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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Rocky Bleier

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

4x SuperBowl Champion and Vietnam War veteran, Rocky Bleier joins the huddle to share stories from his life about where he got his name, being drafted to fight in Vietnam, and his inspiring career with the Pittsburgh Steelers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I am former NFL quarterback Gusfora.I've played quarterback fifteen years in the NFL. This is my show calledHuddl up with Gus each week I team up with my longtime friend Dave Hager, andwe talked with guests about how sport shaped their lives. Pro Athletes,business executives, community leaders, everyone has a story to tell aboutsport. We invite you to Huddl up with gus this week in the huddle today. Ourguest is a rocky Blir, the Rocki Blyer. Thank you for coming on enjoying the SYeah Ameyeah, so rock this is Dave, so youknow you can't really tell them apart right right. So so now we're going toget in the huddle, with rocky we're going to start peppering with somequestions and here' some great stories, maybe you've never heard before so rock.This shows all about how sports and shaped your life as you were growing up,and so one of the questions we like to start was: who was that influentialperson from the time you can remember of playing sports that really developedyour love for the game? You know, I think it so the love for the game. It you know, itjust happens. You start playing, you know I oes it start. So really was my next door, neighbor pause, triterand in Paul I father also owned a bar, so there's two bars together and so we grew up together, went toGreade, school together and so on, and because of that we were neighbors, andso we would we always play. I mean we play,we play catch, we'd play basketball and he would help organize. I mean I canremember our first organized team. We were in the fourth grade at the time,and so Paul was the one that pulled together. So it was joyy bowers. So asPau Hrider, then my brother inlaw now of my brother Inlaw, who Paul reckner,is his name and so puxy that was his nickknack, so puxy we brought he was inthe second grade, so we brought him and the reason is because he had abasketball and a pretty good corte. You know sothat was won it, but but but it was like growing up. Soyou grew up in the Midwest and grew up in Appleton, Wisconsin and so in. Inthe S- and you know it was a period of time where you know the neighborhoodwas the neighborhood and you just picked up. You had pickup teams youplayed in the backyard you played against one another and th there wasn't there wasn't littleleague, it didn't exist at the time. Tey bruth did not exist at the time, noorganized sports, except for the grade school, but by the time you get there.So you know in the fifth grade sixth grade they just start playing the isthen by the ninth grade youwere out, then a new high school came and then wewhen, when we went out- but it was all- was all about the neighborhood andgrowing up in that regard. So what like? So all those all sports? You know I didthe same thing right, we'd Dall, like I', go to my buddy's house. We get hispike and we go to the next Hay House get that guy and then we go get the guywho had the ball and then we go to the field. But so out of all the sports youplay when you rere young right right because even like for me, footballwasn't it because you o yeah and I played a lot of different sports yeah.So yeah and you know football. So when you're young you so woul play to playbaseball that was the biggest one or and then u. We played basketball,because I wase so easy just to get a couple guys together and you play horseand you play in the backyard whatever that might be yeah football. We didn't play really until the fifthgrade. Fifth Grade was the first time that I played organized football and then I didn't play again until Iwas in eighth grade. Rightwhich was fine and then went ont to high schooland then in played in high school and I so the importance of sports wassomething to do. But ultimately, what you learned as we look back now on. Itare different skill sets that complement one another, no matter whatthe sports is so when, when in today's society were where everybody'sconcentrating you got to go to this campe playing this an you. Con ReallyPlay One sport you're going to play baseball R, you're going to playfootball you're going to play basketball, and you can't do multiplesports. I think its really injustice to a young athlete, because I think thathe really needs to be able to experience all those other sports thattie into one another high eyehand coordination. The ability to droubleafoot bet a basketball. You know the t hitting of a football even for o outstanpoint Yo burned out El, that's right, yeah, ND, so n! All you got todo. Is You know? So? If you just concentrate on one sport, you're goingto get burne on you're going to have some change you're right, so I cunstill remember one of my favorite things was my dad gave me a broomhandle and he brought a piece of big selt home and he said just tape it upthat Tal be your ball and I'm like what- and I literally we went out mybackguard and that's what we used to...

...play because you could swing and hit itand feel like almost like a bit, but it wouldn't Goas far right right, it's alot of fun and we do. But that's how my dad was a milk. I WORKD FOR PPG forforty two years and Weid have a lot of money, but you had you had amanufacture things to go out and play, and we did it all the time you know andI think anted not to take a bit. I think one of the experiences that youhave wish when you organize yourself amongst your amongst your peers. Well, somebody'sgot to take charge, somebody's Goitg to make a decision. How do you chooseteams? You know who and then you got to make up your own rules, because youdon't have enough people to cover everything, so it was like okay fougot.If you got seven guys, Jon got three on one osideand four and the other. So you got a picture you know and and the other guywould. The other team would catch for you or ojus Wa at that servce ntems Waa.But when it's done for you, you know you, don't you don't learn thot skillsofi want to negotiate or, what's you know, who's going to make? What teamand what's out, what's not out? What's fair, not fair, and you know- and soyou can't hit to this field because we don't have anybody over there so rightso it was all yeah. It was like the shift back in the day right, like yeah,when you played, because we didn't have enough guys so you're not how to hit itover there t the Al Yeahdon't go that way. You know and not to live in the pastand that's not wor, but but it's but but it makes you who you are, or youknow gives you a lot of skillsets that sometimes I think today you know our young athletes don't have a chanceto be able to hone and have experience it. So you playedbaseball when you were younger. Who did you have like a team that you rooted foor favorite player? So it's so it is so I got to go so we go back into the sagain and, and then the Milwaukee Braves were big, the back in fifty six, fifty seven. So sowe had Eddie Matthews was probably or ourfavorite player. On that day on the team, a young Hincare, he would have been yeah yeah early yeah, and so and not that you would, you know, notwe'd, listen, my grandfather, you know so, let's snop over and say grapand grandma,and so he would sit on the porch and he have the radio and he be listened tothe praves game. so He'd sit there and Ow you doing grams. Fine. You know ewith you, listen to part of it and itis part of you know part of getting toknow your grandparents at the time, but those are memories that you have, andso that was it and you know the packers, the packers really didn't come into.You know com into volgue until when one bardicame in fifty eight, youknown fifty eight Fiftyni sixty when they won their first championship a andthen moved on and people started getting. You know getting excited, butyou know not to say well, here's an wold guy, but you know television. Youknow we had three channels or three stations, I should say, and it closeddown at midnight and they weren't. It was a regional game or one o'clockevery Sunday afternoon yeah. I kind of liked it better, because I find myselfalways surfing like there's something better on and there's like a thousandchannels. Aan, you just watch what you WATC Alistento baseball on. The radiois still one of the greatest things. I love that whole feeling listening to agame on the radio on no turn off the TV and listen righ yeah. It would it andso yeah because it was all about the announcer you know and how exciting hemade the game seam at the time, and so I grew up in Arizona, but we could on aclear night, we could get ellie dodger game. So then skulling was Oh yeah. Itwas great yeah that was Oul be good on. So so your dadwas owned. A bar you guys yeah did you. Where did you live? Did you where? Sowe lived ther, so we lived there at the Bar Oko that bought the br one thousandnine hundred and forty five, and so I came the following year in one thousand nine hundred and fortysix, but the bar was an old inn and there were rooms upstairs and there wasa there was a kitchen and living room in a bedroom. You know behind in theback of the Barofe same building, but that was that's where we grew up on theultimatelyae one thousand nine hundred and fifty seven or so they remodeledthe upstairs, and I gr so up. Unto that point of time I grew up with four guys:Four guys that lived upstairs with us. I mean O had bedrooms ubsers, so it wasan old end. Was a boarding room, you know, and so yeah there was a Joan God. Who else was there whos? Don't anyway, but the so you know you don't think about it, butyou go back and you go okay, fine,...

