Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Peter Vaas

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Longtime football coach Peter Vaas joins Gus Frerotte and guest host Marnie Schneider in the huddle! Vaas talks about what inspired him to get into football as well as how he inspires his players. Furthermore, he talks about his many career stops along the way including stints at Notre Dame, NFL Europe, and the XFL. Of course, they also talk about his stints as head coach of Allegheny College and Holy Cross. Join the huddle and listen to yet another star studded episode! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joining us in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback, gusts Rod, alongside my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar, where we talked to guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on our website. How up with Gustscom, where you can listen to more episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle everyone. Thanks for joining US another episode of Huddle. Off with gusts. I'm your host, Gusts Rock, fifteen year NFL quarterback. I'm usually joined by my longtime friend and cost Dave Hagar. Dave is not with us. Dave got a new job. You'll keep joining us every now and then back on podcast. Today I'm joined by my kind of interim co host, Barnie Spencer. So, Marnie, how are you doing? I'm doing great. Thank Gus. How are you? I am doing great. Great. Now, Mornie, you've written a bunch of books. How's that going? How are you? How? How's everything? What new books do you have coming out? Well, my newest book football pretty and fumbled Dog Game Day in Dallas. It's about to come out and you know, the book business is, I think, a pretty consistent business. But in particular I really believe, and you know this, guys, we've talked about it, that sports is the universal language. So it's really important for me to try to educate my love of football, but also my love of history and my love of the tradition of football through my children's family book series football, Freddy and fumbled the dog. And I'm certainly excited to have a really illustrious, you know, coach with you today and that I get to be part of this, because I've been doing some research and watching her youtube videos and they're amazing and I and relatable. I mean I have three kids. Two of my boys play football, and so I feel like when I watch your videos, I could actually then show them the videos and they're really easy to translate. But also I could probably get out there and keep my well, you know, keep my soul drop and, you know, find my left foot to plant on and and maybe, you know, throw some good twenty yard passes. That would be great, Parney. Yeah, there you go. So, Hey, arpisode is brought to you by RADIOCOM or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and you can also find us on amp TV a MP tvcom. Today's guest coach, Peter Voss. Peter grew up in Massachusetts and I correct. Coach. Absolutely cool. And then you've coached all over. You were quarterback at Holy Cross. You've coached at Holy Cross. You coached at Allegheny College, I think is just north of Pittsburgh. So let's get into it, coach. Thank you for joining us on a huddle up with guests. I'm thrilled to be here, flattered to be here. I'll go back to what money just said. That I'll disagree with. I don't know anything about this illustrious stuff. It's one of these things where it's much more like I'm an old coach, but glad to be here. Well, thanks for joining us, coach. So let's go back, coach, when you were growing up in in Massachusetts, when you were a young kid, what was that time? The first time you remember why you fell in love with sports? Was it an idol? Was It somebody was your dad was at the kids in the neighborhood? We all have a different story. What's yours? Well, I think it's probably a combination of all that. Certainly, like a lot of us, my father was my first coach. I can still remember him trying to teach me to throw a spiral in the living room one Christmas. I know that we used to play catch all the time in the front yard and I grew up in Westwood, Massachusetts, which is a small suburb of Boston, and at back in those days, because heck, I grew up in the S and s there wasn't pop want a football. So I was never exposed to football until I reached high school. But at the same point in time, I guess my First Love was little league, and you know the Little League Baseball I was the first organized sports we had. The local elementary school, Jim's, used to be open for basketball...

...on Saturday mornings, which you'd go to, and then as I developed into junior high school, I had a physical education teacher basketball coach by name of rustdowns and just kind of fell in love with what he did for a living. And always grew up wanting two things, and this will probably have to educate you guys a little bit, but I grew up wanting to be a teacher and on top of that, my father was a Boston College graduate, my uncle a pretty prominent lawyer in Boston was a holy cross graduate and back in those Days Holy Cross and Boston College were well, they still our forty five minutes apart, but they've gone in a tremendously different direction when it came to athletics. Boston College has much larger school. Holy Cross has remained a small liberal octs school. But back in those days I had a strong desire to go to Holy Cross. So I kind of combined the idea of being a teacher and a coach with my love of Holy Cross and that's where I ended up going to school and it just kept on going from there. You must like climbing hills if you went to Holy Cross. You've been there? Oh Yeah, I know my son. I took my son to visit there and because we had some good friends whose kids went there, and and he's like, man, I don't know if I could do these heels dead. It's where Saint Pittsburgh and I'm going to imagine you went there in the summertime. Try Those hills when it's winter. No, we're actually there in a winner. Oh did no wonder you made the yea. Yeah, yeah, it was kind of cold and chili out. So like so you know coaching and you said it. You grew up in a neighborhood. I can't imagine what your neighborhood was like mine. I had a bunch of friends, we rode our bikes around, we went and played every sport. We went, found a field and found the court, did whatever we had to do, and it seems like a lot of that is lost today on kids. How do you feel about that? You know, I think the most important thing that we have to remember about athletics is you play a game and we get caught up in the game and forget the play, and that's exactly what it is. Can you be creative? And this will sound like a strange analogy, but just because it's fresh in my mind, I happen to live in Tampa Florida now is both my daughters. One daughter has two children, one of which is they three year old granddaughter, and the three year old granddaughter is now my best friend. But we go in the swimming pool virtually every afternoon and we're always coming up with something like I'll carry her and I'll walk and I'll turn and I'll say Kayley, look at that, there's mummy, and I'll step into the pool and we fell into the pool by accident, and so she jumps out of the water and goes pop, more, pop, more and more and more. And then yesterday we came up with one where we're on opposite sides of the pool and we'd reach towards one another and I'd go, Kaylee, hold my hand and she'd reached to me and we both step into the water. And my point is the imagination, because it wasn't once that you do these things, it's like sixteen times in a row. She can't get enough. But the idea of playing, the more we can let kids play and figure out the argument of when you grab a bat and the guy that ends up on top gets up first or second, or just all that creative things that go into doing at the arguments that you have. I was safe, no, I was out, you know, whatever the case may be, I think that stuff is critically important because it solves problems. It helps stop the foundation of team work. I'm not in favorable a whole lot of structure because, I mean, it wasn't brought up that way until I got to an older rage. But when you seven, eight, nine ten years old, let them play and you know it's just it's too much fun not to play. Yeah, I remember when we were playing baseball, I was my mom. I've always been a big baseball fan, and you would go up and we're playing all your buddies. You would imitate some your favorite player right how they swung or what they said or their mannerisms...

