. But so you know, you don't think about it, but you go back and you go, okay,...

...fine, there's one bathroom upstairs that everybody used. Just one, just one, you know. And so the guys are you know, they that was there. That's where they but they needed to there's no want to. The bar patients still like everyone. No, no, no, that's out. Sorry. Yes, other upstairs. Yes, I was. Your mom had a Goul in your first because pretty she never did shed. That's right. So did you have brother sisters? Yeah, so, yeah, so I was the oldest of for and so they had two sisters and a brother and so myself and then sister and a brother and sister, and so they all had, you know, and it's like we get back together now after all these years and and it's amazing just to listen to their experiences because it's completely different than my sens, you know, from how interactive with the with the patrons of the Bar, growing up in the bar and the interaction of mom and dad within that, within that growth period. But so down with your mom worked in the yeah, so, so mom took care of so she took care of all the books. I mean she did, she she took all the care of all the books. So we had a kid. So we served in this. So there was a kitchen. They served early, they served lunches and then back in the Midwest, so it was fish fries were big on Fridays, you know, that was a staple. So fish fries, that was a that was a big thing and in that lasted for about a year, okay, and then we closed the kitchen until we remodeled again. And then, as I said, so we moved. We had had an apartment upstairs and then we started serving food on special nights. So Wednesday was a state night, Friday was a fish obviously, Saturday was who was a chicken chicken nights. So it wrote to you. Knew you were working at a bar from Oh so, yeah, so you and so really so when we were when we were young, we were back. So we had a bust the tables, you know, on those days. And then it's friendly. Were Free Label. Yeah, so, and then we had, you know, I had to do the dishes, you know, worked in the kitchen, nailed clean up and all that kind of stuff. Never barred on it. I never. I mean really, I did once and maybe that was the reason I never got into the blue as your dad, but it was your dad, the kind of bartender that like mark the lines and make sure everybody had the same amount of he just poured the no, he's just for to drink. That's it. So Dad's you knows dad's whole thing, like was basically in his philosophy was, if I'm serving you a drink, I'm serving you would drink. So I poured the drink in front of you, you know, it's not on the back bar, you know, and I mix it here. I poured the beer in front of you and so that you could see it was the presentation of that drink for you specifically there. And so, just for our audience, you, this is water. This is water. Thank you. Yeah, just make the know we're talking a lot about bars, but it so. The other interesting thing that I read about the bar was how you got your nickname. Oh yeah, so, so, obviously, being the first born, dad was very proud father, as we all are every kids, and you know. And and so the Appleton was a Milltown, you know, much like western Pennsylvania, a lot of towns that are here. Was A milltown. Was a paper town, on paper mill town, but you know, guys would come in from the mill and d'd be opened at eight o'clock in the morning and close at one o'clock at night, and so there were shifts that would come in. So the late night and you know, so they'd stopped in and it's a hey Bob Haus, a new kid of yours. Oh, Dad said all or you should see him, you know, very proud. You know, she's called these little muscles. I mean he looks like a little rock sitting in that crib. So then they would come back, you know, and they say, Hey, Bob, how's it? How's that little rocketbears? So, what do you mean? You know the kid that was and and that's how I got so I was referred to as rock and and had that name ever since. COULD BE WORSE? I guess what? Good, that's what's right. He looks like a little blob in the curl with a dough boy. There is, but it was that a lot to live up to. Like everybody calling your rock. He was it just like no, it is this, it. That was it. You know, it was kind of interesting because everybody I was your name, so everybody called you. You were pretty called your rocky. My real name is Robert Patrick, after Robert, after my father, and and was baptized on St Patrick's Day March. I was born March fifth. But so, but nobody ever calls me Robert. So somebody the only okay, so, the only people that would call me Robert were the good nuns that taught me in grade school and...

...my mother when we're showing. That's right. That's what we just talked about with Roberta with mom call you when she was at the only time she would say Roberto was when she was mad. Other what did you say? Was I forget any other? Pinchio. And Yeah, see, mad she was, but we all said like our mom's had a like they usually when ere maddie called you by your real name. That's right. Yeah, right. So that's pretty interesting. So, rock we're going to move on to a little bit. Thanks for sharing your childhood. Want to go, Lena, into high school because, you know, part of the show's talking about transitions that we all have to make in our life, right, and going from from when you're young and then you're in middle school then all of a sudden that transition to high school is tough, no matter where you live right it's a difficult thing and you know you. I'm sure that you were known around your areas a pretty good athlete. And how did that affect you going into high school? Ye, well, it was, I mean it was interesting. So the here's the here's the deal, which was that now we're going back to one thousand nine hundred and sixty. So we've got the baby boomers, baby boomers moving into into that high school realm. So new high schools were popping up all over and Appleton specifically, new Catholic high school was built. Gold Savior high schools built in fifty eight. So fifty nine was the first year. Sixty we get. So in that would they had freshman and sophomore those two years. I came in as a freshman and then they had three classes and so by my sophomore year it was a full fledged for year school with a new conference that was developed. Now the that and so is Christian brothers. It was a Christian brothers school. So it was new and there was and what was important about that was there was no legacy that you had to leave live up to because there wasn't any, you know, and so easier to set records, that's right or whatever, and nobody thought about records, you know. And so I came as a freshman and I you know, and I I tried out and I played football as on freshman and in on the JV team and I played on the basketball team, but I also played in the band. And so coming out of St Jose Catholic Grade School, you know, I see, I started playing the trumpet in the fourth grade and so we played up through the eighth grade and you know, so it just continuous. And so this was something new because being practice was after school, as football was after school or basketball was after school. And so all of a sudden there was a conflict and I wasn't necessary me. Well, a lot of athletes played in the band, okay as well, and so they were back and forth. Eventually, the following year, in my my sophomore year, they change being to the first period or zero period. So he had to be at seven o'clock. He had, we had been practice so that we could play football. Now. The catalyst was the coach, because I always believe, well, like we will get into that, but the catalyst was a coach and it was a coach by the name of Torchy Clark who came out of St Mary's Catholic Grade School well, and they were a dominant basketball team and because of Torchi and his style and how he organized his team and in he got any would always win the Catholic league in Grade School. Well, you know, we finally want it over at St Joe's when he left to go to high school, and so then we dominated where here and wanted but so we get over high school. Now you go to high school, you're a freshman. I it's a new experience and you know, how do you know what are you going to play or what's going to do, what he's going to turn out to be? You just go out and you know and you play and you play and basically you know if, if you're halfway coordinated, you know if you get some natural ability that kind of comes through at that level. And and so I got it. So you get to get a chance to play. But what was interesting was that it also drew this Catholic high school from surrounding communities because of the new Catholic High School, and so all of a sudden it was a leath raw of young talent that came in from other great schools. You know, that coalesce right here. And so during my period of time they're the conference years from Sophomore, junior and senior is that we never lost a football game.