...there's one bethroom upstairs that everybody used just one just oneyou know, and so the guys are you know they that Wasterv,that's where they id, but they needed to oy an the bar patient ti likeeveryone, no Noo Sorr, yes, N, first bcauseyo ever get Itso. Didyou have brother sisters, yeah so yeah? So I was the oldest of four, and so Ihad two sisters and a brother and so myself and then I sister and hon abrother and an sister, and so they all had you know, and it's like we get backtogether now after all these years and and it's amazing just to listen totheir experiences because we're completely different than myinserornces. You know from how interactive, with the with the patronsof the bar growing up in the bar and the interaction of mom and dad withinthat within that growth period, but so now wa did yourmom work in the yeah, so so mom took care of. So she took care of all the books. Imean she did she. She took all the care of all the books. So we had a kick sowe served in this. So there was a kitchen they servedearly, that they served lunches and then back in the Midwest. So it was fish. Fries were big on Fridays, youknow so that was a staple, so fish fries that was there was a big thing ein that lasted for about a year. Okay andthen we closed the kitchen until we remodelled again and then, as I said,then so we moved to it, Handan Department upstairs and then we started serving food and specialnights. So Wednesday was a stake. Night Friday was fish. Obviously Saturday wasa was chicken chicken night. So I ro you cando your working in the bar for all so yeah. So you in so we so Wen Weerwhen,we were young, we were back so we had O bus, the tables you know on those daysand then I frentay were for tree label yeah. So and then we had, you know howto do the dishes. You know wok in the kitchen, 'll clean up and all that kindof stuff, never bared Tani. I never I mean Irea. I did once and maybe thatwas the reason never get. I te Plu as You di, was your dad, the kind of Ar tenderthat like marked alines and made sure everybody had tho save Hamount or hejust pour the Jo Hes, just ard, O drink thats. I so Daa, you know so that'swhole thing I was basically in his philosophy was, if I'm serving you adrink, I'm serving you a drink. So I pour the drink in front of you. Youknow it's not on the back bar, you know, and I mix it here. I pour the beer infront of Youand so that you could see it was the presentation of that drinkfor you specifically there, and so just thror o audience. This is water. Thisis what Er thank you ea just make. We even though we're talking a lot aboutbars, but it so. The other interesting thing that Iread about the bar was how you got your nickname, oh yeah, so so, obviously being the first born dadwas a very proud father, as we all are ove kids and you know, and in so the Appleton was a mill tower. You knowmuch like western Pennsylvania. A lot of towns that are here was a milltomtwas a paper town paper Milltown, but you know guys were coming from the milland ad be opened at eight o'clock in the morning AU close at one o'clock atnight, and so there was shifts that would come in so the late night, andyou know so. They'd stop in and it'd say: Hey Bob has a new kid of yours. OhDad said Ar. You should see him being know very proud. You knowhes catl theselittle muscles. I mean he looks like Little Rock sitting in that crib an sothen they would come back. You know, and they say: Hey Bob how's hit how'sthat little rockaheers. He said what do you mean? You know the kid that was youknow and and that's how I got so. I was referred to his rock and had that name ever since could be worse.I Ge. What could it I that's? I that's ie looks like a little laan. Itherisyeit Walo, O liveup to like ore, calling you rockyasit just like noitwas. Just that was it. You know it was kind of itfersing because everybodythat was your name, so everybody called you youretty called you rocki. My realname is Robert Patrick, after Robert after my father and then and wasbaptized on St Patrick's Day Marchu that wis born march fifth, but so, but nobody ever calls me Robert, sosomebody the only okay, so the only people that would call me Robert, werethe good nuns that taught me g in grade...

...school and my mother Whenne ut Talwcllyou when she was a the only time she would say Raberto was when she was madother. What did you say? Was I forgu e? No in she pinch him, Yeah Yeah. He Newithat she as, but we ally, said like our moms, had a like. They usually whentheyere mad at you called you by your real NAM name. That's right! Yes! Sothat's pretty interesting, so rock we're going to move on a little bit.Thank for sharing your childhood want to go Blinda into high school, becauseyour part of the shows talking about transitions that we all have to make inour life right and go from from when you're, young and then you're in middleschool. Then, all of a sudden that transition to high school is tough, nomatter where you live right, it's a difficult thing and you know you, I'msure that you were known around your areas, a pretty good athlete and howdid that affect you going into high school ye? Well, it was, I mean it wasinteresting, so the here's, the here's the deal, which was that now we'regoing back to one thousand nine hundred and sixty. So we got the baby boomersbaby boomers moving into into that high school realm, so new high schools werepopping up all over and Appleton, specifically new Catholic high school was builtcalled Savior High Schools Hilt in fifty eight, so fifty nine was thefirst year sixty we ged s and that Wut they had freshmen and sophomores thosetwo years I came in as a freshman, and then they had three classes, and so bymy sophomore year it was a full fledged for your school with a new conferencethat was developed now they ther, and so as Christian brothers. It was aChristian brother school. So it was new and there was- and what was important about that wasthere was no legacy that you had to leave live up to because there wasn'tany and so easier to set records. tator whatever and nobody thought aboutrecords, you know, and so I came as a freshman and I you know- and I tried out- and I played football, anfreshman n and on the JV team and I played on the basketball team,but I also played in the band and so coming out of Saint Jo'sCatholick grat school. You know I do. I started playing the trumpet in theFourth Grade, and so we played up through the eighth grade and you knowso it just continuous, and so this was something new, becauseband practice was after school, as football was after school or ase boysafter school, and so all of a sudden. There was a aconflict and it wasn't necessary me, but a lot of athletes played in the bandokay as well, and so they were back and forth. eeventually th the following hear my myself: WorYer. They change Bant the first period or zero period, so he had to be atseven o'clock. He had we had ban practic so thet we could play footballnow. The catalyst was the coach because I always believe.Well, I wi'll get into that. But the CATALYS was a coach and it was a coachby t namer, torchy Clark who came out of Sntmary's Catholic grade school o and they were adominant basketball team and because of torchy and his style and how he organized his teamand and he got andhy- would always win the Catholic lead in Grade School. Well,you know, we finally wont it over at Sit Joe's when he left to go to highschool, and so then we dominated rig yern and wanted, but so we get overhigh school. Now you go to high school you're a freshman, it's a a new experience and you knowhow do you know? What are you going to play or what's going to do what Hougoing to turn out to be? You just go out and you know and you play and youplay, and basically you know if, if you're halfway coordinated, you know ifyou get some natural ability that kind of comes through at that level, and- and so I gotta so you get to get achance to play. But what was interesting was that it also drew thisCatholic high school from surrounding communities because of the new Catholichig school and so all of a sudden, Osa Thlethra of young talent that came infrom other grate schools. You know that Co us right here and so during my period of time there, theconference years from Sophomore, junior and senior, is that we never lost afootball game. We won the conference...

