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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 9 months ago

Ricky Williams

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

My teammate joins this week in the Huddle. Ricky Williams is a gentle soul that was misunderstood by many for years in the NFL. After winning the Heisman and every other award while at the University of Texas, the expectations placed on him were unrealistic for many, but not Ricky. He expected to be great, and talking with him about his journey was incredible. 

Growing up in San Diego, he became a star on the diamond and the football field. He was drafted by the Phillies and played in their farm system while in college. Although he has a deep love for baseball, he excelled on the football field. While at Texas, he was a two-time All-American and won the Heisman trophy. He loved Texas because he said it felt like a family. Ricky was drafted by New Orleans, who traded all their draft picks that year to move up and get him. New Orleans is the only team in NFL history to draft one player in an NFL draft. 

This is why expectations were so high. He lasted 3 years in New Orleans before being traded to Miami. While in Miami, his life's calling was just beginning. He retired, played in the CFL for Toronto, and then played for the Dolphins again. He finished his 11-year career with the Baltimore Ravens. 

Ricky was still finding out who he was. He started coaching and became an ESPN analyst for the Longhorn Network. He was in a few reality shows, Celebrity Apprentice and Celebrity Big Brother. Ricky followed his heart to alternative medicine and healing through all of this. He is now an astrologer, owns a wellness company called Real Wellness, and created a new app to use astrology to match people using their astrological signs. He also has his own podcast called Curious Questions, where he interviews his guests about their lives and interest using their astrological signs. 

Follow Ricky @williams on Instagram and @rickthelaureate on Twitter.

His store: https://realwellnessherbal.com

His Website: https://rickywilliams.life

Thank you, Ricky!!!!!

...welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup. Brian. Here, sports fans. Whether your game is on the gridiron,at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, Yeah, welcome to this week's huddle upwith gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents' passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the benches play for seven NFL franchises with 114TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are. One.Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay,sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios. It's kickoff time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with gusts.But again to the left. Hey, everyone, welcome toanother episode of Huddle Up with us. I'm your host guest parrot, and I'mjoined today by a very special guest. But before we get to my guests, I wantto introduce you to my new studio. This is not it, but 16 31. Digital news isbringing my new studio to you, and I'm very happy to be a part of of of theircompany and what they're trying to do to bring news through the Internet. Andso they're really starting up, and they're out of D. C. My very first home.So I'm really excited, uh, to be a part of 16 31 digital news. And I'd alsolike to thank our new platform, Sounder FM. Sounder is is just doing a greatjob. And they're bringing great new technologies to podcasting. Uh, today,my guest is someone I played with before. Uh, you can see him on here,but, man, what a career he's had the ups and down the emotions. Uh, you know,Ricky, when I when we played together in 2005, I was kind of a joke structurein the locker room. You were kind of the guy would go on the other side ofthe workout room, You do your yoga. You were very quiet. So I'm so excited forthis interview. My man Ricky was a Heisman winner. He was a first rounddraft pick. You name it. He's and talked about. He's won an Espy beforehe's done it all. And he's just an incredible human. And Ricky, thank youso much for joining me on. Huddle up with Gus? Yeah. I mean, you know, Ithink about that 2000 and five season often. You know, I think it's kind offorgotten by a lot of people, but, you know, for me, it was a year off after,uh, you know, walking away from football. And then that was my re entry.And, you know, Nick Saban was our head coach. And so it was There was a lotgoing on. I think people don't realize, you know, how good of a team we had.You know, we ended the we ended the season, went in six straight, beating aplayoff bound charges in the playoff bound Patriots. Yeah, you know thatseason for me? You know, I obviously was a journeyman. I played for sevendifferent teams, but that season for me, I I absolutely loved it. I worked mytail off to be the starter. Um, I probably was the lightest I've everbeen playing in the NFL. Just because, you know, there wasn't a day we wentout in Miami. You didn't sweat your butt off and, you know, and we did havea good team, you know, we had junior sale, and that defense we had wasincredible. And, um, you know, I tell a lot of stories about Nick Saban becausehe and I didn't get along so well, We we butted heads. You know, that's notthe only thing I've ever but in my head against. But Nick Saban, I butted heads.And so, you know, I just feel like I wish I could have had another year withthat team because I just felt like we were just so closeto being really good. Yeah. I mean, especially on offense, you know,towards the later part of that season with me and Ronnie and you and Chris,we just we just Randy we just got We got the rhythm and it was fun. It wasIt was It was a really good team, you know? Um, but let's get back to what myshow is about. Really? It's about how sports shaped your life, you know,because your life has been comprised of so many different areas. You I mean,from an astrologer to, you know, massage therapy to now creating yourcompany real wellness and doing all these things you do. You have your ownpodcast. But you know, first and foremost, you know, you were a footballplayer. So take me back to when you were kids. We don't need to go in allthe crazy specific, because I know your childhood is different than most. Buttell me about that first time you remember where you fell in love withsports. Uh, you know, it was it was kindergarten. I remember I waskindergarten, and I had a teacher. Um, Miss Schwartz, Uh, and she said that,you know, every morning we're going to take two laps around the field. And Iremember the first day I was thinking, I don't really want to do this, youknow? But after two days, you know, I started thinking, you know, I wonderwhat it would feel like to be the first one to finish the two laps. And so Idecided that day I was going to run as fast as I could and try to be the 1st12 finish, and I you know, I almost...