We won the conference those three years and they went after that three years we lost for Basketball Games. Who with the defending state champions and basketball during my junior year, my senior year, we lost the championship game. And so it was. It was a hot bat, I mean, and it was at one person. Was a lot of, you know, good talented people coming together and we had a coach that demanded in you know, and got the most out of out of all of his players. And depending on your experience, but really to this day and for those who, if you ever talk to anybody that played during that period of time, will you know of nothing but great things to talk about Torchi Clark and and with the impact that he had on their lives that allowed them to play now. And what was so good was that there was a lot of guys that went on to play in college or football thereafter. But it was a great high school, you know, experience and a stepping stone for a lot of people, just from a business point of view anyway. So that was kind of what it taken place. So all of a sudden, you know, you play and so you become all conference and then you get to be all state and then got to be on a high school all American, you know, was the parade magazine, you know, and so it was a great distinction. But because of that then you get recognized, and so I you know. So the thing about sports and probably anything, is that I've always felt that there was always a catalyst. What becomes important is that catalyst, that that that that coach, because every because what he moles together are individuals into a team, and so it's the success of that team that gets you recognize. You know, if if we never want a football game, you know, you might not, you know, get recognized. I say, you know for but all of a sudden, you know, the team gets hot and you know you're not losing and you know you're part of that and you get recognized. And so then you get a chance to where you go to educate your parents. Did they get involved in your high school athletics, like just besides going to the game today, like say, we went to play this or do? No, no, no, no, because everything in the bar. Yeah, that Randy able to watch your games? or well, yeah, they they're go. Yeah, they'd go to the game. You know, they'd go to the Games and then even then in coup because they gore the game. Because after the Games, you know, most of the parents would come back to the bar. Yeah, that's it's right. Same experience, like where you were upset at the coach or something happened and you went and told Your Dad, like because I've done out with my dad, and my dad be like just just shut up and play. Yeah, that doesn't happen now, like with kids, right, you know, the different, different mineset you. No, no, you know, not it way. I never had that. You never take that stuff to mom and dad. You wouldn't say you know. And you ended that. Did you remain in contact with Torchi as you got into the NFL and later? Yeah, yeah, yeah, we didn't. And he went down HMM and started the basketball program at then Florida Tech Univer at Florida Tech Okay, which now is central Florida University. Wow, yeah, so he started the basketball program and I remember when he went down there and he started it and they had no Jim, they had no resources. They worked or they practice at the at the Navy Reserve Center, because I was the closest basketball and and so because his is practice uniforms were as game uniforms. Well, how they are down there, like hey, torchy, we don't have any facilities yet, but we were. Well, am is, because if it was, you know it, he he he. He had the talent to be able to coach on on a on the college level, and so and then it was also kind of coach that he got a chance to do it his way and and start a program. Well, here, and so then they, they, then they changed it Florida Tech, winty central Florida University, and so the gym there, the Basketball Gym, is now named for him to torture Clerk Jim. So he's not one of the best names I think I've ever. Yeah, what a great name. So, so then you're playing multiple sport in high school, Right, yeah, so you play. Yeah, so, you played, you, so you play football. Okay, then the next day w basketball and then we didn't have a baseball team, so we ran...

