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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Peter King

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

He has been named National Sportswriter of the Year three times, is a household name in sports journalism, NBC Sports Writer Peter King joins the Huddle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome to our podcast hoddle up withGus, where we talk to guess about how sports help shape their life. I'm yourhouse, former ANFL quarterback Gusfran and I'm joined by my longtime friendand cove Dave Haker. We are a RADIOCOM original podcast and you can find us onthe new radiocom out or anywhere. You listen to your favorite podcast. Now,let's get in the huddle so joining us today, he's written for sports,illustrated he's with BC. Sports now he's just so knowledgeable, just agreat guy, everybody in the NFL loves them. They love talking to them in thegood times in bat, so joining US Dave today, Peter King Peter, thank you forbeing on the show with us, hey good, to be on with you guys, thanks for askingyeah so where we starte the show. Like always, is we go back to where you'refrom we want to go back to when you grew up in Massachusetts and what waswhat started that love of sport for you? Well, I was born in Springfield massand raised in a border town in Connecticut and Field Connecticut andwe're halfway between New York and and Boston. So you know my father was a big. He was abig pitcher in high school and when I was a kid, the only thing I wanted todo was grow up and succeed. Karlyostremski is the left, fielder theBoston Red Sucks and after a while, I figured well you're, probably not goingto get to do that. So I loved writing. I loved English. I love reading and Isaid well, if I can't play it, maybe I can write about it and that's reallywhere it started. I'm really fortunate, because when I got to be in probably fourth orfifth grade, I knew exactly what I wanted to do with my life. If I wasn'tgoing to be a baseball player, I knew I wanted to write about sports if I could,and so that was Sart of a driving influence in my life and my fatherreally emphasized education. My mother was a huge reader. She did crosswordpuzzles she loved. She got me love of jeopardy. You know so words andsentences and reading, and everything were really really important in theKing House growing up, but you still had to go out and beat carly a stremsky.When you were a kid you a gon to go out and play them. Did you have a group ofkids that you went out and played with all the time of c? Of course you knowwhen you were a kid it's totally unlike it is now ou. Is You know, Guss, I'msure it was the same for you growing up in PA that I mean anyway. This is how it was forme. You know at nine o'clock in the morning we were out the door, and thatwas it. We were not back. We came back for lunch for a little while and thenwe were out again at quarter to one and we were out until dinner and we're justplaying games and and running around and riding our bikes, all Erobota, yeahand and look I mean, I think a lot has been lost with kids today and I'm notone of those. Oh, my God, it was so much better when I was a kid, I'm notsure was better when I was a kid, but I know that we were a lot more physicallyfit you ko as kid en the kids are today. So I think that's one of the thingsthat the kids Miss Today Wen. The kids have stronger fingers. Now, though yeah,then it Corporal Tunnel a lot easier: Yeah N O, I don'te know what corporaltunnel was growing up. You Know My dad would just say: leave the House don'tcome back to the nine o'clock whistle blows and then you know then I'll. Letyou back in the house. That's about that was good. Yeah T at's a good wayto be that's a good way to be raised. I grew up in Arizona, and so when theCoyote started, howling we knew was pobby yeah com in Ni to go. Hol Yeh aput down the Lookaballbaso one of the questions. We always ask all of ourguests and Dave usually aske. This question I think we're hitting overninety percent on so I think we might get a good chance here. Well, wealready kind of give him a little preview, but did you play Witha Wall asa get I loved whiffeball, but it was actually the game that we played moreand I don't know if you ever played it, but the tiny ball. It was like the golf,the Plastic Golf Ball. It was called a PG ball. Okay, and we used to play withthat and my brother used to use the pitch and he would throw knuckle ballsand it was impossible to hit that little ball when it was dancing allaroundright. I love wiffeball as a kid. I thought it was the best. What kind ofbat would you use A wiffleball bat? Oh Yeah, yeah, thin, Yellow Yeah, the beenyellow bat? That's what we use Dave get mad at me, because I love to use thebig fat red one, because I just like to hit home runs. You know and we all itwas a lot because I can never hit with that little yellow bact. It was welljust you were able to yeah it. It took a little bit more finass yeah, the redone was ridiculous yeah that was the best one. The Red One was too easy.Wasn't was Toeli, always brought that...

