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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Randy Cross

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Three time Super Bowl Champion Randy Cross, who played for both UCLA, and the San Francisco 49'ers joins me in the huddle to discuss how sports has shaped his life. I love the fact that he never lifted until he played professionally.  Can't do that nowadays. Here are some of his stats and also what he is doing below. Was a state shot-put champion in high school. Was named All-America twice at UCLA; helped the Bruins defeat top-ranked Ohio State in the 1976 Rose Bowl. Was drafted in the second round of the 1976 NFL draft by the San Francisco 49ers. Made the Pro Bowl three times and played on three Super Bowl-winning teams. Final game as player was Super Bowl XXIII in 1989. Has worked as an analyst for CBS, NBC and Sirius Radio. Hosts the Randy Cross Invitational golf tournament, which has raised millions of dollars for the Stanford, Cal., Ronald McDonald House. Was selected in the 2010 class for the College Football Hall of Fame. Randy Cross is a veteran football analyst who joined CBS Sports Network in 2009. He calls select college football games and also serves as a studio analyst on the Network's weekly roundtable show INSIDE COLLEGE FOOTBALL. Cross previously worked for CBS as an NFL game analyst from 1989-93. He returned to the NFL ON CBS from 1998-2009 as a game analyst and studio analyst for three years with THE NFL TODAY. Cross has covered the NFC Divisional Playoffs and Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XXVI. He also served as an analyst for CBS Sports Radio’s coverage of Super Bowl XXIV. During the Network's coverage of Super Bowl XLI, Cross reported during the pre-game show from Baghdad with coverage of American soldiers who were serving in the Iraq War. Following Cross’s earlier tenure at CBS Sports, he spent four years at NBC Sports as an analyst for its NFL broadcasts. He also served as an analyst for select Notre Dame games, including the 1995 Fiesta Bowl and also as a reporter for Super Bowl XXXII.   Check out more about Randy and listen to his podcast...https://www.randycross.com   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone. We appreciate you joiningus in the Huddle, I'm your host fifteen year, NFL quarterback Gasprat,alongside my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hager, where we talk to guestsabout how sports shape their life be sure to check us out on our website,Howdo up with Guscom, where you can listen to more episodes. Just like this.Now, let's join the huddle. Everyone Gusperad here welcome toanother episode of Huddle up with Guss. You know you could find us on Hudo upwith Guscom or and also you can go to Radiocom or wherever you listen to yourfavorite podcast. You can also find thus on n sixhundred andthirty onedigital newscom. So today's guests, as you see, I'm going to be driving thisbus solo today, so I'll have a lot of questions for ourguests. Today. He played my favorite position, even though I was aquarterback. These are the guys I always hung out with when I played thegame because they were the most fun, theydrank the most beer. They had the most fun when we went out, and you know Iguess I was always closest to them in practice and in the locker room. Sotoday, Joinn me is three time super bowl champion he's a roseball champion.You know he's been an analyst for football for a very long time. He lovesthe game. You know he just has an experience that I've always admired.You know, and he got to do a lot of things that I never got to like. Go toa super bowl so joining me today in the hotdle forty niners first year center, then the rest of histime he played guard joining me is Randy Cross Randy. How are you doingI'm doing great guys thanks man for Shit Yeah, you know it's so exciting. I mean all every team I played for I playedfor seven teams, you know, and I'm kind of jealous that you got to play with oneteam. I wonder what my career would have been. I like, if I would have justplayd it for one, but you played for thirteen years as Aliman. That's prettyamazing yeah. It was, and actually it was all sort of totallykind of, I wouldn't say a mistake, but it was pretty random that I end upplaying football well really at all, but especially up to that level yeah. You know it is amazing, tha thatND, you don't see it that often, where guys say, with the same teamsthroughout their whole career, even the great ones is you played with you know,probably one of the goats of all time in Joe Montana, even left and went toanother team, and you know you see that quite often in the NFL, but guys wantto continue their their careers and teams are kind of said. Okay, we've hadenough we're going to move on t somebody younger and better, as as weknow, there's always younger and better coming out and gunning for our spots,but really, let's get to when you were young, and you know you were born in New York. Youmoved to California at some point in your life and then you lived insouthern California. Tell me about the first time really where you fell inlove with sports. Was it an idol? You had was a watching a team or was ityour family? Well, I was, I was a big baseball guy.I started playing baseball. Yeah I' was like five years old playing t ball and all that at Tarzana Little League in the SanFernando Valley, so I mainly playing baseball up untilhigh school. I that's that was my whole deal. I mean I played the Litt LeagueInd Playe Pony League, going to play. Colt League Ino played American Legionand it was yeah I was. I was pretty sure I wasreally good at it. He in my mind, no, it was. It was fun. For me, Sandy Cofax was mykind of boyhood idol right I was. I was born in Brooklyn and grew up in La yeah.My Dad was an actor, so we were based in New York and then we moved to LosAngeles and coincidently. So did the dodgers, but right yeah. That was sortof my whole thing. I was baseballl the time. So did you play with your dad in thebackyard a lot or D juce kind of have neighborhood buddies. You played withbecause we, you know back in the N S when I grew up and you grew up is, isit was backyard stuff? You know, itwas like dad came home from work. We playedin the backyard or we went out with our buddies. Hire was no real organizationfor us for a long time, even though little league was a little bit and yougot some coaching there, but man most of my experiences that were great werein the backyard. Did you have a lot of those kind of experiences growing up,yeah yeah exactly we had a real long drivewiy and you know we had a hoop set up onthe garage and in the driveway went...

