Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Mike Ditka

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

IRON MIKE Ditka joins the huddle. He talks growing up in Pittsburgh, the personalities of the Chicago Bears, and how he feels about people who "B*TCH". See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How do you keep your family healthythis season when it feels like everyone around you is getting sick? I USESAMBA call. It's drug free and scientifically tested to help support your immunity.SAMBA call has the power of black elderberry in every purple bottle. It comesin tablets, Serru chiables or, my kids favorite, the great taste,in gummies. So this cold and blue season, support your family's immunity withSamba called black elderberry. It's the only one I trust for my family and, best of all, my kids love it too. I am former NFLquarterback, gust fraud. I played quarterback fifteen years in the NFL. Thisis my show called huddle up with gusts. Each week I team up with mylongtime friend Dave Hagar and we talked with guests about how sports shape theirlive. Pro Athletes, business, executive, community leaders, everyone has a storyto tell about sport. We invite you to huddle up with guss thisweek in the huddle. Raised in the steel town of Al Equippa, amulti sports star in high school, he became a consensus all American, apit drafted in the first round by the Chicago bears, a five time allpro tight end super bowl champion as coach of the eighty five bears, nowa popular broadcaster, successful entrepreneur and restaurant tour member of the pro football hallof fame. You know him, is Iron Mike. Please welcome them tothe huddle. Mike Dick got so everyone, we got coach Dick on the linetoday. We're going to get into huddle with coach right now. So, coach, what we do is we really want to talk about your youthand really find out like those people that influenced you on becoming the person youare today, the player you were so from your earliest memories. Who Doyou think that person was? Your father, your family? Who Was it?Well, I I don't know that it was my father. On myfather was a big influence in my life on the way to live your lifeand a way to live a good life and they be be outstanding. Idon't know. From the time I was or five years old that I couldremember, I always wanted to compete and I always competed against the kids arewere older than me and I got my butt whip. I played football withhim, I played baseball with him, I played I try to play basketballwith him, but it but it was a learning process. The whole thing. About the only thing I had. I had a competitive nature. Iwanted to compete. I wanted to play those sports and you play him longand I got better and better than my played pretty good as a pretty goodbaseball players a kid and a pretty good basketball player in high school. Butmy sport was football and you know, my start really came I tried outto when I try out for high school football my sophomore year. I'd playedat a Catholic Grade School and I tried out myself. When we were Iwas five foot seven, a hundred twenty pounds. So you can understand thatI got my butt whips and I was going to quit after a year.I was going to quit, but I had a high school coach. Yousaid, Mike, you we're got to...

...grow, you're going to get alittle bigger. He said, then when you come back next year you'll bebigger and you'll play football. Well, I grew. I did. Igot bigger. I got came back at a hundred sixty pounds. It wasabout five five eleven and I started on the W pa out tippleway championship team. It's linebacker and and and it was not because I was a good player. Is because this coach had so much confidence in me. He believed meand he made me believe in myself and I be see a pretty good footballplayer after that. By the time I finished my senior AD offers to goto fifty, sixty colleges and then the going to pit because I wanted tobe a dennis. I didn't work out, as you can tell, but it'syeah, you know, it's been a heck of a run, buteverything to me has been setting goals and reaching goals. Try to reach him. Work, find out the best things you had to what you have todo to reach the goals you're trying to reach. And I don't care howmuch practice it takes or whatever, if you want it bad enough, you'llfind a way to get there. Will coach. How would you describe lifegrowing up in our EQUIPPA? When you did? I mean that's it's aninteresting place for those, yeah, haven't been there. It's a it's verydynamic. Yeah, and in the days I got not a CLIPPA was booming. Jane how still was booming. My Dad worked on ALCIPPA southern railroad withservice Jane now still it was booming. It employed a lot of people.The whole community, the downtown area probably was about stuff. Nine blocks ofstores and shops and Boutiques and bars and just about everything. It really itreally was a dynamic town and once the mill closed, Jane now still closed, it became a ghost town. It really did. We lived up fromthe housing project called Littmar. There was what cell ECLIPPA, there was plants, weel plan six PN seven, but we lived in a housing project calledLittlemar and we didn't have it. We didn't have anything, but we didn'tneed anything. Men We had what we needed. My Dad came home fromhe worked as but often in the in on the railroad. Came home meonce of the tavern. He had a couple beers, came home, wehad dinner and that's the way we live and we didn't think anything on that. I had a paper out my whole life. I gave every bit ofmoney I made work and every job I had I gave to my mother andfather. They gave me an allowance and that's the way it was. Evenwhen I got to college. You was the same way. I gave themthe check they gave me in a loan. Did you have an athletic family?My brother and I. my brother Face Football. He was a oneyear behind me him and I lay football. My other brothers sister. No,but my action did, as played it buck now. He was acaptain to buck now, but it was one year behind me. Well,Hey, coach, you know your stories a lot like because I grew upin Fort City and we had PPG which...