...trap. Yeah, we ran track, just to whatever that is. But I played track. Huh. Did you have a CENDR as track? Yes, sweet, yes, we had a nice school. Good, when you follow that stuff, that's no joke. Well, no, that's right, but I think I still have some of that in like that. That's right, it isn't you know, we're we wasn't a unlike today. So and then I played American. Then I played Legion Baseball League makes football during the summer. Right, yeah, so, but I said, I played that and in eighth grade. So that summer between Freshman York I went on played American Legion. Got Invited to do that, and so that was a and that was a then that was another great experience playing during the summer. What was your favorite? What's your like your football experience? The one memory that you say this is when I think about high school football, this is what I remember. Was it a play? Was it a game? But no, it was like okay, so it was a game. It was my sophomore year and we're playing pre Monterrey on a Green Bait and a Pre Monterrey was the dominant Catholic high school mm in the area at the time. So it was like central Catholic heres depicts. You know this, but it was. It was the dominant. They won everything and so on. It's on. So find me this upstart new school, Zavier, you know, comes out and we are playing up there pre Monterrey and and it. It is the definitive game for that conference at that time, these two powers, and so we ultimately, we ultimately beat them. But in this case, as we were moving the ball down the field and it was it was towards you in the fourth quarter, and so it was a quick pitch to me around the right side. Okay. So it is wrong the right side, and so I'm going down the sidelines and going down the sides and I get hit, but I keep my balance right, okay, and so there is a picture of me with my left foot inside the out of bounds line. My right foot never touched, but was never touched, but I was out of bounds, you know, and control my body. To come back to the first thing, to replay picture. That's right. Letty Swan Right and scored to win the game. Wows, and that was probably the definitive that's it's true. Cone. Yeah, that bus ride was fun. It was. Yeah, it was. He had everybody was excited that we want to beat pretty Montrey, and so that was a you still keep in contact with in your former teenage and classmates. So yes, it d savior. Yeah, so there's a couple. You know, over the years I've hea say, like Paul, like Paul Streider, he still lives there, and Kelly Crenelli, and and Kip what ingern? KIP Willinger, he was our talking about basketball. He was the dominant basketball player in that conference at that time and we wouldn't have had this success if we hadn't, you know, if we didn't have kept. Yeah, without kept I mean he was a he was a thirty point guy a game in a kind of it. Did he play in college? Then after he went to Ohio state, you know, and then unfortunately was in an aunamobile accident and got hurt and just in that that that was, you know, his career. said that was shortly, right. Yeah, but anyway, so he was. He was great at tennis. It was a great tennis player, Great Basketball Player. His father played at Ohio state at the time during the period of time when the underhand shots all right, you had a jobs right involgue at the time when so the right and and so kit was following in his dad and his dad, you know, and Dad, his dad did made kip practice every day, every day, every day. So when you talk about a parent influence on one's life, you know, he was whether whether Kip wanted it or not, that was there and made them. Yeah, made him great. So if I know, you went to Notre Dame, but did they? Did they come see you, or did other schools just did everybody start sending new letters? How was that like? Yeah, it was the first one you got. What was the first letter you got? The first contact was from University of Wisconsin. Okay, that they were. That they were you know, they would were interested. Of obviously snse was a state that come Notre Dame. I got a letter from Notre Dame and then I got a contact from...

Notre Dame one of the scouts that were in that area. So actually there was a there was a gentleman in Appleton who is name was Russscal Okay, and Russ's dad owned a nightclub, which one nightclubs were bake back there is a dinner club, you know. It's a place where you went with a you know, suit, a tie, you know, and had a fine meal and so on. and Ross went to Notre Dame. Russ was a walk on player at Notre Dame. Yeah, and in it changed his life. As far as you know, he not that he was a star. He was in a scholarship. He was a walk on. It was a part of this team, and so I remember it was my fall of my senior year and he said, okay, Wisconsin's playing Notre Dame. YEA, and he said, so let's go down to the game. My Dad and I left set. We played Friday night. We left Saturday morning about four o'clock in the morning because it's about and he wanted to get down there. He wanted to get down the campus so to have breakfast at one of the dining halls and anyways, it was about a five hour drive, you know, to get down. So we got down there about nine o'clock in the morning, but papa went over and see the coach at the time and so I met the coach and Hue Divoor, was the coach, was in from coach at the time, and so coach divorces, Hey, if you want to come here, we'll ve you a scholarship to come to Notre Dame. I'm still I'm going home. That's very exciting and so on. But anyway, then there that was. That was that was my first interduction to kind of like Notre Dame and and then I got a after after that senior year and then more formal invite to come, but we got a brand new coach, are parsaging comes in. So, you know, whatever who divorce said before there, it doesn't matter, it doesn't matter now. So that happened though. They yeah, so then. So I went to Wisconsin and so on then. But I got letters from big ten schools like Illinois and Michigan and you know, in Minnesota, in not that any you know. They invited me to go on trips. Right, but it was the really the advice of obviously the scout or the coach from a Notre Dame, and not that he was selling Notre Dame. All he was selling was the opportunity, the of going or having a chance to, I suppose, for me to select Notre Dame. But he said this, he said not, listen, you can get a lot of you can get a lot of offers when schools and you know division two, Division One, you know from around this and you know and every time you go visit one of these schools are going to roll out the red carpet and show you a good time and go through this process of when you go through this whole process and you got to make a decision you know it's going to be more difficult when you have all these red carpets out there. How do you make the really different? He said, so, why don't you pick three schools that you would like to graduate from, not play for, but like the graduate from, because anything can happen durings for years. You get hurt, you know, but it's the education becomes very important and and then it'll just be an easier decision for you. And I thought that made such great sense to me, you know, at the time, and I said, okay, fine. So Notre Dame was one in Wisconsin, because I felt an obligation. And then we had a family friend that stopped in the bar who would graduate from Boston College and he said, I can get you an interview up in Boston College. Okay, so I went up to Boston College as well. Loved Boston. Yeah, great, not austome shot a boss it, you know, because you're you see your get a little room from the Midwest. I mean there's the first time I was over. Awesome, right, you're not an appleton. This is really terrific, and you know, and so on. And so then went to Notre Dame and which was even nicer and and so offered a scholarship and Notre Dame, and I had to go to Wisconsin. It Wisconsin, maybe in my mind was just like too big, you know, to do. But okay. But like every good Catholic boy, you know what you're taught, was to go to church and pray for guidance and direction make sure that you make the right choices right and so then, like every good Catholic...