...down at this gate, which is probably I don't know about a hundred and twentyfeet. I mean it was pretty good size pretty good, so we always play catchbaseball or football or or whatever there and did a did. A lot of that G TA lot of my early scarring there. One of our more memorable moments was having my I came from seven kids. I hadfour younger sisters and a brother, and I had one of my younger sisters,throwing me tennis, balls and I'm hitting balls and I'm hitting balls andthat she throws me like is a small ball, but it's still a small rubver ball andI think it's baseball fat and I', like Ban Mi, hit this thing and it bouncesoff. This bond come right back and I just starte bleeding like a stuck thing and theres blood everywhere my mom kindof freaked out, but of course this was, you know,probably what sixty two or something like that. Sixty three right, wehospital my mom made butterfly stitches out of band ads and that's if I had Iside of my eye there for about a week, well, that you know that's kind of allthe experiences we had when we were young was, you know, going out an the in just finding all your buddies and wefound a field. We played football baseball, we played basketball, I meanthose were the three sports. We played a N. I remember we used to sneak intothe football field when track was set up and we used to do high jumps on ourown because they had all the mats out and we'd have wrestling tournaments andthen we'd be. You know I was. I was always Andre, the giant because I wasthe biggest kid in my neighborhood, but you know I should have been hull kogeninstead, but I mean what I think it's different. I think it's so differentnowadays with kids, and I don't know if you've seen that or notice, I meanyou're still involved in sports and athletics as well. Tell me about yourexperience of seeing that compared to when you grew up and when we grew upand how that difference is jaged. Today, it's as much of a sports thing as it isa social thing, as it is a tarenting thing. You know not only my yard and I hadprobably four or five good buddies that lived in pretty close proximimity to myhouse, but we had a a great park that was about a quarter of a mile away,maybe a third of a mile. So we did everything there, that'swhere we, you know they had baseball fields. They had a huge football field.You know played my first unofficial, tackle football and about the about themiddle school junior high period of my life, but yeah always had that park,and that was we did everything that way and it w S. I tell you there's one termthat comes to Mywen, I think of that park, and you wont every hear a parentsay this to their kid, and that is whatever you do be home before dark.What time do after be Homeo if it's dark you're in trouble? If it's notdark, it's this time to Yeat derer right, it's not o specific. It wasgoing ahead. Hey I'm going to the park good, be home, BFOR DARK! Alright, Ican do that o now la that's. Eight o'clock, ITI RIGHT RIGHT! Well, that mine was the firewas,so we had the firewas on our in our small town. When I grew up,Pennsylvania and and DAD said, AP firewilti blows at nine, you better bein the door. You know thon. We all had that kind of thing. Growing up with ourparents right and even like when I went to, I went to Catholic school growingup, you know and then yeah the I had some really outrageous nuns who lovedbig, rollers and Paddles, and but I was more scared of going home to see my dadthan I was of those nuns. I'll tell you that you were a smart kid. That's why I don't know about that. But yeah. Iknow where my so called bread was butterd, that's for sure, Yeah Yeah!Well, I know I had a little bit of the same thing. I went to Catholic schoolsearly then Public School for a period and then my dad had the ingenious idea that I was going to go to a Catholicallboys high school which didn't go over real well with me when Iwoasd tell about it, but you know that's that's sort of where myorganized for life sort of sort of started,especially football, yeah yeah. You know all that see. I seethat organized for me was. I couldn't be who I wanted to be anymore, like Ialways was willie starjol or Dave Parker, or you know one of the piratesther ere. I was Terry bradchaw out there playing. You know when I was in the thing, thenyou get to organize and you couldn't be those guys anymore. You had to beyourself, and so that's hat. I always saw the difference as for me. You know,because if you're up there in little you know organized sports you're tryingto swing like Willy Stargol, the coach would rip your head off. You know soyoyea kind of figure out who you were...