...was there. It was a hugefactory. Our town was booming. Yeah, and you know, it was thesame thing. And so one of the things I remember so many kidsthere, and kids don't do this today. We would go out. I learnedso much from just going out in the Sandlot and playing right and goingtell those sports don't nobody does that today. It it drives me crazy. Andthen when no organization either, Gosh, you know was it was a bunchof guys who got together, we picked it up, we went outand we played the takes from really almost from the sun up to the sundown. I mean we're doing something all the time. We didn't have to havesupervision. We knew what we were going we had a bat in the ballif somebody hits the ball where we couldn't find that, we had a problem. But yes, it was. It was a great way to grow up, really it was. and then everybody pitched in. I can mean,like I said, you know, I had a paper out. I deliveredthe papers. Everybody new kind of knew who I was because they get thatget held the paper was a good and it sometimes it wasn't my fault,but you know, the paper be late maybe, so they get mad atme for not getting there in time. But I you know, I growingup the way we did was great. I had the greatest high school coachin the world, coach Carl Ashman. He encouraged me to stay which footballwhen I wanted to quit. I was a pretty good baseball for why,or a better baseball player anyways, and I got a little bigger and Iended up playing football on a really good team my junior in high school andI'm run and went on the Pitt and the bear. So had a prettygood clear and football. Yeah, you know what's funny, coaches, mydad was so hard on me when I was growing up. You know,he was one of fifteen kids. Were a big Catholic family. He workedin PPG, so did some of his brothers and sisters, or you'd someof them work at Aleghanty Ludlam. And you know the thing about it was, no matter what I did that was good. He could care less.He was like, man, I can't believe you didn't catch that ball thatcame out you today, or or you know, you threw an interception orwhatever. He was always the hardest on me and I always swore that Iwas never going to be like that and one day I found myself being justlike that with my kids. But that would he said, and I alwaysasked him and said, dad, why you like that? He said thatwas how it was. My Dad was like that with me and it wasjust tough and they had to make you tough, and that that, Ithink, that's why so many great players came out of western Pennsylvania. Iagree with you, got sir, I agree a hundred percent. But youwouldn't have it any other way. That's the way. That's the way itwas. My Dad was the same way with me. You know, ifI I struck out playing baseball and and crew in the bat or something,boy, I got my butt whipped. I just got you know anyway.I mean that's just the way it was. Oh, it was. And wehad the fire whistle at nine o'clock. If you weren't home by the timethe fire whistle one off, there was hell to pay. Right.Well, I had to be an earlier that when there was no light,I had to be an Oh really, yeah, oh, yeah, yeah, and you know, if dad came home and mom said anything to them, then you were in trouble. Well, my mom didn't want to say anything, but sometimes of year she had to. But my dad, doyou know that everybody that they worked in...

