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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 3 months ago

Matthew McConaughey

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to the very best of Huddle Up with Gus! You’re in for a very special treat as we revisit Gus’ discussion with the great Matthew McConaughey about his love of football, how he became a Washington Football Team fan, what life was like growing up and how he juggles being a busy Hollywood icon and cheering on his favorite team in burgundy and gold. 

Hey everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital newsdot com. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say, yeah, welcome to this week's huddle upwith gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the gamesare one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up.Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it'skick off time. So snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left. Hello everyone and welcome to huddle upwith Gus, I'm your host, just parrot and thank you for joining us. You canfind us on huddle up with gusts dot com. Uh and you can also find us on radiodot com and wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, you are joining ustoday in the News 16 31 digital news studio and we are glad to be producedby an tv. We are excited to be on K. S. I. X. You can find us there on sundaymornings at 10 a.m. Right before the NFL get started. Today is a great day.We were joined uh, this week by a great guest who grew up in texas. Told usabout how uh sports shaped his life. Matthew McConaughey joined us, sat downwith us this week, gave us a lot of insights that we didn't really knowabout him. Matthew and I were friends back in the days when I played with theRedskins, the Washington football team. And it's kind of funny when we sat andtalked about all these green lights that he has because of his new bookcalled Green lights. A lot of things. I had to go back and forth. You know, wetalked about the old days and what was the old days? It was the Redskins. Wetalked about the new days and how Daniel Snyder might call him to helphim name the Washington football team. But you know the insights that Matthewgave us into his life, all the green lights that have helped him through hislife. The way he took his journals, wrote his story down, went out into thedesert, took Took quite a few days. I think it was over 50 days um, atdifferent periods of time to write his new book and to really hopefully helpus all uh turn those yellow and red lights into green lights to move ourlife forward. And I really hope you enjoy this episode and now I think weshould join the huddle. All right, Matthew we are ready to getin the show. I just wanted to get into some stuff that we always talk aboutwith our guests and that's how sports shaped your life and you know, knowingyou and reading your book. I actually listened to it because it was niceduring your voice. Um And I think you did an amazing job reading it. Um So Ilistened to that and I think that you know, I never really found out. I meanyou talk about chris hamburger a little bit back in the day, but how did youfall in love with sports at a young age? Yeah. Well we grew up, I mean there was,excuse me, there's always some sort of ball in the house. I got two olderbrothers, they were decent athletes. My middle brother Pat turned out to be areally really good golfer. Um We all played football up until about theeighth grade. My older brother played like ninth and 10th and that's about asfar as we went. Um So whatever season it was, that's the ball that we playedwith this football season, played football, baseball season, we playedbaseball. I took up golf later on and played some tennis. Played 12 years ofsoccer. Um, you know, that, that's just the game we played basketball. That waswhat we did during, during the season. It's just kind of what we did, whichmost of the other neighborhood kids did. Um, you know, I became early on growingup in Longview texas about 2.5 hours east of Dallas. I became a, what wasthen called the Washington Redskins fan,...

