Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Renee Montgomery

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

WNBA star Renee Montgomery joins the huddle! Listen in, as Renee and Gus talk about the current police brutality and pandemic issues facing the United States today. Also learn about Renee's successful career and her foundation. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joiningus in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts front,alongside my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hagar, where we talked to guestsabout how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on ourwebsite, how up with Gustscom, where you can listen to more episodes justlike this. Now let's join the huddle. Hey everyone, welcome to another episodeof Huddle up with Gusts. I'm your host, Gust far at fifteen, your NFL quarterback, and I'm usually joined by my friend and cohost Daveager. Dave is not able to join me today, so I'm on myown. I'm really excited today. I think we're going to get into alot of topics that are very much needed today, but we're also going tofind out a lot about somebody who grew up in West Virginia. No PROteams in West Virginia, so I'm anxious to find out who she rooted for. But today joining us is Renee Montgomery. Renee, you were drafted by theMinnesota links you play for. You Con one a national championship. You'vewont to be WNBA Championships. You've done it all. Now you're moving onto with your foundation and you're kind of you really I think turning the ballwould a lot of people want to do, but you really have the courage togo and do it and I really applaud you for that, because alot of people could never do what you do. So thank you for joiningus in the huddle today and, you know, I just appreciate you beingwith me. Thank you for having me on the side of yeah, soour show really starts about when you were young. I knew you grew upin St Alban's West Virginia, which is not that far from Pittsburgh, probablywhere I where I am, and you know, one of the things wealways start with this. You know, when we're young, we always havethat moment or something that you can connect back to how you fell in lovewith sports. Do you remember that or why that was that you fell inlove with sports? Yeah, I can remember my sisters were playing. SoI'm the youngest and anybody that's the youngest knows I have two older sisters,Nicole in the Shay, and so when both of them started getting interested inbasketball, I'm like I'm dribbling too, because I just wanted to be likethem and then just that little start that that's where I fell in love.Yeah, you know, and it's so important. Everybody has a different ideaof and reason why they fall in love. I interviewed somebody the other day.It was just because he had a very you know, he loved theYankees and Mariona Rivera was as idol and he just loved the Yankees, andthat's all. We fell in love with sports and for you it was likeme, you know, was it was family members and it was people inour neighborhood and then you just started going around. Now, did you playmultiple sports? I did, so I played soccer in high school and ourranch tracks as I was young. Now, what did you run in track?A ran long business young, like. I don't know what I was thinking. As I got older, I...

...started running hurtles. So again,I don't know what I was thinking, because I had to stop running hurdlesmy senior year because I had already thought what you can okay, and theywere like no more hurdles for you know, they weren't. I was like nowords, it's a lot of work, you know. I coach Ezekul Elliottand high school and is Zeek was up was a state for your statechampion Hurdler and you know he ran both the short and the long and I'vewatched you know he would leave football practice and he would go and work outfor I mean it's a lot and the technique you have to do and everythingto make it successful, but I'm assuming that all that track work helped youon the basketball court. Yeah, and the footwork was soccer to you know, like there's different things and stamina. So I think it all I tooka ballet when I was younger. My parents, my parent that was myparents choice, not mine. I think all of those things like helped mehave my footwork and help me be the player I am. Yeah, doyou think it's important for kids today to play multiple sports? I mean,I definitely do, because I don't think you know what you like. Youknow, you might have a sports family that loves football, but you're ina soccer so if you only try the sport that your family may like,you may not know that you you have a lower passion for something else.So I definitely think multi sport is definitely the way to go. When you'reyounger. Yeah, we definitely made all of our kids try every sport.And you know, it's funny. My daughter we said, okay, you'regoing to try soccer, you know, and she stood by the goalie andtalk to the goalie the whole game. So we're like, yeah, wedon't think soccers really her sport. She wasn't a runner, but then sheend up playing goalie in Lacrosse and field hockey. So you know, youjust never know. You got to try it all to find out what youlove. So then, you know you played multiple did you play like ayou or anything when you were in basketball when you were a kid? Ohyeah, definitely, definitely. I played a you. I think starting outat twelve and played all the way through till when I graduated. So whendid you really feel like Hey, man, I love this, this is thisis going to be great, this is what I want to do.I have a real passion for it. And you know, was it whenyou were early on, or did was it more in high school? Definitelyearly on. Actually, wasn't very good early on I was kind of putin the game usually when they needed like a defensive stopper or things of thatnature. So that kind of drove me as well, like I didn't likethat I wasn't the player that played a lot. I didn't like that Iwasn't the player that was playing at the end of the game. So thatwas almost my driving force when I trained, because I want to understood that Ishouldn't have been that person. I wasn't good enough, I wasn't betterthan them. So that was my that was my posh in my force totry to get better so that I could get more minutes and then be onthe court at the end of the game. Yeah, so you go to SouthCharleston high schools at right. Yeah, Stop Roston. Yeah, so you'rein high school, you're playing. Now what when was it did youstart getting recruited by all these schools? Because you went to Yukon, probablythe best, you know, Women Basketball College in the country, and youknow, when did you start getting recruited by all these schools? Well,I would say my sophomore years, where...