...or whatever you did. But when you got to like little league and stuff and you try to do that, the coach would be like, pay attention, don't do that, you know, and it's like it's what you said. They take when it's structured, all that kind of imagination and play goes away. Absolutely it, because now you are forced, if that's the right word, to be in an environment where somebody is dictating to you what to do as a as opposed to being creative. Let's not take away the creativity of young minds. I totally agree with that. You know, there's been so many studies on the value and importance of playfulness and how it really can shape your mind and give you the ability to have leadership qualities, be a big thinker. Problem solved, like you just said, coach, and you know, certainly in baseball. I love baseball as well. I grew up having a really unique opportunit tunity. My grandfather on the Philadelphi Eagles and at the time they shared the stadium with the Philadelphia Phillies. So when the dog days of summer, when there was nothing happening on the football side, and I'm a daughter of a single working woman and my mom worked for my grandfather, I was hungry and board and I would wander over to the Philly side and they would feed me and me a ticket to a game or let me sit somewhere, and I got to watch Mike Schmid and the great ones, actually, you know, Pete Rose, but they were playful too. It was interesting. You know, baseball players, I think, are a little cerebral at times, but definitely there's a playfulness and the mascots got involved and it really brought the fans and, like you said, guys like imitating. Growing up, my friends would always imitate certain players and it definitely added to, I think, their ability on the field and I love the idea of being able to play. I think, coach, that's so brilliant and something that were so missing now, just giving kids a ball and saying just go play, I don't care how you do it, just figure it out. You're absolutely correct. Money in and it's one of the things that when people always ask you, why did you get in the coaching? Well, there are a lot of very academic reason to do yet, but the bottom line I never wanted to grow up and you could. You're always around a game. As a player, you're always around a game. Is it a business? Yes, is it serious? Yes, but if you take away the playfulness from it it becomes much too rigid and I don't think you relax. And I know when, oh shoot, I just wrote a thing the other day somebody asked me a question about what do I look for when I evaluate a quarterback? And, to be perfectly honest with you, you'll look at how with how does he do it, in the sense of does it come naturally for him? If a quarterback is robotic, he's probably not what you're looking for. You want it to just come naturally and be relaxed and be at ease and thus playful, natural. Hey listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website. Huddle up with Gustscom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddle up with gustcom. Now let's get back in the huddle, right, coach. So when you're going to high school, now you're in ninth grade, you're going into high school. What High School did you attend? Went to Westwood High School and Westwood Massachusetts. And I will go back to what you guys had just talked about about being on the field, because I think I'm taking words out of your mouth, gusts, and I apologize. You're fine. How did football stop? But I went because I grew up in the age where the greatest football player ever played and I wanted to be him, and that was Jimmy Brown. So when I started on the high school freshman team or started playing, I wanted number thirty two and I wanted to be a running Jimmy Brown. I wanted to imitate my idol by Ol boy, you've I was seeing me run. You know, I was living in a Dream Ball. That's why, that's why I played quarterback, because I couldn't run. Well, ironically enough,...

...that's probably what happened to me. The the guy that want wanted to be a quarterback. They switch the running back and he became a very good one at our high school, at our high school, and they switched me to quarterback and for you know what good things happened to at that level. Now, when I say good things, you know we weren't very good. I think we were owing eight my freshman year. I've we were doing six, two and six and then finally went five and three when I was a see. So we didn't play a whole lot of games, we didn't have a whole lot of success, but yet at the same point in time, the whole lot of fun. What was the greatest thing you learned from playing High School Sports? Coach? You know, I guess, when I look at it that way, what was the greatest thing I learned? I'd like to tell you how to compete, but when I look back at my high school career, I was probably an extremely immature rat because you know that had a little bit of a temper and you know, let a lot of basketball. Followed out of a lot of basketball. Game played, a lot of played an awful lot of baseball, as you mentioned, played it played an awful lot of football that you know football was where I had the most success. Just to work hard at it, to keep going at it, to keep plugging, to put things behind you. And I don't know if I learned this in high school. Well, I guess I did, and it's almost that you had to have a balance between a extremely competitive nature and I don't care attitude. If you put too much pressure on yourself, you didn't perform as well as you did when you almost relaxed and said I really don't care. And I know that's probably rambling in a bunch of different ways. Here is I'm trying to answer your question. I just learned to keep competing, just to keep playing, keep working hard. Yeah, you know, and that's that's a I think that has a lot to do with coaching, right, is if you have a good coach. Sometimes there's tough, sometimes they're lenient. Everybody has a different style, but if you have a good coach that you feel cares about you, you are going to get back up, you are going to work hard, you are going to do those things, because I see I've had coaches that didn't do feel that way and we had no players. You guess, you are absolutely correct. I know one of the things that I've preached as a coach is you don't have a chance to win or to be successful at all unless you're in it together. And how do you approve that you're in it together? You care about one another and and I know all the tright expressions about what athletics teaches you as the idea of team work, with the good of the team in front of the good of yourself, but as tright as they are, they are true the fundamental things that we all go through, and money very graciously mentioned some of those video those that as you go through and anything you do, it's the fundamentals that are important. I know as a coach you can get hung up with scomeat schemes and schematics and it's the new play, let me run the double reverse, triple option pass and all that. No, throw the ball accurately and catch it, and to throw it accurately into catch it, you have to have the fundamentals. And saying all that because it goes back to the creation of a team. In the creation of success is togetherness. If you don't have togetherness and people that care about one another, and that's teammates caring about teammates, coaches, caring about players, players caring about coaches, families involved, the little girls that come buy, the little boys that can buy, you know, reaching out and, you know, giving him a bag of peanuts or a candy bar or a pop cycle or whatever it might be. All those things show the genuineness that you have to have as a person, and it all starts with caring about other people absolutely. You know, coach. For me all, my first experience really watching professional football, although I was very young, was having an opportunity to watch coach Dick for...

