Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Randy Cross

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Three time Super Bowl Champion Randy Cross, who played for both UCLA, and the San Francisco 49'ers joins me in the huddle to discuss how sports has shaped his life. I love the fact that he never lifted until he played professionally.  Can't do that nowadays. Here are some of his stats and also what he is doing below. Was a state shot-put champion in high school. Was named All-America twice at UCLA; helped the Bruins defeat top-ranked Ohio State in the 1976 Rose Bowl. Was drafted in the second round of the 1976 NFL draft by the San Francisco 49ers. Made the Pro Bowl three times and played on three Super Bowl-winning teams. Final game as player was Super Bowl XXIII in 1989. Has worked as an analyst for CBS, NBC and Sirius Radio. Hosts the Randy Cross Invitational golf tournament, which has raised millions of dollars for the Stanford, Cal., Ronald McDonald House. Was selected in the 2010 class for the College Football Hall of Fame. Randy Cross is a veteran football analyst who joined CBS Sports Network in 2009. He calls select college football games and also serves as a studio analyst on the Network's weekly roundtable show INSIDE COLLEGE FOOTBALL. Cross previously worked for CBS as an NFL game analyst from 1989-93. He returned to the NFL ON CBS from 1998-2009 as a game analyst and studio analyst for three years with THE NFL TODAY. Cross has covered the NFC Divisional Playoffs and Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XXVI. He also served as an analyst for CBS Sports Radio’s coverage of Super Bowl XXIV. During the Network's coverage of Super Bowl XLI, Cross reported during the pre-game show from Baghdad with coverage of American soldiers who were serving in the Iraq War. Following Cross’s earlier tenure at CBS Sports, he spent four years at NBC Sports as an analyst for its NFL broadcasts. He also served as an analyst for select Notre Dame games, including the 1995 Fiesta Bowl and also as a reporter for Super Bowl XXXII.   Check out more about Randy and listen to his podcast...https://www.randycross.com   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joiningus in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback, gusts fraud, alongside my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar, where we talkedto guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out onour website. How do up with Gustscom, where you can listen tomore episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle. Hey everyone,guess fraud here. Welcome to another episode of Huddle up with guests. Youknow, you could find us on huddle up with guestscom or, and alsoyou can go to Radiocom or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Youcan also find us on sixteen thirty one digital newscom. So today's guests.As you see, I'm going to be driving this bus solo today, soI'll have a lot of questions for our guests today. He played my favoriteposition, even though I was a quarterback. These are the guys I always hungout with when I played the game, because they were the most fun,they drank the most beer, they had the most fun when we wentout and you know, I guess I was always closest to them. Inpractice and in the locker room. So today joining me is three times superbowl champion. He's a rose bowl champion, you know, he's been an analystfor football for a very long time. He loves the game, you know, he just has an experience that I've always admire, you know,and he got to do a lot of things that I never got to,like go to a super bowl. So joining me today in the Huddle forers, first year center. Then the rest of his time he played guard.Joining me is Randy Cross. Randy, how are you doing? I'm doinggreat, guys. Thanks, man, for sure. Yeah, you know, it's so exciting. I mean all every team I played for. Iplayed for seven teams, you know, and I'm kind of jealous that yougot to play with one team. I wonder what my career would have been, I like if I would have just played for one. But you playedfor thirteen years as a lineman. That's pretty amazing. Yeah, it was, and actually it was all sort of totally kind of I wouldn't say I'mmistake, but it was pretty random that I end up playing football, wellreally at all, but especially up to that level. Yeah, you know, it is amazing that and you don't see it that often where guys saywith the same teams throughout their whole career, even the great ones as you playedwith, you know, probably one of the goats of all time inJoe Montana, even left and went to another team, and you know yousee that quite often in the NFL. But guys want to continue their careersand teams are kind of Said, okay, we've had enough, we're going tomove on somebody younger and better. As as we know, there's alwaysyounger and better coming out and gunning for our spots. But really, let'sget to when you were young, and you know you were born in NewYork. You moved to California at some point in your life and then youlived in southern California. Tell me about the first time really where you fellin love with sports. Was it an idol you had, was a watchinga team or was it your family? Well, I was. I wasa big baseball guy. I started playing baseball. Yeah, I'm was likefive years old, playing tea ball and all that at Tarzan a little leaguein the San Fernando Valley. So I mainly played baseball up until high school. I that's that was my whole deal. I mean I played little league andI played Tony League and I played cold league, played American Legion andit was, you know, I was I was pretty sure I was reallygood at it. They in my mind now I was. It was funfor me. Sandy Kofax was my kind of boyhood idol. Right, Iwas. I was born in Brooklyn and grew up in lay. Yeah,my dad was an actor, so we were based in New York and thenwe moved to Los Angeles and, coincidentally, so did the dodgers. But right, yeah, that was sort of my whole thing. I was baseballthe time. So did you play with your dad in the backyard a lotor just kind of to have neighborhood buddies she played with? Because we,you know, back in the S and S, when I grew up andyou grew up is is, it was backyard stuff, you know. It'slike dad came up from where, we played in the backyard or we wentout with our buddies. There was no real organization for us for a longtime. Even a little league was a little bit and you got some coachingthere. But man, most of my experiences that were great. We're inthe backyard. Did you have a lot of those kind of experiences growing up? Yeah, yeah, exactly. We had a real long driveway and youknow, we had a hoop set up on the garage and the driveway wentdown at this gate, which is probably,...