I kind of knew I could choosewhere I wanted to go. You know, I signed with Yukon my junior year, so I didn't even my whole senior year. I knew where Iwas pretty much going and was almost a done deal. So I would saymy freshman year I got some good amount of attention and then my buy,my sophomore year, I knew that I would be able to choose wherever Iwanted to go to school. Now, did your family, your sisters,have influence on where you were going to go play? Not at all.If that was the case, I would have signed with the University of Marylandbecause that one was my number to pick, and my sister lives in Maryland,so that's I wanted to go there to be closer to her. Butwhen I went to go visit Ukon, I knew that that was the schoolfor me. Now, what was it when you went to the you know, you say it's a school, but is it like when you visited andall the team got to meet you? Was it just the atmosphere of beingaround other, you know girls that were like for me when I went toTulsa, the coach and the team and what they were doing was more vibrantto me than the other schools that I visited. What was that interaction likewhen you first visited Yukon? Yeah, I would say that the same.It was the energy that was there and the energy and the culture this there, that's created by the coaching staff. So usually when you sign with aschool, I mean, I know what with some guy players, you know, they go in a team up, but usually it's the coaching staff thatcreased the culture and they recruit players that can continue that culture. So that'swhat drew me to Yukon. It was the culture, it was the howthey carry themselves. You know, I liked how professional Yukon was was andhow how they treated their players and with the professionalism to so I just likethe whole spill of Yukon. Like you know, I just was drawn toit because I love that they were discipline. I love that team work was thethe the beginning and end of everything they did. I love that.You know, coach our I am. I really didn't care about superstars.You know, everybody says that, but he really honestly is the better theplayer you were. That was worse for coach or a him, because youknow that he's going to get onto you. So yeah, I just liked everythingabout it. Valet, stay and play on your next getaway to LosAngeles, the Weston Bonnadventure hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the cityof angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sportingevent. Our hotel is just moments away from all the action and accessible toHollywood beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room andvalet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box whenmaking your online reservation, or call one two hundred and three, six,two four one thou and ask for Promo Code PSF. Yeah, I kindof did that to Ezeko all the time. I said, look, I'm gonnabe harder on you than anybody else. I know you got the talent andthose people are looking up to you, not up to me, and soyou know, I was hard on him to push him to be thebest on the team and everything, and you know everybody followed suit. Soyou know, one of the things you mentioned, I read an article thatyou did and talked about when you were growing up. You know, youwent to almost like an all white school...