...meal, and I think he was one of the first coaches that really led with an empathetic hearts and he would say to the players, you know, you don't even know how great you are, and was always hugging and kissing and crying and making them, you know, making everybody know how valuable they were, whether it was the janitors in the locker room or Ron Jaworski or whoever it was, he would always take a moment to acknowledge the importance in the value of what they were doing. And then, obviously the players would, you know, want to develop their fundamentals and they'd want to perform for coach for meal because he led with this heart that was so open and generous and really loving. And it's interesting because now I think so many coaches really follow in his footsteps of and eventually he got to win the Super Bowl. I mean, it didn't happen in Philadelphia, but it did happen because he stuck to his method of coaching, which is to obviously be very disciplined, have a tremendous amount of grit resolved, you know, bring it to the football field. If you're not prepared, you are gone, but then also show with love and empathy and kindness, and I think that that's one of the remarkable qualities of coach for meal. Like you were just saying, coach at that's really obviously how you coached as well, and it really does make your players and your team and your fan base way more invested in what you're doing on the field because even if you're not winning the game, they know that you're bringing all of it to the fields. I know, in coaching quarterbacks, one of the things that I read to him every single year, and it ties into coach for meal, and that's the poem. If if you've never read it, you know or if you have a chance, there is somebody can get it. Find It. Find it, and it's by rugged clipping right's Rugge kipling. And if you can hold your head when all about you were losing these and blaming it on you. If but part of it deals with if you can walk with kings and not lose your virtue, and I'll paraphrase, and but yet stay in touch with the common man and not feel better than and that's what you're talking about with Dick, for meal, treated everybody the same matter, if it's a president of the United States or the Custodian in the Locker Room, all those people are human beings. They all have feelings. Treat them with the utmost respect. And the reason he was successful, in my opinion, is basically what you just said. He had a plan and he stuck to it and along the way there are going to be some moments when that plan gets challenged, when you're not having success, but if you stick to it, eventually it comes to fruition. I happened? It wasn't when he was Philadelphia, but because of my involvement with NFL Europe, I'd go around at training camps and I happen to be a Kansas City's training camp when coach mcmuck the meal was there, and the part that I noticed over two or three days he den every practice with a different coach addressing the team. And basically what I thought of it was and how it registered with me, was Dick Vermil is letting everybody else speak his piece. In other words, we are one voice, we are one thing. At eat. Everybody would say it differently, but they'd all say the same thing. They'd all talk about together and it's a love for one another, working together and etcetera, etcetera, and it was an artistic way of handling that whole situation or developing a football team during training camp. Very impressed us with it that I've never forgotten. Me Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and suites and enjoy breakfast or two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US each day you stay for reservations. Be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo Code box when making your online reservation at Mariottcom backslash LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and asked for a promotional code S for B. Now that that's awesome, coach. So let's get onto your college career. You go to...

Holy Cross. What was that decision for you? I mean, you told us a little bit why you picked Holy Cross over Boston College. I think those are your choices. What was the coach that you had there and what? Tell us a little bit about your career at Holy Cross. Well, you're very, very fortunate. Guess not. My career at Holy Cross was an interesting one. Is, as I mentioned, that quarterback at Westwood High School that became a running back was pretty good. So in high school we handed the ball off of ton. My aspirations were and again holy cross, or excuse me, Westwood, was probably like Ford City. Wasn't a very large but from no place. We didn't have much success. It's one thousand nine hundred and sixty nine. Recruiting wasn't what it was today. So basically I walked on at Holy Ross. So we had a freshman team. So I get there and we're practicing as freshman. Now the other part of it. You get to understand money. Excuse me, but this is all male. Holy Cross is all mail back in ninth the falling nineteen seven, right on campus until one thousand nine hundred and seventy two. So anyway, the I get there and they'd recruited a quarterback from Cincinnati Moa. Now this little kid, this little naive kid from Westwood Massachusetts, Goes Cincinnati Molar. Ah, my Lord, this guy got to be able to walk on water right. They to they'd recruited a quarterback, but that was Mr Kennisius from Canisius High School in Buffalo New York. Again, I'm not in his to scholarship INS in my class. And they had reported to training camp the first of August from the Varsity did. I didn't come till school start at August twenty five, and so I go, as all go, as a walk on it. Basically I ended up playing quarterback. We played five freshman games. We started two of them. But it goes back to one of those questions to ask before about my high school career. It really registered as a freshman in college where I'm on that field. I'm an hour of the reputation of these two guys and then as we're competing on the field, I said to myself in a minute I'm just as good as these two. Don't anyway. To quicken the story a little bit, I played started two games to freshman on the freshman team. Then as a Sophomore we had a coaching change. Mediocre, I think, through a four and six my prete my sophomore year at Holy Cross, but I've played a bunch of positions. As a sophomore they had me as a running back, a wide receiver, defensive back. Then about halfway through the year we scrimmaged again and I asked coach I had like to be a quarterback again. Long story a little bit shorter. I started the last few games of the Sophomore I split time other guy with an upper classman as a junior and then I started and, as I so flippidly say, unfortunately, I had a good season as a senior and had the misfortune of signing a contract in Canada. And I say it that way because my professional career consists of sixty nine dollars. I laughed one of few days in Canada on a three dollar for dam the and the and I did. I had a premus career at Holy Cross. I enjoyed the heck out of it. I came back from Canada in July of one thousand nine hundred and seventy four started to get a teaching and coaching job. Well, at that point in time, in the midsummer, everybody's setting ready to go. I couldn't get a journy. The High School Buddy of mine had played football at a little place called allegheny college in western Pennsylvania, exactly right any miles north of Pittsburgh, up from seventy nine. So he went to a wedding, bumped into his head coach's head coach said we just lost our only assistant coach and that Assis in coach happening to be God a name MC Glenn Mason. Don't you remember? Are Not the former? Yeah, the Soda Coach, and Glenn just left alligator to go be a back to ball state. And then guy and if you went to Holy Cross, may have visited bullgate at some point in time. Yep, if you had one of the most successful,...