...when I played so that anybody could useit, but it was a lot more fun, but so so you're going through this, he got alot of a lot of. Did you play any sports? Were you on? Oh Yeah, you caall the I yeah I play Little League Baseball. I played I played soccer when I grew up.I played football until I got cut from my from my pop warter team in sixth grade, and Iwas so ticked off at the coach that I said: That's it I'm playing soccer. SoI played soccer seven through twelfth grade. We had a really good team in highschool, so it was not that big a deal. The soccer team was better than thefootball team, but my big sport in high school was baseball and you know I played. We had a reallykind of big time: American leg, an baseball team, my senior in high school,we went all over New England. We played in all six states, I had a home run,one night in Carlton Fisth's Home Park in keen New Hampshire, and that waslike the highlight of my life tslike, because I was a big Red Sox fan as akid. I Love Baseball, get this story, so Iget accepted and I enroll at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, and so Idecide that I'm going to walk onto the baseball team, try to walk on for the baseball team.Now Mike Schmidt went to Ohio, you Bob Brenley, they had. They had really goodteams in those days. So I walked on to the baseball team. In the day I getthere, there's a hundred and thirty three kids walking on you know: try Rinout yeah a hundred and thirty three for trioups and the coach stands up and hegoes well. You know I'm going to bring out of this. Try out today, I'm goingto bring seven candidates onto our team and I just looked around and you knowlike I said I think the numbers are against all of us so anyway, that was like my lastbaseball experience. So how many people walked away at that point? Now everybody everybody's everybodystayed, but it was kind of a crappy practice. You got five swings and theyasked you to throw three balls from centerfield second third in home, and that was thetryout and- and I thought it was really I don't know- I thought it was justBush League, so I ended up writing a note and sticking it on the baseballcoaches door at Hio. You- and I just said I hey,listen you it's your team Bulo. I really think that I could becompetitive and I really I want to chance. I want a real chance andbelieve it or not the phone rang in my dorm room that night and he said, showup tomorrow tomorrow at three o'clock. You know with the with the other sevenI'll, give you a shot. So I always appreciated that. That's right y takeit. I did make it, but he did. He gave me more of a shot than then then athree minute tryout right, but that talks a lot to what it takes to get your shot. Thoughright yeah, many people would never even make the effort that you made to say hey, I believe I can be here.You got to give me that chance and we hear those stories all the time andthat's pretty amazing that you did that and and actually gave you a shot a mostpeople would, I think, yeah, but I also like Gus. When I talk to kids now you know our business, the newspapermagazine Journalism, business for Young, kids, man, it's not good and- and Ialways tell kids today that if you can't take rejection and you can't takea long road- you know you're not going to be ablejust to walk into a job. It's just not happening, but I think therewill alwaysbe a place for storytelling and for story tellers, but it's just thatyou've got to be able to have the ability to get slapped around a littlebit. It's really. I Bet I bet it's a lot, what you had to put up with andtry to make it to the NFL, because there's probably a lot of people whotold you know and that's what the business is in journalism right now,everybody's telling people now. Well, it's going to be tough because the kidsaren't coming out with the same passion right they're, not reading books likethey used to they're, not doing the same things. Just like we talked aboutthey're not going out and socializing the way we did. I can't imagine trying to write about baseball now,where you don't even kids, don't even go to the game and score it like. WhenI was a kid I used to go in the pirate games and score the game. Yeah, I'mThewhey, listen. I am the weird O in the crowd all the time, because I getthe weird looks because I still keep score at the baseball games, and I justI love doing it. My Dad taught me when...

I was six or seven years old and I'vekept score. I wouldn't say every game, you know. Sometimes you go to a gamefor business or something but virtually every game I've been to.Since I was seven years old, I've kept score. I think it's just fun. It justadds the enjoyment of the game, it's a lost art for sure aliyea. But if youjust go to the game to watch, there's a lot of downtime. The Games are younger.Now, right but O it does give you like. Okay, WHO's, coming up Wi, I got to getready to score it. I keep track and you kind of understand the game a littlebit better. When you do that- and I think probably in journalism th samething with kids nowadays, wthey're losing that art form I mean look, there still are a lot ofkids who grow up with the burning desire to do this job, both in news andsports there's a lot of them, but there's also some who at's the right word to say they I mean.There's still are some people get into this business who they want to write?You know and that's their thing, and I tell everybody: Listen you better beable to be varied. You better be able to be versatile and to do a lot ofdifferent things in this business because, like when I was a kid in Ohio.The only thing that we did. This is a funny story, because I didn't even journalism. School is so different.These days I went to Ohio with the exact same time as matt lower went toOhio and because the TV part of the curriculum in the Collegeof communications was totally different from the curriculum in the journalismschool. So basically, I never even knew Matt Lower in college like I've met him.Since, obviously- and I said man- that's crazy- we're in the same schoolfor we are crossed each other for threeyears. I never knew them right because you just didn't know the people weredoing tv because all I was doing was, you know, print journalism and right.So that's how much it's changed now if you go you're going to try toexperience everything in in a journalism and communication school.Well, how important is it now that you have to understand social media injournalism? I mean look, you got to do it. I mean at NBC now you know part of what I do after I writesomething you know: There's social media team at NBC and they'll figureout, they'll read my column and they'll say this is what we think is going toget people interested in reading it. You got some of our Kyler Murray thisweek he's hot. Let's get him! You know everybody's interested in Kyla Mer. Oh,you got pathrok my homes in the column this week. Let's highlight that and sothey'll send out social posts about that, and so I do some of that too. Butand I'm not saying you can't teach an all do tricks at all, because I'm inthe social media, because you have to you, have to be- but mostly I just tryto let what I write speak for itself on just o cover the today show he wentto school with Matt Lower. I went to school with Savanna Guthre in theschool media arts at Ufa, wow, so ese. How about that seright! Exactly Oidid't know that yeah she was the cousin of my longtime girlfriend YavvannaLopez, so yeah eeal Al cm Li. Is that a tribaquestion I can actually use. That's, probably something you could use yeahyou coul. We we went to high school together tooso yeah, whether she remembers me or not. She's, I still insurance. NowPeter She's did she us Ma'm, sorry D, chuse, your nickname, whan she talketoyoufortunately. She didn't know the nicknames that we talked about theother day. I was just checking yeah. No one knows about those except now thatye've en broadcast linethey're, not flattering Peter and I'm glad you misse,those so er. When you were in Ohio and you'relooking to go work. Did you understand hat you wanted to be in in sports,specifically football or you just were going to t any job you wanted? No, Inever! You know it's funny Guss. When I was at ou, I never. I didn't write sports. I wrote news infact, my senior year, I was pretty convinced, I'd, probably becovering thestatehouse and living in Columbus or I don't know just tryng- to get a jobsomewhere writing about politics, maybe or writing some news thing, because we were. We were always taught that,even if you wanted to be a sports writer, you should really learn allaspects of the of the business. He should writeabout everything, so I really got into reporting the news. I was the managingeditor at the school Papor my senior year, and I really thought that that'swhat I wanted to do, the news side. But...