...kind of, and that seemed toyou. Know, I don't know how much you realize it then, andyou know then you get to Yukon and there's probably a heck of a lotmore diversity. So how do you feel like that affected you or helped yougo into the school you did in high school? I think it all helpsyou. I think when you're submerged in another culture, that that's helpful.You know, after I got graduating UKON WBA players, we play in theWM gay in the summer and then after two weeks, after our season,we go play in Europe somewhere for seven months at a time. So Ithink those experiences only helped. They helped me understand another person's thought process.They had helped me understand another person's situation because, you know, in Americawe see it's fast, fast, fast, fast, pass everything we do asfast. We eat on the go, we do everything on the go.But and Europe they sit down to have dinner every night. You know, they enjoy things, they slow down. So I take a little bit fromevery culture. Yeeah now, that's that's great, you know, andI think that's that's so important. You know, we're all on these thingsall the time and people get very emboldened on there and then when you sitdown to have a conversation facetoface. They don't say the same things to you, and I do that a lot with family, friends, that everybody,because you you know, what do you really believe? What are you feel? And then I'm there. It's really easy. FACETOFACE, like you're saying, it is tough, and that's and I think what's that's a lot tosports does right, because you have a coach that's facetoface with you every day, yeah, you know, and telling you what's right and wrong and coachingyou. Yeah, and so what did you learn from your college coach?Oh, Gosh, I mean everything. I learned how to be, Ilearned how to prepare. So I think that that. That, to me, is one of the main things. And my parents had already started thatwith me in a sense of you know, my my Ditty, this is mydaddy, always say, if you're not early, you're late, youknow, and it's my parents already kind of laid the found foundation and thenwhen I got to Yukon they just hammered it home. And how to prepare, like, basically, overpreparing is preparing. Can you do it so many timesthat you can't do it wrong? I can you do it right.One. So I started to learn different concepts of when I thought I waskilling it and then he's like, all right, do it five more timesand if you can't mess up, then you know how to do it,and I'm excited. I got it right once, right, right. Istarted to understand that I needed to prepare differently, and so I think that'swhat coach or I am and the coaching step. And you contaught me nowthat did. Did he kind of let girls would have graduated already, havegone onto the WNBA and and achieves these things? Did he let them comeback in the locker room and speak with you guys? Oh, even,I'm come back and practice and beat up one is. What are you talkingabout? Those are the worst days, honestly, when I saw Rita Williamswalking in the gym or Sue Bird and I'm like, okay, here wego, like because you know that he's gonna he knows that they're already goingto have the up her hand. He's going to yell at you while they'redoing it because he's going to enjoy right.

It's no, it's going to beone of those days. So but again, that that helps. Thathelps me because, as a young player, I had to give my mind rightearly, like, because I will get dominated like Bertie will not careif I'm if I'm doing it right or wrong, or if I don't know, like she's going to do what she's supposed to do. So I'll letme. I learned young that, like you just gotta be ready. Theydon't tell us the night before they're coming. They just walk up the practice andyou're like, okay, well, that almost makes a game like that. You get in and you're like, oh, it's going to be ontoday. Yeah, and and you know it's it's interesting because you know,they rehab. You know, a lot of times, like the athletes thatare former players, they go back to the school to Rehab. So they'rethere. I just love the Camaraderie of the program that you can go backto you kind of Rehab if you need you might get some shots up withus like they did, you know, like, but I just like that, you know, as a family environment. Yeah, you know, and it'scrazy. I'm glad it's like that for you, because it wasn't likethat for me. It ALSA was not a place where you could go backtoo easily. Wasn't very opened us former players come back. You know,they didn't have a problem with me giving the money but not coming to theGames and opportunities. So we all have a different story and I'm glad yougot to have a positive one because I think it's so important. You knowthat you pay it forward, and that's what coach, I think, expressesto you. I've watched a lot about him and he seems like a greatperson. Yeah, he is, and that's the thing. You know,a lot of people get caught up and he yells a lot, but youlisten to him talk and you see how his players talk about him, youcan understand the type of guy is right. So then you're going in. GotTo go move on. Yeah, have an understanding of like, Hey, I'm going to have a chance to go play in the WNBA, I'mgoing to be drafted. What was that process like for you? It wasn'tthat process. So people forget the WBA draft is like three days after thechampionship game. So I won the championship with the final four. You flyingback, you have the parade, you have the rally and then you flystraight to the to get drafted. So it's a whirlwind. My God.I remember the night of the championship game signing with my agent. I thinkI signed with Nike that same night after the championship game, and the nextday we flew out. It's really crazy, like it's a fast process for wnbaplayers because it happens in the same week. So when did you getyour take your first breath? Because it seems like it everything is just movinglightning speed for you. The fast because you know then you get drafted.You got your coach calling you like Hey, welcome to the team, can't waitto get you up there, and I'm like all right, cool,like you know. So you're kind of just riding away. Yeah, andthen you get back to school and you got to celebrate with all your allyour friends and players and the whole school. You got to go pack because yougot to go to the don't pay team. You know, the wnbastarts in the summer. So you have the final four and then you playthat same summer with your WBA team. So it's not there's not that thatperiod of of Tom where you just have off, it's you go one straightinto the other. So then you're making...