...lapped most of the people. And so, youknow, I just had this exhilaration of wow This is something that I'm good atand it feels wonderful to run. And every day, every morning we build thosetwo laps and I'd, you know, be the first one around. And that's when Ireally realized that that I love to move my body and I love to compete, andI love to move fast. Um, and then from there, um, I started getting intobaseball and growing up in San Diego as a big Padres fan. Big Tony Gwynn fan.So imagine me at seven years old sitting in my bedroom listening to thePadres on the radio. You know, I was I was in it. And so I started playingbaseball, and I, um, didn't start playing organized football until untilmiddle school for a couple of reasons. Uh, one. My mom really couldn't affordit to that point. Up until that point and two, I was claustrophobic, so I wasalways afraid of being trapped underneath underneath people's bodies,and so that really inhibited me from from playing football organizedfootball. But I played in the yard and, you know, I was one of the fastest kids,and you know that my nickname was Tim Brown at the time Because, you know,when you're playing in the playground, everybody's a receiver. And so, uh,yeah. So, yeah. Quarterback or a quarterback? Yeah. Yeah, but so I waskind of known as that. The jock, the athlete growing up. And it wasinteresting. Interesting. The kind of fact is, um, in California, there'ssomething called like magnet schools. And these are schools that specializein certain areas, science or drama. The elementary school that I went to, umwas a magnet for athletics. And so from the time I was in first grade, untilsixth grade, we had at least an hour a day physical education, like realphysical education. And so it was literally I was I was trained to be aprofessional athlete. And so, from a very early age, so much of the way Ilook at the world is through us through sports and competing. Yeah. So Iimagine you were a lot like me because, you know, when the recess bell rang andwe had that 45 minutes to to go outside and play whatever it was right,sometimes you just pick up football. It was well, football. It was kickball,you name it. I came in so sweaty for the second half of school that Iabsolutely hated sitting there. It wasn't because I hated school. It'sjust because I was drenched. And that's how it always was for me. So I canimagine. Like, when you went out for that hour long physical education,nobody took a shower. You just came in and went to class. That was the worstpart for me. I hated that. Yeah, it was true. It was true. I mean, I mean tothe point where the reason I went to school was to get sweaty at at lunch atrecess. There'd be right now, I agree. So So tell me about you know, because Iknow that, like you had some, uh, things happen in your early childhood.So tell me about how sports really helped you get through some of thetoughest times in your life, you know? So, uh, you know, I think as kids, youknow, we talk about kids, adults, we talk about kids, and we talk about kidsgoing through difficult times. But I think as kids, we don't know that thesetimes are difficult, you know? we don't we don't. Our minds are developedenough to compare our experiences to other people until they're much older.So as a kid, you know, it was it was more part of the mythos, you know, is Iwas an athletic kid, and part of athletics is competing. And so part ofcompeting, especially in football, is you get cut, you get nicked up, you getback up and you do it again. And there's almost like pride. You know,it's like if something bad would happen. I wanted a scar. You know, I wanted toscar to prove to prove that I survived this and I'm still here. And so I think,sport, I think that's that was my I think I was born with that mentalityand so going through those difficulties, my attitude from Jump was These aregoing to make me stronger, and these are going to help me to be successfulin life, and I think that's what that attitude is. What allowed me to be asuccessful football players, you know, the ups and downs, or whatever myattitude, regardless of what happened, my attitude was, I'm taking this goodthing. This success or this failure, and I'm using it to get better. Yeah,so then you get You said you didn't play later on in football, but youalways played baseball. Sound like that was the same with me. Like youth.Football for me was tough because it was awkward. I was growing up. I wasalways getting knocked on my tail. I wasn't a fast guy. They put me on theline the first time I ever played. I was like, I hate this. I'm not gettingmy tail knocked around. But I loved baseball, right? I go out and pitch andhit and do everything like that. Um, and then so for me, when I had to makethat decision going to college, um, you know, baseball and football work isequal to me and reading about you, you know, which I never really got to dobefore to understand you more. I wish I...

...would have when we were playingtogether. Um, but I have little kids in my mind was crazy, but was that the same for you? Because Iloved both of them so much. Yeah. So, like I said, baseball was my first love.Uh, and and I decided as a kid, you know, when I was seven, you know,listening to the Padres that I was going to be a professional baseballplayer. My mind was set, and as I got older, yeah, I was good at football andit was fun and, you know, it was rough. So it was a good outlet until I playedfootball and I was 12. I was watching Notre Dame football and on NBC, and Iwas like, There's something about the tradition of college football that I Ineed to have that experience. And so at that time, I told myself, You know, I'mgoing to play college football and be a professional baseball player. And so Iwas fortunate enough to get recruited by pretty much every college in thecountry. And I was recruited. Um, by most baseball teams end up beingdrafted in the eighth round by the Phillies, and when I told all thebaseball teams is I'll play baseball in the summers. But I'm playing collegefootball and I told all the football teams I'm playing college football, butI'm playing baseball in the summers, and so they both knew and I was able tocarry that, um, that dream or fantasy, Probably that there is a better word.Um, until until pretty much the combine and I was at the combine and and mostof the NFL teams told me, You know, you have to you have to pick betweenbaseball or football and the truth is, uh, I spent much more time, and I wasnaturally more ahead than football and baseball. I was a little bit morebehind, and so, uh, I made the decision to stick with football. And you were anoutfitter in baseball. Correct. That's part That's part of the issue is mywhole life. I played third base, a little bit of shortstop, but when I wasdrafted, they saw that I could run and they put me in the outfield, butnaturally, at their basement. Hey, that's what I played to the hot corner.Um, you know, they wanted me to pitch right. It was a quarterback, obviously.Strong arm. I absolutely hated pitching. Mm, like I just didn't have thementality to do it right. I could stand in there and swing the bat hit curves.I loved all that, and they always wanted me to pitch because it was 64right? And, you know, I just didn't like it. I don't know. It's because ofmy dad. Maybe because he was always yelling at me through the fence, butthrow strikes? Uh, a lot of, but there's a lot of pressure andquarterback, I mean, well, and when I was a little kid, Ricky played inLittle League. My dad said This is what he taught me. Throw the first one attheir head and then they'll move back from the plate and throw the next oneover the plate. And I'm like, Okay, so I remember we were playing a littlelink and we're playing the ter Pack twins. They were on the other team, andthese are these two little stocky dudes. They always hit home runs. I hit bothof them in the head because they were one right after the other. My dad'sclapping, You know, I'm like, Okay, yeah, this is No, that doesn't fit mypersonality at all to do that. So So pitching wasn't and for some reasonthat I was wild all the time, so but baseball was absolutely loved, and thenfootball for me, it was something that I really didn't want to do. Because inninth grade I broke my neck, and then I had to come back and and and play. So Ihad all these crazy things going on as a kid and imagine you you were so goodat both of them. You're getting recruited. You told us that story. Sowhy Texas? Why was that ultimate place for you? Texas. Yeah. So, um, you know,I had again this idea of playing college football, and it started at ayoung age. And so I had I had ideas about what I wanted my college footballexperience to be like, you know, I knew I wanted to start as a freshman. Iwanted to go to a big program, but a program that had a rich tradition buthad, you know, had a couple of down years and was ready to kind of makethat next step. You know, I really wanted to be part of the missing pieceto help to help rebuild the program. Uh, obviously, I wanted to get an education,and I think most important is it needed to feel like family. And so I took myfirst recruiting trip to Berkeley. Um uh, and I canceled my second trip. Iwas supposed to go to Stanford, and when I started the recruiting process,my my senior year, Bill Walsh was the head coach at Stanford, and during therecruiting process after the football season, he retired and Bill Walsh wouldhave stayed at Stanford. I would have. I would have gone there to follow inthe fullback tradition at Stanford, but he left, and so it kind of opened my Mychoice is back up. And so Notre Dame was on my list and the University ofColorado and USC. Um, so I took my recruiting trip to USC on a FridaySaturday. I flew home, and then I took my recruiting trip to Texas on Sunday.Monday. So I got to compare my top one...