...anyway I was, I was happy taking anyjob and and honestly, my first job out of college was at the Associated Pressin Columbus and I need to get up every morning and do the farm report at fourand forty five AMM. You know and call and find out how much the hogs costthat day, and so I don't know a, I didn't actually love it, but it wasfine. You know, because that was I had a full time job in journalism. So youknow, I just think that was one of the things that that really taught me that taught me. You know even more of a love forjournalism, because I knew that I just wanted to do the job. I reallytruly didn't care if I were, if I was going to do something in news or if Iwas ever going to get a job in sports and when the sports editor Thaus,Cincinnati, inquirer called and asked me to be a general assignment guy forhm.That was great, and I don't mean this disrespectfully to that, but if theyhad never called, I was still going to be really good at some aspect ofjournalism, and I would have been very happy about it too. So I and everythingended up working out right. So we've Inter, I think, that's very interestinghow you put that, because we've also interviewed Sally Jenkins and ChristineBrennan and and Leslie viser and they're. Just talking about you know alittle bit about e quality, but just more about we just love doing our joband we wanted to deat the best. We didn't care what we were reporting onright ever job we were given. We just wanted to go out and give it a and givea great product back, and one of the things they said was because we didthat and we gave such a great product then that let us make the next step andI think that's what you're kind of Sayig is that you just wanted to work.Har You didn't care what it was. I just wanted to make great great stories orproduct. You know what I you know, I'm sixty two years old now and when I wasfifty six sports Illustratov gave me this. The ability to do this website calledthe MMQB I rano for five years and what was really interesting aboutit is that you know I got to hire people and I gotto work with people, and that was really that was a fun thing to do. Butthe one thing I learned about that is that you know the business and in doing somethingreally different and editing and hiring people, and I used to have to go on theroad and try to sell ads, and things like that. So I got to know kind of theevery other part of the business right and the thing I learned thing I learnedabout it is that I really love this one thing, which was gathering informationand trying to disseminate it in a manner that people would love to read and again. I've also done TV. I've donequite a bit of TV. In fact, one of the most fun thingsI've done is going to be on TV here. In a couple of weeks I sat down. I went toKansas City in August and I got fared to come upand I got far mahomes and Andy read and you know, as you know, obviously readcoach far as his quarterback coach Tweny, one an mvp in Green Bay and thentwenty one years later, he coaches Patrick tehomes, when he wins the MVPin Kansas City. So it was really. It was really what was fun about it is wewent and- and I brought tape of five- far place and five mahomes place and wewatched it and all three of them just talked like they were sitting AroundinAttencion, saying wow. What were you thinking of here? What were you doingthere, and so that's going to be on in a couple of weeks, and those are thekind of things look. If I did that, just writing it. It wouldn't be as goodright because you wouldn't really see far of in my homes interact, but we'reactually doing a half hour. TV Show thiat's going to be on NDC sportsnetwork on October thirtiet, because the video was so good. It's going to beon TV too, but you know how TV stories all right. Three and a half minutes andit'll be fun that story, but it won't be everything it could be and sothon'ht. But Anyway, I just love the story right. You know I love. I gotsuch a kick out of being in the same room for forty five minutes with farpahomes and Andy Reed, just tryng, to get into the heads of those guys yeah.I never got to play for Andy. I know a lot of stories about Brett as far aslike his demeanor and way he was around people and the jokester and just had alot of fun playing the game you know and what so what is Patrick Mohoms likeI don't I mean just I watch thim and it...