...which now called the Washingtonfootball team. And it was because of a few simple reasons that a four year oldmind we'll fall in love with the team. I mean, I'm watching westerns with mydad and I'm rooting for the american indians on horseback. I like the guyswith the arrows into the guns after that. And favorite foods hamburgers.Redskins. Got a middle linebacker and chris hamburger. What's another greatreason like this team? So I was a big underdog in texas obviously, especiallygrowing up outside of Dallas to be what was then called a Redskin fan. Um,there was one guy across the street scott smith who actually was the onlyother risk. In fact, I knew in texas, I used to go to the texas stadium painteduh, shirtless painted burgundy on top with a headdress And you know, theshammy is used to drive a car off with, oh yeah, I'd have a shammy wrappedaround my waist with a rope, tied it on. I'd be barefoot and I'll be right thereon the 50 yard line, uh, in texas stadium. When the Redskins would playthe cowboys. I was at, as you know, the last game at RFK, the first game atJack Kent Cooke and the first game at Fedex, I have burgundy soil in a masonjar from the end zone of RFK. Um and then just grew up loving that team. Ithought that's what I want to be at that time. They were called the washerRedskins. I wanted to be a Redskin football player at the john Riggins waswas my guy and I was the guy in the backyard. I was sort of a late bloomer,so I wasn't very fast, but I had strong legs and uh backside and I was hard toget down in backyard football. So my thing was named Desire. You couldn't,you couldn't get me down. Well that didn't last uh started to go away.Everyone got bigger and faster than me starting around the seventh or eighthgrade. So my football career didn't go much further than that. But sportsman,I mean, it's still my favorite sports is the truest version of reality tv.It's just, it's just, you know, I go to 2000 and five national championshipwith the University of texas beach, USC, you cannot write that script in mybusiness of Hollywood, That's the single most dramatic event, a piece ofentertainment I've ever seen. Um Ebbs and flows of that game. How, you know,I just, it's been a great teacher and me for preparation of my own job. Um,because as you know, um, you want to prepare so much that you're notthinking about what you have to do on the day. You want to go in knowing yourgame plan so well and knowing the opponent's game plan so well that youcan call that audible with just an instinct. Um, and that's for me, that'swhen I do my job the best. Right? And do you think, like, you brought up areally interesting point that, um, you can't replicate a game like that, and Ithink the movie industry has tried to do that, but you don't, I mean, eventhough there's some been amazing sports movies out there, I don't think any fanhas ever gotten the same feeling has been being at a true game. No, I, yeah, I'm not a huge fan of alot of sports movies because it's never as good as the real thing. And you know, and I think that thereare some that are fun, like, like slapshot, they're kind of funny, butit's, it's never, I mean, I could never do, to be honest with you. I couldnever do anything in my life That will replicate that feeling I had when webeat the cowboys that day at RFK and that was the last game I've tried sinceI've left the game for 15 years now, but nothing has worked, right? I'vebeen, I've been an entrepreneur, Nothing. I mean, I love, my family hadbeen married 26 years, my kids are all grown. I get so much enjoyment of pryit out of them but I don't, it's hard. I heard you on a podcast with chrislong and his podcast Green light and talking about um just Mhm What do youdo when you leave? Because you love some something so much. And I feel likelike you're so lucky because you get to be, you do the job that you love for solong. I mean, you can be 90 years old and still making movies, right? And Ihad this short period and and I just just wondering, what do you feel like,like is that part of why you always wanted to be like play at the highestlevel is like you saw all that well, you know, I was going to be, Iwas headed towards law school and it wasn't to my sophomore year in collegethat I decided to change my career route and try to get into thestorytelling business. So I went to film school, University of texas. Look,I, you know, to this day, I still love...

...sports and I'm around my alma mater,the University of Texas Longhorns and look, I'm 51 but I still sit there andand watching practice or something and we'll see a cornerback, you know, umyou know, be a step late on, on, on on knocking down, making a pass anincompletion by tipping it and I'll, and I'll kind of hop and think, oh, Icould have got that and then I realized, no, no, you could have got that. No,but it still feels like it was four years ago when I was in college. Mybody tells me different, but it's still in my mind, still feels like I was justthe other day. Um, I now have a job where I can go. You know, I've playedthree lawyers. I much prefer preparing for a role for three months, working inthat role for three months and then saying, hey now I've done six months asa lawyer or whatever vocation, whatever character I'm plan. Now I'm done, I canquit, go to another job, I can go play another part. It is a real advantage ofwhat I get to do. I get to go try to, you know, live in all everybody else'sdifferent shoes of different walks of life. From astronauts to to toquarterbacks to to lawyers, to poets, to biographies of people. Um it's partof what I love about my job because I've always been keenly interested inpeople and how they were the best at what they did or in my job. How arethey the most true what they did? Because my job is not always aboutwinning. It's one of the great