...this new transition. Do you feellike when? No, like you mentioned to bird when they came back dothat? Did that kind of help you get ready to also transition right tothe WNBA, because I feel like that experience alone, and then their workethic that you got the saw and be a part of your you go intoWnba and you're like, Oh, okay, I got this, I've been aroundthis. Yeah, definitely, and I mean not even just with Birdieand I'm coming back. Just the preparation that we do at Ukon on aday to day basis, whether they were there or not. That's why yousee a lot of Yukon players where they were role players that you can butthey still have a pro career five, six, plush years. That's becausethe thing I talked about before, you learn how to prepare, you learnwhat to do, what not to do, what's acceptable, what's not acceptable,and whether you're a young high school or coming in or not, it'sstill not acceptable. So just having to be consistent on a day to daybasis, that's that's all prepare me most for the WBA. So I wouldassume you know, you go from winning a national championship. Now you're rightinto the WNBA. What was the first game that you played in. Whatwas that experience like for you? I was nerve racking, I mean becauseyou come you come from college where, you know, I was an allAmerican, we won with the championship, and you've achieved a certain level ofstatus and then you get to the pros and it is gone. They don'tcare who you are. Yeah, you don't care that I won championship amonth ago, two months ago. They're they're ready to just play. Andso it was. It was nerve racking in the sense that now you haveto basically start from ground zero and build up again. Yeah, and thenyou realize it's a business too. Oh, yeah, yeah, and that sportsis a business, period. And and, and you realize that now, this game that you played for fun your whole life, you can loseyour job. Like it's your job, so you could lose it at anytime as well. Yeah, and there's so many different factors that you haveto deal with now. You know, before, like you said, Hey, I was going to school and have a lot of responsibilities. Now it'smy job. Now I'm going to have a find a house, I coulddo all these other things I've never had to do before. How was thatfor you did you have a lot of support in that area. Yeah,so, again, WNBA's a little different. The WBA provides housing for us.So you know when I when I got to the League, they wereproviding housing and a car. So you literally just have to fly to thecity and you, I mean you, and provide all of that. Butyou know now, just speaking of that, with colleges, name image and likeness. You know, college athletes are going to have to do a lotmore. You know, when I was in college, you're right, Ijust got to be a student athlete. But Man, these college athletes nowthey're going to have to have somewhere and have have agents. They're going tobe doing endorsement deals. So it's going to be they're going to be wayfurther along as far as prepared when it comes to the business aspects of thingsin the pros. Yeah, it's funny. You mentioned that. They kind ofhelp you the WNBA. In the NFL, there's no help, right. They said be here. You were...

...drafted in the sabbace drafting in seventhround. They said here's when you got to come to rookie camp. Bethere, there's your hotel room and we'll see you then and then it's like, ok, what else? Was No other information? Oh, will sendyou the playbook. Learn this by the time you get here, and it'slike, well, it's crazy and it's fast. Yeah, and so Iyou know, you go on. You played with the links and assume thatthat's who you won the championships with with correct. Correct. How did youlike Minnesota, because I played there three years? Yeah, I love you. Look, Minnesota fan bases is so supportive. You know, that's that'sthe first thing I think. I want to think of Minnesota and then,you know, obviously think of my teammates and everything, but that's more basketballwise. So the city wise. I enjoyed it because the fans just Imean whether you're going to a restaurant, anything, like, the fans knowyou, they support you and they're behind you. So at for an athlete, you know, that's the best thing. That's the best case scenario for acity. Yeah, and I feel the same way about the fans upthere. They really support their teams. I mean when I played for theVikings, I played in the old dome. Never got to play in the newdome, but I played it for two different head coaches and everywhere Iwent, every restaurant. Like you said, they know you, they appreciate youand it's fun to give back to the community. Then, yeah,exactly. And then you want to play for a community like that. Youknow, it's like the Oklahoma City thunders and the communities where they just arecompletely behind you. You want to just play your best and make them proud. So yeah, loved playing there. So you mentioned that when the WNBAseason would be over, you would go overseason play. I never experience that. What is that like? It is different because it now that again,it's the same in the WBA as as they provide housing, they provide acar, but now you're in a country where you don't speak the same language. So I'm in language. So I'm in the grocery store and I'm likeis this chicken poor? And then now with the Internet, everything is somuch easier, but when I first went over season two thousand and nine,it wasn't as easy, you know. So I'm in there like chicken poor, like I'm trying to really like figure out. Yeah, but those experiences, they they shift my mind. When I start to think about, youknow, things going on with people, I always start to think about theirsituation because it's in Europe. It's so different than American like culture that Istart to see things differently. Hey, hoddle up fans, this is producerLogan Carny. We thank you for listening to another great episode. If youwant to hear more about how sports can change somebody's life, be sure tocheck out my novel our seats and left field, on Amazon. Our seatsand left field is about Andy Smith, a sixteen year old kid who growsup a big pirates fan with his dad. Right before the pirates two thousand andthirteen magical season, he loses his dad to cancer. Read all abouthow Andy overcomes his depression while the pirates find a way to win. That'sour seats in left field on Amazon. You can buy it right now.Now let's get back in the huddle. Yeah, is is the basketball anydifferent? Definitely, it's definitely different.