I don't about a hundred and twentyfeet. I mean it was pretty good size, pretty good. Sowe do always played catch, baseball or football or whatever there and did adid a lot of that. Got A lot of my early scarring there.Yeah, one of our more memorable moments was having my I came from sevenkids. I had four younger sisters and a brother, and I had oneof my younger sisters throwing me tennis balls and I'm hitting balls and I'm hittingballs and that she throws me like it's a small ball, but it's stilla small rubber ball and I think it's baseball bat and I Bam, Ihit this thing and it bounces off, this ball comes right back and Ijust start bleeding like a stuck are and there's blood everywhere. My mom kindof freaked out, but of course this was, you know, probably whatsixty two or something like that, sixty three right. We a hospital.My Mom made butterfly stitches out of band AIDS and that's why I had ourside of my eye there for about a week. Well that, you know, that's kind of all the experiences we had when we were young. was, you know, going on in the in just finding all your buddies andwe found a field. We played football, baseball, we played basketball. Imean those are the three sports we've played. I remember we used tosneak into the football field when track was set up and we used to dohigh jumps on our own because they had all the mats out, and we'dhave wrestling tournaments and then we'd be you know, I was, I wasalways Andre the giant, because I was the biggest kid in my neighborhood,but you know, I should have been Hulkogan instead. But I mean whatI think it's different. I think it's so different nowadays with kids, andI don't know if you've seen that or notice. I mean you're still involvedin sports and athletics as well. Tell me about your experience of seeing thatcompared to when you grew up and when we grew up, and how thatdifference has changed. Today it's as much of a sports thing as it isa societal thing as it is a parenting thing. You know, not onlymy yard and I had probably four or five good buddies that lived in prettyclose proxy sibody to my house, but we had a great park that wasabout a quarter of a mile away, maybe a third of a mile.So we did everything there. That's where we you know, they had baseballfields, they had a huge football field. You know, played my first unofficialtackle football and about the about the middle school junior high period of mylife. But yeah, always had that park and that was we did everythingthat way. And if I tell you there's one term that comes to mindand I think of that Park, and you won't ever hear a parent saythis to their kid, and that is, whatever you do, be home beforedark. What time to have to be home? If it's dark,you're in trouble. If it's not dark, it's this time to eat dinner.Rightly, it's not the specific it was go ahead, Hey, I'mgoing to the park. Good, be home for dark. All right,I can do that. You know in La that's eight o'clock. It right. Right. Well, that mine was the fire whistle. We had thefire whist on our in our small town when I grow up Pennsylvania, andDad said that fire whistle blows at nine, you better be in the door,you know. And then we all had that kind of thing growing upwith our parents, right and even like when I went to I went toCatholic school growing up, you know, and then, yeah, the Ihad some really outrageous nuns who loved big rulers and paddles and but I wasmore scared of going home to see my dad than I was of those nuns. I'll tell you that you are a smart kid. That's why I Idon't know about that, but yeah, I know where my socalled bread wasbuttered, that's for sure. Yeah, yeah, well, I know Ihad a little bit of the same thing. I went to Catholic schools earlier,then public school for a period and then my dad had the ingenious ideathat I was going to go to Catholic all boys high school, which didn'tgo over real well with me when I was tell about it. But youknow, that's that's sort of where my organized sport life sort of sort ofstarted, especially football. Yeah, yeah, you know all that. See,I see that organized for me was I couldn't be who I wanted tobe anymore like. I always was willie stargeel or Dave Parker or, youknow, one of the pirates, or I was Terry Bradshaw out there playing, you know, when I was in the thing. Then you get toorganized and you couldn't be those guys anymore. You had to be yourself, andso that's all I always saw the difference as for me, you know, because if you're up there in little, you know, organized sports and you'retrying to swing like Willie Stargel, the coach would rip your head off, you know. So you have kind...