...seems like he has a little bit of thatbread farm where Goy ally relate to hem he's. I said to somebody the other day when Itold him that I did this. They said wow. What do you? I know what you've knownfar forever. But what do you think of my homes- and I said, he's like amature far because I just telling you far- istheyre telling fart stories and stumpand all that and he just firmasthe ultimate good time, Charlie Guy, he right he just he had so much fun. Youknow doing this and myhomes has fun too, but he's a little bit of a business gota business streak in Hem, but but but the one thing I really really likeabout mhomes is that he just loves. He loves football. He loves talking aboutfootball. He loves thinking about football. He he has this thing that youjust know when you're sitting there talking to hem. You just say this guycan't wait to get out of here so that he can go. Do something footballish andand HP. I'll. Tell you this I'll. Tell you this quick story, so you know we're walking out of it.We're walking out of the the field house at the chiefs thing where we wentout, and I had this little field of dreams, thought and farm said he goalong with it, and so I just said: Would you guys be okay? If we just wentout and you guys play catch and and Mahome said yeah sure that'd be great,so anyway we would out and we play catch and we were walking away. Far wassigning some stuff for people and talking to some people with the chiefs and Mahoms, looks at me, and he goesman that was really fun, so he just you know he just e. He loves football and Ithink when he was standing there playing catch with Farv, he goes Thi.He looks a me and he goes. This is surreal, you know, and it was just youjust. I appreciate guys I don't care what walk of life you're in. I reallyappreciate guys who really love it and who are not afraid to show that love ofit yeah. No, that's so familiar to me because, when I was playing for theRedskins and Terry Bradshow came and interviewed me one time well, I grew upin Pitcsburgh and T at was my idol and that's why I had number twelve and Iwas just sitting there. I wanted to ask him like a thousand questions and Hesintervewing me, you know what was it like on this play? Would you do that?You know, and all that and I never got to, but it was just great to sit therewith them and he actually signed a football with me. It was, it was a verysreal moment. You know when Ow you watch somebody that you idolize andthen you're doing the same thing that they did and then they're coming backand Talkng to you. It's a I'm sure that was pretty interesting for Patrick,going through that Patrick was wat was really the other thing about it. Thatwas really kind of fun is that this was Mahoms is day off. Okay, and Ihad told the PR guy look forty five minutes Max forty five minutes Max.Well, it was two hours and fifteen minutes and the PR guy you could tellwas a little bit nervous and and he's walking around, but I mean I'm justtelling you if farvs could have stayed, mahomes would have stayed right, Yoknow he just he had the time, I'm just telling Yeu that he had a ball and andthat's one of the things when I see people like that, I love stories like that, because youknow this you've been around the game, you know if the PR guy will come to youand say hey, would you do this? I mean, with the rare exception of TerryBradshar, coming into town, but the most part Hey Washington, post writer,wants to talk to you or or whoever wants to talk to you, okay, yeah, allright, you know, let's see how fast we can get this done and both far andmhomes. I could just tell you know when they're totally into it and they weretotally into it. It was just fun. Well, I think that's where that cut came fromright. Thet did the nolok passes. Yes, yeah. I saw that on the day, Yeah Yeah.Well, you know they're so similar in the way they play ha thrown fromdifferent boty positions, kind of fearless, a sidearm yeah, just yes, gun slinger, asthat's the old turn, cre guns. What's my Nickdame, you love Tbol me a Dulgian,bommer yeah, that's it yeah! It didn't Gei Thot I youwere Gonay. I thought youwere Goingna, say the Pittsburgh Gun slinger. No! No! I never played if Ido't play for the steelers that might have come on that might have cut onElgia pober Hada bige idulgen bomber would have been really good. Polishcannon I've heard to Polish Canon Yeah, just eastern Europe Bo yeah EA. That's whatmy twenty three and me says. Just like Desin Eur Belgia Bommer, thanks right, so so you're at the you go toCincinnati Inquirer you're. Moving on...