things about sports is sports has of you candeclare the winner. It's 100 m dash. The first one that crosses first winds.You're the winner. It's not a gray area. And my job art is much more subjective.You know, it's hard to say what's what's the best of something. Andsometimes I wish it was what could be more clear cut that there was more of ameasuring standpoint to go like, no, this is the winner. This person isvictorious because of this, This and this. But it's much harder because artsjust more subjective. Mm hmm. Now you grew up you said you always had a ballin the house. I know you have kids now. Are you kind of doing that with them?We always have ball. Go play, go do something. When we were growing up. Weall I was never inside. And I think kids today have changed. How do youfeel about all of that? Are you trying to get your kids out and doing as muchas possible? Yeah. Well, I mean, yes. And we're trying to roll with the timesof this electronic age in this digital age. Because I see great assets. And incertain games they play digitally. Hand eye coordination, uh, seeing theirbrain work choices they gotta make. But we're very um try to be as responsiveas we can about what games we allow them to play. And we very much limitthe screen time. Because I grew up in a household like you did, if it'sdaylight outside, you get your butt outside. Remember mom saying many times,you're not gonna watch somebody do something for you, that you could goout and do for yourself. And there's great lessons in that you go out, youlearn to negotiate with kids, you know, you're the bully comes up, you gottawork your way out of that situation. You get picked on team, sometimes youpick first, sometimes you pick last. Um because some people don't play fairly,how do you call them out? What's what's a good game? What do you know? Somebody,somebody hits you too hard or you hit somebody too hard and they get tickedoff, you know, and it's good for negotiating life. You learn lifelessons on how to get out of life and deal. Um, we still push our kids to getout. Um, quite a bit and they have to, for quite a few hours a day, they haveto be outside moving around. Um, They're playing all the sports rightnow. You know, I'm trying to keep, make sure that they don't Get locked intoonly one sport this early in their life. My kids are 12, 10 and seven, so one ofthem loves soccer, the other one loves football. I'm like, we'll keep playingthem all. You don't need to specialize in anything right now, be an athlete. Iremember meeting you. Can you still dunk? I wish, I wish because when I metyou folks out there, this man didn't need a running start. Standing underthe, under the rim, up two hand jam on the basketball court. You're obviouslyan athlete. You know, you can move, but I'm trying to get, you know, teachour kids, play all the sports and that's what I did, right? And that'swhat I wanted to tell these stories about people growing up because I thinksports is so important for all of us and hearing your story like, yeah,there is a path that you took, but sports probably shaped and influencedyou in a way, Hey, look, your book is amazing. I love hearing the storiesabout your dad and your mom and you mean my dad, I remember going home, twobullies were picking on me. They stole...

...my bike through it in a tree and I wenthome crying. He was working in the garden after working in the middle allday and he said, you better go get your bike and not come back home until youhave it, right. And that story reminded me a lotof stories that you told about your dad. Yeah, scary proposition. But what isthe stuff we remember, experiences, We remember experience is much more thanwhat we were told or given advice for. And I bet you were scared and you know,it could be to go back and get that bite. But then once you got it, I betyou respected that bike a hell of a lot more, but you probably took better careof it. And I bet you, you grew up a lot. You know, our parents are good. Youknow, that's what I mean. When I say negotiate in the world. Um, you know,it's, it's as parents, especially when Children are younger, you see him outon the playground and somebody, they get in an argument or somebody startsto get a some kind of fight your attempted to go, oh, I don't need to gointerrupt, I need to go stop this. But there's great value in going, no, no,no, I'm gonna sit by. I'm gonna let see how my child negotiates this situationbecause that's the real world and we're not going to be there all the time. Solet them go negotiate. Let them get scared and come home without their bike,that the two bullies through in the trees and tell them no, you're gonnahave to go back or we're not, you're not going to school tomorrow until wehave your bike back and you're going to go get it. There's great value in that. Well, how many green lights do youthink sports has given you? Right well, as an approach to what I do,it's giving me endless green lights, did I say? I mean, you know, you playedfootball, you play a bunch of sports, but got football that's a team sport.Most ports at their team sports. And you have something like golf, which isan individual sport. I played a lot of golf. I enjoyed that. Yeah. Mhm. Thatsort of inanimate object that there wasn't a real opponent. The opponentwas yourself and how you dance and play the course. The course is already builtnow. Yes, the wind can pick up after you start to hit your shot and all of asudden kick up to 35 mph in your face and knock your ball down and you underclubbed. But that doesn't happen all the time. Usually you can measure it.So there's a real art form to that individual sport. But football, Let'stake football, for instance, in team sports. Yeah. You're playing for theother person. You're playing for your team and the best teams play for eachother. But at the same