And overseas too. They expect youto do way more than in the pros because in the pros, you know, I have eleven other teammates and they're all all Americans as well. Rightover he's just not necessarily the same. They need you to do more becauseyour American. Now, did you get some time off to go sight seeingwhen you're over there? Because that would that seems like that would be whatI'd want to do. It's a job, so you could like it's not likethey give you off time to do it. But like on my timeoff, I usually would fly back to America or or relax, honestly,because in Europe you practice twice a day, so that's that's pretty tiring to me. So I would usually rest, but my teammates would take that timeto go in school. Now, you know, here in the states aretrainers that help us, that help us recover and do all those things forus. We're pretty I think we're pretty advanced as a country and all thatand all the technology we have to get us back on the quarter of thefield. Now over in Europe, was it the same where they as hightech, where they were? You know, I'm thinking like Europe's old school andthey just give you a I got to say good luck. It ismore old school and a sense of their approaches. You know, they havethe can where they spray the cold air on you and different things like that, but it is old school. But yet some of their the the oldschool methods. Like I prefer them actually, because I'm like, I'm I'm aperson that I get in the cold top. I do too. Yeah, everybody wants to do cry Oh, and I understand all the benefits,but like I like to soap my bones and my body in a cold top. So that's kind of old school now. So I do think that there's sometype of benefits to the old school as well, and they are oldschool and some things. Yeah, now you're on a professional team WNBA herein the states and you go over there and you have a different coach,do they kind of leave you alone or they just kind of give you tipsor how does that work? Because I've never dealt with that like where,you know, it's the same season. I'm I'm playing for professionally here,but I'm also over and overseas. What was that like? It's tough.You have that a short term memory. So I remember in two thousand andsixteen we've lost in game five of five and the championship game with the finalsin the WBA finals, and then in two weeks I had to go flyto France and start and start that season. So I'm like heartbroken over losing thechampionship and then two weeks I started new season. That's difficult because youknow, as athletes, you know you put your Heart in passion in oneseason and then you have to reset. That's hard. And as far asthe coaches, they still definitely get onto you. They speak enough English andget there, you know when they mean business right. Yeah, they canpiece together the sentences they need and some speak great English. So it justvaries. So you've had this incredible career, you know, and I know youleft it early to pursue other passions. You have a foundation. You seemto be really helping the the kids and the people back in West Virginia. You're doing a lot and which is amazing. So as that always beena passion of yours, because it seems...