...those three years and they went afterthat three years we lost four basketball games with the defending state, champions andbasketball. During my junior year, my senior year welostthe championship game, and so it was, it was a hot dat I mean of, and itwasn't one person was a lot of. You know good talented people coming to theother and we had a coach that demanded in you know and got the most out of outof all his players and depending on your experience, butreally to this day and for those who, if you ever talked to anybody thatplayed during hat period of time. Well, you know have nothing but great thingsto talk about torchy Clarkin and I h the impact that he had on their livesthat allowed them to play now and what was so good was that therewasn't a lot of guys that went on to play in college or football thereafter. But it was a greathigh school. You know experience and a stepping store for alot of people just from a business point of view anyway, so that was kind of what had taken place.So, all of a sudden, you know you play, and so you become all conference andthen you get to be all state and then got to beyond high schoolal. American, youknow was the parade magazines, you know and so itwas a great distinction, butbecause of that, then you get recognized, and so I you know so thething about sports, an probably anything is that and Ih've always feltthat there is always a catalys. What becomes important is that cataluss thatthat that that coach, because ever because what he moulds together areindividuals into a team, and so it's the success of that team that get yourecognize and you know W, never won a football game. You knowyou might net, you know, get Reccogi say you know for it, but all of asudden you know the team gets hot and you you know you' not losing, and youknow Youre part of that and you get recognizeing. So then you get a chanceto where you go to Adea wit, your parents, like did they get involved inyour high school athletics like just besides going to the game today likesay hey, we want you to play this or dode. No, no, no! No! Because EOIN, thebar Ye Round! U But EA, to watch your games, ER WOL YEAH! They they would go,yeah theyd, go to the game, you know they'd, go to the Games and and theneven then in Cop Becaun, the COR e game,because after the Games you know most of the parents have come back to thebar yeahexeience like where you were upset at the coach or somethinghappened, and you went and told your dad like, because I've done it with mydad and my dad Bei like just just shop and play like that, doesn't happen. Now,like with kid rih, Oto different, different minds, Y. No, no, no, you ouknow not away. I never had that. You never take that stuff to mom or dad.You wouldn't say you know and you I did. You remain in contactwith torchy. As you got into the NFL and Lat Yeah Yeah Yeah we did and tenhe went down and started the basketball program at then Florida Tech Uiversal at Florida,tech, okay, which now is central Florida University, wow yeah. So hestarted the basketball program and I remember when he went down there and hestarted it and they had no gym. They had noresources. They worked or they practiced at the at the Navy ReserveCenter, because I was the closest basketball and and so his his S. his practice uniformswere: is game uniforms thwell how they go down there like hey chorchy, wedon't have any facilities yet, but we W, because I it was you know it. He He. He had the talent to be able to coachon on a on the college level and so and then itwas also kind of coach that he got a chance to do it his way and and start aprogram over here and so then they they, then they they changed it Florida, tack,Wenty, Central Florida, university and so the gym there. The basketball gym isnow named for him. Torture, Clark, Jim, so he's got one of the best names. I thinkI've everwhat a great name. So so then you're playing multiple sports in highschool fright yeah. So you play yeah. So you play you so you playd football.Okay, then the next AE, N, so basketball. And thenwe didn't have a baseball team. So we...

...ran trau yeah. We ran track just towhatever that is, but I playd I track Huh. Did you have a cinder astrack? Yes, WEK! That's what we had a NiceoGod when you follow that ss, it's no joke won! No, THAT'S GRIAT! N! I thinkI still have some of that in my that's right. It wasn't yeah, woe. We wasn't aonlike today so and then I played American. Then I played legion,Basically Toba fatball Duin, the summer right yeah. So, but I starte I playedthat in in eighth grade so that summer, between freshmanure and I I went outand played American Legion- get invigted to dothat, and so that was, and that was a andthen that was another great experience plang during the summer. What was yourfavorite? What's your like? Your football experience, the one memorythat you say this is when I think about high school football. This is what Iremember was it a play? Was it a game, but no, it was Li e okay. So it was agame. It was my sophomore year and we're playing premontrey at a GreenBait N, a pre Montre was the dominant Catholic high school in the area. At the time O was like central Catholic heres to Pitt. Youknow this, but it was. It was the domit. They won everything and so on, and soon so findle this upstar new school Zavior, you know, comes up and we areplaying up there, premontry and and it it is the definitive game forthat conference at the time these two powers, and so we ultimately we ultimately beat them. But in thiscase, as we were moving the ball down the field and it was it was towards the in the fourthquarter, and so it was a quick pitch to me around the right side. Okay, so iasR on the right side, and so I'm going down the sidelines, a'd going down thesizes and I get hit whun. I keep my balanceright. Okay, and so there is a picture of me with my left foot inside the audebond line. My right footnever touchd. I wasi never touchd, but I was out of bounds. You know andcontrolled my body to Goa he first in to replay picture. That's right, LS onat and score to win the game sow and that wasprobably definittive. Far That's othaet pro yeah that bus ride was Funnan wasyeah ewelli en everybody was excited that we want to be prementre, and so that was a you still keep in contactwith an your former teamage anor classmate, so yeah EAD, Savior Yeah. So there's acouple. You know over the years of say like Paul, like Paus wrider. He stilllives there in Kelly, Cenelli and and KIP whittling or not KIP whilling,or he was our talking about basketball. He wasthe dominant basketball player in that conference at that time, and we wouldn't have had this success.If we hadn't, you know W. ' if we didn't have GE yeah without kept Imean,he was. He was a thirty point, guy a game in a kind of vent. Did he play incollege then after he went to Ohio state, you know and then unfortunately was ana aunobobile accident and got I hurting just ind tha. That was the end of hiscareer. It said that was hi CA, shortlik right yeah, but anyway, so hewas. He was Greata tennis. It was a great tennis player, the GreatBasketball player his father played it Ohio state at the time during theperiod of time when the underhand shots werright to hand a juss right INVOLG.At the time when Soderi and and so Kip was following in his dad and his dad,you know and dad his dad did made kip practice every day every day,every day, so Yo. When you talk about apparent influence on one's life, you knowwhether whether Kip wanted it or not, that was there and made Hem Yeah Ma imgreat. So if my note you went to noter Dame, but didthey did they come see you or did other schools? Just did everybody startsending you letters? How was that like yeah t was the first one you got? Whowas the first letter you got? First contact wish srom University ofWisconsin, okay, that they were that they were. You know they would wereinterested of obvious license. Was the state that come noter Dame I at aletter from noter dame and then I got a...

