Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Renaldo Nehemiah

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ironically, our conversation with one of the fastest men in history is also one of our longest. Renaldo Nehemiah joins the huddle and provides great insight into his life before, during, and after his Olympic track and field career. Gus and Dave talk to Nehemiah about what got him into running and being a world record holder. Furthermore they talk about his current hobby, which only adds to his already impressive resume. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with gusts, where we talked to our guests about how sports shape their life. I'm your host, gust far at, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top with the sports circus and ring master sal look for us on Am TV, a a MP tvcom. Hello everyone, thank you for another episode. Joining us for another episode of Huddle off with Guss. I'm your host, Gusts Front, Fifteen, your NFL quarterback and and longtime avid listener to talk show host radio and Dave and I started this podcast because we wanted a different view and your different story. So I'm joined by my longtime friend calls Dave Hagar and guts, and you could find us on Radiocom or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast, and also you can hear us under the big top with sow, the ring master on the Sports Circus. Today's guess is may maybe, Dave, what do you think? One of the fastest men in the world. He running the hurdles. Well, one of the greatest, the one of the greatest athletes ever really and definitely the probably the greatest athlete we've ever had in our show. Do if I think you and I would even have troubles like just trying to figure out how to get over a hurdle, let alone running over them. I definitely could not do a hurdle right now. So today's guests, renown, Ronaldo, Riam Nissart. Ronaldo, Neemiya is trying to talk to you faster. It's a pleasure having you on and thank you for joining us on huddle up with gusts. I was great to be on. Gus and Dave, my pleasure. Thanks so much for having me. So, Renaldo, we go back to the beginning. Always, Dave, and I start back to where you grew up in New Jersey and as far back as you can remember, what was that first time where you fell in love with sports? Where fell in love with sports? It's probably out. I grew up kind of weird taste here, but I was a a nick and a jet Fan and a met Fan. So you know, I'm New Jersey Guy, but this parting York in there and this part of New Jersey teams in there. So watching Dave the Buscher and Willis read and Jerry Grody and Tommy AG of the mets. You know Joe Namoth, Joe Cool, you know so and Walt Fraser the net. So those are kind of guys that move the needle for me as a fan and someone who was loving to see what they did because of their passion, not once thinking that I would ever aspire or even proceed on that path, but at least gave me a reason why they loved what they did and why they were so good at it. So do you do you now? I saw that I think your nickname growing up was skeets. Is that right? Yes, that's correct. Yeah, because you were such a fast crawler. Well, you know what a skeet is? That a rifle range right. You know, it's a pulled and it goes fast across. So when I was probably, I don't know, six months old or so, I crawled so fast across the floor they said I was like a skeet. I skeeated about and it caught on and actually to this day they called me skeet, see the family members. But and then when I went to the niners in one thousand nine hundred and eighty two, I felt that I had outgrown the baby name and I wanted people to know me as Rinaldo because now I was old enough to be called Rinaldo. Yeah, I love I mean our family is is nickname central. Everyone has a nickname. I mean my kids call me Biscuer Geb you name it them a kind of nicknames, but I think it's just a fun thing. You know, everybody kind of has a nickname. I'm sure maybe you know your family's like renal. That's kind of long. Let's just come skeets. It's yeah, I was skeet. See, I was buddy boy, you know, I had those two names. So and my my college friends call me bird. I don't know why the niners say it called me noodles, at least to my year. Some sports. Yes, so we're not Aldo. It sounds like you were quick out of the gate right from the beginning. What was the first sport that you played? Like well, you did you play little league or anything like that? Yes, I played Pop Warner football when I had to be ten. I couldn't wait till I was ten to put on those pads and that play Little League Baseball and of course, the recreational basketball, swam, we bowled. We're very active, and so a lot of ...

...that, you know, came naturally to me. I always thought I was fast and never knew how fast I was actually, actually was a quitter in my first time. I was the fastest kid on my block until we went across town and having some races and I realize there are a lot of fast kids in town and I wasn't just me. So it was through that experience probably that pushed me toward hurdling more so than anything else. And you know, it was just a perfect marriage for me. I could I had speed but yet I had great agility. I did gymnastics in middle school and junior high. So the hurling was just something that came rather natural to me. Were there are other athletes in your family? Yeah, my brother was probably a better athlete than I was. He's a year and a half younger, but he was a little bit more of a daredevil than I and he leased to ride mini bikes and had a mini bike crash and smashed his ankle, but he was a starting defensive back. He's a third degree black belt. He was, you know, as fast, probably if not faster, than I was, and so so he went on this. You know, he could only do karate at that point and I went on to do the other things. So, you know, I think one of the things today we always Dave and I love to talk about this is about how when we grew up it was so different. Kids were outside, we were in the neighborhoods, we were doing all that stuff. You talked about an experience you just had, about learning how fast you actually were. When you go to another neighborhood. No, it wasn't on it, it wasn't on a track. Now going to another neighborhood and I think kids today really missing and I don't know how you feel about that, but I you know, I used to work soft and sometimes I say it lovingly and other times it is not as lovingly. You know, I'm remarried and I have a step son a step daughter senior and at USC the daughter and the son is getting ready to go to college. And they spent two months time inside, even during this quarantine, there inside, you know, in front of a box, playing games or whatever, and my my dad used to have to come look for me when he got home from work because I was out on some street or at the park. I was never in the house. You know, you know, didn't want to be cooped up and it was just great for exercise and then a chance to grow. I wasn't stimy just in one form of activity. You know, there were a variety of activities that, being out, I was exposed to other neighbors, kids, friends of mine who had other interests. That that's how I got into swimming and that's how I got into gymnastics, you know, because we we all, you know, so community. We like. Okay, I'll try that. Yeah, that's cool. You know, we can hang out together and today, you know, their fingers are doing all the work. You know, that's pretty much it. How does multiple sports that all those activities that you did, think really helped you grow into the champion you aren't. You were. Well, that was cross training before it became cross training, right. You know, we were just you just did a lot of things as a kid. You're involved in a lot of you know, whether you play football, basketball, baseball. You did all three and if you had time to run track, you did all three and you didn't realize that you were developing your body and so many different ways, and so I just that was what you did. You weren't limited by someone else's opinion of you. My father, if we wanted to try it, even if he didn't know it, he would try to learn it or get us in front of people who could teach us if he couldn't teach us. And and then you just weren't well round it. I think, as you know, sports is is you know, teaches you teamwork, teaches you leadership. You know, it teaches you to how to deal with adversity. It all those types of things that you don't get normally. I mean you go to work and there's a hierarchy and work, but you don't, you don't face that type of adversity day in and day out that sports does. And then the discipline. I'm a huge disciplinarian because I think without discipline and structure you can't walk out your front door and have a fighting chance. I mean, you know, you might make it, but it's a hard, tough road, and so my family knows that discipline being the fundamentals, the foundation. It has to be solid no matter what it is that you're doing. And I would sell them, I said, if I didn't have and that's what team sports does. You know, there's a pecking order. That's there's a consequence for, you know, not following instruction or doing things the right way, and it's a metaphor for life. There's instruction when you don't do things with a sound foundation. And so I'm old schooled in that way. I'm a tough lover, you know, meaning that I don't men's words. I'm not mean or anything, but I'm direct to the point, because I think, you know, we can only shelter our kids so long before you go out there and you find out that that world isn't the private school that they grew up in. You know, it's reality. And so how do you arm yourself with adversity, because most of these kids a parents are a fault. Trying to make it soft for them, you know,...