...and two back to back. And what do U. S.C. And you know, Coach Robinson? I had a great relationship with him, and sothat was you know, that was a positive. Um, I had a great relationship with therunning back Coach Charlie White, Heisman Trophy winner. You know,another check? Um, big program, right they had a couple of down years, theywere on their way back up. You know, the big question mark was what I'd beable to start as a freshman. You know, Coach Robinson was saying, You know,you can start as a fullback, but at the time, USC didn't really useful back torun the ball or even catch the ball lunch. So I was kind of like, um andthen there was, like, five different halfbacks that we're all buying for theposition. So I wasn't quite sure and hanging out with the guys on the team.One of the guys, Rodney Sermon, said, You know, he said, Dude, don't comehere. We got too many running backs Don't come here. And so I was like, Allright, that's a minus. Okay, go home, Unpack. Repack. Fight to Austin, Texas.And so, coming from Southern California, I've never, never been outside ofCalifornia, Really? And so I didn't know what to expect. Flying into Texas,I thought, you know, I find that the tarmac and there'll be tumbleweedrolling across the right. But this was before Austin was Austin. Okay? Yeah.So I, um I land in Austin and I'm like it was December 17th. Okay, Land inAustin. It was 72 degrees and it was beautiful, right? And so I was like,Wow, just a really cool city, Really cool vibe. Uh, really. Like CoachMackovic, we got along really well when he said I could start as a full back. Icould see in his offense at the fullback, carries the ball. And, youknow, we had conversations where I believe them. Me and the running backcoach Bucky Godbold, still one of my best friends to this to this day. Andthere was a There was a situation on the when I was hanging out with theguys that really kind of sealed the deal for me, right? Hanging out in thedorm room with a lot of the players. And it was impressed that, you know,they were letting each other borrow each other's cars, and it just feltlike family, you know, and I felt really good to me. And then later thatnight, we went out and one of our receivers, Lovell, Pinky, uh, and andone of the running backs kind of got into an argument, and they kind of gotto throw in pants, you know? And the man, like, tagged him a couple of times.And I was like, Whoa, and, you know, within 30 minutes we're all back in thedorm room laughing, you know, and the fact that something can get thatintense and it can be squashed. And we can be together laughing again. To me,that really epitomized what I was looking for as far as the family feel.And so Texas really, you know, checked off all my boxes. And so it was It waspretty easy, easy decision to make. Well, I would say it was the rightdecision that you make, obviously, for the career you had at Texas andeverything that that I mean, it feels like you felt very yourself at Texas.Is that true? Because, I mean, the things that you did there while youplayed at Texas were incredible. I mean, they're up in the top of collegefootball history, and I mean the things that you've done there, and to me itwas like they let you be You Yeah. I'm not mistaken. Oh, yeah. You know,there's something about that. I think the difference one of the maindifference is the way I think about it between college and the NFL is incollege. You come in as an 18 year old, you know, and usually in the recruitingprocess, you develop like a real, like relationship with the coaches. And soyou come in as a kid, you know, and and it's like you grow up in college. Andso I think you're You're seen as a kid, right? Allowed to be a human being. AndI think once you make that jump to the NFL now you know you become somethingdifferent and there's a different set of expectations. And so I perfectly athome, you know, everyone understood who I was, and it was, Yeah, it was mucheasier to be myself at Texas. Well, that's the thing that struck meafter trying to kind of do some research on you and find out like,because the thing that was never clear to me was like, You go to the NFL right?And then it felt like there was all this pressure that was put on you because of like allof a sudden I'm drafted number one right, And then there's There's allthese things that have happened to you and you get an injury and and then allof a sudden there's media and there's press and there's different pressures.And and I know with some of your anxieties, Um, that probably was alittle tougher for you, right? That had had to feel because I just didn't seelike I wanted you to be Ricky. I watched in college. You know what I'msaying? Well, it's not. I mean, it's funny. And when I talked to most peoplethat most people say pressure, but I don't think it was pressure because Iput way more pressure on myself than anyone. Uh, it's not pressure itsexpectations, and it's not even expectations of how to perform on thefootball field. It's more of expectations, how I'm supposed to be asa person. And I think for me, you know, I just mentioned in my story about whyI chose Texas is it felt like family,...