...of figure out who you were.So you were always Sandy Kofax, I'm sure, when you were playing baseball, and then we have to organ to hate you better be. I wasstill Sandy Kofax, right. I mean right my dad. My Dad hadthe idea when I was about twelve that I needed to start playing football.I had always played baseball and it was hack. It was right after allstars that year and he asked me if I wanted to play football and Iwas like I'll give it a shot, and I've never done it. Sowe go to this tryout thing and they say way you and they measure youas pop warner, and you know, and I was one of those kidsthat I'd alternate between fat or Pudgy and or as I used to refer tous, and we bought our clothes back then. We were, you know, full sized, but I was, you know, it was twelve yearsold and they said, well, you're gonna have to play with like thefourteen year olds. Why wouldn't want to do that? I got no ideawhat I'm doing right and I told my dad I said now I'm good,I'll stay in baseball, I'll be I'll be all right. What's kind offunny, I was the same way because I played in seventh grade and wentand played, as they called it, you know, this was before wewent to middle school, but you try try out. I was, Iguess it was midget football. You know, it's the use that youth now,but I remember I'm playing guard and I got my ass kicked and man, I I did not want I just didn't like the game at that point. Didn't want to be there. You know, my dad just kept you'regoing, you're going next year, you know, in eighth grade, goto high school. Your kind of in that middle school and and go tothe team and try out to again. I broke my foot and dad's like, you're playing no matter what. I just bought you a new cleatue Tiemtighter, and it's just like my first couple of years of football was toughexperience. Yeah, I guess. Yeah. Now for me it was, likeI said, my dad had back in, back in these days,every grade he started in, be in the second semester, was the alevel I would I had just gone through like be nine, which was middleschool junior high back then. My Dad says we're you're going to go toplay as Krescy Carmelite high school and not far from where we lived, andI said no, I'm not going, and he goes, look, yougo, I'll take you to take the test. They do. You haveto. You have to have an entrance exam and if you do well andthey let you in, we're gonna have to talk about it, because Iwant you to go there. All right. So I went and took my testand man, I thought I bombed it. I did everything I could. I mean I was just checking letters and boxes and yeah, I writeand, as fate would allow, I got like a ninety on a test. So then and now I'm now not only do I have to play,I have to go to this high school. My Dad says, you know,I got a great idea. You don't know anybody at this high school. I said, yeah, I know nobody. He Says Golf, football. You know, there's ninety something guys in your freshman class. Asks halfof them were playing football. So you'll learn you'll get to know half twoguys in your in your freshman class, just from playing football. All right, I'll do that. And back then, guess I was a quarterback. Wow, nice, because I would play right. Baseball players were naturally thequarterback I was. I was a picture in a catcher in baseball. Yeah, yeah, so so it makes sense that you know you probably could wingit and you just out there. They're going to put the guy to throwthe ball out there. I could throw. That lasted all about one and ahalf practices in high school at Ninth Grade, because the start of myninth grade year I was five. I think I was five eight and waitabout a hundred and eighty five towns. So I was stocky, as weused to say, and a freshman year I was six one in a hundredninety, you know. So I I spent my whole freshman year playing sports, going to school and laying on heating pads right and no kidd no kidding, I mean I grew six inches from eight to ninth grade. So Iliterally know your pain was. As they say that. My Dad used tosay it you'll get over it, you'll grow out of it. I'm like, I think I'm growing into it. It did. It's not going away, you know, and just some you had to deal with grow when yougrow so fast. Yeah, I was. It was interesting. But what wasthat conversation for you when you when the coach came and said, youknow, I think we're going to move you from quarterback to another position?What do you remember? That like saying, I don't really know if I wantto do this. Well, yeah, I was. I was at thispoint. I'd made my way from the fifth string quarterback to the thirdstring quarterback, and the coach came up to me and said, so,do you like to you like this game?...

Do you enjoy it? I kindof, yeah, I do. He goes a little. Do youwant to actually play? And I looked at him I said, Dr Iwant to play? Yeah, of course I want to play. He goes, well, I don't think you're going to play a quarterback, but ifyou moved offensive line or defensive line, you're going to play because you're prettygood sized kid. I looked at USAID, Huh okay, he goes, okay, maybe you take your pick. I said I want to play defensiveend and he goes well, why defensive end? I said, I justdon't like offense. Right. Yeah, so I played mainly defense in highschool. So did you play both ways? You just play mainly defensive. Youhave enough kids. Shoot. My junior year I played both ways.My sophomore year I played a little bit, offense a little bit, but mainlydefense. My senior I played all the defense. So what were yoursports in high school? Well, I started throwing the shot put just sortof do something in the spring because you know I'm right. Before in theninth grade I've been playing legion ball through my shoulder out and mess it uppretty good. In fact, in later years I would find out they calledit a torn rotator cuff back then. Right are now. Then it wasyou threw your shoulder out, but I told my rotator and I just decidewhat the heck, I'll go off for track and I'll try shot put.So I tried the shot put and did really, really well at it.Freshman year. I threw, you know, through it pretty well, but thenit was only like an eight pound shot. They don't start you witha big heavy one. But I really enjoyed it. So that's something Idid all through high school. Well, I mean, you still hold therecord at the high school correct yeah, yeah, I want. I eventuallywon the state as a senior. Junior, I was third senior, I wasfirst. Yeah, it was, it was, it was. Itwas pretty interesting. I had a great coach, my athletic director and headtrack coach and the shot put coach for guys. That really influenced me sportswise and, you