...we're trying to make everything perfect for them and then the slightest bit of controversy they're having some huge, you know, relapse, if you will, about what just happened. And so I try to give my kids a dose of reality as well as toughness and pushing them and challenging them. And at sixty one years of age, I'm still as competitive. I'm fit. You you know, I train five days a week just because I love fitness. I write my Peloton and I'll challenge them. Not that I can do anything with a nineteen year old, but at least keep him honest. Yeah, Runaldo. When is the first time you set foot on a track? The first time I it was a they was something like the junior Olympics my high school one day and it was the first time I ever had to run a mile. You know, all the kids age groups run a mile, run and it was the worst experience of my life. I realized that that's not what I wanted to do. But I made it, you know, and I got my ribbon. And then when I was in ninth grade, actually a ninth grade, the our junior high went up to ninth grade, Tenh grade. It was the high school and I went out for track for the first time and they had hurdles and no one wanted to hurdle. Everyone was afraid to hurdle. And and our property, in our home we had a split real fence and I used to run jump to fence all the time and I'm like cool that I do that. I do that at home. I could do that. So I was the only guy that raised his hand and it would attempt to do the hurdles and it made me feel special, even though I was somewhat apprehensive. And, as they say, the rest of his history. I made it over the first hurdle and fell in love with it. was different than just running. You know, running to me it's fun, but everybody can do it. Obviously some people can run faster than others, but not everybody could hurdle. No, and it just put me in a special, you know, elite group, if you will, at that point and I was the only one and man, I was like a sponge. I couldn't get enough of hurtling and wanting to be the you know, as my my coach, she's tell me be one with the hurdle and learned the art from form. And we didn't have video back then, so you have to watch still pictures and books and look at you know, and try to okay, that's what it looks like. And but through trial and error, you know, I was I was relentless. I just wanted to be the best that I could be. Not known with that men at that time. Well, a hurdles a little bit more forgiving than a split real sense. After that I was good. Yeah, it's yeah, you get one of give. They leave, though, even though they're forgiving, they leave right they so, Renalda, did you ever run on a cinder ash track? That's all I ran on, you know, ninth grade, ten grade. Yeah, I had a I had a bad fall on US sender track with a big strawberry hip. So so today's kids when they see these synthetic tracks and my guys it wasn't always that way. You talk about being soft. So yeah, you fall on it your strawberry. You know, I wasn't a track guy, but our baseball field was our outfield. Went into the track at our high school complex and I dote for a ball on the track and I remember I just had cinder ash my arms and my hand. You have, diving and trying to catch it. And you know, I know a lot of guys that had have phone on that. And to think back, that's the tracks we had. That's kind of insane, almost right. It's crazy. I even tell people we had we had indoor track, but we ran outdoors. It's just the winter season. I Remember Westfield, New Jersey. We'd run a racist there. They'd have a two, two, two hundred and twenty bank track outside in the middle of the track. So the football field and we have meets there and it's like thirty, twenty some degrees and you'd warm up in the gym and go outside with your gloves on, your skull hat and have to run a race. And but that's what we knew and everybody did that. Today, you know, you'd have a revolt. They wouldn't even think about going outside and and run. But they don't have to a lot of places they have indoor facilities now in high schools. So you you told us some story about it. Why you got into hurdles. You it sounds like he had pretty immediate success as a Hurd Blur, because I know you were very accomplished in your high school careers or Hurdler. How did it tell us about that progression and when you knew? Well, I'm actually really good at this, and how that progressed? I just happen to have the greatest advantage known to man at that time, which was rod milburn's coach. Rob Milburn used to be the former world record holder, and I want a gold medalist. This coach, Dick Hill, lived in New Jersey, maybe about thirty minutes for me. Wilbur Ross, who wrote the hurdlers Bible. They'ved in Willingboro, New Jersey, who talked thought Dick Hill, Russ Rogers, who was an Olympic four hundred meter hurdler who was also the coach at Essex County College, at which later he went...

...on to Fairley. Dickerson lived in New Jersey and one of my high school coach, Jean Poquet, who was a swimmer by trade, said he has his kid who has some talent. He called these guys and they will show up at my practice, all of them, every day. And so they molded me into what I became and it was incredible because I had the greatest minds known to man in one place. And so my greatest asset was my technique and you know my fluidity, but that was because it was crafted by all of these guys. And then my coach, Sean Poquette, was he knew how to get me in shape and train me and puritization, which wasn't really known back then, and I became this phenom of a fitness guy who's in tremendous shape, of a run a four hundred or two hundred and eight hundred. I could do all that and then I had, you know, almost perfectionism came to my technique. Put on all that together, it was just a matter of staying healthy. And you know, I used to run the the collegiate high hurdles against high school guys. I was that good and I didn't like that because I was worried I'd got to get beat. I'm running over forty two S and they're running over thirty nine and I was destroying them. And but it was all because of these great minds that were with me all the time, and they all check their eagles out the door. They all brought certain elements to the table, and so I will tell everybody. Yeah, I had to have the talent, but I needed the instruction to be able to understand. And the other thing that's that a lot of people know how. They knew why, so they could say words to me that allowed me to visualize imagery in my head what they were saying, because coaches can tell you something, but a lot of coaches can't show you how to do it based on their age or they were never that athlete. And I guess my greatest gift was I could internalize visually with those words were saying and just see it in my head and replicated to perfection, which I guess was uncanny at the time. I just because of my love of it. It was just who I felt I was born to be a hurdler, you know, so graceful and artistic and I just loved everything about it. Yeah, so, so, so you're in high school, you're getting this great coaching, you know, and you're going through all those things. When did you start getting that recruiting? When did those college coaches come start looking at you or calling you? Well, okay, so I went from ninth grade. They heard about me ninth grade. I go to ten grade, I run winter track and I pull a hamstring in the first race ever in a shuttle Hurd a relay ripped, I mean right up at where the attachment is. So the next time I ran, guys, from January of my sophomore year I didn't run again till spring of my junior year. It took me that long to see specialist who could who could diagnose the problem. In the treatment it was actually the New York jets medical doctor, my fallows, taking me everywhere, and then within two months I broke the state record. So I ran fifteen three in ninth grade and then I ran thirteen six and eleventh grade and then I ran one, thirteen, two hundred and twelve nine as a senior. So my progression is ridiculous because it's not natural progression. But in between there was an injury and then all the time that I was on the sideline, I was a I was a fo poor old student when it came to the hurdles. I mean I wanted to be ready when when God gave me the chance to get back out there and and when it happened, you know I was ready. But yeah, I tell kids all the time. It'll tell me. Don't always tell them. Don't look at my age progressions because they don't make sense. You know, I went from fifteen three to thirteen six to twelve nine. That does happen like that, you know. But and so I was getting recruited to answer your question, Gus, when I broke the state record of thirteen six as my my junior year. That's when people started talking about me and my only goal and ambition at that point was if I can get good enough to go to school on a scholarship, because I knew I wanted to go to college, then now would make my parents happy, you know, proud. I didn't know what a scholarship it meant like, you know, full scholarship, half scholarship, course scholarship. I just thought, you know, I'm going to get a scholarship to some extent. And, yeah, and, but I didn't take myself seriously like I was the best in the world or country. I just thought I want to be good enough that people would want to, you know, give me an education. When you're running a thirteen six in high school, is that already better than the best of the NCAA's? Well, I remember in high school they're they're thirty nine inches and rights of the ladies of forty two.