...if not the most successful, coaches in the history of full gate, the Guy B NAM addict fiddle. Well, Dick biddle got promoted from the job that I was interviewing to for the full time positions. So anyway, this job was open and the job consisted of being but the stodeing in the gym, but the maintenance to park and allowed you to treat you up to coach football. I took that job, the only job I can get. So for my first two years to coach I was Stodyin in the gym, the David Mead Field House, no Pennsylvania, and I was the offensive backfield coach and the defensive vent coach. Sam Time Alley Gaty College and, and I'll tie it in and get a little long winded here, the athletic director was at him, Harold mcilhaney, and he told me to be to the next full time job at and on campus is probably going to be an assistant football basketball coach. have any basketball back Playton high school, if like premure, lead a pretty competitive level and college. So Anyway, the basketball coach interviews me and now I'm the janitor in the gym for football and basketball. After years at position did become available. I became a full time faculty member and I was an assistant football coach and basketball coach at Alliany for five, five years. Thoroughly, thoroughly enjoyed it. As Mike Career goes on, I end up coming back to alleghany as the head coach. Great know, what an amazing story you know, and that goes to show you that you know. If it goes back to work, ethic, hard work, you know you're a walk on. You proved yourself on the field and I think that happens a lot of people. You're intimidated by either whatever job you're looking for or, you know, if it's sports, whatever position you're trying play, because you know you're not sure what the other person's like, but there's nothing you can do about them. And that's what I try to tell kids. You can't be that guy, you can't be that person out there. You can only be who you are. So you have to make the best person you can be out of what you're doing. And if it's a quarterback, go and just compete, going work hard, go to everything they ask of you. And my son's looking to get into coaching right now and I've had them talked to a ton of NFL coaches and you know, none of them are hiding right now. It's, like you said, it's way late in the game. They all told him to go and find a job in college somewhere to learn the game even more, to learn the analytics, learn all that stuff. And so coach Schmidt, it Du Kane, has given him a job to come in and meet the staff and then being assistant to everyone. And I said, dude, that's what it takes? Yes, it does. It takes a lot of patients, it takes a lot of hard work, it takes a tremendous amount of networking. It's not easy. But yet, as Sam Timer told me, Peter, if you're good, people will find you and you know, hopefully you're able to make a living out of it and sustain it for a long time for as a career. I tell that to every high school kid. If you're good, they'll find you, because all these kids think they have to go to the biggest, best school out there to get recognized, which is not true. And I said just enjoy your kid, your community, enjoy your town, enjoy where you're growing up, because all of a sudden you get taken away from all that. It's a different your lonely. You have other emotions going on. Play where you love to play. You're going to be good. You may not be you win a state championship, but they're going to recognize you. If you want to play at the at the next level, there's a going to be an opportunity for you. You know and Gush. You're not saying it specifically, but it just springs to mind. One of the dilemmas that I always found myself in as a college coach in my later years was this idea that high school kids need to enroll at a college early. So many kids bypass that second half of their senior year because they want to win roll and whatever institution it is in January and get a jump stock. Well, this all started with pre high school and then go to high school. But think back, and I'm assuming it applies to you guys. What was January,...