...like you're so busy with basketball,there's no offseason for you. How did you kind of manage to do allthose things? You seem incredibly busy. Yeah, so that's that's the thing. I've always kind of been interested in and helping people. My parents toldme all the time with my nature. So I feel like this was goingto happen with me at a certain point. But you know, the Strand ofevents that happen in the today. They climate pushed it forward, youknow, I think get fast forwarded in a sense. But yeah, Ialready had my foundation before I opted out of the WBA, so that thatthat was already going to be something I was doing and then when I optedout, my foundation is just going to be the vehicle and which I makethe the initiatives are I do that get the change done. So what areyou doing with your foundation currently? I mean, I've read one of them. It's I think it's called let's go pro or something like that. Andthen I'm I'm assuming you're doing other things with black lives matters and whether it'ssome stomach racism. I know you want to fight for all this stuff.So tell me a little bit about what your foundation is and what really whatyou're passionate about. Okay, so the mission statement for my foundation was tospread positivity through things I learned in sports, team work, confidence, discipline.So those same things that I just talked about that I learned at Yukon. I think that those are life things. I think that if you learned tobe a good teammate in regular life, that in the workplace you'll be abetter co worker. If confidence you know you'll present yourself better, andthen if you have discipline, everybody knows that discipline is how you get alot of more done in a little bad time. So I wanted all ofmy events to have this certain energy about it, and the energy was apositivity. So what that type of mission statement? It gave me a lotof room to work. When it comes to this social aspect. I wantto go to educational reform and I have two different initiatives that are coming out. One is going to be a voting and initiative where it's all informational.What is a Democrat? What is it a Republican? What do you needwhen you go to the polls? Like how are you going to get there? In a sense of all things informational. How does Hell Care Relate to you? If you have a codpaid, that's healthcare, you know, likeconnecting the dot so that people can understand what they're voting for, not justgo vote. So that's the voting campaign and then I have another one.That's HBC HBCU campaign where, you know, different funding for hbcus is just notthere. So those are two. Those are the two avenues that I'mgoing in. That's why I said I'm pretty sure I was going to dothis in and life anyway, and now I just got fast forward and pushedup. Listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We inviteyou to join our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to contentmade just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, huddle upwith Gustscom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again.That's huddle up with gustscom. Now let's get back in the huddle. Well, I know that hbcus are really struggling with everything going virtually online and theydidn't really plan for those types of things in hbcus have really fallen by thewayside and a lot of this and so...

...that you're working with them is wonderful. I work with a group here in Pittsburgh called the Energy Innovation Center andwe talked about and we met another company out of Philadelphia called Jonah Cooper Llc, and we just had a big, long conversation about HBCUS and how wecan help, you know, those those kids coming out there get jobs orbetter fund them or whatever we need to do, because they are kind offalling back. People want to say, well, they're doing fine. No, they're not. They've they there used to be, I think, overtwo hundred. I think it's a lot less now. I'm not sure.I don't know the exact numbers, but that's amazing that you're doing that.You're right and that's exactly it. When when you see schools like, Ibelieve, with the harbor that said they're going all electronic, no no oneon campus. When you see that, that's okay for Harvard because people aregoing to seek out going to Harvard. They don't have to recruit. Butwhen you have schools like an Hbcu, well, when you go online orwhen you do different things, maybe those students don't even go to school anymore. You know people that have been going to those hbcus. They might justopt out that year and and go to work because now they're in a situationbecause of COPD. So yeah, they're not doing okay and that's exactly whyI'm going to focus on that now with your with your voting initiative. Youknow every state is a little different now, or are you kind of studying allthe states and trying to figure out like so if somebody gets you fromCalifornia or you just kind of broadening it. So we're going to it's going tostart here in Atlanta and it's going to be information. There's going tobe brought information and then there's going to be local information. Okay, whenwe talk federal, that'll be every state. The federal like you know who isthe commander in chief? You know if you ask some people that,some people might not know that's the president. You know what I mean, though. It's just educating people so that when they are watching the news orwhen they are reading different stances, they have a baseline of knowledge to workfrom. So there will be federal, there will be local. As faras here in it in Atlanta, I'm starting to I'm going to be workingwith the Hawks and coach Lloyd Piers, because I don't know if you saw, but they open up their arena as a pulling side and the Mel inand everything in nature. So it's going to be exciting because a lot ofpeople are trying to do things and that's how a lot's going to get done. You know, one thing I always felt with professional sports was that theprofessional sports don't come together enough. You know, even though you're in Atlanta. There's some amazing other leagues there. We don't talk, you know,we don't ever communicate. One of the things I was always so up saidabout is our ALUMNIS and our unions. Don't put us in front of otheralumnis and other unions so that we can all kind of if we all havethe same goal, the more of us that are doing it, the morepowerful it's going to be. Agree and I think that that's the one thingthat I'm so thankful for. When I announced that I was up and outof the WBA season, man, I had boatloads of NFL soccer, wnbaplayers, NBA players like everyone reaching out to me, trying to show theirsupport and ask and do I need anything, and I'm like this is perfect.Like so, if, if this...