So it's not on par. Okay at all. Now when I take yeah, well, my senior year when I was running the forty two s, which are the college heights, around thirteen five. So yeah, it was on par because they are running thirteen thirteen four at best at that point. Wow, yeah, so I'll Huh, we're did. Yeah, Valet, stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Weston bonadventure hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code P A s in the code box when making your online reservation, or call one two hundred and three six, two four one thousand and asked for Promo Code PSF. HOW DID YOU PICK MARYLAND? I'm sure there were a bunch of schools, especially from the south, recruiting you. So how did you? How did you pick Maryland over everybody else? I I went around the country. I want everywhere, USC USIL A, Alibama, Tennessee. My school was Tennessee. I wanted to go to Tennessee. They had a they had their own track stadium. Was a first recruiting trip. That had their own track stadium. They ironically did not offer me a scholarship because they thought I was a high school flash. I would kind of like burn out. I couldn't keep it up and to this day at all, the coach is no longer live, but he he disputed it. He says I probably wouldn't have gone there anyway. I said, he didn't even offer me to contract the scholarship. But and then I was on a recruiting trip at USC and I remember being out at southern California and I just felt they were arrogant. You know, they had their their ring of stars, or whatever you call it. Yeah, on their campus and they were pointing to all these greats and now telling me that if you want to be great, you're gonna have to come out here. And I was looking at the ring of stars and at that time many of these stars are east coast guys. Right, dude, these are east coast guys. And I said, well, guess what, if I'm that good, I'll come out here and kick your butt, but I'm not coming here. And then they had a sender track still. So, yeah, it was inferior at that time. So it was a great southern cow because it was a football factory at the time. Right. So track was on the come up, but they had a sender track and I had bad experience with sender track. So yeah, so then Marilyn happened to be one of the best teams on the East Coast. You know, there I see for you champions twenty two years in a row. Prior to our I got there, my mother had passed away when I was fourteen. So it's this my dad and my brother, my sister and I. So my logical question was, how would I be able to get home with any regularity? In southern cow was way too far anyway, right. So Marilyn was far enough. It was a prominent program and it was a three and a half hour drive and that's and I had and and, quite frankly, I had my best time as a recruit on a recruiting trip at Maryland S. see, my chaperone was Miss Hawaii. That was very intimidate. I'm this young guy, I'm shy guy, and yes, she was beautiful, but it didn't resonate with me like they wanted it to. You know, right, it was too much for me. It was like Whoa. And but Marilyn, I you know, I had a great time with what the track guys, with some of the students on the campus, and it just felt right and that's why I chose. Now, were you only a track athlete in high school? Do you play the sports? No, I was a starting quarterback. Yeah, I was starting quarterback and then I got hurt my fifth game in my senior year. Actually cracked or I my track coach was happy about that and and I was recruited for football. I chose track because I was only five hundred and ten out of high school. A hundred and fifty five pounds. Hundred fifty pounds, and I just said I'm a little small. And then a Marilyn Maryland was a running school funding team. They didn't throw the ball that much, you know, ten times, maybe a game. And so you though I had played football. I just I felt that track was in my best interest. Yeah, what was your best forty time? Four hundred and nineteen. Wait, yeah, a few, one nine. Yeah, four hundred and nineteen and I've run for four over hurdles for forty yards. I can be a lot without. Yeah. Yeah, so what would your I'm trying to think what your splits would be. A ten, twenty and then forty. I mean it's pretty so like Darrell. I've watched Darryl Green because I played with Darrell. Darrell's fast at the red skins and I can remember my rookie year we all had a run s. When you come in an offseason or whatever, that is...

...and and he was the same about you know, at ten yards everybody was kind of there. Then there's a big split between everybody and like the fast guys that ten to twenty and then from two thousand to forty, just no one was even close. Like it was just amazing to see how he could just is I mean that explosiveness at that point. I mean, is that? Do you think that's like it's all in the start, obviously, but I mean that's just for one. Nine is incredible. Well, when you know how to run, see everyone, as Clint says, everyone man has to know his limitation. So you're a professional football player, you have that skill set. Basketball a lot of people don't know how to run. They can run, but they don't run efficiently. Right. We're trained to run efficiently. It's body positioning, it's levers. So, for instance, when I was with the Niners, they always wanted to challenge me to run S and I would say I don't want to run forty. I said let's run sixty or longer, and they go why? I said because I'm not really that great at ten, fifteen meters, but the longer it goes my power and my speed comes in. So like dwhite and Jerry Rice and those guys would be with me for like fifteen meters and then after that it was like Gaunsville. You know, it just widens wide and wide, and they just couldn't understand where that speed and power was coming from when they were right next to me at fifteen and I just said because I'm, you know, build runners. We get going. You know right and and I know how to run. You see a lot of guys who won S. they're moving a hands real fast and all that, but the legs aren't doing anything and we were on the opposite the hands Catapulta legs and we have them in Unisin. So every step is a powerful step going in the right direction. A lot of guys are running up and down side. He's twisting and that's that's not helping them move forward. We always in a forward position and we run effortlessly. Wanted. The challenges I had would Joe Montana, and he'll tell you to this day, is that it was hard to throw to me because it looked like I wasn't running great throw the ball I'd be already passed on the break, you know, coming out of a break and the balls behind me and he's say, you don't look like you're running where everybody else is moving their arms. Your heart. He kind of anticipate how they're running. And but that's because we're trained to run effortlessly, because the more relation to body is, the more it responds. It's not the other way around. You don't have it wound tight, you have it round wound loops. That's why, if you do a lot of sprint and you're tired, say the third and fourth one. Usually your fifth one is your best one because you're so tired you relax and right, I didn't put out that much effort and I still ran a good time. It's like yeah, because your body responds to relaxation, not intensity, and that's a mindset, you know. Yeah, so that's why I say it's training, but they're all green. was a special specimen. He could he could run with anybody. Yeah, he was fast. You know, the other guy think about when you talk about like relaxed is was always always Randy Moss when I played with Randy, because he could be sixty yards down field and never like struggling, stressing, where you see a DB trying to keep up with them is falling over his feet and it's so looks so uncoordinated and he's just kind of running and really not very effortless, like you talked about. And then just to football, just lands are he's not yet and that's amazing. And had something left in the tank if he needed a burst. He could birth to get the ball right and he gets separate. Yeah, so he had he had fluidity in his running. That's that's that's a gift. You know, not everybody has that. Yeah, he was just a he was a phenom. You know, you don't see guys his height, six for with that kind of footspeed and fluidity. Right, Um, Rinaldo when you got to Maryland and did you have immediate success or how? What was your college career like? And also, for those of us that don't know, how does it work with a college track and field athlete? Are you able to do international stuff still or do you have to? How does that work? Okay, so when I went to Maryland, my first two races I lost and I wasn't used to losing, and this is a true story. I told I told them, my teammates, that if I didn't win my next race, I was quitting because then it wasn't fun. You know. I think it was just more of the pressure that, you know, here's his highly touted kid and we want to see what he does. And the third race of my indoor season that year was a Cyo met and it was hosted by Maryland. So now all the pressure in the world is army. It is my third race. I lost my first two and as as guy would have it, not only did I win but I broke the world record. And that race my third race in my collegiate career. So that catapulted it. This the story that went behind that. I was, you know, I'd never lacked confidence, but I was very hard on myself and I took my my training sessions very took...