February, March, April, May and possibly June, like of your senior year in high school? And for me that was the second half of basketball, that was baseball, that was the senior prom the senior class trips, all those thee and your class play, all those things that you do as a senior that you waited for long years to do. And yet, as a football player, so many kids leave now at midyear, and how much of they sacrificing as opposed to just enjoying the light as it's presented on a daytoday basis? And I know as a coach I encourage kids come in because you want to get your hands on him, you want to get them into your system. But yet as a parent you say, wow, do I really want my son? And I don't know if daughters are doing it right now or not, but do I will just stick it to football? Do I really want my son to bypass the senior year? And the other thing that goes on here in the state of Florida is kids change schools four times, you know. And what happened to that high school career? We started this off with playing. Let's have fun, let's play, as opposed to I've got a market myself, I've got to make a career, I've got to create my best video, I've got to do this. Just go play and be good. Your videos sell itself. I got off on a rampage there. I'm yeah, you're good, you're good. So Mary. I think that goes back to some of you know why you wrote your books. To be honest, it's it's just play, it's have fun. You know, everything is taken so seriously now, everything is so structured and you know, if I'm going to go enjoy my team and as a fan, you know, hey, there's other opportunities out there for every city I go in to see something about that city and learn and play right and I think that's part of what your books are. Hey listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, Hud Dole up with Gustscom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddle up with gustscom. Now let's get back in the huddle. Well, you know my books. First of all, my mom was a teacher before she became an entrepreneur and then ended up at the Philadelphi Eagles, she was a teacher. So I think that reading is a great coping skill. Playing is a great coping skill and if we can encourage kids and families and communities to read and to play, then I think we're actually going to be helping our communities and really adding value. So, yes, I started writing my book series mostly because I really love football and I love speaking sports and we're going to eventually get into baseball and basketball and soccer and hockey and all the other sports as well. But I do think that being a spectator and being able to watch great people perform at a high school level. I Love High School Football. My kids play high school football. It's a great thing to go watch. High school coaches are amazing leaders. They teach our children this great you know, they teach them amazing things. So High School football to me, even if the kids don't want to go off and play college ball, and they might not be qualified to do that, but being on a team and being part of it and getting lucky enough, because sometimes it is about getting lucky and having a great coach. Obviously you know you guys are both great coaches at the high school level and really care about your kids and have really invested in that. It just is an amazing gift to the give, you know, to give to the community. So when high school football is operating at the way that it is and then the community can really get behind it. It's certainly wonderful. I wanted to write football Freddy so that I could share my love, from a female perspective, of why sports are so important and what it really does. You know, what you can learn from it and how you can really use it as a way to involve yourself and other conversations that might be you know, you might get left out of under normal circumstances, but if you could speak a little bit of sports, in particular regarding Football Freddy,...

...football, that I think you can communicate with your brother or father, coach, whatever it is, anybody, and that's a great thing to be able to speak the same language. Yeah, so I think that's that's so true. So, coach, tell me about now you're coach in college and you got to go into the homes. Who's the person when you go into the homes? I think I know this answer. When you go into homes, who's a person that you've got to impress? And I don't think it's the player. It's not. It's basically the decisionmaker. Yeah, I mean that it could be a bunch of different things, depending on up, on the environment, but the vast majority of the Times it's mom a and you know, more and more dad's getting involved at some more in tune high schools, the high school coach. Maybe there he may be the agent or the guider guidance, but you've got to impress the decision maker. But at the same point in time the impression comes from just what we implied a second ago the video. You got to go in and be yourself, you got to go in and be genuine and and I'll never forget recruiting a young man from Penn Trafford High School and going in and sitting around the kitchen table and dad asked me a question about academics and I give him my answer and he pounds the table, looks at me and I won't use the language that he used, but he was quite vociferous when he was telling me that I was full of crap and you know, and it kind of shocked me, but I just don't my only response was no, it's true. I promise you, we will look after you some because he basically said everybody says that, look at everybody that ends up on the street, etcetera, etcetera. Fortunately, his son went on to have a pretty illustrious career at alleghany and to this his son is a coach today and he's an obviously an allegany graduate. But the you can never tell what's going to happen when you're in that home. So you need need to be prepared for everything and just just be yourself, be genuine and everything you do, just be genuine. Yeah, I remember when coach trader from he was my head coach at Tulsa, the first time he came to the house my mom could darry which, sorry, Gush. Yeah, sorry, I don't know. We got a little go ahead, go ahead and money. So there's a great when you said be yourself, there's a great Latin expression essay qualm with dairy, which is actually was the motto of my High School, but also the motto of North Carolina, and the translation means be rather than seemed to be, and I always love that and I know that obviously that's you. I think that when I get the opportunity to have, you know, a conversation with somebody who's been on a field, whether it's a professional field or a high school field, they definitely have it. I feel like there's a different level of communication and I'm always so grateful for that. But certainly right. But you said being genuine, just in life, which I know those are great things, as to be a genuine person, and you will find your way absolutely yep, well in coach, and I'm sure that when you're not genuine, kids that you're coaching can sniff it out pretty darn quick all, without a doubt. With with our without a doubt, and it goes back to my analogy of watching a quarterback on video, I want somebody that looks natural, that does it with ease, as opposed to somebody who said, the coach told me to do this and the same way. Yeah, you know, just don't be robotic, just relax and be natural. What happened and all those things. So it applies to everything we do. Look, yeah, I've I'm going to steal a and I'm probably the bulging something we may or may not get to. But one of the things that I have thoroughly enjoyed over the last six or seven years because I've now become an instant replay official at the college level, and so you'd be surprised how much officials, how much work officials put into...