...to how does that transition for you togo to sports illustrated well! My last year in Cincinnati I covered the bangeone thousand nine hundred and eighty four and into the spring of eighty five as an incredible team to cover, because the coach was Sam Whitin hisfirst year. He was crazy and a good way for a writer. A collinsworth was onthat team. That was boomers first year there he was a rookie, I mean you knowit was so it was like the wild west in those days in this business becauseboomer gets drafted in the second round out of Maryland, and I just said youknow the Bangols were kind of a cheap organization yeah. So I just said youknow what I'm going to do found out what flight he was on. I went to theCincinnati airport and picked them up. Oh did yourop hem yeah. I drove themback to the Bangals River Front stadium at the time, but you cun do differentthings. In those days I went to newsday after that covered the giants for fouryears covered parcells and Lawrence Taylor and Sims, and then in eightynine sports illustrated called, and I took the job. I never even asked themhow much I was going to make because I didn't care. I said this is absurd. Inever in my life dreamed, I would work there and then I ended up there fortwenty nine years, so it was a as a. It was a heck of a life in this business, so at sports illustrated you've writtenabout every player, you've written everything that we could ever imagineabout the game that I love that I played forever that a lot of fans love.What was your favorite interview? You've ever done. I think there were two things that werereally I mean look. I did a did a lot of things there that were really fun,but I this would have been in. Like my secondyear there I got on the bus with John Madden inPleasanton, California, and I I took the bus to the Dakota apartmentbuilding in New York City and I was on the bus with them for threethsand miles and it was pretty fuch how much filmdid he make you watch this? Is He he was? He was a nut ND. Hereally was. He was crazy, but he also was a big sleeper on the bus and he hadhe had what I when I went back and toured the bus. It was like a heigetswete on wheels. The whole thing the his room was luxurious. It was like theback. Forty percent of the bus was his room, and so but anyway that was really fun because you know yyou're on this thing with them for three days and he's got nowhere to gohe's a total, absolute captive audience and in those days, there's not all theways to communicate. He did have a phone on the bus, but he didn't use ithardly at all, and and basically he was there just talking for we talked forsix or seven hours every day, three days in a row, it was fantastic, sothat was fun, but probably the other one was in ninety six. I think spring of Ninetysix. I had grown kind of close to farm atthat time and written he bottom a lot for si and he asked me he said: Hey,listen, I'm having my first golf tournament. This you know this spring,trying to raise a hundred thousanddollars for boys and girlsclubs down here in Mississippi. Would you come- and I said Oh yeah ID come sohe wanted me to play golf and I'm terrible at golf and the night before Iwas going to go phone rings and Far van he goes. Hey,listen, you're, Goinna read tomorrow, I'm entering Rehab for Po Viking, anaddiction, and so I got to go tomorrow, I'm basicallybeing forced to go, and but we still want to have the golf tournament. Wouldyou would you still come, and I said ofcourse I'll come and he said Ye. I really need to raise the money. Ipromise these people and so anyway, and he as about to get off the phone I said. Excuse me, Mr Most Valuable Player theNFL, but you just told me you're, going into reave Vicisso reay O on of second.You know what I do, and so I just said you know I just said:Hey, listen, I love to write about it. He goes well, that's fine! I want youto think of this for a second. This is like a Tuesday night and sports illustrated in those days.First of all, there was no Internet and sports illustrated in those days wasalready put to Ed for the week. It...

...wasn't going to come out basicallyuntil the following Lednsday, so I'm thinking of myself. Well, I still wantto interview him for it. You know- and I said if you talk to anybody else, hegoes no, and so we talked for about forty minutes and he was unbelievablygood. He was totally forthcoming. H went to the spes that year in a earlyyear from the SBS and to get through it, he took fourteen vicatin and he just told me everything aboutwhat happened, and so at the end of it, there's thislong pause and he goes he goes. You know everybody always comes up to me andthey say man what a great life man I wish. I was you and he said, would they wish? They were me right nowgoing into Rehav for six weeks tomorrow in Kansas? I don't think so, but hesaid that's what it you know to get to go through all this pain that I had that's what it took to be me, but anyway, funny part of the story. Just imaginethese days when it the MVP F, the NFL gives you this tremendous expose andhe's going into Rehab the next day. Just think about this. For a second, Ihad to sit on that for seven days that didn't appear anywhere for seven daysand when it came out it blew up. It was the biggest Tory you know the week,obviously, but but anyway that's how the business has changed. You know Isat on the biggest story in sports for seven days, because there was no otheroutlook for it right and now you can't say it' op for seven seconds, no yeah,it's out that fast, you would have been youwould, have been typing the wholetime on your phone. As he's talking and yeah, I mean that's well, I would have.I probably would had to write some immediately. I would have I don't knowwhether it would have been on NBC. It would have been on NBC nightly. Newsmight have gone on. Sports Center did O get a few guest gigs, who knows, but itwould have L it whal. I that I mean I probably talked to him seven or eighto'clock at night that night by eleven o'clock, I would have been the mostmedia access person in the world. Right, Inon Wi would have told the story a hundred times, but that is al. Ahundred million followers yeah, that's e!! that's how much the businesschanged over the years. What do you think the greatest game is the bretever played? Was it when his father passed against the raiders? Well, when you consider everything thathe had to go through when he played in that game yeah, you throw fourtouchdowns three hundred ninety nine yards you're on the road you're playingin the black hole. I would say that was it, but my feeling is: He had a game in ninety five againstthe Vikings, where I think they want thirty, eight thirty, five or thedivision lead, and my recollection that was really his coming out party, and Iremember covering that game and thinking this guy's going to be great for a longtime and he was yeah. You really was, and it's just remarkable because I meanI played to game for a while and didn't play nearly as many games as him, butI've had so many injuries, but the games that he played continuously. It'sjust Anfathomole to me that that two hundred and eighty three games in a ropit', it is t really is that he, a D, never missed, never missed and yes wasjust an immense presence and leader and let his team like no one's ever seen. Ithink he we've had so many great players in thisgame. I don't know what I mean it's probably hard for you to rank thequarterbacks, but he I mean what do you think that that Racan Yo? What wasinteresting? What was interesting, Gossis that this past summer spring andsummer, I was on a panel of thirty people who picked the NFLS all time topone hundred players, and that was really an interesting taskthat Ha cord. The reason it was so hard is that allthe people he had to leave off yea and- and I remember the debate about thequarterbacks and some people were talking- you know not to get too farinto this, but some people were. It was clear that they weren't going toinclude far on the list of their top ten quarterbacks, and I just I justthought that was insane and I still do- and I don't know if t I don't know theresults of it at all. So I don't know who made it whodid't make it or anything like that, but I think any list of the top tenquarterbacks of all time without Farv, even though he did not have a lot ofgreat moments in the postseason. I think any list that did thave farharmon it wouldnt be a faulty list. Do you so when you've made that list of thetop one hundred players, they said...