...contact from noter dam, one of the scouts that werein that area. So actually there was a. There was a gentleman in Appleton whohis name was: Russcal. Okay and Russ's. Dad owned a nightclub which were nightclubs werebake back ther was a dinner club. You know is a place where you went with ayou know, suit a tie. You know and had a fine meal and so on and Ross went tonoter. Dame Gruss was a walkon player at Notterdan, yeah and and it changedhis life. As far as you know, not that he was a star D, he wasn't ascholarship, he was a walk on. It was a part of this team, and so I remember itwas my fall of my senior year and he said Okay Wisconsin's playing noterdayEah, and he said so. Let's go down to the game, my dadand I left set. We played Friday night. We left Saturday morning about four o'clock in the morning becauseit's about and he wanted to get down there. He wanted to get down the campusso to have breakfast at one of the dining halls and anyway it it was abouta five hour drive. You know to get down, so we get down there about nine o'clockin the morning bop he following over and see the coach at the time, and so Imet the coach and he we devor was. The coach was an inromcoach at the time and so coach divorce says hey. If you want tocome here weave you, a scholarship, do come to noter Damon, still iw, we gonHo that's very exciting and so on. But anyway, then there that was thatwas that was my first interduction to kind of like Noto dam and and then I got a after after that senior year and then more formal invite to com, but we'regoing a brand new coach Air parsageon comes in so you know whatever whodivorce ait before t doesn't matter? It doesn't matter now, so it happens, Oyeah. So then so I wento Wisconsin and so on then. But I got letters from bigten schools like Illinois and Michigan, and you know in Minnesota you not that any. You know they invitedme to go on trips right, but it was the really the advice of obviously thescout or the coach from a noter Dane and not that he was selling oter dameall he was selling was the opportunity of going or having a chance to, Isuppose for me to select noter day, but he said this. He said now. Listen youcan get a lot of. You can get a lot of offers from schools and you knowdivision to Division, one! You know from around this and you know, andevery time you go visit one of these chools wo're going to roll out the redcarpet and show you a good time and go through in this proscess. So when yougo through this whole process and you got to make a decision, you know it'sgoing to be more difficult. When you have all these red carpets out there,how do you make the really different he said? So? Why don't you pick three schools that you would liteto graduate from not play for Wen linke to graduate from because anything canhappen terns for Year Issu, you get hurt, you know, but it's e educationbecomes very important and and then it'll just be an easier decision foryou, and I thought that made such great sense to me. You know at the time-and I said: okay, fine sonoteday was one Wisconsin because I felt anobligation and then we had a family friend that C stopped in the bar who had graduated from Boston College,and he said I can get you an interview up in Boston collegeokay. So I went upto Boston College Hat's, well, Love Boston, yeah, great town, Ot,shotyou, know, bcause Yorr get a little room from the Midwest, I mean thit's.The first time is I osom Youre Notin, you know and so on and so then and went to noter dame and which waseven nicer and so offered a scholarship, an noter dame and I had to go toWisconsin it Wasconstan W. maybe in my mind it was just like too big. You knowto do but okay, but like every good Catholic boy, you know what you're taught was to goto church and pray for guidance and direction andmake sure that you...

...make the right choices right and sothen, like every good Catholic boy. I did what mymother wanted me to do. Right now. Was it go na Haswe went through Rockies,youth and through his high school, and we got to hear a lot of great stories.Maybe some people didn't get to hear before, but now we're going to move on.I know rocky wanted to tell story. A quick soryont know if, as a port star,what was quick, Wan tell stories about influencin and we went to Catholicschool and we had some nun that sometimes were a little harder at usthan maybe they should have been really you know, and so I I so sister alar wasmy sixth grade teacher and and- and I tell this in the in the contextwhich was okay. I gotta go back so now this ione thousand nine hundred andfifty seven o one thousand nine hundred and fifty seven all right and who waswhat was happn in one thousand nine hundred and fifty seven wew for thoseof us who are Aron, one thousand nine hundred and Sfifty, seven rock and rollwas just starting to come. INTOOK, okay, and so you had the H, the king, who wassinging, but you also had you know ducktails. You know tes hoand back an know, thesall big thing. Well, you know. So we had a Christmas break, wish Christmasbreak and right near the Catholic school. So I lived. The black away was Jones Park was a skating rink, soit was a big big skating rat down there. So anyway, now you're going to picturethis, so I decided to become hip in the sixth grade, and so I coled my hairback parted it on both sides over the middle down a little flip. Now it may not sound very good at thistime, but at the moment I got a lot of bit feedback, the opposite Si. What you? Oh, youreally look cute. What do Youo is pretty so I was feeling good and so nowwe're going back to school. So I walk in get my hair dude just the way I wantit and I walked to the class and I satdown on the back where my seat and dusk was stillher comes in. She looks overeverybody. Well, Hey, I'm glad to have everybody back over the holidays. Hoputis good holidays, and so I think this everybody get out there, their Englishbook, the reader. Okay. Now we're going to go back to page eighty six, okay-and this is where we left off right before the break, so we're going tohave some silent reading at this moment in time, don'tbe get heir books. I getmine and she goes Robert May talk to you outside, so I had to get up and walk through theclass and walked outside not knowing what he's going to take place and she'sonly bout, five foot two, you know the Er big, so I walk out and she walks up behind me closes adoraspins me around him. PIDS me to the door with her fingerright in my chest and she said Blessim. You know, kids in this class reallylook up to you and you know your later, whether you think you're a leader ornot, and you make an impact in other kids. So I'm going to tell you thisthat hare do doesn't stay. You got two choices, one you can go home or two.You can comment back the way that it was before and she leaves and walks back in theclassroom. I A decision right. You know obviousdecision, which was when I'm coming home sover very slowly. I con te pack with a part on the sideOpu best ey possibly could, and the mostembarrassing thing was that I walk back in the class because evrybody knew andheard what had taken place out there and soon, but it butbut. It made a difference it becausethat was the first time that she ever hear that I than anybody ever told me.I should say that I was a leader. You know that people looked up to you for what you do, because otherwise youjust you know or a goof ball, like everybody else now all of a sudden wellput more responsibility on me so anyway, I'll need by on get that in Righte.Well, that that's perfect en do right, because you were a captain, an noterdam were't, you right yeah, so I had opportunity after my junior year withelections went up, and so I was I was invoded, it's captain of the team mysenior year and- and it was...