know, work ethic wise, what it took to bereally good at something. II. They never, we never lifted weights.I was all technique. It was all speed. It was all doing thingsas quickly an explosive as possible. So I threw the twelve pound shot inhigh school like sixty seven, sixty eight feet one to stay out in California. And actually most of my college scholarships were dual. They were football andtrack. A couple of the couple of school like Alabama and Nebraska, theywere football only, but you know, Texas and Ucla and USC those weredual. Those are dual. And you know, if you think about throwinga shot put at twelve pound, shot put twenty two and that around twentytwo yards, I mean just in football sense. You know we're Talking AboutYeah, me pee, sixty seven feet sounds I mean that's an amazing longway. And then just throwing a twenty two yards is crazy, probably twentythree. But to hold that record so that you talked about having a tornrotator. So that didn't affect your rotator at all when you throw shot Nah. Now. Well, the shot is is in here. You're holding anythingright there, and I mean you're you're doing this, it's in. It'slike an inner inward press when you're doing it and if you do it theright way, especially the old way, because now when you watch shot putters, they throw like a discus thrower. Right get back there and they rockand they go around in a circle and they throw it and a lot ofreally cool sent tripical force. But it with us, it was I can'tremember the name of it, but it was a slide at a famous shotputter by Animer, Randy Matson, had really popularized it. He'd want agold medal or to you know. So that was how they till you throwdiscus or anything else. You didn't try. They didn't have no like no,our our area and track and field was way too small. We havebarely had room for a shot put area, much less I really know it.I know I remember in my high school we had javelin and the coachwant to me come out through javelin. I mean, I don't even thinkthey have a high school sports anymore, do they? I mean I thinkDave's up kind of outlawed these. Some states do, some states do I'mnot really positive. Given the mental makeup of most fifteen to eighteen year oldMaleles, I would give them a long...

...shark sharp object to throw around aroundother remons in that the truth. You never know where that thing is going. I mean I think I try to throw one time and I hit myselfin the back of the head when I let it go and I said Nope, I'm done, I'll stick to a baseball and football. So so you'rein. You you're playing both. What was that recruiting process like for you? I mean you're getting recruited in in track and field and football. Whychoose just football? Um, well, I I mean I went to youseel with every intention of doing both. In fact, I actually went outthat spring. I missed spring my freshman year because I was on the trackteam. Miss good bit of practice because I was practicing for the shot withtrack, which was fine with me. I had figured out right I couldthrow the shot and not do spring ball and that sounded like a pretty goodbargain. And that's the only plan. Yeah, yeah, anybody has beenthrough spring football now is it's nothing fun about that. But I threw it, you know, I threw the shot, the sixteen pound, the big one, over sixty feet my freshman year in college. What little I threw. But they wanted me to lift a lot of weights. And she's goingto imagine shot putters earlier. They are stacked. Yeah, and you knowthis sounds just stupid and and sometimes a little funny, but every time Ilifted weights I got incredibly sore and if I stopped lifting weights the sores wentaway. So I figured out pretty fast if I don't lift I don't getsore. So I didn't lift weight. I didn't lift weights and high schoolI didn't lift weights in college. I didn't really start lifting weights until after, right about my second year in the NFL. So how did you maintainany kind of did you do other things? Did you did you have like astretching routine? Did you just do pushups? It up, so,you know, like the whole hurtle Walker thing, or how did you renthinganything? I mean because playing alignement position you got to have some strength.Yeah, I was. I was naturally pretty strong. I always had reallygood technique and I was very explosive. So that helped. I never missedit. I didn't. I never had the feeling that there was something thatI was missing out on if I wasn't if I wasn't lifting. We hadplenty of guys on the team that were, you know, they could lift oneside of the building and I could block them. But so even whenI got to the pros, I mean my first I was drafted by aguy named Monty Clark who was the head coach at San Francisco then later Detroit, but he'd been the old line coach for shoeless famous dolphins teams. SoI go up after the draft and have a press conference and then we havea mini camp and the first thing they do is you go in the lockerin the weight room and they're going to test you. They're going to seehow you how you lift, how you do pull ups, Chin ups,those kinds of things, and then we're going to got on a forty.Well, I did. I did two repsent through a quarter. I'd reallyseriously had really rarely to ever lift it. I did want. I did onepull up, the two Chin ups and I'm walking out of the linelocker room until and he looks at me and goes hey, and I goover and say yeah, coach was up. He goes, are you trying toget me fire? So what do you mean? He goes that that'snot real right. You didn't really just do two reps. it to itaccord or I said, I don't lift ways and he goes I am goingto get fired and I he said you'd better run a good forty and Iran like a f eight or forty, five forty and I got down withthat. He looked at me and goes okay, now I'm not getting fired. Now remember why drafted you? You could. Yeah, well, Imean obviously they watch film on You, they knew who you were and theyprobably understood. They talked to the coaches and they had to have an understandingthat you didn't do that in college either. I mean today, obviously that wouldyou know, coaches would go insane if you didn't lift weights. Butyou know, I think that that just is a testament to talent. Youjust had, you know, crazy God given talent that you were able touse and go out and perform. So, you know, as my kids callit all the time, it's just old you had old man strength whenyou were young. You know that you could go and do that and youhad you had the good ta eating. Get thrown around. You know he'sgoing. It took one season of going against, you know, Wililan areand Merlin Olson and Alan Age and some...