...them seriously. So I wasn't I wasn't a didn't play a lot at practice. You know, I didn't want I was too pride for losing. What's not acceptable in my in my my book, because I just felt I was better than everyone and and I needed to push myself. I didn't want to just win racist going through the motions. I was out to do. You know, I don't know. It's just a bad mindset, I guess. Is that why? Why do anything if you're not going to try to get better at it. You know, not there just to waste my time. You know, I don't need to do it. I blame that on coaches, because coaches, you know, push you to elevate yourself and be the best that you can be, and I took that literally. We had a good team and so my teammates were very supportive. We competed in practice. For some reason these guys wanted to beat me and everything, you know, an interval training and all that. So we probably had some some phenomenal, close to world record performances in practice just because guys were testing me all the time. You know, seems like just just freshman can't do this. And and I didn't back down. You know, anything you could do is beat me, and that's fine. I wasn't afraid of a challenge and I think was that what's the worst can happen? I don't win, but it wouldn't keep me from trying to do my best. And if you beat me, I was going to run you to the wall, and so it made me and everybody around me better and we were man we were we used to have like a quarter of the stadium full watching our training. People will just come out to watch what the heck was going on, because there was some amazing times. Yeah, to drivver. Did the football coaches ever come over and say hey, you want to come over and play receiver? We know you played football in high school. I know a couple of guys my team that ran went out for the team. I'm I just watched because I went to the Games and I saw that you throw five to eight times in a game. All they did was block and I I'm not going to go out there get beat up and blocking these big guys and and I'm not. I'm a receiver if I'm going to go out there. So Marylyn didn't throw the ball enough for me. You know, they just start throwing a ball till boomer got there and and I was gone by then. So but you know football. I grew up playing football and I love the game. Never in my Wallace Dreaming Start I would ever be, you know, in a position to play the game. It just fate. And you know the White Clark approaching me and Chris Collins worth at the superstars and, you know, telling me how great I was and they need a guy like that out there and me not taking them seriously until bill or bill wash called me personally. So you must have crossed paths with the University of Tennessee the While you were in college. Oh yeah, you that satisfying. I'm assuming you would beat them. Yeah, I mean. Well, the Galt still is one of my dear friends to this day, and so willie and I were like bookends, and so I would. I would go to University of Tennessee with him and train and the football guys, you know, they hear that I was coming on campus and they show up and watch US train and Willie would kick my behind all the time and practice I just couldn't get I was not a practice guy. Worked on my craft at practice, you know, where I honed my my fluidity and my technique and worked on things. And this case Willy, I guess it was a chance for him to show everybody on this you know, Reggie White, those guys, that he was at good and he was kicking my tail. And then we go to the meet and he would I just blow his doors off and he just say, wait a minute, man, I was I was beating you in practice. I go well, some people practice in some people race. I practice to practice and you were getting up and that's how it was all the time with whoever I train with. They would kick my butt because they would get so motivated to kind of measure themselves against me and I was just working on things in practice. Feel. It was a feel thing for me, and then I would take all those butt weapons that they gave me in practice and build it up to this like animosity, like this indn't happening again, and I would just blow their doors off when actual race took place and they were like who are you? I know. Well, some people were practice, practice players and I'm a race player. So when you had a run and superstars and you had to run into sand, they're agreed to show me his video. I think he was racing Willie Gold I think in the sand and he slipped a little bit and then he still beat them. Yeah, that had to be crazy than yeah, the superstars was. It was a great experience for me because, you know, you measured against America's the greatest athletes, America's greatest, you know, so football players and baseball players, all these sports, and so then as this little track guy, and you know what can this track Guy Do? Well, they didn't realize that. You know, when you only trained two hours a day track, it gives you a lot of other hours to get better. And other two things, and I remember, I tell this story a all the time, that when I entered the swim contest, fifty...