...little asterics which was- I was thelast single captain n on an Outo Dame football team, butthen because everybody else changed and you so we had defensive captain andthen Hav an offensive captain. I got a special teams captain as well and so onso yeah yeah, so that that's awesome, so you had alot of things. Transitioning going your life, you left home, you went tocollege. Did your parents get to come see you a lot in college? Did Dic Tomedown? They would come down Heah the ID They E, not every week, because it was a longdrive and dad. You know take a day off on Saturday, but butthey would come down, maybe three o four times and then iand. Then they organized some bustrips that came down from appleton and you know from a' alot, so preparyeforparently. I love them, watch my kids when they were playing and other sportsand everything so t. that's a good experience right. I mean Hou played onsome of the greatest teams in Heerdane history. Really you look back man wellDurin. He Yeah so eational champion one Nihe film championship yeah, so thatwas a airor. Parstagion came on one thousand nine hundred and sixty fournoter dam had some bad years through the s after the war, you know and then all of a sudden it was drought,but EROC came back and in in one thousand nine hundred and sixty fourhis first year, my freshman year there, the team went nine and one year beforethe only one two games and then went nine and one turn it around wocs. Thelast game of the season, a D so all of a sudden Odenang football, was back inbeforefront by my junior year e. We were voted as a number one teamin the mythical national championship, and I say that to because there was noplayoff game, so we have now and tes Aa all done by the writers and would Yowulso it boiled down to a game in our history. That was a veryexciting game. We played michingan stake, which was also undefeating. Wehad to play up in Michigan Sane and what made this so important. WISCIShere was the first time in this mythical national championship thatfinally, two teams, undefeated number one number two in the rank pulse, got achance to play against one another at the end of the season, and so, as Isaid, was the game of the century, and everybody was writing about its ontelevision. Was a big deal in that game ended in the tie? Well, tender tenderwas no overtime, there's no sudden death. There was no just it just okay,it was over, you know, and fortunately for us. I suppose we hadone game left and we had to go out to California and we played southern calon California on. It was an interesting thing to, and Itell you this only because of the fact that it was we'd, be southern cal.Fifty one tha, nothing in that game in so that was SaturdayMonday. We were voted number one to Oer al now,some Michigan State fans. They were probably a watching. This plodcastleprobably argue that we split with the Michigan State, but they're not doingthis broadcast WSO. We wer. We were the number T's, so that's Prettyiso your senior year,you were captain Rightigh Yeah, and so what was like the. I always wonderedlike that. You see the movies and all the history about the painting of thehelmets and and note Damon, and what was like that for you, because you camefrom Ezaver and Appleton, which probably wasn't a huge school rightright and then you go to no Damon there's just like where you was that inhistory already started, or did you guys start that history of the paitingof the helmets and all this pay? The it came later I mean because it well. Yes,I mean th bund not like when you see it today, we kno so it's all painted ingold, and you know anon the kind of stuff and yeah all after every. Youknow game that I think they painted at Spriaga whatever touched it up, so itlooked halfway decent, but we didn't know that you know I meanit. Wasn't that big for Thi the legacy of Notedame, obviously was just that atthat time of noter dame the historic football teams that theyhad Nud rock me in through the years and latey and and so it and the campus- and you know an what itall meant and the fan base that was from close to coase was really huge,and so it was so you just got more involved in it.You know, and as is then it you know, then it changed, and you know moreSuccessiv is taking place over these last fifty years within at school andbut the school wasn't. Big E was only three husand students. You know at thattime,...

...and now it's maybe eightthousand Gradstudents, maybe tenzano. So it's not Youiteresi. It was just such a nationalpresence right, yes, EST TAT' Alon Time, yeah yeah, and so then, when did you first realize that, likethe NFL was something that was possible like go and play at the next level? So it wasn't until maybe that junior yeargoing into my senior year when you you know, we played caliber or high caliberfootball and you know and that there might be a possibility. I would o secretly do this as wellafter our season in college and e come home. For you know, maybe maybe Thanksgivingwould make a home for Thanksgiving me N, or at least for the holidays, N and mydad, and I would go to one of the Packer Games pay that with so we go topacker games and go to the Packar Gans an I get the program and secretly and Ididn't its first time. I didn't tell anybody then, but I sicredly D, look atthe rosters see if there was anybody my size. Ifthere was anybody that was five ten, stretching it a little bit fiten, maybe a hundred and ninety pounds, anybody that was playing right. Sorry,so the in this game was just was interesting, but the- and I remember this onespecifically and I was looking okay O and they're playing the steelers okay. I now you know these aoee playing thessapers, so they had a running back. steelers did that was like five, tenfive, nine five Hin, maybe a hundred ninety pounds or so right over Nicalled Jim Cannon Ball butmer. I don't remember that name O yeah, so it's Awasa small little compact running, but I was a and I'm going. Oh Wow, you know hecould play and you know so maybe I might have a chance to play. But thatwas the extent of any any really you know then then so the draft, so the draft okay, so thedraft comes in the draft at that time was not in April was in February. So the- and I remember this an you know my senior year was captain and we lostthree games were that year. I think Ou, seven and three. You know that year andyou know- and I wasn'n long American. You know I started meplayed, but Iwasn't you know honest y God, unlike today, where it'son television everybody talks about it get radio talk, shows everybody's, gette prognosis of who they're going to pickand so on is a big deal and the NFL draft on the NFL draft. Today,twenty three million people watch. You know watch that Drie. So I got I got a form letter. I got a formletter in the mail from several teapes and basically itsaid this. It said like okay name, you had to fill it out so name: Okay,Rocky Blaer, school notter, dame position running back height, theyre, five, ten, okay e Wuer, five,tens better than you know: Five, nine, but YTANET. THAT'S WHA! Do ocase a Iten weight hundred nnety Pos, ookay fine, so that tleast seems o balanceand forty yoat the fourth time an you haveto understand. We didn on the forty. Nobody ran the forty, the forty wasn'tan meaningful designation as it is today of what your forty time was. Ay,so I'm going for TI, get a Pua time. Forty time, forty time, okay, oh well,all right! So being a almost a college graduate atthat, I thought to myself: Okay, fiht my best high school, my best highschool hundred itsten flat, okay, my best downhill. When heted you know whateverit was, so it was my best. So I'm thinking to myself, okay, fine! Sowhat's fifty yards, FIF yearts five, five seconds? Okay, forty yards gottaextrapulate a little bit so fifty little man thit fifty forty yards, okay,fine to four three, so I put four three Tan I didn't know whet it was that goodor bad or Soyou know, and w lik non of the thin and so the ony itSel. That was like three teams. A SAINTS TAT got on into sell. I think aget one, and you know that was it. So the draft comes now we're over at...