...of the old timers that were stillin the NFL when I got there, coite Bacon right one year of thatcurly, curly culp I've got a nice scar right here in my kid fromwhere he split me open. I got done with that year and I gotto the offseason and I decided, you know, what you might want tostart lifting weights just a little bit. See if this see if this weightstuff really is what it's made up to be. So then it's so hardbecause you said you when you should wait at sorted. You kind of getpast all that. Well, yeah, after I did that, the funnything is we got right about that time, we got a strength and additioning coach. Actually, his name is Alf for meal, Dick for meals.Younger brother, okay, AL, was amazed and all we did was Olympicslifting, and that's something that kind of a kind of appeal to me.It was all technique, it was all quickness, it was all you know, you're doing the cleaning jerk and snatch and all that. There's all thisother stuff and I kind of liked so I got pretty good. Well,they say that's the best lift you can do as an athlete. Is Youknow, it's do a full clean where you you bring it up and usefront squatt and then press it over your head. I mean that's the totalworkout. And you know, I've been through a lot of Olympic lifting coachesas well. You know, I wasn't crazy as a quarterback about when yougot to do the wide grip and snatch it over your head and never feltgood on my shoulders. But you know, they're as I did. I usedto. I got to the point where I was doing snatches specifically andthe overhead pretty heavy. You know, me really three in the three hundredand fifty range for the overhead or, you know, real five, threehundred five on the snatch. I replaced both my shoulders consequent. I meansubsequently here as as a sprint citizen, I have two titanium shoulders. Sodid you notice a difference right from from the first year? Then you startdoing some Olympic lifting? Was it a big difference, because you obviously hadthe technique in the skill set to play guard and Lineman, but did younotice a difference and how that strength and that muscle that was added to yourbody? When, when, then, you were able to go up againstthose defensive players? Yeah, no doubt, no doubt. It's it was allworth it. Plus, you know, I moved quicker, your steer legsis stronger, your your your core area is so much stronger. Itcorrelated very, very well, translated well to to playing, you know,playing lineman. It was I'm glad I did it and I think, youknow, not doing it before then, you know, might have taken alot of wear and tear off my body. That maybe that's one of the reasonsI lasted as long as I did, right, but yeah, it wasit was an interesting setup. Hey everyone, I want to thank youfor listening to a huddle up with gusts. We're joined by Randy Cross. We'regoing to take a little quick break here. We'll be right back andI got some great questions for Randy coming up, so stay tuned. Heylisteners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you tojoin our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content madejust for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, huddle up with Gustscomand hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddleup with gustcom. Now let's get back in the huddle. Hey everyone,we're back in the huddle. Joining me today is Randy Cross. You knowyou can. I really appreciate everyone listening to our podcast over the last yearand a half and we've had some great guests. Three times will champion today. Randy Cross. I have a few questions for him about his relationship withhis quarterback. So, Randy, I you know my relationship was always reallyclose with my line and I loved doing everything with my line and going outwith them. I have some really good stories with my linement. I havesome really bad stories we probably can't tell on the air with my line.And so tell some good stories that you have with with your quarterback over thoseyears. Yeah, well, you know, Joe got there. Joe Montana gotto San Francisco the same time. builded build drafted him in seventy nineand Joe wouldn't even start. Joe Was the backup to Steve De Bird fora while. Right and and bill basically...