...the mill, they came home,they had dinner, they took a shower, cleaned up, they went down tothe tavern. Yep, and they were down tavern for how many hours? I don't know. And our few are and they come home and bythen, you know, I was either in bed or I had to bein the house. That was for sure. Yeah, could. So you've seenso many changes in your life from when you were a child to what'sgoing on now and those transitions, and that's really what the show is about, like how we all transition. We have tough times and you just gota battle and your story's great because you've just battled, you've worked hard andyou got to where you are because of that influence that you had from whenyou were a child. Well, you know lace all about. Figure outwhere you're at, where you want to go and how are you going toget there? That's basically what life was about. Where are you and thenwhere do you want to be? And know, what are you going todo about it? You want to sit there wish, hope. It's notgoing to work that way. It just doesn't work that way. So youhave to do something about it. You find you have to, you haveto imprevent methods and you have that goals in your life, but you haveto methods that are obtainable, that you can do to reach those goals.And if you don't, well, you're just dreaming. I never asked.I never and never ask anybody for anything. I guess said I had a greathigh school coach, I had people courage me in all sports, baseball, football, basketball, but I never had and and I worked for whatI wanted, and that's the one thing that I got from my dad.He you don't you want something, you work for you ordered and you knowit. It's hard to tell people that today, but that's what it comesdown to. It comes down down to being resilient, not quitting, nevergiving up. Keep going after you never know, some other guys going togive up sooner later. Coach, we want to talk a little bit aboutyour career pit and you know you gave us a little explanation of why youwent to pit. But what was your first real memory of going? Likethat's not far from home, but it is far back in that time right, because I can remember my dad never wanted to leave Fort City. Yeah, it wasn't. No, of course it wasn't far from home. wasonly twenty, forty five miles from Bell EQUIPPA. But I spent my timeon the pitch campus, I really did. I get home maybe one weekend amonth or maybe two weekends a month, but no more than that and Iwasn't running back home every week. So the college thing. He hadunderstand pit campus and it's there's not much of a campus because it's a citycampus, but it worked out well for me. I can and I wasthere and it we recruited from really, really good football players from western Pennsylvaniaand Ohio and and we when we had a lot of good pro we didn'tthat my senior year. Our record was for three and free. Now that'snot very good, but you know, it's it. We tied Syracuse.I think it was the number one team in the country that year and we'shad noted game, I thinking. But anyway, we we were we wereteamed. It was close but we weren't...

...quite there and we didn't throw thefootball a lot. We ran the football a lot. When you got topit, coach, was there a particular player or member the coaching staff theyreally bonded with? That kind of helped your proof. The Guy, theguy had got me to go, was nick pass of Dallas. Really hewas from aliquipped. He had gone the pit. He was a running backand he kind of recruited me for Pitt more than anybody. And Jack Whalleywas a line coach. You put under a coach Michael Olson, and herecruited me. He was a guy to recruited me. Ernie effery, allgreat guys. I mean I can remember more and they had a big impacton my career, my life and and my development as a football player.So, coach you mentioned, did you work when you were in college?Oh, yeah, we all had jobs. I mean we did something. Yeah, when I was in college I worked actually one year at work forthe university I did. You know in the summer where they get all thatcleaning up and well, whatever, you a mat mating this man on campus. Not that I can fix anything, but I could clean things up.You never had that Brian Bosworth job where you just got to sit on thetop of a corvette and watch the oil pumps go up and down? Huh? Not Quite. Yeah, yeah, because I used to hear that's throughall the time when I went to the University of Tulsa. There and andthey used to talk about you know, he was older than me and theyalways talked about it how he had the cush job at Oklahoma and he gotpaid because Barry Switzer took care of his athletes. Well, I think alot of schools back did. Back then we were, I was about oneof those schools. Pit Wasn't one of those schools. So I'm very luckyyou worked out the way I did. Well, yeah, I'm sure thatinstilled a lot of how you became a player and a coach in that sodid you when you were in college? Did you kind of have an understandingof the NFL or you just kind of were we're playing for your school.That was playing for Pitt. I had no clue, no clue at all, and somebody, you know, it was no big deal. Don't forgettingnow. This is back in one thousand nine hundred and sixty. It wasnot that big a deal. And you know the draft is somebody came tome and said the drafted, bears are going to draft you, and Isaid when I figured I play linebacker. When I got to the pros andthey drafted me, I went met Mr Alice, said you're going to playtight ends. What the Hell is a tight end? And then really,we had a coach their named Luke, John Soo Soho. Really he reallydid created that position for me and they threw the ball give me a lot. Had A quarterback named Bill Wade who loved this row the football me.So it ended up being good for me, I mean myself, and John Mackiwas came in the next year right after me. He was a syracusewhen I was a bit and that was really the start of it, JohnMackie and myself. You know, Rocky told us about how, when hegot drafted. He found out by somebody's telling him, Hey, look,I think they're drafting you on TV.