...a friend's house. Afamily, it's a family. They take usout, so we we've become friends over the years and the Hicky family, which was theirname said. So we were. We went out to dinner. MyRoommate D D, Dany Hershman Tom o'leery, was from Columbus, Ohio and the players ND in their family. We werenot the dinner now we're back at their house. Okay, so Sunday night it was aSunday night and we're having libations. You know e'r just kind of like this.We're e we're talking and TVs on over. Here the news is on PLAPA WOW and sowe're talking about school. What's going to happen, you know all right parents coming in all right, then, allof a sudden it says, oh in the NFL draftterday, several players were bingfrom the area and I so and so frunpurduce from southband you know was Bingd in here and so and nother dames captain o football team, Bob Rocky Blyer, you knows drafted, Inumber sixteen by the Pittsburg stalers there was a law. People said: Hey, congratulationsanyway, wellt'great and that's all I found I you know the's. That is great.Rock we've been through, like Ken of how, like that, your story shaped whereyou are getting to and then you get drafted right. You find out by a newschannel that you got drafted and then you know you go onto the next step ofyour life now you're out in the real world. Right now, like you, don't alike, I always say like the school. Wasn't there to support me now I got togo figure out whatever it might be. Hopefully it's he steelers right draftbisteaters go find all that out, yeah and so for the next couple years. Youknow you, your life really takes of amazing transitions. So can can youexplain how all that worked? You know ye so int, okay, so it now we got to go back. I one thousandnine hundred and sixty eight. So the Vietnam War was taking place. A lot ofhigh school friends and buddies and you know, had dropped out of out of school,went o right after high school signed up, and you know the draft was a big. It was a big cloud hanging overeverybody's head and yo had to sign up for the draft when Ou'r eighteen yearsold, and you got a deferment, so the deformant you know comes due and thenyou know so you become eligible for that traft. Obviously, in history,books and so on is that was not a popular war was on television all thetime. Nobody understood why we were there what we were fighting for really and it so we had body counts that weretaking place. That was, it was t e, first really war. That wasin our face and there's a lot of things happening within our society. Studentprotests were taken place. You know, on top of that civil rights movements weregoing on and so there's big upheaval. Anyway. I cometo Pittsburgh and I get drafted now. My impression or my I supdit thoughtprocess was this watching the Greenpay patters okay and I that there would always be an article orpictures of players during this period of time. Thet were in the reserve or anational guard, so they'd go to summer camp for two weeks and the they'd be attheir weekend meetings and there's always pictures black blap on it. Sothe assumption very easily. Well, if you make a football team, I guess thisis the road that you go down to. I didn't think about it very much, and soI got to Pittsburgh and- and ultimately you know, I guess- Gil Austin was our head coachand and probably the happiest time, my life atthat moment, being a rookie coming in was towards the end of training, campand wrupd sit Vincen's college and I just broke out of a meeting when coachAustin said Deah. Can I talk to you for a moment, and so we went into thisother room and he had this letter. He said this letter came in. The Mail wasopened up by mistake. It was by one a classification, so Ho went from astudent for amonth too eligible for the draft now, and he said I think, you'regood enough to be able to make this team an so we'll. Take care of this foryou. So from my small world of influence. Taking careof this was El Getin me reserve her national Dard so September, one throughand mean we started playing the season October came started, playing and hadnt heard anything, and so I wentdown to to see Fran follerdy, who was...

...the the chief's Wayhand Guy? He raneverything took the MAILN, so so he was like business operations, and so I saidI, Mr Falberdasan, did you know anybody? Did we hear anything that was takingplace and he said now? Listen. He said down we're having a little problem. Youknow the general die or the general retired congressman got defeated. Wedon't we don't have our contacts and thiis Wenerw. What don't Worri said:We've we talked to your draft board back in Wisconsin, N and they're notgoing to draft until the end of the end of the year. So you have some time: Soi was like the kiss of death, an theytalke to my draft board. It was like. Oh okay. Fine Anyway was a tenth game, ofthe rightafter the tenth game, Wee Getting Ready for the eleventh game, the season W en I get my draftnortification and it was look oon forty eight hours. I was gone well, yeah itOiwas just like got. It was a Wednesday Friday. I was off to basic training, and so that's OL quickly. It happened,and maybe luckily so I mean, because now all you got to do is youre in areactive mode. You know you're, not thinking about it. Do you just go okay,find N Ageno. I got to get through this, whatever it might be, and and so that's that's what took place yeah sothen you went over there and and what happened to you is clearly whateverybody knows and knows that story about you and then the part that I kind of like when that I love to read about was when yougot the postcard from the JE. Well, that's you know, and I think so so what happens is that you know Iget woundered over there get booded twice we'Renawere we're in a firefightand eventually you know we make it out of there and get on helicopters and wefly to a need station. Then we flied to Demang a spent two two three days in denaying thenwent to Tokyos pen three weeks in Tokyo and then came back to the states andspent nine months in the hospital. So what hospital were you n? I was at FortRighlekue, Kansas Erla Army hospital for Mivy Kansas. That's where I wasstationed there or ended up there, but it was it. You know- and I tell people this bebecause it's Im people that influence you or what happen is that no matter whatwe may do or what happens in our lives? There are times when you know the worldjust caves in then all those questions you know what did I do what's going tohappen where's? My Future, you know go with throuin your head and the interesting. The first part of thestory was is that there was cross cross right across from me. Was Youngsoldiers, a triple IMP, t lost left Armand in both both legs and every day.This was in denangand every day that I was there. He the age would come totake him to therapy, and you know evisually. He gread that little trappeas, that SOMONG overhis bed swing as Torsoas best they could with help getinto the wheelchair and they push him up and he'd stop at her beds. I meanhe'd Snop at the betsy step. At my bad knees, go hey how ar you doing today.You know you really look. You know you look better today. I have to tell youthat she looked better today than than you did yesterday when you got hereyesterday because yesterday, in all honesty, you look like shit. Okay, wenow we get some good dactior, we'll get you out of here or noth let', see andYon. It was one of those. I go. Wow Avan y. This guy got great attitude.You know with the the atrocities a too place in his life and he end live withthose for the rest of his life. It is attitude if he could have an attitude.What about me so I go to Tokyo and ultimately, after a couple weeks inToko, I finally get enough courage to ask my dack its. What do you t find out howhow much damage? Do I have? Can Icome back and play this game from his perspective? Was your leg wrapped andeverything at this pointed you seeing the injuries and like like know it was still. It was te O showhe.I have to tell you this yeah. I was still wrapped until I gotto Tokyo, okay, because the biggest thing that they were concerned aboutwas infection, and so they weren't going to do anything until I got out ofout of the country into w hospital de and so the my first day there, the dock,the dock, would com in so we're all newcin new patients in this ward. Thetact could come in and I could tell where he was, although I couldn't seehim by the sounds of his patience and as he was goingprobing their wounds and finding Os Ikay. So it gets Toma. It comes here.You know, and it comes to my Rad. He said: okay, fine, FIM, fine, and so yousaid on right. I need a four seps and I need SCISSOS. So he get at the bandage.He's got to find out what the damages...