...wasn't putting any pressure on him.Let him kind of develop and would actually design certain red zone and specific playsin parts of the field would be part of our game plan. So Stevewas the starter. Steve ran the offense. Joe Was the backup who got toplay, which worked out pretty well. Joe, Joe is good guy,really interesting. Wasn't a real loud, bragadocious kind of person, you know, pretty calm, pretty, pretty cool. One of the only peopleI ever competed with played with. That really seemed like he got calmer andhis heartbeat slower. Sort of the later in the game and the more importantthings got, he got cooler, he got relaxed. Right. So youthought that pretty early. I mean back in the seventy nine or so wewere in training camp he started running the offense and we had been the yearbefore the reason Bill Walsh got hired. We were the worst team in thelate we were two and four team, right. We really, we reallysucked. The next year we could run, we move the ball offensively and we'rerunning bills offense. Even in training camp. You go on, Hey, this is pretty cool. These plays work. He knows we're open gameas one, nothing like but our defense we couldn't play dead. So weknew every week we had scored thirty five to forty points and we didn't getup in that area, we had no, no chance of winning a game.So we were two, fourteen to ten that year. But and Joegot some playing time and then got more playing time the next year and eightyas a soul start and he actually until that Buffalo Houston playoff game where theycame back from what thirty one points down? Right. We were down at halftime to the saints, Thirty five two seven. It's by midseason archtmanning was a quarterback to date myself of the same we were down thirty fiveto seven at the half and we came back and beat him in regulation.Three thousand eight hundred thirty five. Wow, yeah, I read at a half. Anyway, they played, they played pretty decent and we just scarevery time we got the ball. Right what you had to write, andthat makes it fun. I mean those, those are the Games you remember,you know, even if you would a lost, they gave you toproud of. Just remembered that, the emotions that went in through that game, because I've had plenty of games like that. Well, you gues,you know that's like money in the bank, though, for it, for ateam, and we had a group of guys. That group, thatoffensive group, outside of maybe two guys, was the same offensive group that wonthe super bowl the next year, right, and and would go onand win another one in a couple of years. Right. But once youhave to have that experience, you have to have that coming back from fourteenwith three minutes to go in the game or coming back from three touchdowns downin the fourth quarter or something for future reference, so that you never reallyget to geeked out about day down. You know, you right. There'salways better what you are you there's always a way to do it, andI think from that point on we never gotten a game that we were downthere we didn't think there are somehow, some way. The math. Sowell, you build trust. I think that's what it comes down to,that you build trust. If you didn't all do your jobs the way you'resupposed to, you would never be able to score that many points in thesecond half. so that builds a trust that hey, if I do whatI'm supposed to do, then we can get this done. And we seeall the time in the NFL when mistakes happened that trust is broken and thenthat becomes pretty hard. But you also have to build trust off the field. So tell something about your time with that team because, like you said, it's a team, it's a bonding experience. Tell us about like howyou guys spent time off the field. That really built your bond as well. Yeah, I mean it was. Well, we all had one thingin common. We all really hated losing because God knows we had had achance to lose twenty eight games the last two years. We were ten andsix and eighty. So we still were losing and we just didn't want togo back. That was a hell of the hell of a motivator. Thatright. Yeah, we knew what was back. We knew what was instore if we got our set. We let ourself get bad again. Infact, an eighty two after our first super bowl, we had that strike. And that strike you here we were like three and six. We're inplayed nine games right and that really sucked.

So again, that was more more, but you know, that's the field was so important, whether itwas training, camp or a in position groups. You know, they allline hangs out all the time together, as does every every individual group.But there's something different about a line with most teams because you know they've gotto be able to get along with everybody. You got to be able to getalong with the D line on your team, you got to be along, able to get your socalled still guys on your team. N since Ialways it was an interesting dynamic that we had because we also didn't do somethingthat most teams do, and that's beat the crap out of each other webuilt. Bill wasn't a believer that you had it all the time, andyou know it probably starting in like eighty three, we only really brought ourpads out to practice two days a week where we do nine on seven andone one crash rush would do our shoulder pass. The rest of the timewe were basically just running everything on air and learned how to go full speedwithout pads, which is not easy and most most teams can't do that.But bill sort of taught us by, you know, trial and error,that is the best way to go right and you know, and it's funnybecause when I played for the Broncos and coach Shanahan, that was the samephilosophy we had there. You know, kind of Coachhan came from that eraand that mindset them and that offense, and I mean that's what we did. Let's practice hard, play fast. We don't have to kill each other. But we did get into scenarios like that where you get in the shortyardage and goal line and you you put them on, you go for alittle bit and you know, hopefully nobody gets hurt, but you got toget some of that work in. But it didn't have to be all thetime. You know, when I played for the Bengals and Kenny Anderson wasmy quarterback coach, Ken us to tell me some crazy war stories were whenhe played for the Bengals when they would just go at it for three practicesa day and it was just non stop, and I'm like that's insane, youknow, but that's that's amazing. That would that was for us gray. Yeah, for Greg was an old them party, just hardcore. Youknow when we can play the bangles in the Super Bowl. You know,at Pawniac you had to alternate practices and we had the early practice so thebengals would practice after us. Bill was playing music, so we started playingmusic at the very begin of practice. He get louder and louder as thepractice to go on and by the end of practice we got like defensive periodand all this offense up. Guys, we're in the background. We'll playingair guitar and you look back in the end zone and forest gray's got theteams all sitting there and they got their tin straps on and they're ready topractice and they all look so serious. We're going mad. Lightened up.It's right. Force Gray's going. Those California guys don't know what's coming outon. We're telling you know, and I've been with both coaches and I'veseen it all. So, you know, playing with them many different teams,you see a bunch of different mindsets that coaches have and I love thatmindset because it proves that you can still get some work done. You don'thave to kill each other because the game's hard enough on Sunday the way itis, you know that's going to be super physical. So you know,you were also a leader in the locker room. You were Lineman of theyear. I think three years in a row you were. You were fortyniner of the year when year for all your community efforts. So tell meabout that leadership role that you came into and I'm sure you grabbed that andyou were. You have to be kind of proud of that. Yeah,yeah, I was. I mean it was I had I had a greatguy who played next to me, Keith Fahnhorst, who is our captain,and he was also our player wrap and obviously alternate player wrap, right,so that there are those strikes and stuff. We got to do all that funwork. Oh yeah, but yeah, I mean, he he was.He was somebody that, even as a teammate, you kind of lookedup to because he was so solid and he was such a he was hedidn't say much of anything, but he led by example and you know thatwas something that I was found kind of easy to draw on, having somebodythat close to you that was that was like that. So them. Yeah, I mean being a quote unquote leader is as good. It's Nice,but you know, I thought I thought it was something that you or areyou done here? It's like they man.