Somebody told him that. Like hedidn't even know what was going on. So that's amazing that you guys evenhad no clue compared to well, what the draft is today. I meanit's a big production. It's crazy, it is. Yeah, we gotI got a phone call, you know, said the bears draft of you.My first contract was twelvezero dollars with the six thousand and I was asix player picked in the draft, the six player picked in the first round, twelve thousand with a six thousand dollar signing bonus, and I made allpro gus. And then the next year he didn't. He wanted to payme a bad twelve. He want to pay me fourteen. I see,coach, I'm at taking a cut. I said, I mean twelve andsix. Last year I said that was eighteen. I said I wouldn't Finnsfor penny less than eighteen. As soon as I said it he opened thedrawer. He had a contract for eighteen thousand. He wasn't to give mea raise right, he was going to pay eight and I signed it andhey, it didn't matter. When you want to play the game, youwant to play the game, not about the money. And these kids areso fortunate to be involved in this type of an economy. Were they paythe athletes? Would they pay him it, since it's insane, especially like whatMike Trout got out and in California. All yeah, that's crazy. Socoach it and I like and I like Mike Drop. Everybody can getI'm glad you got it. I mean, you know, but there's always away to make things work if you want to make them work, andyou know and I'm glad it was a way it was because it was hardand I had to do it. I had to work. I had towork, I had to have the disciplinity that make myself let go do whatI had to do. That was always important and I never had a problemdoing it. Yeah, do you think that's kind of a just everybody's differentand you know, or do you think that's something stilled by your parents?I didn't think I was entitled to anything. Now that's the thing. You getwhat you were in life and I think a lot of people now thinkthey're entitled to something right for whatever reason. I don't know whatever the reason isthey do. I don't agree with that. I think you're entitled towhat you work for, why you learn. Yeah, time and effort, there'sno doubt about that. Right. So, you played in one ofthe greatest divisions ever. I loved play. I played for the Lions and theVikings. What was summer like? What was the team that you alwayswanted to play against? It you really said this is going to be agreat game, but I was we were told from day one it was apackers you got to beat the pack and as the first thing they told me, no matter what happens, we got to beat the packers. Well,I think. Hell, I didn't know the packers where. I knew whatthis students work right, you know, but the fact of the eagles stayors, I knew that. So that I found out even the packers were, and goes frombardy was and how good they were, Parkstar and warning andTaylor and and all those guys, the great defense they had. McGee.Yeah, so we had a lot of great, great games with him.Finally, in one thousand nine hundred and sixty three, we broke through,we beat him up, we went up there open with him up there andwe beat him in a very close game and we went on and one theNFL chamanship that year in one thousand nine hundred and sixty three. Was thatone of your fondest memories as a player?...

But now you you know, youdon't remember the losses. Guess you don't want to remember the lot ofyou want you remember the win. So yes, that was one of them. Hey, you were, you've always been thought of as one of thetoughest players to ever play the game. was there a defender that you wereat all intimidated by it? Why, don't call intimid anybody tried to killme. That was very niskey. Well, that being yeah, that would beintimidated. Yeah, he was trying to kill me the old time andI was trying to get save my own life. But no, Ray wasa great player and he he guess. Well, was his job, youknow, not the hell out of me when I was on the field,and he did that, and I'm not to all out of him when Igot a chance to. So we had a pretty good court of the rungoing there for a while. Right. So, coach. So now you'veplayed in the NFL. When did you get that that that bucked to getinto coaching as a player, because I played fifteen years and like I waskind of there, but I wanted to kind of be with my family andI try to go back into coaching later. And it didn't work out for me. Did you? You went right into it. Well, you knowit really it wasn't something that what buy the design. I mean I wasn'tlike something. I was, well, I'm going to be a football coach. I'll tell you what happened exactly. I played for the one of thegreatest minute I've ever remember my life, Tom Landry, and at four great, great years of the player Dallas, he salvage my career when I wasn'tI was I was on my way out. I had been two years and ofHell and Philadelphia and he brought me to Dallas as salvage my career.I played for years there, one a super bowl with them and and whenI got got into the Restaur business down there and I thought was doing okayand then, you know, he asked one day as he called me inand you know, I was I was hired, and he says, listen, what are you going to do? I said, well, I guessI'm just going to spend time at the rest ers. He said, weare thought about coach and I said now I had. He said, whydon't you think about it? And like the hired a coach, a tightends in the special teams. And well, that's where it started. That's Inever look back and I learned a lot him and it was great day. You got a question for coach, especially in the in the mid S, had to be a challenge to coach his guys with all his personalities.She well, it was different, really was. And the main thing wehad to figure out and we had to put an offense together. You know, Buddy Ryan ran the defense and we had a hell of a defense.We had some of the greatest players and you know and Hampton and make Michaeland dent and single arry and fancy competing one and not I can name thewhole team was fantastic. That's Frasier. But anyways, we had we hada we had a practice skin. So...