...we're going to have ten quarterbacksfive running backs. Five receivers. Is that kind of Howt went or they justsaid. We want to find the best players that have no. They said. WER HAVE Xnumber in every position, so there were ten quarterbacks that weregoing to be that were going to be there, and so I think there were six guardssix tackles. I don't know it, but but it was, it was very. You had everyposition group in essence, you would debate each oneand then you would vote on it and then whatever happened happend, you know, wedon't know, and I won't know I think it'll start to come out in November andthey'll. Do I think a couple of position groups every week is howthey're going to release it. Did you go through it? Your like e interviewedthis guy? He was kind of a jerk. I don't really want to put him on thelist. No, I do know that's a Weirdt. That's that's a weird thing us becausefor the hall of fame, Yeah you're on your you vote for theHall of Fam Aus, well, Yeah Yeah, we always hear. Oh, my God, you didn't putCharles Hale in because for a long time because he was a jerk to everybody andI laugh- and I said you know, can you give us just some tiny bit ofcredit for for being professional? You know it'slike you saying that if one of the receivers you didn't likeyou know on your team and I hate that guy and he's open on Sunday and you'renot going to throw to them. I mean that you give give yourself a little bit ofcredit for being professional. So if a guys a jerk. So what I don't care, Imean you know, and so that's one of the things that I think is always funnylike. There was a bunch of that because I didn't vote for art monk for the hallof fame for a long time. I Remember A and I'm I don't I don't. I tell peoplewho I vote for Nighyeah. I never. I don't hide that I mean I feel almost like you owe it to somebody. Youknow that it's petty, if you're, going to, if you're going to vote, you oughtto be willing to stand behind your vote. You know I believe too, so I would I'go to Washington sometimes and the monk faction would. I remember a conductoron the AMTHRAC train because I lived in New York when I got off the train. He looked atme disgustedly and he said you won't vote for monk. You know, and you knowso I don't know you just. I did not vote for him because it ad AiN'to to dowith per personality. It was just that even though you made all the catches, Icovered the giants in those days and they were always much more worriedabout Gary Clark and Ricky Sanders, but but be that as it may and just you know, you try to do thejob the right way and you just let the chips fall where they may right, I'mputting a little bug in your ear for my Buddy Henry Ellert, so I'm just hopingwe every Olert is. Is A deceivingly good candidate in part because of hisreturn ability? That's that's the thing about his life that he doesn't reallyget credit for. I think, he's a very good candidate Gus. I really do tvetell him what a tenr 's doing now. Well, I was going to say he's something Ididn't know, and maybe this is universally known in the football world,but how good a route runner? He was. Oh Yeah, he lass Yu, I think he said he's.Maybe the best ons never changed speed and one of the best I've ever seen orplayed with, because you know he would run a corner, rouddig or anything, and it just was. I learned so much from just playingwith him. You know great coaches, I mean I was with Noor for a long time.Cam Cameron Mike Marxs and learned a lot f how to throw routes. But when youhave a receiver like that, that teaches you like that, you can throw it earlyand the timing of it. It was just amazing to learn from Hendry and I'll.Tell you one thing: We interviewed him the other day and he came on with usand he is still triple jumping and Fucki Hol. Is He fifty nine fifty nineand he still jumps fifty the forty threeforty three feet? He set therecord for his age group and I'm like Henry you're making my film Aai meanthat's just this is kind of athlete he wa. Well, he just missed Er. I go. Hemissed the national record by a quarter of an Endwen Hewas, a call when he asin Ollege yeah, so Henry, and I one of ourmy favorite Sath with Henry, is Inever threw a path to Henry that wasn't a first town, no yeah esxat right. It's prettyinteresting. I never knew that an somebody came up and I looked it up andwas like wow. That's pretty interesting. Henry was just yeah. He was just agreat guy. You know he was just a wonderful person, so you're at sports Imean you're, just iconic and sports illustrated, and I think you've donesuch a great job. I mean I have other friends who are writers, and you knowMike really well silver. It might ge like a totally different writer thanyou a, but that's what people like to...