The analogy I would make is doingtea, you know, doing the color and on television. That's somethingyou can learn to do, okay, and you can become a captain andlearn to do that, but people that are naturally like that are just naturallylike that and you know, if they can do it, they can doit well. It's also a I think. I mean the leaders that I've seenin the locker rooms, you just have the utmost respect for right,even when they walk in a locker room and you know you're not supposed tobe doing something, they walk in, you're like okay, because I thinkthe teams are great teams. I don't know how you feel about this,but I always thought, like the teams, we're just about the locker room.Like our great teams that I was on, it was always we hada great camaraderie in the locker room. We all got along. It wasn'tlike anybody against anybody else and the leaders just kept us all together and keptUS motivated. Yeah, yeah, and to a large degree of the leaderskind of kept the kept the kidding in line, you know, the jokes, that fine line between joke and insult and a good readership group and makesure that fine line isn't crossed. Yeah, I know that's that's a hard oneto do, because I became a jokester because I've had many. Iwas with Jeff Hosstetler. He was a big prankster. You know, I'vepranked a few people. You know, because when you after practice you're havingfun. We do some some things, but there's a fine line where itgets over too serious or it hurts somebody's feelings. You don't want that.You know, it's it's okay to have a fun laugh and then you knowyou've got to realize you never can do that to people that have a hardtime with it, you know what I mean? Like Oh yeah, justroll off their back and other people just it just stoos in them. Theyhate it, you know, and you can't you can't always let those guysalone. You didn't want to pick on those guys because they weren't come outand they were going to come back to get you one day, that's forsure. That's right. All right. So then, all right, soyou go through your career. After thirteen years, you've had this great,successful career. You kind of now make this transition. Did you start transitioningto be an analyst, to be in TV and doing those things before youwere even done? Were you talking about that, or did you just getdone and say I need to do something else now? Yeah, I didradio and TV for about five or six years before I retired and I hada production company and did my show, had an advertising and promotions agency andall that I started a couple of years before I retired and we did someof our production out of that and I started sending the networks my tape andabout eighty six, eighty seven, eighty six, and you know, becausealso I did USFL Games, right invader back then. So that was reallyfun. I had never done anything like that before. I got to dothat before I ever retired. So, you know, I started hitting thenetworks with my tapes for a few years before I retired, so that possibilitybeing there wasn't terribly surprising. So how did you get to that point?Like, did you just always kind of want to do that, or wasthere somebody, a mentor that said, hey, you should start thinking aboutthe next step in your life? How did you get to that point?My Dad kind of pointed me in that direction, you know, he mydad, was an actor, so he appreciated sort of the art of beingfull of it, but he also he also, you know, made thepoint that you know, you could be really good and getting along with themedia and knowing how the media works will never be a bad thing. Itwill always serve you well. So I kind of remembered that and concentrated onthat and was kind of a guy they always went to for quotes. So, you know it it became a natural transition going into that and I Isigned my first deal with CBS. I was supposed to do seven games.I ended up doing fifteen. There here. That's awesome. Did you like?Did you enjoy that it was. It was I was fantastic. Itwas. I loved it right up until the playoffs, because they assigned meto work with the NFL today as a sideline reporter during the show. Yeah, and my first assignment was the divisional playoffs. I think it was Minnesotaand San Francisco at candlestick and gets called, you know, come out of thefield, they're back at me in the back of the head and joking, yeah, you know, saying stuff to me whatnot, and they allran vibe and it just hit me like a ton of bricks. I he'sson of a bitches, are going to do it again. They're gonna winthis right without yeah, so that's that...