...so you were always Sandy Cofax, I'msure when you were playing baseball and then I had te Organia Sill Sa Ofa right right. My Pa, my dad had the ideawhen I was about twelve, that I needed to start playing. Football Ihad alwaysplayed baseball and it was Hecki was right after all stars that year and heasked me if I wanted to play football, I was like O, give it a shot. I an I've,never done it. So we go to this triout thing and they stay weigh you and theymeasure you as pop warter, and you know- and I was one of those kids- that I'd alternate between fat or Pudgy and or as I used to refer to Uson and when we bought ourclothes back then we were, you know full sized, but I was Yeuh N W. I was twelve years old and Isaid well, you're gonna have to play with like fourteen year old. Why would I want to do that? I got noidea what I'm doing right and I told my dad I said now- I'm good I'll stay inbaseball I'll, be I'll, be all right. Well, it's kind of funny. I was thesame way because I played in seventh grade. I went and played as they calledit. You know this was before we went to middle school, but you trie tryd of thewas, I guess it was midget football. You know it's. I use that youth now,but I remember I playing garden and I got my ass kicked and Man I did not want O. I just didn'tlike the game at that point: Didn't want to be there. You Know My dad justkept your going you're going next year. You know in eighth grade, go to highschool you're kind of in that middle school and and go to the team and tryout again I broke my foot and dad's like your playng, no matter what I justbought, you new cleats, Tiam tighter- and it's just like my first coupleyears of football- is a tough experience yeah, I guess yeah now forme, it was like I said my dad had back in back in these days. Every grade you started in B in thesecond semester was the a level right. I would. I had just gone through likeDnine, which was middle school junior high back then my dad says well: You're going to go tois play is crestmy Carmelite high school and that far from where we lived-and I said no- I'm not going and he goes look- you go I'll. Take you totake the test you have to. You have to have an infeence exam and if you dowell- and they let you in we're- GOINGTO have to talk about it, becauseI want you to go there all right. So I went and tof my test and man. I thoughtI bombed it. I did everything I could I mean I was just checking letters andboxes and yeah right and as fate would allow. I got like a ninety on a test. So then, now I'm now not only do I have toplay have to go to this high school. My Dadsays you know. I got a great idea, you don't knowanybody at this high school. I said Yeah. I know nobody. This is golfoffootball. You know, there's ninety something guys in your freshman class.Half of them are playing football, so you'll learn yoyou'l, get to know, halfthe guys in your in your freshman class, just from playing football, all right I'll. Do that and back thenges. I was a quarterback wow nice because I awaysl play right: Baseballplayes for naturally the quarterback I was th. I was a picture and a catcherin baseball yeah EAH, so so it makes sense that youknow you probably could wing it and you just out there they're going to put theGuy Coun, throw the ball out there. I could throw that last at all of aboutone and a half practices in high school at nignt grade because it started my seth grade year.I was five. I think I was five eight and weighed about a hundred and eightyfive pounds, so I was stocky as we used to say and the Frirstman year. I was six onein a hundred and ninety you know so I I spent my whole fofrestment year playingsports going to school and laying on heating pads right and no kidding no kidding. I meanI grew six inches from eight to ninth grade, so I literally know your pain, as he say,hat my dad used to say it you'll get over it you'll grow out of it. I'm like,I think, I'm growing into it. It's not going away, you know and just somethingyou had to deal with Giw when you grow so fast yeah. That's thatas. It wasinteresting B. What was that conversation for you when you, when thecoach came and said you know, I think we're going to move you fromquarterback to another position. What do you remember that, like saying, Idon't really know if I want to do this well yeah I was I was at this point. Imade my way from the fifth string quarterback to the third springquarterback and a coach came up to me and said...

...so. Do you like to you like this game?Do you enjoy it? I kind of Ik Yeah. I do he goes a Li. Do you want toactually play? I looked at him I said: Do I want to play yeah? Of course Iwant to play. He goes well. I don't think you're going to play aquarterback, but if you move to offensive line or defensive lyingyou're going to play because you're, a pretty good sized kid I looked at is okay, he goes okay, Maye,take your pick. I said I'm gont play defensive that and he goes well why defensive en Isaid I just don't like offense right. So I play mainly defense in high school. So did you play both ways? You justplayd, mainly defense. Did you have enough kids? So my junor year, I playedboth ways. My sophomore year, I played a littlebit f offense a little bit, but mainly defense, my se or I played all defasse.So what were your sports in high school? Well, I started throwing the shotcutjust sort of do something in the spring, because you know I right before. In theninth grade I've been playing Legen Bos through my shoulgrap and Messe. It up pretty good. In fact,in later years I would find out t they called it. A torn rotator, cof backthen right our now, then it was. You threw your shoulder out G. I try myrotator and I just decide what the heck I'll go offfor track and I'll try chotcute. So I tried the shopcut and did reallyreally well at it. Freshman year I threw you know throughit pretty well, but then ther was only like an eight pound shot. They don'tstart Tou with a big heavy one, but I really enjoyed it. So that'ssomething I did all through high school. Well, I mean you still hold the recordat the high school, correct, Yeah Yeah. I want I eventually wante to state as asenior junior iwas third senior IAS. First Yeah it was it was it was. It was prettyinteresting. I had a great coach, my athletic director and head track coachand the shopclit coach for guys that really influenced me sports, wise and you know, Work Ethic Wise. What it