...so and it gets to my gets this side ssthis and gets the right side. You know my foot and so he's got thathe said four saps he's got it al on so now takes a foreseps and he sticks itin the wond all away up as far as he could. It was like. I read the Besti C, never felt painlike that, I'm en gon and so he's probabing to see if fretty phones arebroken or you know what's inside it wasn't, they idn have xrays and allthat kind of stuff that took place it just like okay find I got ta find outso so that was it and then, after after a couple weeks and then then I askedhim so his response was this. He said: Don't worry about Yit Coang have anormal life you're going to do things that normal people do don't expect toget back onge there. He won't have the strengthen flexibility that is needed to play in the NFL. Sofrom my point of view in Fror my point of view, it was like he was any authority figure. I mean hewas my father image. He was a guy that had all the knowledge, and so he justsucked that hope. You know it just like you don't have a chance, then what comes and playd two dayslater is this. I get a postcard Ne Mail and the Postcard is. It says it's gottwo lines on said rock teams not doing well. We need you aret Roony Woi waslike wow somebody needed well Er. They did need Yo, but ay. It was likesomebody took the time to care, you know, and so that was kind of thefamily and how the family was, and so it gave you a little more hope and butthen you, you know it's like everything else. Then you got to start and so onceI I got to a point where I could start rehabing going back to rehave, and thenI got to a point where I could start running and then his best, I possiblygood wit back to the gym. I wight hundred sixty five pounds when I cameback O way. Tu Ten, when I went over and came back a hundred, sixty fivepounds. So a lot of Thos naturall y had to putbutter but yeah put lrength back in and so on. So you went through that wholeperiod of time. N Till I was A, I got a early out of the military and then wentback to training camp. That July, O one thousand nine hundred and seventy and went through training came, wenttoeend and it took its toll. I mean really. I wasn't ready to go back, butI needed to go back in so limp throughn. Is You know to a days ansometimes three days and it just you beat you up and so era, lot of Murchy on the plaers ma?That's right! So then you know so basically they put me an injuredreserve. I mean they bought me year. Foll near I came back again got throughand I pulled a hamsring and I ultimately ended up on the development. An ad taxi squad ishatathat time practice through that here and then came Ba one thousand ninehundred and sevnty two an he finally made. He made the team in in onethousand nine hundred and seventy two. So it took tos just two years, but theybought me an opportunity two years to heal two years ago, stronger two years,a y and do something with it and get your body wake back up and you know andget back into plane, mord again someone. You still have a postcard from thechief. No, I wish you know it's one of those that you know wherever it was. He is I savedit here, but it wasn't ID didn't make it openyeah. Lik Tad was in Dekreeanwar and he's talke about some of that stuff. He wish she still harihy wouldhave rought with them through all that. So then you gothrough all this. This amazing transition. Now you get back in andyou're playing the game again that you know you kind of grew up, loving andright and and and you've gotten healthy, and you get back, and we know that thatwhole story. Anybody in Pittsburgh knows your story about the steelers andall the success. You had an the people that you got to play with it. We rinning for three at that point:Yeaheah wow yeah, I might sell been nded ten, ten flatn uned, but but so then we know like th the point.We know those stories and then so then, after you get out like you, have thisgreat career you've been through so much in your life and then, when didthat? Take you like what, after you left the NFL, what dit was your nextlike for me the transition from the NFL to after that was toughest for me, okay,Sohowas, that transition for you. After all, that success Yoa. Well, I thinkthere was a couple things only the couple things were coreto. This is thatpart of the transition, your part of the thought process it was when youwere playing when you're playing. Is that y you needed to do something in the in the business ector I meanultimately, so you couldn't just not...

...you know. Did the team tell you aboutthat suff, or did you just cat' figure that out? Well, they I mean there wasthere. was E team didn't tell you you know aboutthat self, but yous just got the you know. Yeah I mean you made okay money. You made a Comane,but it wasn't. You know it was like okay, fine, what? If what if you gethurt? What, if you know, so what are you going to do a lot of guys back inhead a season, job yeah, so they had all season Shob. So I got into theinsurance industry early yeahut, just in when I came B, K on thousand ninehundred ad eventy, seven hundred and eventy two in Chicago was, I was livingin Chicago. An the offseason was working for this insurance company Soigave me, gave me a little basis and so on then came you know in made the team and then ultimately you know, got a job got anotheropportunity, an be was in the bond business and we get into the bondbusiness and HOS investment banker. So we got into that business and then westarted a little firm to be able to do that. So that was a you know. I was astepping stones of something you know that Yo could fall back on and then then, ultimately it comes to the pointof you know our society in this is what happens. Is We talk about transitor,our dist IRSHES inever teaches us or anything about quitting or making transitions? You know,because it's always here you can pull yourself up by the boot strap you cando it again. You Know Cau pick yourself. We go vrom Lik, okay, fine, so I meanif sportsmen are part of your life, then all of a sudden you got to make atransition and I didn't think about retiring until somebody asked me ad,you think about resonerand. It was. It was our Super Bowl N is super bowl,fourteem and and January of Eity, and it was you know you you're getting older yeand started this season. You know you weren't the starter at the beginning ofthe season, more guy youner guys going now. They got me thinking aboutretirement, so I played one more year I played for the season and- and then I retired after that, soduring that period of time one of the things that was offered to me was a job in television so channel.Eleven NBC affiliate had a new Program Manager,a new genral manager that came in, and he wanted to do a tiing with thesteelers and O so offered me a job to be on to do sports, and so it was like.Oh okay, you know so, and you know so it was very fortunate med. Thetransition. I mean money, wise was the same. You know sthere was yeah, soobviously I was not making a lot of money. Bu was a train. That was fine. It was anew challenge. You know, you're still part of the youer there n Kalso y get aGATP yeah, but youlike. Your Ego was Strok because you're on television- andyou know- and people still kind of recognized you, and so I saw that wasthat helped make that yeah I had to when I played for the Bangols one year.Ketty Anderson was my quarterback Drush and he used to tell me the storiesabout. You know: Nasisan, we didn't, we didn't go in, he goes we I weldn'tdworked because I went back to school. I got a lot ogree, he said then we'dstart practicing early July and then that was that was how how a like that's,how you got in shape and that's when you did all those things in like threedays. I said you had three days: yeus O yeah. We hid three days s fo get upmorning, prack thice afternoon, Thenli later in Thonight, so those stores areamazing. So some of the things that you're doing now, with all thedifferent charities that you work with, are pretty amazing. I know you workwith a bunch of different veteran organization. Well, you know, I meanpart of it's so part of it, obviously, is that you know you learn throughoutthe day you know about. Bengan will give back to some degree and thenyouhave to define this thi side. How and we, what can you do so given Givengthe experience that I've had given the chance of being able to play- and you know be successful withthat team and win those four super bowls, you know, gave you a gave you stature, but also being in the military,so youre identity, your identity. You know now all of a sudden, becausemilitary yo ou talk about transitions, military people- if you give you if yo can have a voice makingtransitions as well, you leave in the military, you know so Itas like likeleaving the army during Vietnam. You know, I mean he o nobody wanted to dealwith you. You didn't have this skill set ou of this and you repressed it,but it's much like plane, organized sports is that it's all about a team.So it's all about a team. It's all...