...and the definition of family for me isyou get to be yourself. You know, your family doesn't expect you to besomething other than you are. If anything, your family smacks you in thehead and reminds you who you are, you know? And so, you know, and I think Iwas naive in thinking that when I got to the NFL that it would feel like itwould feel like family. And so it wasn't, You know, it was my naive inexpecting this to feel a certain way. But it wasn't the pressure of playingfootball. It was the expectations of me to be something that really had nothingto do with who I was. Yeah, because you come into, like, you come into a lockerroom in the college. You're 18. Those guys are 22. There is a big difference,but they're never gonna be usually older than 22. Right? But you go to theNFL and you come in that locker room as a 22 year old. There could be 35 yearolds with seven kids, right? That and there's such a wide range because Ilived at all. I came in as that young kid, and then I went out as that oldguy with all the kids, right? It is right. And for me, how I always triedto make it like a family every locker room I went to was, I love to playpranks and do those things to get people to laugh. And I think when youlaugh, But that's what families love to do, right? The locker room was ourfamily all the time, so I understand what you're saying that that you camein and you were probably not embraced like you should have been like a family.Yeah, yeah, you know, I think that's what when there's all theseexpectations, like the pressure is there. But I think you don't make it tothis level of pressure affects you in a negative way, you know? So it's it'snot. It's not the pressure, I think. And you can speak to this. I thinkyou've been around. It's really about finding a good fit, you know, and Ithink that the advantage we have when we go from high school to college is wehave more say and what's a good fit, you know, but and when you go on theNFL, you don't have that much of a say of finding a good fit. Well, you find agood fit, and then there's people that are coaches or general managers orsomebody else that take it away from you. That's kind of what alwayshappened to me is like I felt a good fit and then somebody would come up.You know, General Manager Mike, like in in Detroit, I was the offensive playerof the year. We had a great year and made the playoffs. That year is theyear of the Barry Sanders didn't come back and play. So I'm like, Okay, wedid a great job like, Okay, I'm gonna get rewarded here. I would end upplaying 10 games and they said, No, we don't. We think you have too much funand I'm like, What does that mean? And they said, Well, you, you need to bemore serious and I said, Well, when I cross the white lines, I'm serious. Butwhen I'm in the locker room with, the guys were having a good time and andthat's what makes us a family and you know, the coaches I had there didn'tsee it that way, so I had a fit that fit me and the guys. But there wereother people that didn't see it that way, so that's what I think you'retalking about when you talk about the NFL is that sometimes it's not alwaysup to you. Yeah, exactly. Exactly. Um, and you said it, you know, because whenI when I say a good fit, it's all of these things, you know? Does the Doesthe offensive coordinator system fit your style of play? You know, Does thehead coach believe in you? You know, there's the There's the running backcoach and the offensive line coach. Do they get along? You know, there'sthere's all these, there's all of these little things, you know? I think thatcreates winning football, and it really to sum it up, I felt like the word fitreally, really works. Yeah, I know that. That's that's so true. And then, um,I've been in those situations where you don't fit at all. And I'm sure you feltlike that to, you know, and Baltimore. Yeah, right. Yeah. I'm sure that peoplelook at you. You've been through your whole life and they diagnosed you offof what they read in the papers, or they've heard from somebody elseinstead of really getting to know you. And that's happened to me. right. Sofor me, I've had to live with the whole head butt thing my whole career, right?I had to go through my whole career and people saying, Well, we can't trustthem because of that, right? And I've had the talk coaches out of that right?And I know you've had other situations that may not have been ahead, but itmay have been, you know, other issues that you've had, but they don't seethrough that stuff. And then sometimes they're so superficial. They're notreally looking at the athlete or just the player and and who I am as a person.They just see all this ancillary stuff that doesn't really affect how I'mplaying on the field. Yeah, it's true. I mean, when I when I had similar, ithappens a lot with coaches, you know? So I was drafted by famously drafted bycoach Ditka, and he was fired at the end of 1999 at the at the end of thefirst season and coach Jim has. It was hired, and I remember the first meetingI had with Coach Haslett. The first meeting, you know, with the first roundpick and I'm sure he was pissed because he didn't have a first round pickbecause we created a way for me. But anyways, so, um, he said to me, andhe's like, I've heard I've heard about you, you know, heard that you're atroublemaker and your this and your this and your this. And I was like, she,you know, like you didn't even give me...