tookto be really good at something I they never we never lifted weights. It was all technique, it was all steed.It was all you know doing things as quickly and explosively as possible, so I threw the twelve pound shot inhigh school, like sixty seven N, sixty eightt one te state out in California, andactually most of my college scholarships were dol. They werefootball in track, a couple of the couple school like Alabama and Nebraska.They were footbally, but you know Texas and UCLA and USC. Those were dual. Those were dual and you know if youthink about throwing a shop put a twelve pound shotput. Twenty two hat around twenty two yardsI mean just in football sense. You know we're talking about yeah, I mean Py.Sixty seven feet sounds, I mean that's an amazing long way andthen just throwing it. Twenty two yards is crazy, probably twenty three, but to hold that record so that you talkedabout having a torn rotator so that didn't affect your rotator at all. Whenyou throw shot no, no well, the shot is, is in here your whole right thing rightthere and I mean you'r you're doing this. It's in it's like aninner inward press when you're doing it and if you do it the right way,especially the old way, because now, when you watch shotputters, they throwlike a discuss, thrower realy get back there and they rock and they go aroundin a circle and the throat and it a lot of really cool centrifical force. Butwith us it was. I can't remember the name of it, but it was a slide. Afamous shoppitter by Ham, Mirandy Matxson, had really popularized and he'd want a gold medaleor two. You know so that was howait. So you didn't throw discus or anythingelse you didn't. Try didn't have o like our area in track and field was way toosmall. We hav barely had room for a shopput area, much less. I Realy! No. I know I remember in my high school wehad javelin and the coach wanted me come out through Javlin I mean I don'teven think they have that in high school sports anymore. Do they, I mean,I think thavs Av kind of outlawed ton. Some states do some states. Do I'm notreally positive, given the mental makeup of most fifteen eighteen yearold males, I would give them a long,...

Sark short poject, to throw it roundaround other remons. Isn't that the truth? You never know hethat thingis going. I mean. I think I try to throw I one time and I hitmyself in the back of the head. When I let it go, and I said Nope, I'm doneI'll, stick to baseball football, so so you're in you you're playing both. Whatwas that recruiting process like for you, I mean you're, getting recruited Nin track and field and football. Whychoose just football? Well, I wait. I mean I'm wening to UCLAwith every intention of doing both. In fact, I actually went upe. That SPRI Miss Sprang my freshman year,because I was on a track team. It's good bit of practice because I waspracticing for the shot like track, which was fine with me. I figured outTha. I could throw th shot an not do spring ball and that sounded like apretty good bargain and that's only a plan. Yeah Yeah anybody has beenthrough spring football now. It was nothing fun about that, but I threw it. You know I, through theshot, the sixteen pound, the big one over sixty feet, my freshman year incollege, what little I threw, but they wanted meto lift a lot of weights. If yous got amaghon shop, putters Ora, they arestack yeah. You know this sounds just stupid andand sometimes a little funny, but every time I lifted weights I got incrediblysore and if I stopped lifting Weis, thesoreness went away, so I figure it out pretty fast. If Idon't lift, I don't get sore. So I didn't Livt wait. I didn't lift weigtsin high school. I didn't Livt weights in college. I didn't really startlifting weights until after right about my second year in the NFL. So how did you maintain any kind of?Did you do? Other things? Did you did you have like a stretching groutine?Did you just do push up situps? You know like the whole here Walker thing,or how did you etan anything? I mean because playing olineing position. Yougot to have some strength. Yeah I was. I was naturally prettystrong. I always had really good techniques andI was very explosive so that helped I never missed it. I didn't. I neverhad the feeling that there was something that I was missing out on. IfI wasn't, if I wasn't lifting we had plenty ofguys on the team that were you know they could lift one side of thebuilding and I could back down but oeven. When I got to the PROC I mean myfirst. I was drafted by Guyna Mony Clark, who was the head coach at SanFrancisco the later Detroit, but he'd been the old line coad for Shoerlat'sfamous dolphin stains. So I go up after the draft and havetress conference, and then we have a mini camp and the first thing they dois you go in the locker and the wait room and they're going to test youthey're, going to see how you how you live, how you do pull ups Chinups, thosekinds of things and then we're go, got aron forty! Well, I did. I did two reps of two and a quarter. Ireally seriously had really rarely ever lifted. I did't whant. I did one pull up andtwo CHITUPS and I'm walking out of the lot and the lock rom an tilled, and he looks atme and goes hey a I go over and Sai Yeah coach was up. He goes. Are youtrying to get me fire? So what do you mean? He goes TAC? THAT'S NOT REALRIGHT! You didn't really just do two reps it to it a cordor. I said I don'tlivt ways and he goes. I am going to get fired and hesaid HEU Beta run a good forty and I ran like a four eight or foureight five. Forty I got down with that. He lookedat me and goes okay. Now, I'm not getting fired now. Remember why Idrafted you, you could yeah. Well, I mean, obviously theywatch film on You. They knew who you were, and they probably understood theytalked to the coaches and they had o have an understanding that you didn'tdo that in college either I mean today. Obviously that would you know coacheswould go insane if you didn't lift weights, but you know. I think thatthat just is a testament to talent. You just had you know crazy God, given talent thatyou were able to use and go out and perform. So you know, as my kids called all thetime, it's just old. You had old man, strength when you were young. You knowthat you could go and do that and you had you had the good tat Thayou didn'tget thrown around lit, took one season of going against. You Know Wille Lenneer and Merlyn Elsonand Alan page, and some of the old...