...it, how much pride they taken it. But there's a referee that I've worked with on more than one occasion that I admired tremendously, and at the close of his pregame meeting he says, guys, it's not only important that we get it right, but we have to look good doing it too, and that's a big part of what we all do, that if you look uncertain, if you are unnatural, people sense it's right. Nothing else. Look good doing it, but be natural doing it. Now I agree. I mean I've coached quarterbacks as just like you have, not as long, coach, but and I'm the same way. It's all about natural and it's about doing the proper things. But there's never a time where I wanted them to be robotic, you know, and like these guys. So let's say your strides too long, coach. Right, what are they? I've seen guys put wood planks in front of the side. Don't step, and I'm like that's not that's not it. They're they're taking the ball out wrong, they're they're their wing is too long, they're not taking it back properly. All that stuff translating how your body works and how you throw the football. But and it all goes back to being natural. So, coach, one of the things you've coached on many levels. You've cotched a lot of teams. Can you tell me a time where you recruited or you got a player that you wanted to get, that you seen him grow or flower in his career? And then there's a time where you've just kind of sat and watched him play on the field as a coach and just just made you smile like that's what you wanted, that's what you envisioned for all your players. But there's somebody that you really watched and wanted to see him grown. He did. Ah, you know it. They're too numerous to pick one. There are different things that come to mind and I'm a probably going to go up on our thing here and give you a different examples of situations and potentially some players. But I just over the last two or three days, but in a group text with three players from allegheny college. Now these players and now in their s. So then they're not young kids anymore, because that was not one thousand nine hundred and eighty six. They were freshmen at alleghany. You guys will Bailey Bayne, but the whole text thing comes out that we get together in the summer and play golf. We've now done it for three summers and we're trying to line up this fourth one. And, as you can imagine, there's a lot of ribbing going on. And one of them was replied to the text at thirty in the morning, it was and it was because his daughter was having her twenty one birthday. So just to sit back and watch those having been in their homes, all three of them, my Benet was within their homes when they are high school kids, to watch them to go through college. Why at them cry as their parents left on that first day, their parents drop them off at Allieny, and now today to hear a morning and growing about the twenty one year old daughter message made. With all of that, that kind of thing is incredibly gratifying. But now I'm going to go that and I'm probably going to admit some faults here, but you know I'm not opposed to having a vodka or a glass of wine or a beer or whatever it may be, and most people think of that type of thing in celebration. Well, I'm going to take you back to two thousand and one. I'm the second year head coach in the Berlin Thunder and FL Europe and we we lose to the Barcelona dragons twice in the regular season. We're going to play him in the world both because we ended up coming in second. They were for us. We become in second. I've got a quarterback who is allocated, been in the NFL for three or four years. was allocated to us and the first four days back in training camp, every time he threw the ball he would go, is that what you wanted? Is that what you want? Is that what you want? And I said to him, I said, did you complete it? Said Yeah, said, how do we go? So, in other words, I didn't be a robot. I did. I wasn't expecting him to step a certain way, to release his self, but with certain way, because the bottom line is, did you complete it? Right, yeah, good,...

...good job, good job. So my point is from in that world bowl, we are behind by a touch down. It's third down in two now. The quarterback happened to be about six six, two hundred and forty five pounds. Could run seven. He was a pretty done good athlete, and so I call in naked play figuring. All right, if we get him out on the edge, he can run for the first down. If not, we can dump it in the flat, we can hit the dragon, something like that. So he goes out on the edge. What does he do? He throws the streak down the sideline. The receiver goes up, makes an acrobatic catch, tiptoes into the end zone. We go ahead. So from a third and two at the minus fifty two yard line to touchdown, and I'm in my thought that went through my head was here's this kid at the beginning of the year. It's not what you wanted. Is that what your wander was afraid to be a player at the critical point in the season, at the turning point, the play that wins the World Bowl for us? He three Lances. We've never thrown that passing that it's it's always there on the naked play, but you never throw it, you never brain puts it up. The kid goes up and makes a nice catch. And so when you talk about somebody that's gone from the idea of watching them develop later, at the end of that night we go back to the hotel and, as you can imagine, this celebration, and I just remembered vividly sitting in a corner with a bottle of water. That's why I prefaced this with vodka and beer and wine. I'm sitting there with a bottle of one and I got a grin on my face, a feeling of satisfaction, not for me but because I'm watching these people that had come together from all over the country and all every team celebrate and thinking of that one particular player who just transformed himself from being a robot. That which wanted is that which great, like a play, and it was an extremely gratifying feeling at that point in time. So yes, there are. There are many of those things and you know, I still stay in touch and those kids are their shirt off and danced on a bar when they were twenty one years old that now have three kids. You know, it's it's an amazing thing to watch and observe from a distance. Well, you know, it's interesting. He's talked about that and that makes me think of Patrick Mahomes and why he's so different when you watch him play right. He's not a robot. You know that. Andy Reid's called certain plays and he's supposed to throw the little cross and route, but all of a sudden he's throwing the post and from rolling to his left and and flipping his hips and like. That's not anything that that I've ever been taught in the NFL. They're like but he goes out and plays and Andy has learned to accept that, which is I think has been really cool. And and you know, when I go and look back a positive experiences and negative experiences that I've had, there was probably a time when I was much more dictatorial as a coach than I am now my and then I was in my lady years. My expression has always been as a college coach you're much more dictatorial than you are as a pro coach. As a pro coach or a facilitator, you have conversations with players, as opposed to in college, at high school you're telling a kid what to do. Patrick Mahomes, whether it's because of his background and upbringing and playing pepper on the baseball field or throwing it from different angles or whatever it may be, you can still see in it emanates from him. He's having fun. He's a backyard. But you know, and and I can remember working in gyms and you know you take that runaway jump shot or whatever it is, that you've never taken a game in a structured to Patrick mahomes still has that playground mentality about them and, as a result, he's in. He's got the talent, the ATHLETICISM, the fuem off he makes play. Coaches are afraid to win. They're afraid that if we do this thing, that's out of the ordinary, but you know such and such going to happen. You know negative...