...a shot, you know? And so there'sdefinitely an uphill battle and finally ended with me being traded to Miami, Um,which, you know, turned out all right for me. But, you know, it's nice whenyou don't have a fit to be able to move on. You know, I think the worst thingis when there's not a fit and it's forced. So how did you fit? You know,we talk about the NFL being a lot like a family, and you've played for a lotof years in the NFL. You played in Canadian Football League as well. Um,So how did you fit? Because I know you had some, you know, like, I reallytried not. I tried to leave you alone because I understood that we're alldifferent. But how did you wanna? Did you ever have that? Kind of I want togo make friends with some of these guys in the locker room or not, Just youknow what I mean? Because we're together every day, right? We're justyou know what I mean? Sometimes it's hard. I want to get to know people Iwanna and play pranks. Like I never wanted to play a prank on you because Ididn't know you. Right. But ultimately, deep down inside, you were the one Ialways wanted to play a prank on because I wanted to make you laugh andsmile. Right? And I didn't know. You can only do people I know that can takeit. So I didn't know you as well. So tell me a little bit about that. Goingthrough your career. Yeah, I guess I'm the silent, scary type. You know, thetype that go poster, like type that goes so scary. I get it. I get it. Um,you know, you should have You should have played a prank on me. I would Iwould have laughed. I would have laughed. You know, I was just reallyfocused, you know, I was just really focused, you know, for me, football,football with something. And I guess I was burned early, trying to look for afamily and football and realizing maybe that's not the place to find it. And soI looked for family, other places and for me. I I love the feeling of goingto battle with with my with my teammates, and I love a group of peoplecoming together to try to accomplish a specific goal. And I love people comingtogether, working to improve and get better. I loved all of those thingsabout about being together with this football players, but I just found alot of the things that I was interested in. A lot of the things that I was into.Uh, there weren't a lot of other guys in the locker room that were into thesame things, and so it felt like to hang out off of the field. You know, itjust found so awkward for me because if I wasn't doing that, I'd rather bedoing I'd rather be doing something else. I'd rather be at home, you know,reading an astrology book or I'd rather be at home meditating So it just youknow, football had a place and and But I learned, especially when when I metyou. After retiring from football and traveling around the world and reallyunderstanding myself on a deeper level, I just had more interest. And sofootball was great. But as soon as I was off the football field, I wanted tobe doing the building, the other the other parts of my life. Yeah, I knowthat that is so important to find out who you are and then build your lifearound that because otherwise you can really go down a rabbit hole becausefor me, after I retired in oh, eight, I think, you know, you transition out offootball and you're like, Man, I've done this for 25 years straight. Nowwhat the heck am I gonna do? I went into coaching, but it wasn't therewasn't any satisfaction. Now I'm trying to be in business and entrepreneurship,like trying to do different things to find out who I really am. So a lot ofthat has been tough on me. And thank God I have my wife and to support mebecause I don't know if I'd make it through because she is a lot like you.And I say that in a great way. Because she has been finding herself over theseyears. She went back and got her master. She's a social worker. She's a nurse.She does tarot cards. We do readings. We do all this stuff. Like when I readabout you, I was like, Oh, my God, honey, this is you. Yeah, Ricky or yeah,Like like her favorite thing is, we go outside and we watched the moon likewhen it's a full moon, when it's a new moon, whatever it is like that's her.That's her thing. And we do. We do crazy rituals. So I'm like, That isRicky. And I'm so happy that you found your who you were and all that. Yeah, Iwas lucky. I was lucky. The first time I retired, I got a chance to findmyself. You know, I think a lot of people have to wait until they're alittle bit older. But one of the reasons I retired because started doingthe math and I was like, You know, if I keep doing this at this rate, first ofall, I'm not sure if my body is going to be healthy enough to be able to dothe things I want to do and to, you know, I'm going to be old. And so Irealized I need to, like, live a little bit. And so I had that year away andagain, like when I came back, I had a better sense of who I was. And so Istarted kind of building my my second my second career, you know, halfwaythrough my first career. And so when I retired a second time from the Ravens,you know, it was it was me choosing to walk away because there was moreinteresting things that I wanted to do, and that was really my goal was to havean indefinite football career, not one that ends because nobody wants meanymore. Right, right. Well, mine ended...

...because of bad knees, but your firsttime you retired, you went to Toronto to That's a pretty good place to retirethe first time, right? You go up to Toronto so it was kind of halfretirement, you know, first of all, because it's just more chill playing upthere and second I broke my arm, so I spent. I spent half the season justreally just chilling, enjoying Toronto. And also I feel like my time in Torontohelped me rediscover my love for the game because it's just fun, you know,it really was just guys out there playing football. Um, and you know, Iwas able to come back and have another 1000 years season in the NFL andfinished with over 10,000 yards, and so you know it's getting over that.Getting over that 10,000 yard mark for me was, you know, it was a bigmilestone kind of for me to justify, um, that that my career was a success, youknow, to reach 10,000 yards. Considering all the ups and downs andthe suspensions in the year off injuries and all that stuff, you don'thave to justify anything to anyone. You had an incredible career. Well, ofcourse I do. Of course I do have to justify it to myself. All this beating,the beating my body is taking. You know what, buddy? When when I when I haveone of those days where my neck is hurting my back, is hurting I just gowatch the highlights. And I'm like, Okay, yeah, yeah. I have those days towork an hour to get rolling out of bed instead of, like, getting jumping rightup. And he goes to work early every morning. So I always get up and try tohelp her and, uh, you know, get ready because she leaves at, like, seven. And,you know, we're she just turned 50. I turned 50 in July. It's like, Man,we're up there now. I can, you know, 2000 and five seems so long ago, butit's crazy how it is now. You know, you you had incredible college career. Youyou had a, uh, incredible. I mean, rest for over 10,000. You have an amazingNFL career. Um, you know, you've done things that nobody else will ever beable to do. Now, after the NFL, tell me about your journey. You retire from theRavens? What was that next step? What was that transition for you? Thatjourney of what you what you kind of started to do. Yeah. So, um, you know,I've always been a person that's been motivated to improve, Whether it'simproved as a football player or improve as a person. Uh, and so thatyear off, I really focus my life on how do I make myself a better person? Uh,and so when I retired from the Ravens, um, I just kept going in that direction,and I'm traveling around the world taking any kind of workshops or classesI could that would help me understand myself better. And doing that, Istarted to actually facilitate and teach and help other people do the samething. Uh, and then I kind of hit across the world, and my mom keptbugging me and saying, You know, you promised me you get your degree. Youpromised me You get your degree and so I you know, I said, no, I'm going tocoach, you know, try to stave her off. And so I coached coach for a year at asmall college in San Antonio, and I loved it. I loved it. I loved it somuch. And then it got me started starting to think that if I want to dothis full time, I need to go back and get my degree. And so I enrolled back,uh, in Texas to finish my degree. I think I'd like 72 hours to go. So thattook me a couple of years. And while I was doing that, I was doing someanalysts work for ESPN in Longhorn Network. So I was keeping me kind ofengaged in football and then on the side. I was still studying astrologyand still, you know, working with people. Uh, And then after I got mydegree, um, kind of was at another crossroads and I'm thinking, OK, am Igoing to go into coaching or am I going to pursue this alternative route? And Idecided to pursue the alternative round. So I enrolled in a master's program inChinese medicine, enrolled in a master's program in depth psychology,and I started to take my, uh, my astrological studies more seriously. Um,and and so that was 2017. And so over the past three, almost four years.That's really what I where I've been focusing. And it's become even morelaser focused in the past couple of years as, um, the CEO of relationshipapp that uses astrology to help people understand themselves and understandother people and, uh, and like Yeah, I do readings, recessions with people. Um,and also, um, my podcast, which incorporates astrology. And I'm alsolaunching a cannabis brand. So it's kind of like you said, I'm getting intoon, you know, my tapping into my entrepreneurial spirit, but in a uniqueway, you know, bringing the different parts of myself. And And I was one ofthe things I learned in 2000 and five as I came back to the NFL, and I hadthese other parts of myself that I had learned about in that year off andtrying to figure out. OK, how do I integrate these different pieces intome as a football player? And that was a...