...pandemic, if this, if thispolice brutality, of all of that, it's all a lot of good comesfrom it. Then it wasn't. In main, Start Your Day sunny sideup at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and suites and enjoy breakfast or two on us, no matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles. Startevery day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast fortwo on us. Each day you stay for reservations, be sure that PromoCode S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation atMariottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousandtwo hundred and ninety and asked for a promotional code s for B. Rightright now, and just like today at a gentleman call me and they havethis. They developed this test that that some type of monitor you can wearto see if you have covid symptom. It's not a few of Covid,but if you have the symptoms, whether you're temperatures up, all those typesof things. And he asked if they could come on the podcast and I'mlike, of course, we all want sports to come back, you know, we all want to be a part of this and and and so Isaid, of course. So the more that we can do, and you'reone of them that's doing the most out there and I applaud you for allof that. And and thank you. And I'd love, like I saidbefore, I'd love to introduce you to foyer, who's in Atlanta. He'sa great kid, great person, and I think he's also doing a lotin the community and I think that the more we can all get together andwork with each other, the more will get done. Love it, definitelylove it. I look forward to meet him. Yeah, and so youknow, I know you're short on time. Usually we go a lot, alot of indepth stuff. One of the last things we do is calledthe no huddle. It's the two minute drew at the end. And allright, just, okay, couple quick questions. What's your biggest pet?Peeve, Oh, smacking all your food. All right. What's your favorite sportsmovie? I know you watch a lot of those planes. I'M gonnahave to go with love and basketball. Remember the titans? All right,cool. Now you follow other sports? Yeah, some of what? Sowho are you fan of in West Virginia? You know there's another yeah, Iknow, I'm like a free I call it. I was the unrestrictedfree agent. When it came to picking my team's Um I'm going with everythingAtlanta. So I'm go one, Falcons hawks. It's the one team now, right, I love it. I love it, all right. Sowho was your idol off the court. Well, I don't have to.That's that's my mom must look and just seeing how intelligently she moved, youknow, and she had like six different jobs and didn't even need them,but you know, she was a college professor and then she was a tutorand then she you know, she was doing different things all the time.So I would say great, what was her what was her nickname? Look, I college a book of I love it very like forty plus years.So I'm proud of them. Yeah, I'm on. My wife and Iare twenty five years, so we're on our way. All right. Ifyou're the commissioner for a day in the...

WNBA, what rule would you change? I would try to fund for private flights night. What is that like? I will try to get funding for us to flack provit. Oh Wow, so what do you why do you fly? We frockically black commercial.So you just go to the airport. Yeah, and you're just with allthe other pastors, like you don't have that is crazy. They did alot of people come up and talk to you. Some do. Yeah,actually they don't. White people probably like try to find little corners and stuffand they kind of chill out and stay low key. Yeah, I hearyou there, I went to all right. So last one. You know,the WNBA a lot of great players. WHO's the greatest player in the WNBAcurrently? Currently Fin Cross? That's Ross. He's not retired yet.So she's that player. Yeah, I just interviewed a gentleman from New Yorkand he actually brought her name up and said that she's intense. Yeah,she know, she's she's passionate. Yeah, passion hence has intens because that she'spassionate in a good way. Like yeah, why? Actually asked him, like who would you model yourself after, if you had a model in thattwo weeks? Said so smart, he's smart. Hey. So lastthing. Tell us how everybody can find you, how they can follow you, and you know what we can do to help you. Yeah, soI would say follow my journey and the way people can always help of retweet, a like, you know, a comment, because companies like to seethat people support you. So on Instagram I am it's ring a, Mit s re and EM and my nonprofit is RMF nonprofit. So you canfollow both those on instagram. They're both the same. On twitter. Yeah, follow the journey like join in on the journey. So join in onthe conversation. I think that that that cost people nothing, a simple retweet, a simple comment like but it means a lot to brands that want tosupport like initiatives. Right. No, I appreciate it. Thank you forspending a little bit of time out of your busy day with us on huddleup with guys, and we really appreciate I'll send you an email and introduceyou for you awesome. Thank you all right. Well, good luck downin Atlanta. I know it's hot down there. It's hot in pittsburghs it'sgot to be on the Atlanta. Thank you all right, thanks for NATtake care. Thank you for joining Dave and I in the huddle. Wehope you enjoyed our podcast. If you'd like to hear more podcast just likethis, go to huddle up with Gustcom, where you can find our social channels, subscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join our exclusive huddle throughPatreon. Please join us next week when we talk to more guests about howsports shape their life.

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