...timers that were still in the NFL whenI got there quoit Bacon one year of that curly curly culp. I'vegot a nice scar right here on my kin from where he split me open. I got I done with that year and I gotto the offseason and I decided you know what you might want to start liftingaway. It's just a little bit SEV this see if this wait. Stuff really is whatit's made up to be. So then did it's so because you O, when, when you to waitthat sore, did you kind of get past all that well yeah after I did that the funnything is we got right about that time. We got a strength and additionin coach.Actually, his name is Alvor Mel, Dick for meals, younger brother all was amazed and all we did wasOlympic lifting and that's something that kind of tkind of appeal to me. It was all technique, it was all quickness, it wasall you know, you're doing the cleaning, jerk and snatch, and all that all thisother stuff- and I kind of like so I got pretty od. Well, they say that's. The best. Liftyou can do is an athlete is, you know, is do a fool clean. Where y you bringit up and you front squat it and then press it over your head. I mean that'sthe total workout and you know I've been through a lot of Olympic liftingcoaches as well. You know I wasn't crazy as a quarterback about when yougot to do the wide grip and snatch it over your head and never felt good onmy shoulders, but you know thereas. I did I used to. I got to the ponewhere I was doing snatches specifically and the overhead pretty heavy. You O really three in thethree fifty rangs for the overhead, or you know, reo five, three o five on thesnatch. I replace both my shoulders consequent.I mean subsequently here, as as a EN citizen, I have to titanium shoulders. So did you notice a difference rightfrom from the first year? Then you start doing some Olympic lifting? Wasit a big difference because you obviously had the technique in theskill set to play? Guard and Lineman, but did you know, is a difference andhow that strength, and that muscle that was added to your body. When when thenyou were able to go up against those defensive players? Yeah, no doubt nodoubt it's, it was all worth it plus. You know I moved quicker. Your our legsis stronger. Your your your core area is so much stronger. It correlated very, very well translated well to playing you know, playing linemen.It was I'm glad I did it and I think you know not doing itbefore. then. You know might have taken a lot of wear and terr off my body thatmaybe that's one of the reasons I lasted as long as I did right, but yeah it was. It was an interestingsetup, hey everyone. I want to thank you forlistening to huddle up with Guss we're joined by Randy Cross, we're going totake a little quick break here, we'll be right back and I got some greatquestions for Randy coming up so staytuned, hey listeners, thanks for joining Daveand I in the huddle we invite you to join our excusive huddle throughPatreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs, likeyourself, head to our website, huddle up with Guscom and hit support ourpodcast on the pop up ad. Once again, that's huddle up with guscom. Now,let's get back in the huddle, hey everyone were back in the Holloejoining me today is Randy Cross. You know you. Can I really appreciateeveryone listening to our podcast over the last year and a half and we've hadsome great guess three times roll champion today, Randy Cross. I have afew questions for him about his relationship with his quarterback, sorandy, I you know my relationship was always really close with my lime and Iloved doing everything with my lime and going out with them. I have some reallygood stories with my lime and I have some really bad stories, but weprobably can't tell on the air with my lime and so tell some good stories thatyou have with with your quarterback over those years yeah. Well, you know Joe got there. JoeMontana got to San Francisco the same time. BUILDID build drafted him inseventy nine and Joe wouldn't even start Joe, istobacco to Stevee Debir for a while...