...yards, twenty five each way, and I jumped, I dove in the pool when a gun went off and at the end of the twenty five meters I did a flip turn and came back and when I came up and touched everybody looked like they had seen a ghost, like, who are you, how do you like? I don't know if it was a stereotype that black guys can't swim, let alone Google's do a flip turn and I did the cripture turn and, as I guys, I grew up. I went to the why I swam? You know, I'm not maybe your typical guy, but I did that. And then, you know, or when I was, I hadn't swung golf club and I took a couple instructions, maybe twenty minutes before was closest to the pin. My first two one in the water, my third one on my four feet from the pen, and the guys are just pissed or very pressed. Two hundred and eighty pounds and I'm a hundred and sixty pounds. And you know Mark Gaston, know, who did three hundred and five. Everybody saying you have a pound for pound. That's little skinny guy is stronger than you. And you know, I just yeah, I just did what I did. You know? Or I you know, I set the superstars bowling record at two hundred and twenty six and they're going, you know, or I won tennis. You know. Well, I was beat tennis player. I played. My college roommate was a tennis player on the Maryland. I played. So they just like how you doing all these things? I said I got a lot of time. After two hours of practice, I'm out there doing these other things, having fun, but it was cross training for me, you know right. And then the other thing that my biggest advantace that no one ever figured out was when a superstars competition was going on, it was right in the middle of our harbor training season. So I was getting ready to be in shape to start my season, because it was always December, in January and I would start around February. Football had just ended. So these guys are beat up and tired. Basketball they're not going to do. But so much because their season and getting started April first is baseball, right. So I was the only one prime ready to be competing, and so I was kicking these guys butts and that didn't go over well sometimes because, you know, my teasmio guys want to when they don't want this little skinny dude beating them. But I was are all around athlete, you know, and they were all great, Reggie, Reggie Jackson, a gass know, bobby, Barry, bonds, all these guys, Mike Schmidt, you know, they were wonderful guys to me. I got to meet people that I read about and watched on TV and and Chris Collinsworth and Dwight, like I said, they are. They were Mardeling at my talent and just thought that I could, you know, I could play football. And I always tell the story that the next day Bill Walsh called my hotel room at the Superstars said he was Bill Walsh. I thought Chris and Dwight were playing a joke on me and up on him and our so later he calls back and he says no, Ronaldo, this is coach Walsh and I've never heard coach Walsh's voice, so I didn't know. So I said, if you are coach Walsh, call my agent and I hung up on him again. And in about two plus hours later my agent calls me. Hes To is Ronaldo. DID YOU HANG UP ON BILL WALSH? I said that was Bill Walsh. He goes yes, I go wow, so, yeah, that was my class. I hung up on him twice. Wow, I'm trying to remember back. I love the superstars as a viewer. who were the WHO were the host? Was it the money night football crew or I can't remember who like in then Swan? Let's see, it's Frank Gifford, a host. Frank Youffor was the main host. Yeah, what's the other guy who sell? Never did it. No, that might have been below his is. Yeah, that yeah, probably. Yeah, a Madra shot was doing it. I think Nancy Lieberman was a part of the team, but Frank Giff was the main host, because it was it's you. Yeah, it was ABC. Yeah, that was a great show. I love that show. It was fun. Could you imagine trying to get athlete to do that today? There's no way that anybody would do it. It make too much money. They're not going to risk getting hurt, especially when you see the pro bowl would happen, a couple guys getting hurt on the sand game. So they're not going to try any of that kind of stuff get hurt. You know, too much money involved. Well, the problem with the pro bowl one was it was all football players and and you know, you put a bunch of football players in a room together, it's going to get kind of nuts. But if you think that's what I liked about superstars, like you said, it was just all athletes from all different sports and so it's competitive, but it doesn't I don't think it has the same crazy that you that you would get when all the football players are together, because our coaches would try to have us play these really safe football games and and you know where it's a workout, but you're also it's it's not really seven on seven things like that. It always gets intense. Yeah, you should. Always makes you intense. Yeah, and and when you do the superstars, most guys are fans of the other guys,...

...you know. So it's your first time, if you haven't met them before, first time being in their presence. And then it's seven out of ten events and not all of us do most of those events. So there's a level of few melody that you're just there having a good time and measuring up. Not Do you get competitive, yeah, but you can only get so competitive if you haven't done certain things. But at football the common denominators like m cheese mole versus m cheese Mo and at some point the level goes up in the intensity goes up here. You know, if if you're not a good tennis player, you're not a good tennis player. You know so you're doing your best just to get the ball back right. You know I mean. So, that's so. That's what's the level of humility across all sports. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and suits and enjoy breakfast or two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US each day you stay. For reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and asked for a promotional code S for B N Alltho. Tell us about what point were you at Maryland? I guess you would have been like maybe a junior so when the Olympic trials or coming up and tell us about that experience of the boycott and everything. Yeah, it's a Ken to what just happened now. I was a junior so and I was a favorite to win the Olympic trials. I think, I guess, in February. So President Carter announced at them that we might boycott if the Russians don't leave Afghanistan. So we were concerned, but we still had to prepare it because the Olympic trials were still going on, you know, and so if you don't go to Olympic trials you can't make the team. So you know, I'm going to Olympic trials anyway. And then on the heels of that, the miracle on ice takes place. You know, we beat the Russians. So now I'm thinking, okay, the one in Olympians got to go. They beat the big bad Russians, so maybe we'll get to go. And of course that didn't happen, but I never knew if I get another chance to represent my country. So the not going to the Olympic trials was never not going to happen for me. I was going and and I was a favorite and I did win the Olympic trials, and so I was happy about that. But it took me a problem, about twenty years. You want to talk about it, because there were, you know, so utopia of every amateur's career, you know, and I met guys and gals with this was their last and only Olympic trials to make. So they would never even have a chance to make a team again. You know, theyre because back then if you were twenty seven, I was considered old in sports back then, especially being an amateur athlete, and so that was the impetus for me really when when football came knocking on the door, it gave me a chance to prolong my athletic career because there was there was talk of a second boycott, which there was. There's the East Block, Eastern Bloc countries Boardcott at the nineteen eighty four Olympic Games. So those games now we're going to be watered down. And so I always tell everybody. I was a college graduate nineteen eighty one and I needed a job, and so the forty niners not only gave me a job, but they prolonged sustain my my professional career. It gave me a professional career. And then while playing with the niners, because once I signed the contract, they banned me because, no, I was no longer an amateur at the time, they said, and so I fought for reinstatement. But in nineteen eighty three, within a year of me playing with the Niners, my sport turn professional in nineteen eighty three. So I had guys Carl Loos and the likes making more money than I would and I was getting my butt kick. Your first practice with the niners, how did I go? Like? What do you remember most about trying to I mean, you haven't played football on what four years? Right, right, it was. It was. It was interesting because again, there's a certain element of guys on a team, rhyn lot in particular, who was a fan of mine, but when he put that helmet on he was a freaking football player. Yeah, so it didn't matter what I used to do. Now I'm between the lines now. It was very it was challenging. I won't say it was intimidating because I had an arrogance that was as in the world and I got ten guys to help me do whatever I have to do. So I'm not afraid because I have help. When you're around the world and you don't speak the language and there's seven guys trying to kick you out, that could be intimidating with fifty, sixtyzero people in the stands. So that was comforting for me. But...