time, I still see it as a very selfish sport meaning.If everybody, if if every player says I'm going to play my position to thebest of my ability on every single play within the context of what needs tohappen and what play is called, well then the collective team is going toplay better. So I do see it as an individual responsibility and anindividual game as well within a team sport that it is. But then again,that's how I look at life. I believe in the collective and I believe in groupsand communities and in different tribes and what have you. But there's still,it's up to the person in the mirror, each one of us to say how good can I beat what I'm gonna do. Whether it's the game of life, whether it's with therelationship with our spouse or as a father or with our job. Um, So it is anindividual sport, but we are collectively combined when we're reallygood at, if we're on a team were individually, everybody wants to be thebest for everybody individually, wants to be damned excellent at what they do.That's what you're bound by. That's the collection. Um, because as you know,you get, you know, you got, you got 65 linemen and four of them. I want to be the best every play andthe other one, it's kind of like when the hell's halftime, I'm tired. Wellthat's when that guy sneaks in on your backside right over that guy, that hewas tired, you know, right? That's when you're pulling yourself up out of thatnice RFK dirt that you have in a jar. Um So, so if you take sports andeverything, you learn from it growing up and your love for it, how did youtranslate that into the work that you do today? Because it is a team thatyou're going to? Yeah. We don't get to see the behind the scenes and all thework. Like I think about like when I met you in our facility and I see youon the sidelines of games, we don't, we rarely get to see that as fans of whatyou do now in those, in all those processes. So if you are the star orthe quarterback of that group, what responsibilities do you have to leadthat team? Yeah. Well one I'm going to show up as or more prepared thananybody. I'm gonna be the master of my man, my character. Um Yes, somebodywrote it. Yes, I was directed me but I'm the master. It goes through me. I'mgonna know my character upside downside...

...left, right. I'm gonna come to thescene, I'm gonna come to the set every day with four versions of the truth togive you on my character, throw at me whatever you want. I don't care youtell any of those other because they can do what they want to say what theywant. I'm ready press record. We're live. I can call them, I can call myproverbial audible. If you do something that's not scripted or if the directorwants to change something up, I'm like, yes, always. Yes, yes, yes. I go inwith an attitude that as soon as I walk out of my trailer, the cameras rolling,Not between action and cut. I am my man when I walk off the set until I go homeat night. So for that 12 hours it's in my mind. I'm like, it's live, there'sno audition. It's all one take, you have one take and the cameras rollingright now be your man. McConaughey is what I tell myself. So. And that comesfrom preparation. Uh, I've tried to, when I was younger, I tried toarrogantly act like that. But if I wasn't prepared, I couldn't, you know,I couldn't back it up. No, but now I've learned to prepare to where all my workis in pre production, meaning that your work is in practice and in reps and ifyou do the right work in the preseason, my pre production when it's game timeor when I'm on set, I'm not working. I'm playing. Yeah, because I did thework. It's a door from I'm not thinking about it. It's not my head it's moveddown to my instincts. It's moved down to my body. You see how many teams outthere they get a new D. C. New defensive coordinator. It's got thisreally you know complicated defense. Pretty good reason to Tibet againstthat team next year because you'll see players thinking and if you see aplayer thinking if you see it, if you see a safety or cornerback thinkingyou've got Westbrook or whoever has gotta step on him. Because becausebecause because the corner was thinking so you got to make that transition fromintellectually learning something to wear. No it's past that now. It's in myinstincts. It's in my gut. I'm not even have to think about I'm moving with it.I'm reading the context of the situation, I'm reading the tales on myman that I'm covering, I'm ready. I'm calling audibles in stride, you know,in the game. That's when I know I do my job the best and I would guess thatthat's when, you know, you athletes do their job the best when they're nothave to have to think about it, they're actually doing it. Yeah, if you have tothink about it and it's fourth and seven, you know, and it's a big part ofthe game or third and long or whatever you name it, um it's not you're notgoing to be successful and you know, it just makes me think about how similarbut different they are and I, you know, I compare football to a lot of thingsin sports, to a lot of things and I was just thinking about that, how yourpreparation and how our preparation would be the same and what your gametime is, right? Your game time is is when you're doing all these greatthings. So tell me what was your game time? What was your I see your prep wasyour game time when you wrote this book? When you were taking going out to thedesert. I mean to me, I was like, How do you do that? Because that that was acrazy preparation. Your preparation that took 30 years of you writing inthe journal? Yeah, Yeah. years of preparation bywriting the journal and then to get the damn courage to say I'm taking thosejournals away to go turn and see if it's worthy of being a book, which Ithink it ended up being and hope it did because that's what it is and that'swhat I got out there. But so when it was games out for