...long, drawn out process. And I feellike just now, just now that they're all starting to come together. Yeah.Hey, everyone, I want to say thank you for joining us on how to cope with Gus.We are talking with, uh, the great Ricky Williams. And, uh, we're gonnatake a quick commercial break. We'll be right back. Hey, everyone, welcome toanother episode of Hollow Up with Gus. I'm your host, former NFL quarterbackGus Frerotte, and welcome to the new 16 31 Digital news studio You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well, I say to those people you've never read16 31 digital news dot com Go to 16 31 digital news dot com To get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. How to up with gusts. Check it out today at www 16 31 digital news dotcom. Hey, everyone, we're back. Welcome back to huddle up with Gus. I'm yourhost, Gus Frerotte. We're joined by one of my old teammates. I say old lightly.Ricky Williams. So, Ricky, you know, you just explain to us everythingyou're doing now. So let's break some of that down in your post NFL careerbecause, you know, I just I just I'm so excited to talk to you because I justfeel like I always wanted to have this conversation with you in 2000 and five,and we just never did you know, they're not like it was a bad thing or anything.It was just It was just I felt like maybe I didn't want to overstep mybounds, you know, So I'm so happy for for being able to have thisconversation and your journey. Now, I'm hearing this because so many peoplestruggle with this When they leave something they've done for a long time,it could be football. Baseball, hockey could be with a company forever. Andyou're trying to make a transition into something new. So tell us how importantit was you to find. You know what you really wanted to do now? You you had acouple of choices between coaching and and doing the alternative stuff. Andwhy was it the alternative stuff that really spoke to you? Um, you know, it'sa really good question. Uh, you know, my I'm gonna ask. I'm an astrologer. Sowhen I when I when I feel the questions like that, my mind goes intoastrological answer. And so I have to do a little translating. So, um, so youknow, this idea of, you know, and I think this is this is common thing forfootball players is when you're really good at something, you know, you had aconversation with my daughter, and she's, you know, she's in high school.She's a freshman in high school and she's picking up across and she'sfinding that she's really good at it, you know, Um and she's kind of tornbecause she doesn't necessarily love it, but she's really good at it, and she'srealizing she's getting a lot of positive reinforcement and, you know,because of it. And so I realized that, you know, as a football coach as ananalyst was getting really good because I know football. And as a coach Icoached myself. So I was a really, really good coach and I It wasrewarding for me. But it was kind of this feeling of I can keep doing thisand it will be great and I'll be successful, right. But there'ssomething there's something missing. You know, it's kind of that thing whenyou've done something over and over and over again. Yes, you're going to begood at it, but it doesn't doesn't lead to much growth, you know. And so Ifound that for me, growth and self development is the number one priorityto me. So I took a path that would lead to more growth and development and andit has, you know, it's really helped me diversify my experiences in life. Um,you know, I think I spent I spent so much time being like the big, toughfootball player that I developed out of balance a little bit. So I've, you know,spend a lot of time trying to swing back to become more balanced and, youknow, studying healing, right, that, you know, Like you said, massagetherapy and Chinese medicine and astrology like these are things thattypically, you know, scheme or feminine. And I found it. It's made me a morewell balanced and happy person. And my my quality of my life is so much better.Yeah. No, I I agree. I mean, I do these things with my wife. It's not that,like, it wasn't my passion was hers. But we're in this thing together. So Ienjoyed doing it with her like, uh, you know where you do the 12 card pools andit takes an hour. So I've done those a lot. Uh, but it's it's a lot of fun.We've done all kinds of crazy stuff. Um, I called crazy. She's, you know, justbecause it's not my thing, you know,...