...and t's. It was great you know, and I never got to know you as well as Iknew my just because my wife's crazy and her name's Ann your wife's name, anand I'm sure we all get along Tou her and Mike always hit it off. I don'tknow why yeah they just did, but Mike is a different kind of writer, but Ialways have appreciated your writing and how you just told the story of theplayer or of the game or of the NFL and what's going on yeah. I appreciate that.Look. We all have our own strengths. You know look Mike was incrediblyvaluable in the way he wrote in the way hereported because he was the best at getting people to tell him stuff awayfrom the field an he just. He was great at it and there's a skill for that and it wasn't that's whatever it takes. Whatever it takes, but look, everybody everybody's gottheir own way of doing things, and and- and I always thought that one of thereasons why I mean I'm guessing ninety six- ninetyseven- why we hot such a good team at Si is that you know we had PaulZimmerman. Who was just the total football nut job ou? Who kneweverything about it? You know you had me who was Sartof the worker be atsilver who wis going to get inside the lives of everybody you played, and Ijust I thought I thought at the time we got a really good team. Do You Hav? Soyou said Paul was like the most knowledgeable, probably that yousaid writer. He knows the Mul. He was the most knowledgeable guy aboutfootball who I've ever who I've ever covered thegame with there's a bunch of new guys now who are coming in, who really aregreat at it. Andy Benoyt, who I hired at the MMQB, is really incredibly goodand I think in time, he's going to be every bit as good as Paul Zimmerman wasbut Paul's Zimmen and the reason he was great is that he can watch every gameand tell you exactly why something happened in the game wow. I used to seehim by. I remember seeing him in a locker room, one time with Matt Millinand they must have been twenty minth. I mean Zim needed to go talk to t oMontana or whatever this when they were when Millon was with the niners and hedidn't care. He was more interested in just breaking down the axes and Oses ofMatt Mellin, and that was his cup of tea. He love that. So what player doyou think that you've ever been around is the most knowledgeable about thegame manning? No, I agree with that. Payton is justhe's absurd. In fact he was Kno. I used to tell him hereminded me of, like you know. Sometimes when you hear a Golferinterviewed after a game, he will say right away. He said, okay on the fourthhole, you know I get the hit the three wood off the tea and youknow I hit it to a hundred and eighty yards from the from the green and onthe way down I'm telling the cadty listen. I want to hit the NIG and ironright now, N, the CADTI say no hit the aight and so we're going back and forth,and then I hit the Aigton I did and the memories of this, and even years laterhe an say well, I came up to sixteen at Augusta and I said I really want to hitthis strong ad a little cross win there. I had to hit it through the wind. Youknow it's just absolutely nuts. How much guys know and Pete Manning isexactly that way about. I Bet I could ask him about his comeback in Tampawhen they had to score twenty one points in like the last six minutes to send it to overtime, to win when hewas with the colts, and I'm telling you I because I've asked hem about thisbefore he knew every play of of each of the three drives. Well, that's a newand he disected everyone and he's I've had it so that he'll be on his way homefrom a game and I'd be and ID Call Hem and- and we have a conversation aboutthe game and he'd be sitting in his driveway, and I knew that I was takenpersonal time, but he wanted to get it exactly right. He just he was a totalabsolute nut job about about details and that's why e was so great, so thatintelligence? How long do you think that extended his career? You know if hedidn't have, I he had the same talent, but his intelligence was as good. Doyou think that he wouldn't have played as long? I don't think he would have played aslong he just you know. I say sometimes when people talk to me about my mostmemorable guys, I covered- I say things like you know find something that youlove one. Third, as much is paid...

...manning love, football right and you'llhave a happy life yeah. He just he was one of those guys. I slightly worriedabout him when he left football, because I said he'll never findanything he likes as much, but he's one of these guys when he gets into this media stuff alittle bit. He is really really good at it. Yeah he's excellent at it, in fact,and this series he's doing about the history of football if you watch ityear and of how good he is at doing something totally different in doing itreally well he's just hes, just a really really bright guy he's going tobe good at whatever he tries, I think, but definitely going to be better thanhis insurance. What is his insurance Comron, Natihis Ski, the United Way, commercialonl, that's one of the Great Oh. That was one of the great one where he'sdrilling these kids out on this field in New York. That was alls, well himtalking about how he didn't want to do it like, because you know he's a greatperson. He didn't want to go out and drill these kids with the football andthe parents were like no just hit himoyocahe's like are you sure, ges,and so he said all of a sudden, I'm like at these kids that are like eightyears old, I'm dronin right the face, iall Itas, pretty funny. It's a greatit's a great, pretty good comic. I mean welle that'St,one Tisit's classic for sure Peter touchd on this a little bit, but yourtransition from sports ulstrated to money morning, quarterback and then toTV tellus about like how that went, because I mean I think, Peter's more for many people more recognizwele nowthan he was even as a sports lill stat writer. Well, his picture was only likethis big and true R, yeah, no swell it's different. You know it's reallydifferent. If you start to do TV, it just is- and I done TV on and off sinceOe, thouand, nine