me to go do that asyou know, what's the hardest part about working out or doing so many thingsthat we're afraid of doing or don't want to do. The hardest part aboutworking out is tying your damn shoes right? And getting out the door for meto as soon as I've loaded all my, you know, you don't wanna do it as soon asyou do it. That's the hardest part. You glad you did for me. That was it. Assoon as I loaded up my truck with all my journals and my steak and my bourbonand and and and my water. Then I was like, okay, I'm doing this. I'm in. SoI went to the I I like to go where I can have no other incoming frequencies,meaning so I went away to solitary confinement to this place with noelectricity, no internet service. Um, nothing with just me and myjournals, which is basically me hanging out with me over the last 50 years. Allright. And I didn't want to. Yeah. What's that? Did you take one of yourairstreams? One of your silver bullets, nope, nope, left us at home. That wastoo much luxury. Uh, he was just just a shit. And I knew that I would get bored.I would get frustrated. I would get lonely. I would get like, I don't feellike great, but I I didn't want to have an alternate escape. I wanted to belike, okay, if you're bored or you know what? You've got one thing to entertainyou and that's your journals. So just...

...keep going to that. So For a total of52 days spread out over different sort of 10 and 12 day parcels I spent insolitary confinement right in the book. Um, and that was it. I I ended uploving it so much and got so hot, you know when you get in the zone, I wasworking 17 hours a day on average writing and my only, my biggestchallenge was putting the pin down and going, you need to get some sleep. Thatbecame the hardest thing is just because my mind was just on fire and Iwas writing and it was coming out of me and the words were coming out of me.And so that was the hardest part after a while was just to remind myselfyou've got to get some sleep or you're going to burn out. Well, I don't, I don't think you burnout. You know, I was listening to you talk and then I've watched several ofyour podcast that you've done with a lot of other people. And I waswondering in my mind if you would be a great rapper, because you're so poeticand you put words together so well, and I wonder if you've ever thought that Well, Yes, and look, version of what Ido is wrap, you know, and, you know, the original, my original, my favoriterapper, the original wrapper, bob Dylan, that guy was a rapper. Man, if you everlisten to bob Dylan, that's what he's doing, rapping. He was a folk poet, buthe was a rapper. Um, so yeah, I do have a tendency and an affiliation for forfor putting music to words and, you know, I speak lyrically. Um, I'll, youknow, I'll come up with the slang or jargon that'll that'll look that thatfeels and sounds and tastes like a, like a, like a title to a great rockand roll album. Um, and that's just how my mind works with, with words. And alot of the writings in the book are sort of, have that sort of like, oh,we're in the rock and roll era right now. We're in the beatnik period of thesixties, like, Jack Kerouac, just spitting out jazz. And, um, that's,yeah, that's that's how my mind kind of computes and put sentences together alot of times. Well, I loved your podcast for that reason, right? Um,because you were you were given a little short clip about what this meantto you, and then you would play the song that meant so much to you, and youjust went song after song after song. And I'm not saying I was a fan of allthe songs you listed, but there were so many that I connected to as well, and Ithought that it was a great way to do a podcast. I've never seen that donebefore. Where did you get that idea? Well I did want you to ask me to dotheir first one when they had their their new their new U. two station. SoI did 11 U. two songs. Um My favorite U. Two songs and I D. J. Them. And Iactually spoke for like sometimes two minutes as an introduction to a song.And then you know music, I listen to a lot of music. Every character I play. II may have a different album that I create for that character. I have adifferent song for every scene I've ever been in when I go on set. And sothe Spotify uh list that I put together for Green lights were songs that overmy 50 years um meant something to me. So there's a bit of a chronology, um,with, with the music that I chose. Um, some of the songs I love, some of themare not my favorite, but they were a seminal song for me at that time. Um,and so I just put that together guy and then late at night, you know, mixedcocktail came to dark room, started laying down some introductions asMcConnell and a DJ for green lanes. I love it. I love it. You're like, you'relike the first baseman that we know he's going to hit a home run and wehear his music come up and we all fall in love with her. Right? So there'ssomebody on set for you playing your music that when you come in, this iswhat I want to play and you're, you're getting ready to come up and basesloaded, hit a grand slam. Sometimes I'm carrying my own jam box. Hey, how come up with us listeners?Manscaped. Yeah, They sent me, uh, they hooked me up with a bunch of tools andformulations for their package three point oh kit. So you know, I want toshow you guys what's in the perfect package, Right? We all think we got aperfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid. Iwant to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box.Uh, you know, you can see what it says. They will thank you because they sentus this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes yousmell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this great, uh, uh, someboxers, you what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sentme this cool uh, sack, I guess you want...