...boy, I did what my mother wanted me to do right now, was to go to learn. So That's how that decision is this it was made. That's awesome. We went through rocky's youth and through his high school and we got to hear a lot of great stories. Maybe some people didn't get to hear before. But now we're going to move on. I know, rock you wanted to tell story, a quick story about I don't know if there's a port start. Well, it was quick. Yeah, stories about influence. And we went to Catholic school and we had some nuns that sometimes we're a little harder on us than maybe they should have been. It's really you know, and so I is. So Sister Hillary was my six great teacher and and and I tell this and that in the context, which was okay, I got to go back. So now this is nineteen fifty seven. Go in nineteen fifty seven, all right. And who was what was happening in nineteen fifty seven? Well, for those of us who are around, nineteen fifty seven, rock and roll was just starting to come into OK, okay, and so you had the the the king, who is singing, but you also had, you know, ducktails, you know, the home and back and know these all big thing. Well, you know. So we had a Christmas break. Was Christmas break and right near the Catholic school, so I lived the block away was Jones Park, was a skating rink. So it was a big, big skating rink on there. So, anyway, now you got to picture this. So I decided to become hip in the sixth grade, and so I cooled my hair back, parted it on both sides over the middle, down little flip. Now it may not sound very good at this time, but at the moment I got a lot of good feedback from the opposite side, which, Oh, you really look cute, what are you doing? This is pretty so I was feeling good. And and so now we're going back to school. So I walk in, I got my hair dude, just the way I want it, and I walk to the class and I sit down on the back where my seat and dusk was still are. It comes in. She looks over everybody. Well, Hey, I'm glad to have everybody back over the holidays. Open is good holidays, and so I think this. Everybody get out there their English book the reader. Okay, now we're going to go back to page eighty six. Okay, this is where we left off, right before the bridge. So we're going to have some silent reading at this moment in time. Everybody gets her books. I get by and she goes, Robert, May I talk to you outside? So I had to get up and walk through the class and walked outside, not knowing what he's going to take place. And she's only about five foot two. You know they were big. So I walk out and she walks up behind me, closes the door, spins me around and piles me to the door with her finger right in my chest and she said blessing. You know, kids in this class really look up to you and you know you're a leader, whether you think you're a leader or not, and you make an impact another kids. So I'm going to tell you this that here do doesn't stay. You got two choices. One, you can go home or two, you can comment back the way that it was before. And she leaves and walks back in the classroom. I got a decision, right, you know, obvious decision, which was not going home. So very, very slowly I combed back with a part of the side push, is best I possibly could. And the most embarrassing thing was that I walked back into the class because everybody knew and heard what had taken place out there. So on. But it but, but it made a difference because I was the first time that she ever that I did. Anybody ever told me I should say that I was a leader. You know that people looked up to you for what you do, because otherwise you just you know, or goofball wick everybody else. But all of a sudden more responsibility on me. So, anyway, I'll need I never forget that, right. You know right now so well that that's perfect India rate, because you were captain a Notre Dame, which right. Yeah, so I had opportunity after our my junior year with elections went up and so I was I was a invoted it's captain of the team my senior year and and it was no little asstrix, which was I was the last single captain on...

...a Notre Dame in football team. But then, because everybody else changed, and you so they'd had defensive captain and then had an offensive captain, now a special teams captain as well and so on. So yeah, so that's awesome. So you had a lot of things transitioning going your life. You left home, you went to college. Did your parents get to come see you a lot in college? Did it come down? Would come down? Yeah, they not every week because it was a long drive and dad, you know, take a day off on Saturday, but the but they would come down maybe three or four times and then and then they organize some bus trips. That came down from appleton and, you know, from cancer for yea for parents. I love them watch my kids when ever playing and other sports and everything. So that's a good experience, right. I mean he played out some of the greatest teams in their history. Really, you look back, I mean well during yeah, so when National Championship, one National Championship. Yeah, so that was a are par season. Came in one thousand nine hundred and sixty four. Notre Dame had some bad years through the s after the war, you know, and then all of a sudden as a drought, but eric came back and in one thousand nine hundred and sixty for his first year, my freshman year there, the team went nine and one year before the only one in two games and they went nine and one. Turn it around whist the last game of the season, and so all of a sudden notre name football was back in the forefront. By my junior year, we we were voted to as a number one team in the mythical national championship, and I say that because there was no playoff games we have now, and so it was all done by the writers that would do it. So it boiled down to a game in our history. That was a very exciting game. We played Michigan State, which was also undefeated. We had to play up in Michigan State, and what made this so important was because here is the first time in this mythical national championship that finally two teams undefeated, number one number two in the rank pulls, got a chance to play against one another at the end of the season. And so, as I said, was the game of the century. Everybody was writing about it was on television. Was a big deal. In that game ended in the time, well, ten to tend. There was no overtime, there's no sudden death, there was no just just okay, it was over, you know. And fortunately for us, I suppose, we had one game left and we had to go out to California and we played southern cal out in California on it was an interesting thing to and, and I tell you this only because of the fact that it was, we beat southern calififty one to nothing in that game. In so that was Saturday. Monday we were voted number one team. Now some Michigan State fans, they were probably watching this podcast, will probably argue that we split with a Michigan State, but they're not doing this broadcast. So we were. We were the number one. Believe it's going to go with rock. So that's pretty in. So your senior year you were captain, right. Yeah, and so what was like the always wanted like that. You see the movies and all the history about the painting of the helmets and and Notre Dame, and what was like that for you, because you came from Xavier and Appleton, which probably wasn't a huge school, right, and then you go to no dame and there's just like were you but that history already started? Or did you guys start that history of the painting of the helmets and all this port that came later? And because it well, yes, I mean, but not like when you see it today, when I so it's all painted in gold and you know, on the kind of stuff. And Yeah, all after every you know game that I think they painted its spring, but whatever touched it up so looked halfway decent boat. We didn't know that, you know. I mean it wasn't that big for the the legacy of Notre Dame, obviously, was just that at that time, Notre Dame, the historic football teams that they had rock me in through the years and lady and and so it and the campus and you know in what it all meant and the fan base that was from coast to coast was really huge. And so it was. So you do. You just got more involved in it, you know, and as as then, you know, than it changed and you know more success is taking place over these last fifty years within a school. And but the school wasn't begged. It was only threezero students, you know, at that time, and now it's maybe Eightzero Grad students, maybe tenzero. So it's not...