...about a team. Until you start goinginto the job market Han, it's not about a team it'Saby you and what can you door bring to us? So you have to be able to make that transition and and and say,okay, fine. So how do you decide what skill said en this of what happenstoday? Is that I'm a ranger sniper? Okay, I' I like to be a management know Ijust had twenty years in or or fifteen years or whatever it was, and now Iwant to get into the business. Well, you know so you got hr over her anhow.Can I use this guy? You know I mean he's a ranger sniper. You know whatdoes he know about this, so I have to be able to be able to sell myself andsay: okay, fine. This is a skill sese. You know that I bring to thisorganization in management in whatever that might be. So is so that becomes very so that becomesvery important. So if you got a voice and at least to get people to listen to about these, so all Tho, allthe stuff that is happening within the NFL happens in the military, as well asthe first responders o you talke about postemaic stress. You know that happens,transitions happens. You know. Divorce rates happen. So youknow. Is there help? Yes, there is. What can we go? What can be Du thosekinds of things I think become very important. So that's what you so hoswho.Are you working with now at at? What's your kind of charity of choice at you,Kausd of ther's, there's a there's: There's aGeurman yeah, there's a so there's jerty calls warriors of citizens,whereas of citizens is transitional faith based organization that helps soldiers specifically make thattransition. So it's the understanding that you'redeployed you'R your good two or three. If you look atour professional soldiers today, you know go to the Middle East orAfghanistan, Iraq, it's you know they get the three deployments of fordeplinments and you know all of a sudden family'sback here. Things become tough, you know and you get T so it's you know it's difficult. So there's t e theyanyway, it's Ann awareness factor, so I worked itwit but then there's Han son.So here in Pittsburgh, there's veterans, leadership, League, okay, sofederans leadienship legs, a hand, son group that help veterans specificallyin either finding employment, finding jobs, finding the services that theymay need and and the help that they may need. But it's a place outside of the va it Ike. So when you make, whenyou make transitions a lot of times, it's like you know, you don't want anything to do with theservice anymore. You know you made your transition until when you need whateverbenefits you later on, but so there's tthere's those things and is awareness factors Welitso. You know the NFL hassome of that. You know like where we have the alumni. We have NFLPA, youhave retired players Congress. You have a bunch of different organizations thattry to help former players through everything they're trying to handle,because you don't have all the answers, O you don't know, and sometimes it'sreally good to get some help very much. So you know, and but it's also a pridefactor. It's also on you know. I mean it's tough to leave a you, know aposition and then say I really need help. You know and or but if you get through, that N, whichyou can there's, there's those organizations if you're talking aboutthe NFL, the helps make the transitions and you know to go to classes andthere's always we always get something in a texture, an email about theopportunity to go to get an MBA. You know go to this yea, whatever it mightbe and so yeah, but it's just making it aware a d that it's out there a and getpeople to use the the services that are available. We got rock for one morequick segment. It's called no huddle and we're going to blast some questionsat Hem and rocks gonna Answer Real quick, so Daves go ahead, shoot allright rocky one of my first memories of you was the rocky Blyer story. You wereportrayed by Robert, your right. How many times have you seen you'R in movieyeah? Never now I've seen iver see pretty good, as wasn't okay Maye formade. For Monday night till it was a television Maj, Motie,Proverdur and Rumber your. I had a chance to pick Robert Urick, becausethat's how I see myself tall good. Looking a lot of heir...

...ausion bout, Robert Er yeah, I was bigrobber Fanat', it alright rock. So what is your favorite food e? My favoritefoodis anything my wife makes is my favorite its think. Am I have that AiSA, like a robot that when I say itthough but yeah it's I mean it sorry who's the funniest person. You knowreally and- and I say this- a Bradshot, Terry breadshaw it'just a funny guy. I mean you reallyI's just a funny guy. You may seem like a good ball at that and he is but he'sjust a funny. Guy's go grits, I we just you tells stories and it makes youlaugh, maybe because of his accent may because he's won Louisiana. Maybe he'sthat good old boy or anything, maybe because he's put on like two hundredpounds, Butso so bredshaw what you see on camera, gradshaws that that's itthat's Ho! That's him yeah! There's! No! So if we were scanning through yourphone right and W, we said all right, rock fignd us the most unexpected likewho would we see on your phone t, we'd, say: Wow, that's pretty interestingthat we see their name in your phone. Oh, let me see Vice President Jol Biden, nice, that's a really good o! Thank youthink. That's a really good e!! that's unexpected! That Isino, like that. Ilike that good answer all right, you're a man of many talents, but you have anhidden talents, Moni! No! No! I put all my talent Yo.What we would you see is what you get II, have no idn't talance at all: Okay,fair! No! What's your biggest pet peeve or today in a HISC, I suppose mybiggest pet peeve today. Is: U N in the World of sports? You know where, where a couple people we talk about a couple people here,couple people you know skew the the the factor for all theother players I mean so yeah. My my pet peeve is hi. How did they get away withthis kind of stuff? You know, and social media, andso or my other pet peve is Tis you're down twenty one points and you make a tackle and all of asudden, you stand up puming your chest, like Oh yeah or like you're down twentyone and you finally spore touch down late in the fourth quarter, a d you doseltaion isofethat. That really makes me that, like everybody, I mean thatmore than itright last one day, what da you got. Okay, you've probably beeninto many places in this world where's a place that you would like to visitthat you've never been. Oh, you know, probably N and I'll saythis is- is really like to snt Petersburg. That's what Wu say.Excuse me. Sometimes I get these little fades in your snt Petersburg SaingPetersburg, Russia. Okay, so I like you, go to Sam Petersburg, Russia, onebecause my daughter is my daughter's there and my daughters going to school there, but alleverything that I I get back from her would be like. Oh you got to come deadand be able to see this beautiful place even Thoughn, some Russia in all thehistory, thet texts place and so yeah. That's a it' Ik, a Ling there ISI'll goduring the summer. Yeah Welrockan really appreciate RobertRight. You Know Robert ADINATS. This is amazing right where here's, the RobertRoberto, Clemeti Museum right. Our first yes, is revertal Clemeni juniorand now we have rob Robert Patrick Bliro thats. So that's our first couple,that's our first day, so we really appreciate you come on. Yougot welcomeme, wit. US thank you.

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