...those guys every day in practice andour practice is weren't a live but they were pretty pretty temple. So itmay. If we didn't defend ourself, we were going to get killed inpractice. And I kept telling the buddy we're not playing the bears this year. I check the schedule, we're not playing you guys me. You know, take it easy on us. So anyways, you know what, itmade us better. It made our offense better if we could, if wecould, go up against our defense every day in practice, and we hadthe the seven on sevens in that and we did it well and we didand it worked out great. And don't forget we had the great water pain. We had great guys. McMahon is not easy. Was I would ratherhave nobody in my quarterback than him right. Well, you know the thing thatwe know, coach, it takes, even though there's all those great players, it takes a leader to bring them together and want to win andplay together. And one of the quotes I saw you say was, youknow, if you walk with me, we're going to get to the dancein and you know that's what it is. They they wanted to follow you.They knew you've been there and I think you were the influence that putall that great talent and made it work and win a championship. Well,I knew when I got there we had a go and I knew I'd coachHoll was hired me. He hired me to wind championships in irony and everyreason. And we had that opportunity because the nucleus was there, the defensewas there, we had it, tweaked some things. On offense, Ihad that, in my opinion, I had the greatest running back in thehistory of the game and Walter Payton, and my fullback, Matt Stuey,was as good as there ever was. In my opinion. Our offensive linewas solid. Is Solid as you could find. Those guys were great.We had a couple guys of tight end receivers. We had speed receiver.Will they go out? We had, we had all kids sketch. Can'tname every and any, but you know what we had. We had peoplewho complimented each other and our defense was a key factor of everything we did. There's no question about that. But on top of that we had reallygood special teams. We had great special teams. And did you have afavorite player that you coached? They were all my favorites really. I meanif you were to talk about one guy, I don't know. I look differentguys. I mean I love the way make Michael played because he playedour didn't have the talent, mamped and played. You know, we gotfridge and everybody. There's a lot of cruish and fish was a good footballplayer for us, playing great. He was a great college football player.You know, he let himself go. That's why he became what he became. But when he came out and when he when he was waiting in there, about two hundred sixty pounds a guy, was unbelievable and hill quick as acat. But you know, you can't say they know it takes disciplinein like to take care of yourself if you're going to play the game football. And he sports well. I think a lot of people saw him almostas that. On the outside song is...

...almost like a side show, buthe really was a very good player. Well, he was. You know, it wasn't by it wasn't by accident that we put him in the backfloor and random, because I watched him run this. They could. Wereally had to run these things, Buddy Adam, and they did run theselike ten yards guys sprints and I watched. I watched fridge. His start wasunbelievable. He couldn't run, you know, he couldn't run. Fortyarms effective way but he wasn't that bad. But he could go five yards prettydamn passed and I watched that and I said, Hey, I'm goingto put this guy in in front of water, and I did and hesmashed him. I mean it was crazy. He just he just blew a holein the water walked in. So I know I'm on Jen, hiscoach. So I said, well, as a sea can block, youcan run. So I gave ble he ran. He ran right over people. Rather they score a touchdown. I said, well, if he canrun it, he can rock it. You said they he can, hecan catch it, and we do on the ball for touchdown. I saidwhat a was. We can do all that. He can pass the ball, while he couldn't pass the ball. I thought out a three. Yeah. Well, coach, so you've had a lot of highs and lows inplaying in coaching and it's very difficult sometimes. How were you able to manage allof that as a player and as a coach, all those different highsand lows you get in the game of football? Well, I guess sometimesI didn't do it very well, but sometimes I did. I mean it'shard. I mean they you know, people don't realize it's it's more thana job. Did these guys are become your life. It wasn't every dayand you really want in my case, I had had success as a playerand I wanted them to have that kind of success, that killing that Ihad when you win, and that's only it only comes when you win,and that when you get closer, not when you're you're almost there. Yougot to win and we just had a good group right and like for me, when I had problems come up in my career, and I've had alot of them, but when those came up, I would go back tothings my dad would tell me to like try to put things back into perspectiveand how I grew up, where I came from. The ride is getsbumpy at times and it's hard to stay in the Buggy, but you gotto do it. What do you remember most and what would you give adviceto other people about if they want to go into coaching? Well, firstof all, I think you have you for you have to have a gameplan for what you want to do. You have to have understand you haveto put the right people in the right place, you got to get theyou got to utilize your personnel to the best of their talents. How thewords. Don't try to make a donkey and racehorse, you know, makehim. You know what I mean. For you, you got to dowhat you got to do with the talent they have and you try to tryto get that all together. I don't...