...and also Bill Walsh, more than anyone, was a great fan of mine. So I didn't see behind the scenes because I have a helmet on. The bill would tell those guys running the baby DB's Dwight Hicks to back off, like when I when I'm running routes and all that they couldn't hit me. I didn't know that. I found that out later because he didn't want what I found out through my career with bills that bill took it personally that he had to protect the world's greatest hurdler. You know, he wanted me to benefit his team, but he did not want me to get maimed on his watch, right, because that was something that he would be held responsible for because I was the best hurdler that ever lived at the time and everybody was watching everything that was going on with me and him. So that was good and bad. I I had the utmost respect for that. But I was very frustrated because bill would limit my times of playing because there's kind of like, okay, you're having a good game. Now I want to sit you down for a while, like I don't want you to get over the exposed because you know gust, the longer you play, the more opportunities you have to get hurt. Oh yeah, and so he would sit me and I'd be frustrated. And then bill decided that I would play more when we played on turf, that I would on grass, and he said to me, well, because you're faster on turf, and I said, Bill, if I'm faster than everybody, it doesn't matter what the surface is. But I think he just felt with the given the give of the grass and all that I could get heard, I could blow out at knee and all that, and so he would. So I knew in a team knew when we play a teams on turf, I was probably going to play seventy percent of the game right, you know, half and that's good and bad. But because not all the Games are on turf. And then we weren't playing on turf. You know, I play on me twenty percent of the game. Yeah, it's too bad. You have a video from you running on a cinder ass track. You say look, Bill, so faster, everybody, I'm running on the cinders. Let's send the track. Yeah, that's funny. So you go through your time and you get back into you're able to train. Now, obviously in there's an offseason in football. But did you train all your did you go out to the track still and do your track workouts through the football season, or did you wait? Did you take that time off? No, so from the moment I signed with the Niners, I knew that I was going to be banned, and so I was fighting for my reinstatement, not because I wanted to run track, but because I felt I had to legal right to run, because playing football wasn't going to make me a better hurdler. It was it was detrimental to my health. And so I did the formality of that. And then when they re instant, when they open the sport up to professional and eighty three and it was a lot of money and I was a big name in the sport. I knew I could make more money running than I could playing. Not Money. That Gustin, Dave that one of my frustrations was with the niners, is that because of my my my inconsistency of playing time, I felt I was sitting on a talent that I would never get to use again. You know, I only had a shelf life and I didn't give up running when I could run every day, to sit on the sidelines not using my talent. And that's how I was thinking when I was on the sidelines. Oh Yeah, head of I gave up one thing and I'm not getting this time back and as time goes on, I'm not getting a chance to use my talent. And as much as I love this game, I want to be a full time player. This is what I signed up for. Injuries apart of the game, so build if you're that word about me getting hurt long term, this is not going to be the vehicle for me. And so it gave me more incentive to fight more and more for my reinstatement. And then in eighty six or at end of eighty five, when my first four years were up in the nine just wanted to resign. ME. I said, if I'm not going to be able to play more, I'm not going to sit on my talent anymore. So let me go back to running, because now I can run every day and utilize this talent and make more money, right, and that's what I decided to do. So what did you oh, go ahead, guess, as you say. What did you do after the ers and what was your career path after that? I was reinstated in eighty six, so I went right from the niners back in the track and feel as a full time professional athlete now, because it was no longer an amateur. So it's far sponsorships and stuff. You were not able to have sponsorship contracts as an amateur, right, correct, but now you can. Correct. Yeah, so that sponsors. Yeah, you were running billboard and that's where your the bulk of your money's were coming from. Plus you're getting paid to run in addition to that. So who's your first big sponsor? Puma. Yeah, they paid me a hundred twenty fivezero dollars and eighty six M. I'm not yeah, eighty six. No, I'm sorry. They paid me a hundred twenty five Tho dollars in one thouusand nineteen eighty before we...

...had trust funds and and so when a trust. So Puma wanted to sign me and there was a loop hold in Ancaba saying if, what was it? If you could still run track, you just couldn't run for your team. And so I had already won three NCAA championships, but they could pay me to money. It's going to trust fund, a trust trustee would govern it, meaning for my expenses and household expenses, and only thing I would be giving up is giving up my place on the Maryland team. So I'm like, okay, I've already won three NCAA championships, I can still run track, I just can't run with these guys, and now I can get paid a hundred twenty five thousand dollars. And it didn't go over well with the coach, but I did it because right, you know. So I started making that at yeah, as a junior and in college. So how do you feel now that athletes can get paid INCAA? It's a mixed bag. Guss, I don't know how you you know because of the obviously title nine. Yeah, that's a talent. How do you quantify an athlete's value, meaning that is it just on Jersey sales and imaging that so the quarterback or whoever the star receiver is makes more than the others? I mean, how's the parody? I do think I would be more in favor, prey, just throwing out a number that, you know, if you gave every athlete a thousand dollars a month or whatever, just as a sake of a number, that's at least that's better than what they're getting right now, because you can't even have a job where average student can have a job. You know that. You know the requirements nowadays in the sports and football it's pretty much full time. I'm I just think you open up Pandora's box. I'm all on. Or you put it in a an annuity for everybody. You know, you come up with some amount and it's an annuity that grows tax deferred for a certain time, and that might be worth, you know, a hundred or two hundred thousand dollars by the time the thirty years old, for for instance. I think that's more in line because you can just contribute to a pool just like you know, our collective bargaining agreement right, you know, are they based on a number of years? You know, it's parody. You know it's dollars per credited season. Is Not because you are a star you get more. It is what it is. So I think if they came up with that kind of formula, I think it would be a nice nesteak for everyone at a foreseeable time, say age thirty, that would be, and it could grow to, you know, a hundred two hundred thousand dollars. That's a lot better because it's sitting at the end, as opposed to ongoing payments, which I think it gets dicey because you know there's already cheating. It's going to be real a lot of cheating when you come to well, I mean, yeah, I talk. It's what are the rules are? You know you're going to see like the five starters on the football team or the top guys driving new cars and do commercials for local car shop. Saying right, that's what I'm saying. So if you can take that out and force everyone to put pool the money so you have a billion dollars and whatever it is to go across whatever the schools are, that's but you're right, you don't take the star players and they're going to get all the benefits and then it's a problem. It's a big problem. So what do you what are you doing currently? So I have a sports marketing company I've had since two thousand and eleven. I used to work with Octagon here in lions for thirteen years, eleven years, and I went out on my own in two thousand and eleven and it's just Olympic track and feel athletes and I do all their marketing and a lot of their events and I do consulting for a track resurface in company. So sometimes I meet with different universities that I have relationship with that want new tracks, new football fields, etc. But for the most part I'm still mentoring as young as eighteen year olds to my oldest Justin Gatlin, who's thirty eight this past February, who's still one of the top three in the world, and and that's been good. It's I've been wanting to wind down and the last two years and just spend more time at home with my family and pick when I want to travel places. But I landed to superstar clients this year without even recruiting them. They were sent to me Shicari Richardson from Lsu. She was a freshman to Tranen. Seventy five hundred years and and twenty two flat in the two hundred meters, and you know. And then a kid named Kenny Ben Erik who's running forty for six and a four hundred and or twenty flat and a two hundred. So I guess it's I'm still going to be in this for at least one or two more cycles. But how? How are they dealing with the Olympics being off now, because that just, Oh God, canceled? So them, sure they're. What you have to tell them is is probably pretty valuable. I have to be very careful in my wording, guess, because...