...a US it was just such a national presence, right. Yes, it just such a long time. Yeah, yeah, and so then when did you first realize that, like the NFL, was something that was possible going and play at the next level? So it wasn't until maybe that junior year, going into my senior year, when you you know, we played caliber or high caliber football and you know and that there might be a possibility. I would do secretly do this as well after our season in college and he come home for you know, maybe maybe thanksgiving. We'd make it home for Thanksgiving me and or at least for the holidays, and and my dad and I would go to one of the Packer Games. Okay, that was so we go to the Packer Games. It go to the Packer Games and I get the program and secretly, and I didn't it's first time. I didn't tell anybody then, but I secretly I look at the rosters see if there was anybody my size, if there was anybody that was five hundred and ten. Stretching it a little bit, five ten, maybe a hundred ninety pounds. Anybody that was playing right. Sorry, so they in. This game was just it was interesting. It's but the and I remember this one specifically and I was looking, look out and they're playing the steelers. Okay, I don't know. You know, he's a really playing the stealers. So they had a running back, steelers did, that was like five ten, five nine, five nine, maybe a hundred ninety pounds or so. Right over. It's called Jim Cannon Ball Butler. I don't remember that name. So very so. Yeah, so it's always a small, little compact running but it was a and I'm going, Oh wow, you know he could play and you know, so maybe I might have a chance to play. But that was the extent of any any really, you know. Then then so the draft. So the draft. Okay, so the draft comes in. The draft at that time was not in Aprils, in February. So the in I can't remember this. And you know my senior year was captain and we lost three games. Were that year. I think it was seven and three. You know that year and you know and I was an all American. You know, I started, I played, but I wasn't you know. I honestly, God, unlike today, where it's on tele audition, everybody talks about it, you get radio talk shows, everybody's got to prognosis of who they're going to pick and so on. Is a big deal. I mean the NFL draft. On the NFL draft today, twenty three million people watch. You know, watch that right. So I got I got a form letter. I got a form letter in the mail from several teams and basically it said this. It said like, okay, name, you had to fill it out. So name. Okay, Rocky Bler, school, Notre Dame. Position, running back. Height, the five can okay, there weren't enough. Who knows? There? Five ten is a better than you know, five nine, but five stand that's right. Good, okay. So five hundred and ten. Wait, a hundred niney pounds. Okay, fine, so at least seems in balance. And forty at the forty time. Now you have to understand. We didn't run the forty. Nobody ran the fort the forty wasn't a meaningful designation, as it is today, of what your forty time was. So I'm going forty. I get a put a time, forty time, forty time. Okay, oh well, all right. So, being a almost a college graduate at that, I thought to myself, okay, find my best high school, my best high school. Hundred, it's ten flat. Okay, my best downhill, when they did you know whatever it was. So it was my best. So I'm thinking to myself, okay, fine, so what's fifty yards? Fifty yards, five, five seconds. Okay, forty yards. Got To strapulate a little bit. So fifty, little math, fifty, fifty, forty yards. Okay, fine. So for three. So I put for three that I didn't know that it was that good or bad, or so the anal and wait, like none of the men. And so they only it's. So that was like three teams. The saints, I got on Minnesota, I think I get one, and you know, that was it. So the draft comes. Now we're over at a friend's house,...

...a family. It's a family. They take us out. So we've become friends over the years and the Hickey family, which was their names, and so we were. We went out to dinner. My roommate did, Danny Hirshman. Tom O'Leary was from Columbus, Ohio, and the players and in their family. We were not the dinner. Now we're back at their house. Okay, so Sunday night, it was a Sunday night and we're having libations. You know, we're just kind of like this. We're ready, we're talking and TV's on over here. The news is on, plap blow, and so we're talking about school. What's going to happen? You know, all right, parents coming in. Then all of a sudden that says, oh, in the NFL draft today, several players were picked from the area, and also and so from produced from south bound, you know, was picked here and so and Notre Dames Captain Football Team, Bob Rocky Blyer. You know, it's drafted a number sixteen by the Pittsburgh steelers. There was a law. People said, Hey, congratulations anyway. Well, that's how I like that. That's all. That's great and that's all I found out. You know, that'sure. That is great. Rock, we've been through like can of how like that your story shaped where you are getting to and then you get drafted. Right, you find out by a news channel that you got drafted and then, you know, you go on to the next step your life. Now you're out in the real world. Right now, like you don't, like I always say, like the school wasn't there to support me. Now I gotta go figure out whatever it might be. Hopefully it's a steelers right draft by stealers. Go find all that out. Yeah, and so for the next couple of years, you know, you your life really takes some amazing transitions. So can can you explain how all that worked? You know, yes, so, okay, so it now we got to go back here. It's one thousand nine hundred and sixty eight. So the Vietnam War was taking place. A lot of school friends and buddies that, you know, had dropped out of out of school, went or right after high school signed up and you know, the draft was a big it was a big cloud hanging over everybody's head. And he had to sign up for the draft in or eighteen years old and you got to deferment. So the deferment, you know, comes due and then, you know, so you become eligible for that draft. Obviously, in history books and so on is that was not a popular war. was on television all the time. Nobody understood why we were there, what we were fighting for really, and so we had body counts that were taken place. That was. It was a first really war that was in our face, and so it was a lot of things happening within our society. Student protests were taken place, you know. On top of that, civil rights movements were going on, and so there's a big upheaval. Anyway, I come to Pittsburgh and I get drafted. Now my impression, or my I said, thought process, was this watching the Green Bay packers, okay, and is that there would always be an article or pictures of players during this period of time. Yeah, were in the reserve or in National Guard. So they'd go to summer camp for two weeks and then they'd be at their weekend meetings and there was always pictures, blah blah, up on. So the assumption very easily. Well, if you make a football team, I guess this is the road that you go down to. I didn't think about it very much and so I got the Pittsburgh and in ultimately, you know, I guess Bill Austin was our head coach and in probably the happiest time my life at that moment, being a rookie, coming in was towards the end of training camp and rupt St Vincent's College and I just broke out of a meeting when coach Austin said, can I talk to you for a moment, and so we went into this other room and he had this letter. He said this letter came in the mail. Was Open up by mistake. It was by one a classification. So you went from a student to ferment to eligible for the draft now, and he said, I think you're good enough to be able to make this team, and so we'll take care of this for you. So, from my small world of influence, taking care of this was all. They getting the reserve, our National Guard. So September one through, I mean we started playing the season, October game started playing and and heard anything. And so I went down to see Frand forerdy, who was the...