...and and bill basically wasn't puttingany pressure on him. Let Hi kind of develop and wouldactually design certain red, Zon and specific plays ind parts of the fieldwould be part of our game plan. So Steve was a starter. Steve ran theoffense. Joe Was the backup who got to play, which worked out pretty well. Joe, Jo, is good. Guy Reallyinteresting, wasn't a real, loud pragadocious kind of person. You knowpretty calm, pretty pretty cool one of the only people I ever computedwith played with that really seemed like he got calmer andhis heart beat slower sort of the later in the game and the more importantthings got he got cooler. He got relaxed Right, ye O that pretty early Imean back from the seventy nine or so we were in training camp. He startedrunning the offense and we had been the year before the reason bill wash gothired. We were the worst team in the late. We were toing for e right. We wereally sucked the next year we could run. We movedthe ball offensively and we're runing bills offence. Even an training camp.You go on Hey. This is pretty cool. These plays work, he knows, Merlton gunis but our defense, we couldn't play deat, so we knew every week we hend up oscore. Thirty, five to forty points Han we didn't get up in that area. We hadno no chance of waiting again sower two, an fourteen toten that year, but and jogot some play in time and then got more playing time, the next year and eightyas a Sol start, and he actually until that Buffalo Houston playoff gamewhere they came back from what thirty one points down right. We were down athalftime to the saints thirty five to seven Py mid season. Arch cmanning wasthe quarterback. To date, myself of the SAM. We were down thirty five to seven atthe half and we came back and beat him in regulation. Thirty, eight thirty,five wow yeah e half anyway, they pla they play pretty decent and we just horevery time we got to theall right what you had to right, and that makes it fun.I mean that was those are the Games. You remember you know, even if youwould have lost, they gave you Tho proder, just remembered tha, theemotions that went in through that game, because I've had plenty of games likethat. Wer, you gosh. You know that's like money in the bank, though, for a team, and we had a group of guysthat group that offensive group outside of maybe two guys was the sameoffensive group that won the super bowl the next year right and and would go onand win another one in a couple of years right, but once you have to havethat experience, you have to have that coming back from fourteen with threeminutes to go in the game or coming back from three touchdowns down in thefourth quarter or something for future reference, so that you never really gettoo geep out about being down. You know you might there's always a matter whatyou are there's always a way to do it, and I think, from that point on, wenever gotten a game that we were down, that we didn't thinkthere was somehow someway the man. Well, you build trust. I think that'swhat it comes down to that you build trust. If you didn't all do your jobs,the whay Youw're supposed to you, would never be able to score that many pointsin the second half. so that builds a trust that hey. If I do what I'msupposed to do, then we can get this done and we see all the time in the NFLwhen mistakes happen, that trust is broken and then that becomes prettyhard, but you also have to build trust off the field. So tell something aboutyour time with that team because, like you said it's aid team, it's a bondingexperience tell us about like how you guys spent time off the field thatreally built your bond as well. Yeah I mean it was well. We all had one thing in common: We all really hated losing CRI. Godknows we ad had a chance to lose twenty eight games the last two years. We were ten in six and eighty, so westill were losing and we just didn't want to go back. That was a hell of hime hell of a a motivator that we knew what was back. We knew what was instore. If we got ourselt, we let ourselve get bad again. In fact, ineighty two, after our first superbowl we had that strike and that strike year we were like threeand six. We played nint games right and...

...that really sucked. So again that wasmore Mo, but you Kno, that's. The field was soimportant whether it was training, camp or and in position groups. You know theold line hangs out all the time together, as does every everyindividual group, but there's just something different about a lign withmost teams, because you know they've got to be able to get along witheverybody. You got to be able to go one of the dline on your team. You got tobe Alon, able to Detto your so called Youodoesonyour team encean. I A it, was an interesting dynamic thatwe had, because we also didn't do something that most teams do and that'sbeat the crap out of each other. We built bill wasn't a believer that youhad it all the time, and you know it probably starting inlike eighty three. We only really brought our pads out to practice. Twodays a week where we do nine UN seven and one an one crash res, we o wereshoulder pass the rest of the time. We were basically just runningeverything on air and learned how to go full speed without pats, which is noteasy and most most teams can't do that. But bill sort of taught us by you know trial and error. That is thebest way to go right and you know- and it's funny, because when I played forthe Broncos and Coch Chanahan, that was the same philosophy. We had there. Youknow kind of Cocan a came from that era and that mindset and that offense- andI mean that's what we did. Let's practice hard play fast, we don't haveto kill each other, but we did get into scenarios like that where you get inthe Shortyarda an goal line and you put them on you go for a little bit and youknow, hopefully nobody gets hurt, but you got to get some of that work in,but it didn't have to be all the time you know when I played for the Bengalsand Kenny Anderson was my quarterback coach. Candy should tell me some crazywar stories, F o when he played for the Bengals, when they would just go at itfor three practices a day and it was just nonstop and I'm like Ait's insane.You know, but that's that's amazing. Tha W that was four OS grade. yeahforforth Greg was an Oldem Barty jis hardcore. You know when we cal play theBANGALS in the Super Bowl. You know at Pontiac, you had to atinate practicesand we had the early practice, so the bangals would practice. After US billwas playing music, so we started playing music at the verybeginning, O practice they get louder and louders. The practice would go onand by the end of practice, we got like defensive period and all the SoffensSofe guys werein the background, we're playing air guitar and you look back in the end zone andforest gray, dot the teams all sitting there and they got their tin, straps onand they're ready to practice, and they all look so serious. We're going mad,lighten up right, forst, grays, Gon, tnose, California,guys don't know. What's coming at them or tolling. You know, N I've been withboth coaches and I've seen it allso. You know play with e many differentteams. You see a bunch of different mindsets that coaches have, and I lovethat mindset, because it proves that you can still get some work done. Youdon't have to kill each other because the game's hard enough on Sunday. Theway it is. You know it's going to be super physical. So you know you werealso a leader in the locker room. You were limeing of the year. I think threeyears in a row you were you were forty nineor of the year on year for all yourcommunity efforts. So tell me about that leadership role that you came intoand I'm sure you grab that and you were you have to be kind of proud of that yeah yeah I was I mean it was. I had. I had a great guy that playednext to me. Keith Fawnhorse who's, our captain, and he was also our player rap andobviouslthe alternate player, revet right so earn those strikes and stuff.We got to do all that. Fun Work, Oh yeah, but yeah I mean he he was. He was somebody that, even as ateammate, Yeu kind of looked up to because he was so solid and he was sucha he was, he didn't say much of anything, but he led by example, andyou know that was something that I alwas found kind of easy to drawon. Having somebody that close to you, that was that was like that. So yeah I mean being a quote. Unquote, leader is is good, it's nice, but you know I thought I thought it wassomething that if yo...