...know. I watch these kids sayingthere's they're so talented, they're so there's so much bigger and faster stronger thanwe were. It's unbelievable. Well, they don't. They don't partake indrinking smoking like they did back in the day. They they really take careof their bodies today. Sonny jer gets, you tell me a lot of thosestories. Oh yeah, Sonny was a well, we all did it. I mean that was it. I mean you had a football game,we go to the we stopped by the tavern after the game drink about twentyfive years. But the hell? Right, yeah, that's what our dad's did. Right, and there's no cameraphone zone, right. Yeah, nobodyhad a phone filming. You hope they nobody cared. Actually reports. You'reright there with drinking with you. You're on your side. Not trying towrite bad things about you. Yeah, rude career who I always wanted toask you about the Saturday night live episodes when they had the fans there andChris Farley and those guys and and did you watch those? Did you enjoythose? Well, you know, they asked me to come on and Icame out and they were good guys. I really enjoyed it. I rejarddoing a show. Yeah, I you know, I got caught up intoa little bit, but it was a it was a good thing. Imean, I they it was fun and those guys are great. And thenyou know, they they really played. They built the bears up pretty goodand that I liked that bears, you know. So Oh, yeah,it's fun. Yeah, it was great. It was my kids still do it. You know. Do you want? Would you take a hurricane or wouldyou take coach Dick? And we always walk around the House going coachDick, you know, because well, Pittsburgh guys through and through after theNFL, but you kind of stayed in it, right, because you're partof different organizations now. I was fortunate I got to do job. Iwork for NBCCBS, ESPN, I work for all the major networks and itwas great. I got a sad the chance to stay close from the gameand talk about it, and so it was fun and I'm sure, Imean you had a lot of very successful business ventures too, and your yourphilosophy and coaching probably translated well into the business world. Well, we havesome wrestlers that we are a very proud of. We have a couple ofhere Chicago, one in Pittsburgh. So we're we we're okay. We dowell with what we're trying to do and the brand is good. I've gota good partner. It's a delicious restaurant. I have to say it's one ofmy favorites in Pittsburgh. Right. So, coach, how often,like, do you have other from some of your former players come into yourrestaurant? You get to see them often? I don't see a lot of theformer players anymore. Every once to why I see some of the guys, but no, they know, they got their own lives. I'm inthe restaurant. HOW ABOUT CIGARS? I got the cigars. Yeah, Igot a land of Cigar and I actually actually got one right in front ofme here. But I like that's the only that's the only advice I reallyhave. I like to smoke cigars. Right. So, so, coach, you've come from Al Quippa, right,...