...it's not really crazy, but I get it wasget what you're saying. Um, the other thing I wanted to ask you, uh, thelittle kid who his name is he's not little, but he works kind of with me.He interns with me. Um, he wanted me to ask you about something. Uh, and so hewanted me to ask you about is a big brother, big brother? Yeah, thecompetition you were on. What was that like? Because you've done it all likeyou've been in. You've been on TV, you've been on the reality shows youplayed in front of people on football, you know, just just done it all. And sotell me about that experience, because I know you know, you have this thing of, uh,I'm sure, you know, in the NFL in the locker room, you had to be you wantedto go to kind of do your thing, right? But that's like they're on you all thetime. Like the cameras on you all the time. What was that like for you? Yeah.So, like I said, you know, I know how I am. And I also know that people change,and so I'm always pushing myself. You know into doing things that are thatare uncomfortable. So I was just funny. I was, was that was in New Orleans. Iwas at the at the Sugar Bowl, um, covering it for Longhorn Network. And Igot an email from an old friend of mine who is a TV producer and, you know, andshe said that you know, that celebrity big brother is doing another season andthey want to talk to me. And at first I was like, what? Because I'd seen oneepisode of Big Brother and and I watched it for 15 minutes and literallyWhat I remember is thinking to myself I would never do that. I could never dothat in the scheme and I could never do. That was my thought. And so, of courseI get this email and I'm like, This is crazy. And so I kind of, you know, shutit up. And then, um, my daughter has no idea this is going on, and she she textme and asked if I've ever seen Big Brother. And so whenever I noticedweird coincidences like that, I pay attention. And so, you know, I reopenedthe email and I reached back out and I said, Okay, I at least have aconversation. And so I met with one of the producers and we talked a littlebit, and I just kind of explained to about my personality and how I was andI was quiet and kind of chill. But everyone likes me and, you know, I said,I don't know if that's gonna work well with the show and a couple weeks later,he called me up and said, You know, we want we want you to do the show until Isaid Sure and again, you know, completely, completely out of mycomfort zone. And it's intense, you know? It's intense, like they like.They literally lock you away from friends, family devices, books, writingutensils like you don't get anything, you get a Bible. That's it. How longdid it take? So the first they put you in sequester, You know, they put you upin a hotel and somewhere in in in the valley, and you, like, literally lockedin your room for like, four days like nothing. You know, they leave the foodout. So you're really like, shut off and you're funny. story. You werequarantined before there was quarantine. It was real. It was where I mean, I wasI thought in my mind a couple of times I was on the second story. I'm hoppingout of the window and run into a pay phone and calling my wife. I was goingcrazy in there, but, um, and and so again, out of my comfort zone. And thenthey put me in the house and I'm sitting there and, you know, I'm a youknow, I don't mean anything against celebrities, but I don't really likecelebrities that much, you know? And so I was in a house with celebrities, youknow, some of them are really cool. And there's a couple of athletes. Lolo iscool. So So, you know, I get in the room with all women Tamar, Tamar, Lolo,Natalie and myself. And I felt comfortable, you know, for me, feelinglike family. And so we we had, like, a little group, and I was fine. And butthen when I realized about all these guys, okay, and it's and I just grew uparound a lot of women, these guys were like, petrified of women. So anytimethe women got emotional, all the guys would like. They, you know, they wouldgo crazy like they couldn't handle it until my advantage was like, I justdidn't get triggered by women getting emotional. I was used to it, and so theguys didn't know, And so I would go over to the guys and tell them, youknow, talk to them about the girls and and act like I was giving theminformation. And they thought I was on their team. And then I would everythingthey told me. I'll just go back and tell the girls and the girls and theguys weren't talking because the guys were afraid of the girl. So it worked.And and the crazy part I know it probably is crazy, and people didn'twatch the show. But Tom Green, Tom Green and I like we really, reallybutted heads, okay? And I call it the Jedi Mind trick. You know, my myhighlight moment was Tom had finally gotten rid of me, you know, He you know,he finally got rid of me. He had the votes, I was gone, all right? And heeven won the veto, so no one could save me. Okay. No one could save me. All hehad to do, all they had to do was give the veto to someone else or justdropping. And he gave me the veto. He saved me. Um, and that was my like, Idon't know how I did that, but I just Jedi mind trick and that that allowedme to get to the allowed me to get to...

...the semifinals. But it was just It wasan amazing experience, because when you lock people in a group setting likethat and the whole game is one person gets kicked out, it's primal, you know,like primal, instinctive emotions come up in people and it's real. And I thinkfor me being, you know, playing football and being in that kind ofprimal environment a lot. I was I was right at home. Yeah, so I mean, thatthat sounds big, but you've done other shows as well, right? I did. Celebrityapprentice. Um, it was less than it was less intense, but it was still Ilearned so much, you know, and And the reason I did that show is because Iknew I was going to get into business later, and I knew from coming fromfootball. I really had very little experience. And so you know so much ofwhat I learned from doing Celebrity Apprentice with Arnold Schwarzenegger,not Donald Trump. Well, I'm using it now, and my business is I'm using itand what I'm doing now. So it's it's been, um, it's been there's been agreat experience doing doing reality TV. Yeah, the business side is very scaryfor me. I'm trying to do a few things now with business, and it's just likeconnecting the dots is easy, right with people. But doing the contracts, theagreements and doing all those things. It's very scary for me. So that's whenI slow down like I feel like and you gotta have good people around you.And I try to really find those smart people around me to help me throughthose tough times because business is tough. If you know that's not somethingI ever for 25 years. I didn't ever worry about any of that. I was. I was afootball player and I was a husband and a dad. That was that was all I did Andsometimes I regret not going to school to further my education while I wasstill in football for all those years. But then again, we were moving thefamily from state to state because I played for seven teams. So, um so tellme about everything you're doing now. How do you coordinate it all right?Because, like you said, you mentioned so many different things. How are youcoordinating at all? And how you How are you putting it in? I mean,obviously you probably got, like, six calendars going on, but how do youcoordinate and I'm finding the time. So I'm a Gemini. And so that means I needto have a lot of things going on, you know, to keep to keep me occupied. I'mhere to live multiple lifetimes and one, and so I I need to do it. And that'sthe great question is how do I organize it? And, you know, I have great peoplearound me you talked about, You know, it's scary going into business. It isscary. I'm married. A married a corporate attorney. So Well, that's oneway to get around it. She she she has my back and and, you know, my CEO atLeela. Our app. You know, he's like my main guy helps just have really goodpeople around me where we we understand each other's strengths. What we do well.And we support each other. And, you know, my my motto is Put it on thecalendar, you know, put it on the calendar. And if it's in the calendar,get up in the morning. Look at my calendar. This is what I'm doing, whatI'm doing today and I go for it. I love it. So talk to me a little bit aboutyour podcast. What is the curious questions? Curious questions? Yeah. SoI was born July 31st. I'm a Leo, So I'm your your show. Have your chart righthere. Uh, yeah, you know. So there's a There's a, uh there's an app calledIt's a website actually called Astro Databank. And they have, like, kind ofrandom celebrities charts. And for some reason, someone got a hold of yourbirth time and in your chart, you know my birth time. Yeah, I know. You wereborn at 2:17 a.m. Nice. You know what my wife just did a reading with Larrywith an eye out of Colorado, and he wanted to know her birth time, and wecannot find it anywhere. We don't even know how to get it. Because we orderedher long form birth certificate and it didn't have it on. And she was so upset.Really? What? What state? What state? Pennsylvania. I think it's called abook. Copy. We gotta get a book copy. And I think that's what it's called thebook. Copy. Oh, my God. Should be so happy if I get that for Yeah. So justone thing I was interesting, like, interesting that. And if you were onthe show, I would ask you about this because you've already shared aboutyourself. Like you're a Leo. Right? And one of the one of the Leo archetypes isthe is the is the class clown. You know, the person that likes to have a goodtime, you know? And so this idea of coaches saying you're having too muchfun, you're in your chart, you know, you have a configuration. I would saythis is someone that has too much fun, you know, um, it's interesting, Leo,you know Leo and the third house. But what's most interesting about what yousaid is is, um, an astrology. The 10th house. It's what it represents is thetop of the chart, so represents where the sun is at noon and symbolicallyrepresents our reputation. You know, our reputation and for better or forworse And the planet Mars. Okay, Planet...