...are you DONB? It's like the Amaneanalogy I would make, is doing t you know doing the color in on television.That's right thing: You can learn to do okay and you can become a captain andlearn to do that, but people that are naturally like that are just naturallylike that, and you know if they can do it, they can do it. Well, it's also a I think. I mean the leaders that I'veseen in the lockrooms. You just have the utmost respect for Uright, evenwhen they walk in the locker room, and you know you're not supposed to bedoing something. They walk in you're like okay, because I think the teams agreat teams- I don't know how you feel about this, but I alwaysthought, like the teams were just about the locker room, like our great teamsthat I was on it was always we had a great caraderie in the lock room we allgot along. It wasn't like anybody against anybody else. An the leadersjust kept us all together and kept US motivated, yeah yeah and, to a large degree, theleaders kind of kept the kept the kidding in line. Then you knowthe jokes t that fine line between joke andinsult and a good reatiorship R can make sure that fine line is 't crossed. Yeah know, that's that's a hard one todo, because I became a jokester because I've had many. I was with Jeffhostettler. He was a big prankster. You know I'm franked a few people. You know,because when you, after practice, you're having fun, we do some somethings but there's a fine line where it gets over too serious or it hurtsomebody's feelings. You don't want that. You know it's okay to have a funlaugh and then you know you'v got to realize you never can do that to peoplethat have a hard time with it. You know what I mean like Yh, eand,just roll off their back and other people, just it just stews in them.They hate it. You know, and you can't you can't always let those guys alone.You didn't want to pick on those guys because Theye Gino come ut n. They eregoing to come back to get you one day. That's for sure, that's right all right! So then all right, so you gothrough your career. After thirteen years you've had this great successfulcareer. You kind of now make this transition. Did you start transitioningto be an analyst to be in TV and doing those things before you were even done?Were you talking about that? Or did you just get done and say I need to dosomething else now yeah I did. I DID RADIO AND TV for about five or sixyears before I retired and I had a production company anddidmy show had an advertising and promotionsagency and all that I started a couple years before I retired, and we did someof our production out of that and I started sending the network. Mytape, Andabout Eigh, six, eighty seven,eighty six and you know because also I did USFL Games Bra, an vader back thenso that was really fun. I'd never done anything like that before I got to dothat before. I ever retired so yea. I started hitting the networks with mytapes for a few years before I retired, so that possibility being there wasn'tterribly surprising. So how did you get to that point? Like? Did you justalways kind of want to do that? Or was there somebody a mentor that said hey?You should start thinking about the next step in your life. How did you get tothat point? My Dad kind of pointed me in thatdirection. You Know My dad was an actor, so heappreciated sort of the art of being full of it, but he also. He also, you know made the point thatyou know you can be really good and getting along with the media andknowing how the media works will never be a bad thing. It will always serveyou WEP, so I kind of remembered that andconcentrated on that, and it was Kindo the guy they always went to for quotes. So Yeah Ikit became a natural tranktransition going into that and I san my first dealwith CBS. I was supposed to do seven games iended up doing fifteen thatherer. That's awesome did you like? Did you enjoy that it was it woul O as fantastic? It was, I loved itright up until the playoffs, because they assigned me to work with the NFLtoday as a sideline reporter during the show yeah, and my first assignment wasthe divisional playoffs. I think it was Minnesota and San Francisco aCandlestak Pala, a get all you know come out of thefield. They're baffing me in the back of the head and joking yeah, you knowsaying stuff to me and what not D Noy Al ran five and it just hit me like aton of bricks. I, these son of a Bitchis, going to do itagain, they're going to win the Soi...