...was it. That was a uniqueposition. Yeah, I'm sure. I'm sure you know. That's great advicefrom Your Dad. You know, my dad used to tell me like ifyou don't make the team, the world needs to ditch diggers to son.That was that was my advice from my dad, you know right, hewas a mill guy. He was like you can come work with me inthe factory. So I was like whatever I had to do to stay outof there. I wasn't I wasn't going into the factory, that's for sure. So you have a long career in the NFL, then you have along career as an analyst. What you know? Tell us about some ofthe ups and downs you went through doing that and like, was there atime where you said, okay, I'm done with this, I'm going tomove on, but you seem to like stick with it for a long time. Yeah, I mean I've done it now since eighty nine, so thisis my thirty second year. Wow TV. Twenty eight of it is with CBS, for with NBC back when CBS Lost Football there in the early S, right or in S. Yeah, I have no regrets. I didtwenty years of NFL. I'm now done, you know, eleven years of collegefootball. It's it's a man as the greatest game there is. It'sit's there's a lot of analogies and parallels with life and everything else that thatcome to bear in this game and it is just a game. You know, it's there's that great you know quote you see or that that that soundbite you hear about why so serious? Right, that's right, that's that'sa little voice in the back of my mind when I'm talking about football.Is You know, if I see him at times like I'm laughing for noreason, it's because I'm thinking of that. Why so serious, right? Youknow, and how many coaches do you know that are like that?You know, and I I try to explain this to youth coaches all thetime, like just let them have fun, don't be so serious with them.They're not, you know, you're not winning a super bowl, you'renot. You're just trying to have fun. So they continue to play the game, you know, throughout as long as they can. But a lotof people are serious and they take the game very serious. And you know, as my kids always say, Dad, that's old school thinking, right,but that's just kind of how a lot of the old school coaches were. Oh Yeah, Oh yeah, now I was. But it's fun.I really love it. It's a team atmosphere, you know, because youknow, it really is chemistry between you and your partner when it comes tothe play by play guy and in the whole team, to produce, producer, director, the BEA, the ad the stats people, the people upin the booth with you. You know, it's still very much a team environmentand it's something that, you know, I really enjoy. Have you evergot that little bug in your they were. They're saying, okay,Randy, and you're off script, like get back on it now. OhYeah, oh no, I love I'm very familiar with it. Okay,bring it back. Really back in, buddy, really back in. Yeah, yeah, I'm sure true. I'm sure you've had a lot of that. So, Randy, one of the last things we like to do hereis called our two minute drill. It's just a lot of fun. Sonarputs two minutes on the clock. I asked you a bunch of questions andand then, you know, at the end, I want to find outwhere people can follow you or what your favorite charities are, or where whatthey can donate to, what your groups are. All right, so,righthit two minutes for us, Buddy. All right, Randy. GAS ORELECTRIC CAR? Oh, gasps all the way, in fact. Pickup truck. Oh, nice, I haven't I have a pickup truck myself. Flyor drive? Would rather fly or drive? Um, fly, it's faster.Right, all right. What's your biggest pet? Peeve, God,how much time you got? I'll be very simplistic. People are very disappointing. Okay, you sound like my wife she likes our dogs way more thanmost people. All right, hot or cold? Oh, I'm a hotguy. All right. Favorite sports movie? Favorite sports movie, Um, bolder. I like that one. bulldorm was good. All right. Whatyou're what sport do you play now? Mainly Golf, mainly go. That'swhat's a handicap at. I'm a really good fifteen. Nice. I loveit. I love it's about having fun, right, is about having fun andR and and making money. Yeah,...

...okay, I think money and bag. Yeah, okay, all right. If you could change places with oneperson for a day, who would that be? One person for aday, dead or alive, it doesn't matter. I let's go with MarkZuckerberg. All right, you will put some more change in your pocket.Yeah, no, I would just like for one, for one, justone time, gets to know what it feels like to be that rich.Right, right, I'll take Jeff bezos. All right. Last one. Thisis a kick to field. Go. We did score touchdown. All right. Who is your favorite all time quarterback? Oh, Joe Montana,the one that's undefeated in super bowl and it's never throwing an interception, unlikeother people I can name. Right. Well, that's probably every other quarterbackthat's playing the super band. Pretty much. All right, Randy, I appreciateyour time. Tell me how our guests can find you and what yourfavorite charities are where they can donate. All Right, Higher Heroes USA ismy favorite charity lately. My all time favorite charity is the Ronald Mcdonald House, which I'm sure is in a city near you. Those are fantastic.And go to my website, Randy Crosscom. That's where my podcast lives and andalso where you can find me on all the social media platforms. Allright, real quick, tell us what you talked about on your podcast.Heck, football, cooking, life, fun jokes. I love. Ilove what kind of like the Red Nick Red Knicks fail videos, right,those type of things. It's my it's my podcasts. It's very unstructured andI can put on it whatever the hell I feel like. Right. Thereyou go. I love it. I love it. Well, remember everyone, if you get to meet Randy some day or if you want to sendin something to them, just remember he's not serious and he doesn't want youto be serious. So everyone. Thanks again, Randy for joining us onhuddle up with guests. We really appreciate you listening, check us out one, six thirty one digital news huddle up with guestscom and RADIOCOM or wherever youlisten to your favorite podcast. Have a great day. Thank you for joiningDavid I in the huddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast. If you'dlike to hear more podcast just like this, go to huddle up with Gustscom,where you can find our social channels, subscribe to hear more by our merchandiseand join our excuse of huddle through Patreon. Please join us next weekwhen we talk to more guests about how sports shape their life.

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