...the chiefs right hand guy. He ran everything, took the mail. So so he's like business operations, and so I said it, Mr Fulbo. He said, did you know anybody? We hear anything that was taking place? And he said now listen. They said, we're having a little problem. You know, the general died or the general retired, congressman got defeated. We don't want we don't have our contacts, and it's very well. What don't worry, said we've we talked to your draft board back in Wisconsin and and they're not going to draft until the end of the end of the year. So you have some time. So it was like the kiss of death, I'm going to talk to my draft board. It was like, oh, okay, fine. Anyway, was a ten game of this. Right after the ten game, Getting Ready for the eleventh game of the season, when I kept my draft notification and it was whoop Foon, forty eight hours I was gone. Yeah, so it was just I got it was a Wednesday, Friday, I was off to basic training, and so that's our quickly it happened, and maybe luckily so, I mean, because now you got to do is you're in a reactive mode. You know, you're not thinking about it. You just go, okay, fine, are going to be. I got to get through this, whatever it might be, and and so that's that's what took place. Yeah, so then you went over there and will happen to you is clearly what everybody knows and knows that story about you. And then the part that I kind of like, when that I love to read about, and when you got the postcard from the g what that's you know, and I think be so. So what happens is that, you know, I get wounded over there and get wounded twice. We were we're in a firefight and eventually, you know, we make it out of there and get on helicopters and we fly to an eight station. Then we've flied to de Nang and spent to to three days in Tonang, then went to Tokyo, spent three weeks in Tokyo and then came back to the states and spent nine months in the hospital. So we're with but over you I was at Fort Riley Kansas, Orwin Army hospital for Ribby Kansas. That's where I was stationed there or ended up there. But it was it, you know, it say, and I tell people this and be because it's in people that influence you. Or what happened, is that, no matter what we may do or what happens in our lives, there are times when, you know, the world just caves in and then all those questions, you know, what did I do? What's going to happen? Where's my future? You know, go with through your head and the interesting the first part of the story was is that there was a cross across right, across from me, was a young soldiers, a triple empy team, lost left arm and in both both legs. And every day, this was in the Nang and every day that I was there, he the aids would come to take him to therapy and you know, visually he read that little trap P's a's and over his bed swings torso as best they could, with help, get into the wheelchair and they push him up. But he'd stop at our beds. I mean he'd stop at the beds and stop at my bed knees. Go Hey, how are you doing today? You know you really look you know you look better today. I have to tell you that she looked better today than then you did yesterday when you got your yesterday, because yesterday and all honesty, you look like shit. Okay, but we know we got some good doctor. We'll get you out of here and let's see. And it was one of those guy go wow, I have any skies. Got Great attitude, you know, with the the atrocities that took place in his life and he had to live with those for the rest of his life. Is Attitude. If he could have an attitude, what about me? So I go to Tokyo and ultimately, after a couple weeks in Tokyo, I finally get enough courage to ask my doc. He said, what do you did? Find Out? What? How? How much damage do I have? Can I come back and play this game from his perspective, was your leg wrapped and everything at this point? Did you seeing the injuries? And Yeah, I know it was still it was still you still have to tell you this. Yeah, it was still wrapped until I got to Tokyo. Okay, because the biggest thing that they were concerned about was infection, and so they weren't going to do anything until I got out of the country into a hospital there. And so the my first day there, the DOC, the DOC would come in, so we're all new. Can New patients in this warden? That doc would come in and I could tell where he was, although I couldn't see him, by the sounds of his patients and as he was going probing their wounds and finding use any so he gets Tom it, comes here, you know, and he comes to my readies. Okay, fine, fine, fine, and so you said on right, I need a forceps and they need scissors. So he's he has cut the bandage he's got to find out what the damages so and he gets...