...it's a meal town. We knowthat. A lot of people in Pittsburgh understand that. You've made allthese transitions in your life and you really wanted to. You know, sportswas it's just it's in you. It's all a part of you. Whatadvice you want to give our listeners to about how sports can really help youget to where you want to go in life? Well, it's not aboutsports, is about life. You know you. We have people say he'sI want to be this. Well, what are you going to do aboutbecoming this? How are you going to attain what you want to become?You got to have goals, but you have to have methods. Of Rico'sgoals and you got to be a and he got to be attainable. Imean you can't say I want to do this and that and you know,if they slip the flipprop your off the top of your head, you getyou. You have that game plan for life and I really believe that.So you you know where you want to go, you know how you havea pretty good idea how you want to get to here's what you got todo and you got to do those things. I mean, I I'm not tellingyou you don't know, and sometimes it's not comfortable, sometime to getstuff, but that's what it got to be. A success is not EA, it doesn't come cheap and it's not easy and if you think it is, you're crazy. Right, and that and that's what's going on like ifyou see Pittsburgh in the transformation that we've made in the last forty years frommilltowns to technology and people understanding that. Look, just because times get tough, it doesn't mean that it's the end. You got to keep fighting, yougot to keep pushing and and when you have those goals, you gotto give you something new to reach for. And that's what this shows about,you know, not talking about the current part of sports that we hearevery day and we get sick of listening to. It's about trying to givepeople information that can change their lives. Yes, that's they used to tellus all time. When Times get tough, get going very well. That's justthe way it is. I mean, you're right, and Pittsburgh people,and I said this all over and I don't know if it's true asmuch today, but because of the mills and the industrial makeup of the cityover the years. I thought it was. I thought it was I thought thepeople were just the greatest. I really did, and I think nowthey've transformed so much into different technologies in that but it when it was astill mill town. It was not a bad believe me, a little bitdirty because of a little bit. It's cleaned up nice. It has allright. It not unbelievable, unbelievable pits for exampliable well, coach, notto a lot of hard working people in Pittsburgh. My nephew is a coalminer and I know what that's all about. So you know those guys got yougot to have a lot of grit to do that stuff. We're goingto fire some quick questions in our last segment here called no huddle. Coach. This is a lot of fun. Just just fire out the answers andand we edit this and have a lot of fun with it. It's ourtwo minute drill, for lack of a better term. So go ahead day, fire the question. He coach. What's your biggest pet peeve? Mybiggest pet peeve is people who bitch.

Fair enough, all right. Thisis a little Pittsburgh versus Chicago question here. Kill Bassa or brought workst I likea both, but I'll say CABASA. Yeah, what's the little sour cropcoach? Oh, yeah, that's the way. That's what I wouldraise on me too. Hey, I'm Polish and belt bro Crain. Ohmy gosh, we ate all that. Yeah, yeah, you gotta havethe Progis at a go unpkey still in all that and all that Lusky,all that stuff. Hey, how about this? Were you a better collegeplayer or pro player? Well, I would put it this way. Mysenior year in College I caught twelve passes. My rookie year in pro football Icrot fifty eight. Yeah, but you're figured. Well, you know, the animals all American, I think too. I mean you were youmight have. That was that gave. That came from defense. Really,I play and as again, I thought I was going to be a linebackerin pro ball. Not a tide in that. I had really anybody elsewho would have drafted me, I would have been a linebacker very and that'sfact. Now, when you come back to Pittsburgh, besides going to Dickkids and Robinson what's your favorite place to go? I don't go anywhere.That's the only place I do go, so that's a good place to go. Dave wishous, coach. So my question for you was what is yourfavorite cigar? What type? I think Maduros. There's all kind so whatdid your favorite? There is no bad cigar and I gotta I got itright now. I got I got my own line line that's called called theditches signature line, made by Camasho. They're not bad. They're pretty goodcigars. And then right here, I have one right in front of menow, I have a David offline front of me and I like them.We're we're your cigars made. Yeah, these are Roh hi. I thinkthey're adorn. Yeah, they are there ondoors. Yeah, now, coach, last question. With all your years and TV commentating, give it mostfavorite TV colleague. Really enjoyed working with Chris Berm and I thought he wasI thought he made people rounding better and I thought he was a real proadded and I really enjoyed working with Chris all the years and I would hadthe fortune of working for working with him at Hes. Yeah, but Iworked for a lot of bog guy. I work with Jim Mans to Jimwas fantastic, you know, when I was at hating weird CBS together.But so everybody those guys are good. But I mean it would be hardto be boo or boomer was pretty darn good. Yeah, boomers. Grabmet him several times and he seems like he brought up the audience, thelife in the room and everything and ask those great questions and really made everybodyaround them better. So, coach,...

...and we really appreciate you coming onwith us. Thanks for spending forty S or so minutes with us and giveus a little background. Our fans are going to love it and we'll shareit on social media and if you can help us out, we'd really appreciateit and hopefully some day we can see you. Robinson it at Dick has. All right, thanks, guess. All Right, Care God. Thankyou, but.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (148)