hundred and ninety five, but once you get on NBC and you're doing abunch of stuff for NDC it just you're, just a lot more recognizable.But again I never really you kn. I was in the studio, I think, for nine years,an football night in America and hey look. It was great. The opportunity waswonderful, but at the end of the day I just I kind of like writing about thegames and I like going to the Games and I like doing features TV features,they're fun because NBC spares no expense and they do it the right way, but at the end of the day, if you giveme a column to write, that's what I'm happiest and Luckily I've been able todo that now. It NBC that's, probably what I'll do for the next couple ofyears and then we'll see what happens yeah. I can't imagine in your collumthis week, isn't about officiating. I mean it Wat. I ryou know what it'sfunny. I read a lot about officiating on Monday, because I think that you know the NFL passed a bylog tochange their rules for passing our ference and to make them replayreviewable and for some reason, our riveron his brought it on himselfand adopted this policy himself that that he was not going Ta overturn andhe rules that he didn't want to overturn, and I just think it'sridiculous. He and he decidded, or somebody decided that he wasn't goingto overturn a lot of calls, and I thinkthat's dumb and I think now look. I think what the NFL has to do is. Ithink they got to do that sky judge thing I don't think iffishating's evergoing to be perfect and but the technology is so good. I'mgetting to the point gus honestly, where I would really like to not havereplay anymore, O Weve Boher. I just like to let the chips fall where theymay, because you're never going to it's, never going to be perfect. So, let'sjust accept the fact that there's going to be some human error and accept thefact that we're not going to be able to change some calls. That's Al Right.Just we talked about this like in base b days, one of his big pet peeves Thasin baseball when the runner slides over the base. But he can't hang on and henthe guy just holds his glove on him and then he tags them and, and they go toreplay and said: Oh your hand, came off a half an inch so you're out yeah. Wekind of feel the same way like replay should not we're like it shouldnt just I agreelike just get rid of it. There's going to be human air, just git rid of replay,I think so too, but well. I doubt you're going to be able to put thegenie back in the bottle, but you know we'll see we'll see what happens aslong as the National Leau doesn't en of the DH. But no I do not want the DH. Iwish the American League, which I like better. I wish they were dagless to. Ilove the strategy in the pictures I mean no Idon'ti still don't know whythey've never changed that role. I mean it just should be the same across. Well.People love offense. I think that's what they say anyway, but it makes themanager really manage when you have to...

...deal with this nine spot. You know Imean it's. You have to you have to work around that yeah. He might only hit oheighty, but that's whe. You have to deal wthright he's got TA. You got toteach him out a bunt yeahs how in help yeah like if they ha o there wouldn'tbe as much discussion. What do you? What are you going to say? If I tellyou that three minutes I got to do a TV hit for NBC? Oh and you got to go, yougot to do that. Man I might I might have to get. I might have to go allright, oef five minutes. Well I mean can't wecan't we do next time til. We do like an hour. Fifty five yeah. Definitely Imean that's how we love. We love the game, so we usually stand us with ourno huddle. It's like quick questions. We ask you, so I'm Surebe, I alrightgood day. Okay, if you could tell a young Peter King, one thing go back intime for ten seconds. What would you tell him? Be versitile read a lot and write every day, evenwhen you're not going to be published, nice biggest pet peeve, walking down the street and someone is texting and is walkingreally slow and especially in New York, where there's a lot of sidewalktrafficg where I live, I sometimes want to kick them right in the rear in, butI don't you hold back two more day. Okay, if you could go back in time forone day, where would you go and when would it be? I probably would want to go. I probablywant to do one of two things I would want to go see a New York Yankeesbaseball game, one thousand nine hundred and twenty seven when bay,bruth and Lugarry were in their primes, or I would like to go to a baseballgame of the Boston Red Sox in Septembe, N thousand nine hundred and forty oneand see Ted Williams in his drive to hit four hundred ye H,because my father's favorite player was Ted Williams, he absolutely loved themand I obviously never got a chance to see him. I never got a chance to seethose incredibly Yankee teams, but those things really or you know.Honestly. If you told me that I could, I could have a sceen F, onethousand nine hundred and fifty eight NFL championship game in Yankee Stadiumwith the colts, Andy and the giants. I would take that day to yeah, sogreatest sports movie, ever I'm partial to field of dreams, love it.Thank you, man! Well Sa. We appreciate we loved hearing your stories and Youre.It was just an honor to Inter finally get to interview you for once. Hey thanks a lot guys, it was really alot of fun. I appreciate I al Right, ORANSA tater. We want to thank you forlistening to huddle up with Guss a RADIOCOM original. You can find ourshow on radiocom the new RADIOCOM, APP or anywhere you listen to your favoritepodcast. Please leave us a review or comment if you enjoyed the show, we areon facebook, twitter, instagram and Youtube at Hutdl up with Gus. You canalso visit us on our website. Huddle up with GUSCOM HUDDL UP WITH GUS isproduced by Camhaldeman, and our media relations director is Terry Sholman.Our show is recorded at the energy innovation center in Pittsburgh. PA.Thank you for listening, and you can hear a new episode every Monday righthere on RADIOCOM.

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