...without yeah. So that's that was a that was aunique position. Yeah, I'm sure. I'm sure you knowthat's great advice from Your Dad Yoa. My Dad used to tell me like. If youdon't make the team the world needs ditch diggers Toson. That was that wasmy advice for my dad you' right. He was a mill guy. He was like you can comework with me in the factory. So I was like whatever I had to do to stay outof there. I wasn't. I wasn't going into tha factory, that's for sure, so youhave a long career in the NFL. Then you have a long career as an analyst. WhatI you know tell us about some of the ups and downs you went through doingthat and like was there a time where you said. Okay, I'm done with this I'mgoing to move on, but you seem to like stick with it for a long time. Yeah I mean I've done it now, sinceenty nine, so this is my thirty second year well TV tenty eiht of it is with CDs for with NBCback when CBS Lost Football there in the early s right or bid diies yeah. I have no regrets. I did twentyyears of NFL. I've now done. You know eleven years of college football. It's it's to me is the greatest game. Thereis it's, it's there's a lot of analogies and parallels with life andeverything else that that come to bear in this game, and it is just a game.You know it's there's that great, you know quote you see or that that thatsound bite you hear about. Why so serious right? That's right! That'sthat's a little voice in the back of my mind when I'm talking about football isyou know if I see at times like I'm laughing, for no reason it's becauseI'm thinking of that. Why so serious right? You know how many coaches do youknow that are like that. You know, and I try to explain this to youth coaches.All the time like just let them have fun, don't be so serious with them.They're, not. You know, you're, not winning a super bowl you're, not you're,just trying to have fun so they cantinue to play the game. You knowthroughout as long as they can, but a lot of people are serious and they takethe game very serious, and you know, as my kids always say, dad that's oldschool thinking right, but that's just kind of how a lot ofthe old school coaches were. Oh Yeah, Oh yeah! Now it was but it'sfun. I really love it. It's a team atmosphere. You know, because you knowit really is chemistry between you and your partner when it comes to the playby play guy and the whole teamthat thetes producer director, the Ba the ad the stats people, the people open to booth with you. You know it's still very much a teamenvironment and it's something that you know I really enjoy. Have you ever got that little bug inyours, oer, they're, saying: okay, Randy you're off script like get backon it now! Oh Yeah, Oh Noy, I Lov CI'm very familiar with it. Okay, bring it back really back inbuddy, really back in yeah yeah, I'm sure true, I'm sure you've had a lot ofthat so ranny. One of the last things welike to do here is called our two minute drill. It's just a lot of fun.Sonar puts two minutes on the clock. I ask you a bunch of questions and, and then you know at the end, I want tofind out where people can follow you or what your favorite charities are orwhere what they can donate to, what your groups are all right so or hit twominutes for us, buddy all right, randy gas or electric car, Oh gas, all the way, in fact, pickuptruck. Oh Nice! I Have A, I have a pickup truck myself fly or drive. U rather fly or drive fly it's faster right, all right!What's your biggest pet peeve, O God, how much time you got I'll be very simplistic. People arevery disappointing. Okay, you sound like my wife. She likes our dogs way more than mostpeople, I hot or cold. Oh I'm, a hot Guy Dai, favorite sports movie, favorite sports movie, Bolder! I like Tha, Llen bulldorm, is good allright. What's your? What sport do you play now? Maly off mainly Gompus thats? What's ahandicap at I'm a really good fifteen nice! I love it. I love it's abouthaving fun right, Itis, not having fun...

...and and and making money, yeah Ihyeah. Okay, all right, if you couldchange places with one person for a day, who would that be one person for a day dead or alive, it doesn't matter. I let's go with Mark Zuckerber all right.You Gan put some more change in your pocket yeah. No, I would just like forone one, just one time get to know what it feels like to be, that rich on right,right, I'll, take Jeff Besos all right last one. This is a kick tofill. Go we didn't score touchdown, all right. Who is your favorite all time,quarterback, oh Joe Montana, the one that'sundefeated in super bowl and is never thrown an interception. Unlike otherpeople, I can dame right. Well, that's probably every other quarterback thisplay in the superbow. All right, Rannie appreciate your time.Tell me how our guests can find you and what your favorite charities are, wherethey can donate all right higher heroes. USA is my favoritecharity lately, my all time, favorite charity is the Ronal McDonald House,which I'm sure is in a city near you. Those are fantastic and go to mywebsite. RANNY CROSSCOM! That's where my podcast lives, and also where you can find me on all thesocial media platforms. All Right, real quick tells what you talk about on yourpodcast heck football, cooking life, Fun, jokes! I love. I love kind of like the rednickred nick fail videos, Al those type of things. It's my it'smy podcast, it's very unstructured and I h N. I can put on it whenever thehell, I feel like right. There you go. I love it. I love it. Well, remembereveryone if you get to meet Randy someday or if you want to send insomething to him. Just remember he's not serious and he doesn't want you tobe serious, so everyone thanks again randy for joiningus on huddle up with gusts. We really appreciate you listening check us outon Nshixeenden D, thirty, one digital news, Huddlo up with Guscom andRADIOCOM or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast have a great day. Thank you for joining Dave, and I inthe huddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast if you like, to hear morepodcast, just like this go to huddle up with Guscom, where you can find oursocial channels subscribe to hear more by our merchandise and join ourexcusive huddle through patreon. Please join us next week when we talk to moreguests about how sports shape their life.

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