Mars is in your tent house. Okay, Righton the right, on the cusp of the 10th house and you mentioned earlier,everywhere you went, you know, butting your head right followed you around.Mars is the planet of butting your head. You can't. You can't make this stuff up.Right. But another, another interpretation is you know that you area competitor. Because the 10th House rules are career. So that you are acompetitor for for a living, you know, And what you do in the world is, um,body, though this warrior energy, right? And, uh, and so And anothersynchronicity. Another thing that you mentioned is you talked about, you know,getting into business, scaring you a little bit, right? Mars is where wehave to face our fears, right? And so, in order to develop courage we have tobe humble enough to acknowledge where we are afraid. Um, so it's it's coolstuff. So I would ask you questions about facing fears in your career. I'dask you about being an outcast. I would ask you about curiosity, you know,Gemini Rising. Um, I'd ask you about mentors. You know, the moon in thesixth, six houses, about where we have things to learn. I'll ask you aboutimportant mentors and coaches in your life. Yeah, no, that would be great. Iwould love to do that. I also love my wife to do it because, uh, I alwaysfeel like I learned so much from her, and then we do it together, and ithelps me because, actually, deep down, I think I really do enjoy it. You know,we sage everything. I absolutely love all that, you know. And then, um shouldwe do all she's done all the chakra stuff. Um, you know, she's going toclasses for all that, and I just think that it helps her so much in hertherapy and everything else she's doing. And, uh, you know, for me, it's it'slike I want to I want to learn it. But I'm not like as passionate as she is.And so thank you for giving me that reading. I can't wait to show herbecause she is going to be so jealous. So I'll challenge that. Alright, Sopart of astrology is interesting. So this just philosophically I mean, Ihave to go, but I just want to get see if I can get this out philosophically.You know, when I look at a chart, the chart represents the person, right? SoI'm looking at your chart right now, and this represents you, OK? And so itrepresents everything that shows up in your life. And so from an astrologicalperspective, if you are married to a woman who is very passionate aboutsomething, it's, you know, psychologically, we would say that'sprobably a lot of your passion, right? But since since you're the footballplayer and she's the woman and she's more, it's more socially acceptable forher to be passionate about those things. Then you get that in your life throughher, right? Right? Yeah. So you're you're trying to actually says that,you know, it says deep down that you love this stuff. I mean, I'm not makingit up. You know, that would be a valid interpretation of deep down. I lovethis. I love doing rituals in the house. It's what? It's what the church says.Yeah. No, I love it. I love So, Ricky, before you go, I appreciate all yourtime. Yeah. I mean, thank you for giving me your time today and joiningme on the show, but please let our audience know of everything that you'redoing and how they can find you. And even about your company. Real wellness.Yeah. Yeah. So, yeah, I'm an herbalist to something in my alternative healingnot only cannabis, but really all herbs, um, are really quite amazing, in myopinion. Um, so, uh, r w, um rw dot life real wellness herbal dot com. Um,hey, leela dot com is the relationship app. It's coming out, and they're goingto launch in the next month, so it's getting really close. And then atWilliams on Instagram and Rick, the laureate on Twitter, Um yeah, and, uh,the Heisman h i g h s m a n dot com is my new cannabis line That coming outlook soon, so yeah, check me out. We'll have to find out. Maybe we'll see theHeisman. When my nephew goes back to the Get his medical cannabis. Maybewe'll see a strain instead of Pineapple Express next time. Maybe he'll findsome Heisman in their Heisman. O g. Yeah, I love it. I love it! All right,buddy. Hey, thank you for joining me. I really appreciate it. And maybe we canconnect again sometime. I love my wife to talk to you because I think you guysare just, like would hit it off. Yeah, that'd be great, guys. Alright, Ricky,take care and thank you for joining me and huddle up with us. And that's awrap sports fan. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 Digital Studiosfor another actually huddle up with Gus, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback GusFerrand Huddle up with Gus, is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and isavailable on Apple music.

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