...is going to happen. UN thus, they become too structured. You've got to let your players play. Go back to the beginning of his conversation. Do we like the structure or do we like to play? Learn how to play. Valet stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Western bondoventure hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation, or call one two hundred and three six, two four Onezero and ask for Promo Code PSF right, exactly exactly, and I think it also gives them confidence when you can give them the opportunity or give them the choice of how, you know, giving them the tools, giving them that the influence that you have and then saying go play. It gives them confidence and with confidence it can really create a really wonderful results, which obviously it did with Pat Mahomes and Andy Reid, you know, has now has the confidence in his quarterback to say, all right, dude, you could just go do what you want, like, I'm fine. You know, obviously I'm fine. You just you're hitting on something that is absolutely correct and I'm going to put it in a different category. I'm going to put it at leadership. I'm going to give you a weird analogy and ask you a question, probably put both of you on the spot, that when your kids were little, and by little I mean ten or eleven months old, they're sitting in the high chair and they heard something, they turn and all of a sudden that glass of milk that's there. They knocked the milk over. It spills all over the floor. What is the very first thing that they do? They look at us. Why? Yeah, I want to see if they're in trouble, like they learned that early. They are looking to see how you react. As soon as you stock to yell at them, they cry. If you just bend over and say Okay and you start to wipe up the milk, they don't cry. And my point is that if you lamb base somebody when something negative happens, they become sheltered and the Patrick Mahomes is of the world would cry if you lamb based to them. If you do it like you just said, you, Andy Read has learned to accept it or learn to understand that, hey, that's him, that's the personality and I can't rip his heart out, then you're going to develop a great player who's going to take more chances. He's going to fail on a couple of them, but he's going to be a lot more successful on a lot more than he fails on. As I exhibited, a great answer, because most people always say they cry. They don't cry. Do you tell him the cry? And you tell him the cry by how you react right, right, and and I mean I can think of a thousand times where you know your kids are always looking at you and it's funny they still remember. My kids are older, twenty, going to Abby's going to be twenty five, twenty two, twenty one, and they still remember times when they say dad was mean to them when they were young, right, and if they're I'm like you were like seven when that happened, they're like yeah, we still remember Dad. That is they're right. They're going to write exactly I'm that's why I've always tried to probably too nice to my kids. I'm like, I don't want to pay for the therapy bills that you're going to end up going to a therapist. He going to call my mom was so means she made me do this. I'm like now, if the opposite that, I'm like, well, I really probably needed to have done as why? But that's okay. That's what great coaches are for. So I'm exampt from having to do certain things. I'll just let the coaches handle it. There you go. So, coach, you've had this great coaching career. What you know? You've kind of you're kind of done with coaching as far as the structured stuff, with on teams, running a team, doing all those types of things. Now you're coaching individuals. You said you're helping with instant replay.

I saw you're also a speaker, so you're probably just as busy now as you ever have been, probably more so. The and and one of the things that I've learned to do is be creative and probably be a little bit more aggressive and seeking things to do. But yes, it's been fabulous. But the and and this this is an interesting one. You are absolutely right. Guy Side Two thousand and twelve with the University of South Florida was the last, quote Unquote, Known Official Assistant Coaching Job or any kind of coaching job I had in a structured format. When they let us go at South Florida. Apt To that, the decision was do I really want to move? I'm living in Tampa Florida, or at that time I was sixty years old, and do I really want to move? And the answer was no. So we had to recreate ourselves. But his an interesting one. In the recreation of it all, you're obviously have a lot of contacts. I've done a lot of different things and as as the company, I had a form at one point in time says everything football, and I really do. But this last winter I get a phone call from a guy that I had conversed with and we'd work. We'd work together and always try to do certain things. But anyway, he offered me a position as his offensive assistant because he was the head coach of a thing called team nine. This is the best coaching job you could ever have. Team nine was team nine of the XFL and there was a head coach, Bart was he ought. He gave me the offensive coaching spot and those a defensive coach. So are three of us and we had forty players and we would just practice squad guys. We had to get them ready so when they get called up to the various xfl teams, they had already been practice and they were ready to go. We had, oh, game planning. We had no game so we had no video thing. We didn't have to play any games. We have to game plan. We just practiced three, four, five times a week. It was fabulous. But the best part about it that coach the offensive line. And as a head coach and as an offensive guy and all that kind of stuff, you always want the offensive line to be good. But yeah, yeah, you had an idea of the concept, but the actually get down there and sit in a meeting room in a video room and talk to those guys. It was a great experience in it get cut all too short and I'm just hoping for the good of the game of football that this August, when the xfl goes up for auction, that somebody buys it. The things wots again in two thousand and twenty one, and whether or not I'm involved or not, who knows. But you are absolutely correct. I do a ton of different things. To coach at a quarterback over virtual thing was skype and zoom and all those kind of things. Coach kids in Europe that way. Coach kids privately, you know, in person, but that's what that's what. Well, I do that too. I tell parents are said, look, I don't have to come be in person with your kids. Just video, y'all. Everybody has a phone now, everybody has an IPAD. Just video and send me the video. I'm not here to you know, your kids in ninth grade. He's not going to be Joe Montana in ninth grade right. You know, what we're trying to do is make him as natural as possible. And this dad sent me all his his kids going into eighth grade, but he's playing on a ninth grade team and all the stuff and I said, look, he has a good motion, you know, he throws a ball well and and virtually now us as coaches can, I think, do a lot more. Oh, without a doubt, without a doubt. And the pot that I have found tremendously challenging is this young man that I'm working with. I haven't done a thing physically. It's all been mental. We've gotten together five times now. We've talked about middle of the field, open, middle of the field close, what's the advantage of Man Coverage? What's the advantage zone? And we spend a good hour plots each time and obviously I can put some video up there and make him identified...