...they hang on every word I say like they'll ask me a blanket question. So when do you think we're going to go back to running? I don't even want to say when I things because they'll hold me to it and if it doesn't happen, then it's like I said that, even though I get correspondence from the European community every day about wanting to hopefully have a season August, September and October, but I try not to convey that. But as the reality, I'm like, okay, everyone is hoping they have a late season, but you need to stay fit. They're still getting Paider to sponsors. So what that reason alone, you need to take this seriously, that your sponsors are still paying you to first and second quarter payments, which are sizeable for some of my clients. So your commitment is that you are a full time professional athlete and you are paid to be prepared and ready and and not only that, what else are you going to do? Now? They've had to get creative, you know, because some except most of all the facilities to shut down two tracks, the ways, etc. They've been going to some parks. Now some of the parks have been limited because of the congregation of people. So they're out riding bikes, doing different drills, you know, in the parking lots, and just trying to you know I call a cost cross training. They're doing whatever to keep their minds focused on what they need to do. It's been tough. Some of my younger clients have lost motivation, you know, but they haven't lost cashing those checks. So I write right, I have to let them know you are a professional. So that's my job. Really. I'm a cheer leader more than anything else, checking in on them, making sure that they are doing something fitness wise or'LD say are there. Most of my athletes are part of training groups, so they are coaches are meeting with them five days a week and they are having organized whatever they're doing, but it's on certain times. You know these, you know, we didn't have anything. We had the Olympic boycott and we had, well, we had the Olympics, which was one of those. We hope to win gold medal. So something can come out of it financially, that you know, and we'll be fortunate enough. These young people they already have financial, you know, security to extend and the Olympic Games are like the icing on the cake. It really it's like a bigger win, full full fall. But but they have different mindset. I mean they're I find very few athletes today guys that truly love what they do. They do it because it pays them. Right, we did it because we loved it and the money just happened to come along with it and the money didn't change our love for it. And and I've had to have this frank conversation with most of my athletes when they start, you know, drifting on me, and I'm like, if you love this, you can't wait to get back to it and you're going to stay ready if you don't love it and you're distracted by whatever it is, because then maybe you know you're staying power is going to be limited, because those who love it stay around longer than those who just here to get paid. Yeah, exactly, I agree with that. I agree with that. So we're not. One of the one of the last things we like to do on our podcast is called the no huddle, and you know Dave likes to fire bunch of questions. Just want to remind everybody that they can catch us on the new RADIOCOM APP or wherever they listen to their favorite podcast, or under the big top at the sports circus. So Day, fire away with our no huddle questions. Okay, we're not. Aldo, if you were in charge of I don't know, in a pardon me, I don't know that, like the committee, but the International Track and field did I A for it's it's the World Athletic Federation. Now we just changed that. They just change their name to Waf instead of I af. Okay, if you're the commissioner of that organization. What for a day? What rule change would you make? What rule change would I make? Wow, that's a tough one. I would say that athletes wouldn't have to wait three years to change citizenship for representation. You know some, some athletes who maybe like an American who isn't that good boy? It's good, but it's not that good compared to some of our best. But these other countries are offering them financial stability to come represent dohak cutter and like sometimes million dollars to go represent cutter. Nowadays you have to wait three years for that to happen because people were crossing allegiances left and right. I would let them do it. I mean these athletes are trying to make money. It's all about them trying to make money in a sport that they otherwise wouldn't be able to. So I would change. I would relax that ruling.

And there's always a clock ticking. So three years, they might not even want that person at that point. Correct, you might not be the same person in right. Yeah, exactly. You might play football for the nighters for three years and then up be the same track guy. That's right, running a lot might be hunting you down. By the way, I wasn't the same track guy. Well, yeah, if you couldn't train that way, all right. What's your biggest pet peeve? Biggest pet peeve that we're all not that, you know, like some people are just full of themselves and think because whatever they do. I mean I've never taken myself seriously. Most people don't even know that I've done the things I've done because I'm just a regular guy and I'm no better than anybody else. So I might pet peeve is when someone thinks they're better than someone else and I'm just like, no, you're not. You know right, I like it. All right, we're not. If you're going to make a mount rushmore of the superstars, who, I think you would find yourself on it. But if you couldn't put yourself on it, who would the other four be? Who? Bob Seagrin, because he wanted multiple times that was a third baseman for the MONTRO expose. His name was? Should I think of? That would be yeah, he won it. To Man, I can't think of I would put Willy Gault on it and then I would put what's up. I can say Mike Schmidt, but but MKE didn't win it. So that fourth one is tough, the one I really want to put on it. But it's a woman. It would be Martina, that Rattulova. They used to have the women superstars following our superstar event the next week. That's right, and she dominated too. So I'd have to put her on my Mount Rushmore. Superstar. You just say male or female, so just super scar. Yeah, right, I'd put her on there. Hersha walkers. He wanted to, did he? Yeah, that, yeah, he wanted. But the guy dusty, dusty DIVORC? Dusty? Yeah, yeah, the volleyball player. No, no, not him. There's another dusty. Is it Monto s will expo? Third Baseman. He was an all star after his first a second year. He's really good. We're really good enough to look him up. Yeah, look, I'm just thinking Tim Wallack. I know it's not Tim Walla. Yeah, yeah, I can't think who that is. Yeah, all right, let's just set a solid mount rushmore. Yeah, it's pretty good. So my friends, I didn't want to put them on there. Right, Ronaldo, do you know who I coach? That? It's currently an NFL running back. That was a high school hurtling champion four years in a row that you coached. Yes, heard mean champion. He's playing now. He's playing now for the Dallas Cowboys. Superstar. No, really, Zeke Yep, I coach seek in high school. That's the high school I coach and I used to watch him run all is. He'd leave our football practice and go work out for hurdles. I remember the first time I saw him Hurd Little Guy, and I said to my one of my friends, I said, he's hurtle before. Oh yeah, it just the way he did it. I said he's hurtled before, but I didn't know he was a hurdler. That's really yeah, his times are pretty good if you look them up. Not as good as yours, obviously, and I don't think he ever went to forty two, but I think that's why he didn't run in college. Yeah, well, he made the right choice. I mean, yeah, he should be. He is. Good Day. Um Ronaldo, you you've ran track all over the world. What's your favorite sports or track venue that you are a participant in? So my favorite, that they no longer run events there anymore, was in Cologne, Germany. They had the most beautiful stadium that I've ever seen. At the time. The most renowned stadium is Zurich, Wilk class every year, and then the most incredible stadium that are none is where we had the world championships just passed, September, October and DOHAC cutter. But when I was an air conditioned stadium that's over outside a hundred plus degrees and it was seventy degrees inside and it was arguably the best performance in the history of the world championships, because sometimes I was cold in there, that's how comfortable it was. I was gon outside just to get warm. But yeah, I had never seen an air condition of fully air conditioning, you know, seventy thousand seat stadium in...