...to my gets this side, sees this and he gets there the right side and you know, my foot. And so he's got that. He said forceps. He's got it all on. So now takes a forceps and he sticks it in the wound all the way up as far as he could. It was like, Oh, I grab the better. I'm cool. He felt pain like that. I mean go. And so he's probing to see if any bones are broken or you know, what's inside. It wasn't. Then't have extra rays and all that kind of stuff that took place. It just like, okay, fine, I got to find out. So so that was it. And then after, after a couple weeks, and then then I asked him. So his response was this. He said don't worry about it. Can have a normal life. You're going to do things that normal people to. Don't expect to get back in over there. You won't have the strength and flexibility that is needed to play in the NFL. So from my point of view, in from my point of view, it was like he was my authority figure. I mean he was my my father image. He was a guy to get had all the knowledge and so he just suck that hope. You know, it just like you don't have a chance. Then what comes and played two days later is this. I get a postcard in the melee and the postcard is it says it's got two lines on said rock team's not doing well. We need you. Aren't Rooney? I was like, Wow, somebody needed rob really they didn't need you, but say it was like somebody took the time to care, you know. And so that was kind of the family and how the family was. And so it gave you a little more hope. And but then you you know, it's like everything else. Then you got to start. And so once I got to a point where I could start rehabbing, going back to Rehab and then it got to a point where I could start running, and then it's best I possibly could. What back to the gym. I went a hundred sixty five pounds when I came back, a way to ten when I went over and game back at a hundred sixty five pounds. So a lot of it was naturally had to put by the but yeah, put springs back in and so and so you went through that whole period of time. Till I was a I got an early out of the military and then went back to training camp that July of one thousand nine hundred and seventy and went through training camp. Well to me, and and it took its toll. I mean really I wasn't ready to go back, but I needed to go back, and so limped through and is, you know, two a days, sometimes three days, and he just you beat you up, and so it was a little mercy on the players. That's right. So then, you know, so basically they put me an injured reserve. I mean they bought me a year. Following her, I came back again, got through and I pulled a hamstring and I ultimately ended up on the developmental squad, taxi squad. Is that that time, practice through that here and then came back in one thousand nine hundred and seventy two and you finally made to made the team and in one thousand nineteen seventy two. So it took toll just two years, but they bought me an opportunity. Two years to heal, two years to get stronger, two years ago and do something with it and get your body weight back up and, you know, and get back into plane mode again. So you still have a post guard from the chief? No, I wish. You know. It was one of those that you know wherever was. Yes, yeah, I saved it here, but it wasn't a did make it over. And maally dead, was in the Korean War and he's talked about some of that stuff. He wish she's still had. Right, yeah, would have brought with them through all that. So then you go through all this this amazing transition. Now you get back in and you're playing the game again that you know. You kind of grew up love and and right and and and you've gotten healthy and you get back and we know that that whole story. Anybody in Pittsburgh knows your story about the steelers and all the success you had, the people that you got to play with, and we're running for three at that point and stubble. Yeah, well, yeah, I might still been in had Ted flatten a hundred. But but so then we know, like the this the point. We know those stories. And then so then after you get out, like you have this great career. You've been through so much in your life, and then where did that take you? Like what after you left the NFL? What did was your next like for me, the transition from the NFL to after that was toughest for me. Okay, so how that transition for you after all that success you had? Well, I think there's a couple things. Only the couple things were the core of this. Is that part of the transition? Your part of the thought process? It was when you were playing, when you're playing. Is that you you needed to do something in the in the business sector. I mean, ultimately, so you couldn't just not you know, did the team tell you about that stuff or did you just got to...

...figure that out? Well, they I mean there was. There was a team didn't tell you. You know, but that stuff would you just got the you know? Yeah, I mean you've made okay, money, you made all come in it, you know, but it wasn't you know. It was like, okay, fine, what if? What if you get hurt? What if? You know? So, what are you going to do? A lot of guys back then had a season job. Yeah, so they had all season shopped. So I got into the insurance industry early, just in when I came back in one s seventy to in Chicago. was I was living in Chicago in the offseason was working for this insurance company, so it gave me, gave me a little basis and so on. Then came, you know, in made the team and then ultimately, you know, we got a job, get another opportunity and be was in the bond business and we get into the bond business and is investment banker. So we got into that business and then we start a little firm to be able to do that. So that was a you know, it was a stepping stones, something, you know, that you could fall back on, and then then ultimately it comes to the point of, you know, our society in this is what happens is we talked about transition. Our decide, our never teaches us or anything about quitting it or making transitions, you know, because it's always are you can pull yourself up by the BOOTSTRAFF, you can do it again and you can pick yourself and go blo, okay, fine. So I mean a sportsman or part of your life, then all of a sudden you got to make a transition. And I didn't think about retiring until somebody asked me, did you think about reserving it? And it was a it was our super bowl, a super bowl fourteen and then in January of eighty and it was you know, you're getting older. You and started this season. You know, you weren't the starter at the beginning of the season. More guy, younger guys are going on. Well now they got me thinking about retirement. So I played one more year. I mean I played for the ad season and and then I retired after that. So during that period of time, one of the things that was offered to me was a job in television. So Channel Eleven, NBC affiliate, had a new program manager and new general manager that came in and he wanted to do a time with the steelers and so offered me a job to be on to do sports, and so it was like, Oh, okay, you know so and you know so. It was a very fortunate and made the transition. I mean, money wise was the same. You know, see, that was yeah, so, obviously I was not making a lot of money. Right, was a trend. That was fine. It was a new challenge. You know, you're still part of the you're there and kid also get a get yeah, you love. Your Ego was stroked because you're on television, you know, and people still kind of recognized you, and so I saw that was. That helped make the yeah, I had to. When I played for the Bangles one year, Kenny Anderson was my quarterback rush and he used to tell me the stories about you don't offseason. We didn't. We didn't go in. He goes. We I would worked because I went back to school. I got a lot degree. He said. Then we'd start practice in early July and then that was. That was how I tell you got to shape and that's when you did all things in like three days. I said you had three days years. Yeah, we had three days. It's yeah, more in practice afternoon and later in tonight. So those stories are amazing. So some of the things that you're doing now with all the different charities that you work with their pretty amazing. I know you work with a bunch of different veteran organization. Well, you know. I mean part of it, it's so part of it, obviously, is that you know, you learn throughout the day. You know about being and will give back to some degree, and then you've defined this side how and we're we're what can you do? So, given given the experience that I've had, given the chance of being able to play and, you know, and be successful with that team and when those four super bowls, you know, gave you a gave you a stature, but also being in the military. So your identity, your identity, you know, now all of a sudden, because military you can talk about transitions military people if you give you if you can have a voice making transitions as well, you leave in the military, you know. So it's like like leaving the army during Vietnam, you know, I mean you nobody wanted to deal with you did have this skill, such a this and you repressed it. But it's much like playing organized sports, is that it's all about a team. So it's all about a team. It's all about a team until you start going into the job market and...