...coverages and it's been a challenge to me to go back and try to create that type of an atmosphere using this medium, as opposed to being in a room where the video person put together film clips for me and all that. So that's been a tremendous experience, the great experience, and I still do the same thing that you do. I get video sent to me. I'm probably a plug for somebody called coaches eye that I use, where I tell a straight over it and slow it down and all that stuff voice over it. It's been fabulous it, I guess the right words. It's very gratifying. Yeah, no, I agree, and and and with as bad as covid spend over a hundred thousand people passing away from it and everything else, there's been some good does come from it to people learned that they can do things they didn't think they could do. Right, they could work from home and have kids. You know, there's a lot of stuff that came from it. There's a lot. I think a lot of things are going to change in our world virtually right because of g in the Internet and how we're all just so connected that that you could coach somebody in a way and get them to be a good quarterback without ever leaving tamping in really without ever met him right now. The one thing, though, I do have to give you a little bit of a job money. I noticed you get out of your bedroom. I'm out of my bedroom, some guy. Did you even get out of bed? I mean, no, it's my daughter's where's like? This is my temporary podcast room, my daughter's room. It's really the US is excuse? Yeah, we kicked her out three weeks ago. Back go back to her apartment at pen and so we said, okay, we're going to make her room and to the office now. They that's why I don't usually have yellow pillows behind. So Hey, coach. One of the last things we like to do here on huddle ups have a little fun. We it's a called our two minute drill, and we'll go into this two minute drill, it's called no huddle, and we ask you some questions and we'll just fire them away and they're pretty simple stuff. So the first one I usually ask is what is your biggest pet peeve? People being late awesome. What's your favorite sports movie? Sports movie for love of the game. Kevin coston is a baseball picture. It's a tremendous used to make our quarterbacks watch it all the time. Great movie about being in the zone the love of the game. That that is a great movie. Who who is your Mount Rushmore of quarterbacks. There's tooth. I'm trying to think of how I wanted to answer that one, but it has to be Tom Brady from the from the New England accent and the Boston upbringing to now the move to Tampa. I mean, and I know if he's just following you around coach. I wish that were the case, but you got three more, who else would it be? You Got Tom Brady, and when you say rushed Mount Rushmore, you're talking about people in general as opposed to those that I've worked with. Yeah, anybody that you think like that. You've said that these are the guys that, if there's a quarterback out there, this is who they we should aspire to. Kind of be like right, that you were your favorites, that, however you want to put it, that you were your biggest idol or whatever it was, but it's your amount rushmore to people that you you look up to, that are playing that position. Tom Brady, Joe Montana, Dan Marino, nice, nice. And why do you like Dan? I know I like Dan. Confidence, quickness, bravado, toughness. Yeah, his release was unbelievable. Yes, yes, was. was just in just incredible. Coach. If you could go back to when you were, you know when you say growing up in the S and S, and talk to young Peter, what would one piece of advice you would give them? Calm down, don't be as hot headed. What were? You're from Massachusetts. Are you supposed to be hot? Added? One of...

...the biggest ironies of me being involved with instant replay is every official that I meet along the way. And you know, a lot of the guys that are in the NFL cut their teeth in NFL Europe. The sterritoris gene and Tony Work Games at allegheny college. You know, different things along those lines. But there isn't one guy didn't say I remember you, and it's all said with one of those. It wasn't like I was one of those calms. So we little guys on the sideline. So the words that were used that probably shouldn't have been they didn't necessarily say that. Would Love Right? Is that what you're saying? Right? All right, cut you. If you could go to one golf course in the country and play it, which what course? Would it be? Pebble Beach and and I say that because, and I don't mean to be a SNOB, but I've had the good fortune of playing oakmont, I've had the good fortune of playing Augusta. I was supposed to go to pebble beach at one time, but haven't been there. Yeah, that sounds I've never played that course either and it seems like you know I want to play it on a day when it's not super winny. You know it's always going to be windy, but just when it's kind of come correct, it's a beautiful I've never golf there, but I've been up there and it's spectacular. Just so I better do I mean. And no matter what, you're going to have a great golf day because you're a pebble beach at just the surroundings of it. It's like, okay, I'm fine, I'm good, it's perfect. Yeah, and that's that's part of one of the best moments I've ever had on a golf course was on a Saturday morning on the eighth green at a place called Wentworth by the sea in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and there were about fifty wind sailors out there on a bright, Crystal Clare Sunny Day and it was just they're out there in the bay or the of the Atlantic Ocean. You just went wow, was gorgeous. A stuck out on a little peninsula on the green and will always nice gorgeous. Yeah, yeah, now I hear there's some places you go in a golf course that are that are spectacular. All right, coach, I just had my question. Let me think about it. I lost it there was listening to you guys. Picture myself on on an eighth green. So running he took all over right here. You right, it's picture of myself on at Eighth Green. Sorry, coach, I had it all planned out there. I can't remember my last question for you, but you know, I think that you know, your career is telling you know. It proves that if you love the game like you did, you grew up loving it and you got to play it and you you persevered through times and at Holy Cross. You've done a lot of things to really get you to where you are today and you know, I think that now you've stayed in the game. For me, it's it was about that too, because I didn't necessarily stay in coaching. I was in high school after I retired and then got out of high school felt like it wasn't being able to reach enough kids and all those types of things. But now let my son's doing it. I think that it's just been amazing that you've been able to stay in out as long as you have and helped as many people as you have in this in this great game that we call football, on the game of life and and really produce some amazing people and and I want to thank you again for joining us on huddle up with gas. Marnie, thank you for being my cohost today, and Peter. You know, I hope that, though, all those coaches that are hot heads don't yell at you when you call them. You know, you say it was incomplete, but it was really complete, or their feet were in a bounce but they were really out of oout. So good luck with all that and I hope you don't get y'alled at too much. Thank you very much, guys. It's been a pleasure of mining. Good luck with everything you're doing and keep off the good work. We need those books. Thank you. Thank you for I really I learned a lot, so thank you. I'm very grateful. Thank you very much, my pleasure, trust me. Have a great day, guys. All right, have a great day. Thank you again. Bye, bye. Bye. Thank you for joining Dave and I in the huddle. We hope you enjoyed our podcast. If you'd like to hear more podcast just like this,...

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