...my life and this was incredible. Wow. Yeah, what is your favorite play that you were ever a part of? As a forty niner, it happened in my home state. We play in the New York giants on Monday night football. Danny Don Meredith and frank giffers in the booth and I started the game again. The Games on TURF. So I'm starting and the first play of the game I run like a run an out or something, and bill calls me over. It's on his sideline and he goes down to the turf and he draws this play up and he tells me to tell Joe on this particular play. I was going to be on the opposite side. I was going to go in motion, I was going to come down. He's telling me the guys can be trailing me on the other side and when I go to the out he's going to be underneath and then I'm going to turn up and it should be nobody there. And it was a timing pass. And so I tell Joe and I said Joe, Bill says throw the out to me and there'll be nobody there because the guy is trailing me. and Lo and behold, you know, dy comes underneath. I cleared the white. I God out. So that turned my head to ball. Is there? I cast the ball. I look up the field. There is no one there. I run fifty nine yards for a touchdown on Monday night football in my home state and then standy down matters. Said me, am I was a bullfrog. Did you have a lot of family in the stands? Yeah, and I ran over to build and I said it worked, and it worked. He had this look like of course it was going to work, and I was like okay, that's why they called him to genius. So yeah, yeah, he would do that a lot, a lot of times. Yeah, and I called play. I'd go in with a play often and Joe would look at me and go, who the hell call that play? And I said build it, and then Joe would call his own play and I come off and build a scream at me like that's not the play I said. He changed it. He just that's that's Joe. Yeah, but it was is great experience. You know, I couldn't play with a better bunch of guys. I mean Joe Montana was I mean he was a shy guy off the off the field, but when on the field he was incredible. The most intense backfield with running a lot, and Dwight hat, Carlton Williamson and who was the other guy, Eric Wright. They're all pros. My first year, all of those guys are all pros, three rookies, and then Dwight Hicks and of course you know Russ, Frances and Hacks, all Reynolds. You Know Dwight, I mean Wendell Tyler, Roger Craig, who was a hurdler at Nebraska and he and I were, you know, big buddies and it was just a WHO's who's list. And then we had the greatest owner at the time because he was a players owner. Right now we the Bartlow, the Barlow. We loved him and he loved us, and probably a lot of things that he was doing for us you not supposed to do, but the guys loved them. That was the s. You could do whatever you wanted back yeah, yeah, why? Why? Why? While West back then, right now, you know, you played the s when there was some serious hitting going on. What's the hardest hit you ever took? So I got knocked out against the Atlanta Falcons running a shallow cross and it was the first time a Joe and anybody had seen a combo combination defense. So usually when you're running show Frost Gus, you know if the guys trailing you keep going. Well, right, look across and you see the guy sitting there. That means it's zoom. Well, they were on a Combo. He trailed. The guy on the other side did a wheel. He went back like it was his own and he wheeled back forward. But Joe had thrown the ball and as I caught it he speared me through the chin. And I was knocked out before I'd be hit. You know, hit the ground and I fell down. The ball laid on my chest and that it didn't hit the ground, was just on my chest and I didn't have possession because I was out and the DB picked up the ball and ran unabated all the way down for a touchdown, while everyone was looking at me because they thought I was dead. And Yeah, and fractured for front teeth because I bit in my face my oh out piece and they thought maybe I had some neck damage, which I didn't, thank God, and I must at a headache for about ten days. Man, it was incredible headache today. He drown out of the game. But Luckily Kipson, he was smaller than me, so he was only about five nine, probably made a hundred fifty pounds. So that probably saved me at that time because he was smaller. But that was a vicious hit. But that that that was an aftermath that hurt because I didn't see that hit. You know, I had to watch it on film that Monday to see and believe that it happened right. Just hit was when I got hit by lt coming across and you get clotheslined and you feel that. I mean it's like he throws his form through your chest and you just like you buried on the ground and...

...you know, got those guys tuck trash, they talk trash. Oh yeah, so no one wanted to get, you know, get beat by me on any circumstances. So I got a lot of trash talking all the time and I just had to just ignore it. But well, that was bill's fault for sending you across the middle. Yeah, back then, you know, we were attending our possession team and across the middle was, you know, a priority for this team. Today you don't see that too much, right. You see these guys down field. They're taking advantage of their speed. Right, exactly, good dude. Um, okay, if you could run ALO, if you could go back in time and give yourself ten words of advice, what would what would that advice be? So I had to give myself ten words of advice. So I've always been a rebel with a cause, you know. So something done make sense with me, I question it. Eve My dad used to not like me questioning his authority, but I had to understand it. So I think I would I would say you don't always have to question everything. Sometimes you just have to go with the flow. I'm little wound type that way. You know, one plus one has the equal to with me, and when it doesn't, I'll question. I could have a conversation with you and you can be talking about something if I could see a way to question it, not because I'm not confident what you're saying, but I want you to expound on it. I'm one that I need texture. You know, I'm not one it just takes word for it. I don't know what that is about me. You can tell me this guy is blue and I'm going to probably ask you why, and if you fumble with that, then that brings in the doubt that you know to talk about. So that's what that's. That's me, I'd have to tell myself. Sometimes you don't have to know everything right, all right. So now, if you got to unwind, if you're going to sit there and watch a movie, what's your favorite sports movie that you would watch? You know, guys, I don't. I I like more action movies, so I'm more like the fast and furious kind of stuff and John Claude von Dam and you know I like that kind of stuff just because you know, the martial arts or crazy stunts. I like to see mindless stuff. A lot of what's your what's your favorite movie? If you had to go put it on right now, which one would it be? It would be what's said, the Denzel movie. Don't want to he not annihilates everybody. What's it called? Here's a lot of movies is wanting to know. The one man he sets his watch and you know it's just Russians and Oh, yeah, I can't, I can't remember that. Yeah, DIS place for precision and all that what he was doing. And Yeah, yeah, that's I like movies like that. So that's probably something that I would vent at on right now we're watching the series the all American it's on. I think it's on Netflix. That's Neflix here at Netflix. The kids and I and the mom, I will watching that. I didn't know what it was about, but it's a football team. He's Guy, one guy from Compton, an other guys from Beverly Hills and you know, he's adopted into their family, so to speak, and so they have games and, you know, kids stuff. I just watch it with him, but I'm watching that those kinds of things. Yeah, did you watch tiger cake? No, I can't get it. It's too great for me. Yeah, I can watch it either. Yeah, it's just too crazy. Yeah, and I'm a golf guy, so I you know, not that there's anything live on right now, but it's relaxing for me just to watch golf and study and see what they do. And my wife did them the sound. I can sit in front of TV for three hours watching golf, but I might almost taken notes. Well, it's either sit and watching it or going out and playing for four hours. So either. Well, yeah, either one right, which I did yesterday. I felt badly. Maryland we're on we're on essential only and all our golf courses are closed. But where I used to live in Virginia, Virginia is not closed. So I drove over to Virginia to play with some guys yesterday. I felt badly, but it was a beautiful day. So yeah, they you got to get out or else should go crazy. All right, one more day. What you got? All Right, Um, what's one skill you wish you were better at? One Skill? I wish I was better at my piano playing. Yeah, I play saxophone growing up and then I was I was. I can read music and I took lessons with piano when I was with the niners and I was pretty good.

But if you don't practice it over the years, you know, you lose your finger dexterity. And I have a keyboard in my office and you know, I'm starting to play it again because I want to get more efficient at that, because I love I'm a jazz guy and it's something you can do by yourself, harmony and melody in both hands, and so that's what I that's one of my objectives, not because of the quarantine, but over the next two years just to really get proficient in my piano playing for me. For me, you know, playing, being able to pick up any song and play it. Tough thing is that I like jazz. So jazz is not easy. No, that's that's a tough piano to play right there. That's not slow at all. Now, hey, Rondo, Dave and I we really appreciate you joining us today. I appreciate it, and Gust I appreciate it a fir much. Yeah, we thank you for joining us in the huddle and everyone out there, you can catch us on radiocom listen to huddle up with gus or go to our website. Huddle up with guscom so, Dave, were not all? Thanks for joining me today and how with guys. It was as a pleasure and thank you for helping us learn more about and all the day. Thanks so much, gentlemen. Thanks for all though. Okay, Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shape to life. As always, I'm joined by my great friend and Co host, Dave Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with Gus and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

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