...it's not about a team by you and what can you do or bring to us? And so you have to be able to make that transition and and and say, okay, fine. So how do you decide? What skill said, and this is what happens today, is that I'm a ranger, sniper, okay, and I like to be in management. You know, I just had twenty years and it or for fifteen years or whatever it was, and now I want to get into the business world. You know, so you got hr over here is and how can I use this guy? You know, I mean these are ranger, sniper, you know, right, what does he know about this? So I have to be able to be able to sell myself and say, okay, fine, these is the skills sets, you know, that I bring to this organization in management and in whatever that might be. So is so that becomes very so that becomes very important. So if you got a voice in at least get people to listen to about these. So all the all the stuff that is happening within the NFL happens in the military as well as first responders. So you talked about post romantic stress. You know that happens, transitions happens. You know, divorce rates happen. So you know, is there help? Yes, there is. Where can we go? We can be do those kinds of things, I think, become very important. So that's what you so who would who are you working with now? What? What? What your kind of charity of choice that you can do? There's there's a there's a there's a journy Mo. Yeah, there's a. So there's journey calls of warriors, just citizens, whereas the citizens is transitional faith based organization that helps soldiers specifically make that transition. So it's the understanding that you're deployed, your your goot, two three. If you look at our professional soldiers to day, you know, go to the Middle East or Afghanistan, Iraq, it's you know, they get the three deployments of four deployments and you know, all of a sudden the families back here, things become tough, you know, and you get it. So it's you know, it's it's difficult. So there's the they anyway, it's an awareness factor. So I worked with it. But then there's hands on. So here in Pittsburgh there's Veterans Leadership League. Okay, so Veterans Leadership League is the hands on group that help veterans specifically and either finding employment, finding jobs, finding the services that they may need and in the help that they may need. But it's a place outside of the Va, you know. So when you make when you make transitions a lot of times it's like, you know, you don't anything to do with the service anymore. You know, you made your transition until when you need whatever benefits you later on. But it's so there's there's those things and it's awareness factors. Well it so, you know, the NFL has some of that, you know, like where we have the alumni, we have NFLPA, you have retired players Congress, you have a bunch of different organizations that try to help former players through everything they're trying to handle, because you don't have all the answers. No, you don't know, and sometimes it's really good to get some help. Very much so, you know. And but it's also a pride factor. It's also on you know. I mean it's tough to leave a, you know, a position and then say I really need help, you know, and or but if you get through that, which you can, there's there's those organizations you're talking about in the NFL. They helps make the transitions and, you know, to go to classes, as there's always we always get something in a text or an email about the opportunity to go to get an MBA, you know, go to this school or whatever it might be. So yeah, but it just making it aware and that it's out there and get people to use the services that are available. We got rock for one more quick segment. It's called no huddle and we're going to blastom questions at them. And rocks got to answer the real quick so dave should go ahead shoot. All right, rocky, one of my first memories of you was the rocky flyers story. You were portrayed by Robert. You're right. How many times have you seen? You're in a movie. Yeah, and never know. I've seen. I've seen. You see good. Always have, always an okay, made for made for Monday night, till it was a television made movie. Robert York and Robert R I. I. I had a chance to pick Robert York because that's how I see myself. Tall, good looking, a lot of hair. Yeah, Hey, this range. Yeah, it's yeah, Dave, I...

...had made discussion about Robert. You're yeah, I was big Robert. You. It's all right, rock. So what is your favorite food? Well, my favorite foot it's anything my wife makes is my favorite. It's I think gave and I had that say. I see it like a robot that when I say it, though, but yeah, it's. I mean it, though. Sorry. Who's the funniest person you know? Really, I, and I say this, a Bradshaw, Terry Bradshaw. It's just a funny guy. I mean you, really is just a funny guy. You may seem like a goofball at time, and he is, but he's just a funny guy's good greats. Let me just tells stories and it makes you laughed. Maybe because of his accent, maybe because he's when USA, maybe he's a good old boy or anything. Maybe because he's put on like two hundred pounds. But so so, Brad Choice. But what you see on camera with Bradshaws, that that's it. That's how that's him. Yeah, it is. No, I don't up. So if we were scanning through your phone right and we said all right, rock, find us the most unexpected like, who would we see on your photo? We'd say, well, that's pretty interesting that we see their name in your phone. Oh, let me see vice president, Joe Biden. Nice. That's a really good one. Thank you. Think that's a really good but that's unexpected. That isn't expected. I like that. I like that good answer. All right, you're a man of many talents, but do you have any hidden talents? Need No, no, no, no, I put all my talents on out when we would you see, it's what you get, Sire. No hidden talents at all. Okay, fair enough. What's your biggest pet peeve? Oh, today, you know, I said, sorry, I suppose my biggest pet peep today is in in the world of sports. You know, we're we're a couple people and we talked about a couple people here, couple people, you know, skew, the the the factor for all the other players. I mean. So, yeah, my my my pet peeve is high. How did they get away with this kind of stuff? You know, and Social Media Song, right. Or my other pet peeves this. You're down twenty one points and you make a tackle in all of a sudden you stand up pounding your chest like Oh yeah, yeah, or like you're down twenty one and you finally score touchdown late in the fourth quarter, you do a Celtation cepression that that really makes me back, like everybody. I mean that more than it right, last one day. What do you got? Okay, you've probably been in many places in this world. Where's a place that you would like to visit that you've never been? Oh, you know, probably it and and I'll say this is is really like to St Petersburg. That's more. Excuse me. Sometimes I get these little fads in your St Petersburg, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Okay, so I like to go to Saint Petersburg, Russia, only because my daughter is, my daughter's there and my daughter's going to school there, but all everything that I get back from her would be like, Oh, you got to come dead and be able to see this beautiful place, even though it's some Russia, in all the history that takes place. And so, yeah, that's it's so like there's I'll go to during the summer. Yeah, a lot. Well, Hey, it's rocky. Really appreciate Robert. Right, you know Robert the days. This is amazing. Right, we're here's the Robert Roberto Clementi Museum. Right. Our first, yes, is Roberto Clemati Junior, and now we have Robert Patrick bly. That's right. So that's our first couple, that's our first day. So we really appreciate you. Come on, you're welcome with us. Thank you.

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