...to call it you to store all your stuffin. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, youknow, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, if you can go toManscaped dot com and put in the code, uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E RO T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can geta kit, you can get individual items like uh, this way cool groomer that hasa little led light, um, ceramic. These things come apart, they're waterproof,you can do a lot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know,it's funny money. I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'mnot going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playingon our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll knowexactly what I'm talking about. But he brought his own clippers in one timeand he used to trim his beard up, his goatee and everything and he had himthere for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walksin and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with hisbeard trimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use thesame trimmer down there that you use up here. So, uh, he kind of freaked out alittle bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there?And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using itever since, so you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don'tleave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it,we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uhtaking care of your balls stories I've ever heard or been around in the lockerroom in the NFL, so It's a great story, um, but you know, I always said therewas no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was just using it andanother guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. Soone of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing in the league, um butyou know, there's so many great things about manscaped and what they're doinguh because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got greathair, um, and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort ofgrooming, right? And so, you know, we all work out for me. I like working inmy yard, doing those things now that I'm retired. Get a little sweat on andeverything. You want to smell good. You know, you got to take care of yourself.They've got some great products. Uh, you know, this one, uh, a little, uh,ball deodorant. We'll need that here and there. Um, after, you know, workingthe yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um, it's a great thing.But there's so many great products. Um, I want to thank Manscaped for sendingthem to me. Um, uh, the lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere inyour body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials. But this isone just letting you know that the lawnmower three point comes with theperfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself, you can buy all theseproducts individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can seethe back, your balls will thank you. And then here's the front. So it's anawesome shirt to have a great gear. And you know what? Sometimes you can justsit back, take care of your balls a little bit and and and read the paper.So manscaped even has their own daily news, so which is great. So don'tforget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E. R.O. T. T. E. Uh And you can save 20% on any products. The complete the perfectuh package gift set and uh you know you can save 20% and get free shipping. Souse the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. Hey everybodyspells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong on the back of my pro bowl jersey.So you know I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forget how importantit is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below uh and havesome fun right, there's nothing closer to you than your little buddies. Uh Souse the lawnmower uh use the Code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shippingand order some great manscaped products. So uh Mhm. Mhm. Yeah.

Um you know and if we go back, you knowI love the other part of your book that I really love with the bumper stickersbecause I think that's it makes so much sense, right? Because what you said waswhen you're riding down the road and you see a bumper sticker, youimmediately kind of get an idea of that person in that car. So what I wanted toask you is if you can think about the Redskins, what would be your bumpersticker if the Redskins, the Washington football team had one on their carright now? What do you that bumper sticker would say? Time to hail H. A. I.L. That's right H. T. T. R. Right. Yeah. Yeah that would probably be, yeah.What's it gonna be now, hail to the red wolves? What's it gonna be? You know,they keep that song and just change out Redskins? I don't know. We'll see youhelp us with the name, bumper sticker. That's it. Right, so we're putting outthere. I'm surprised that Daniel Snyder hasn't reached out to you to try togive them some understanding of what the name should be. I'm surprised to gust daniel. If you'relistening out there, you got my number, man. We talk, we've talked a few timessince this name changes even come up. But you haven't even asked me yet.McConaughey, give me a lyric. Give me a bumper sticker. Give me a name. That'sright. What better wordsmith? Right. Just tell Daniel that you too will goout into the desert for about. You don't have to be 50 days, maybe 20 daysand we can come up with a name. Can you see me and dan Snyder in the Dc danSnyder in the desert? In the cabin with no electricity for 52 days. That wouldbe awesome. Right. How long do you think he would make it? Uh, he'd make it longer than he wouldinitially think he could because you know what I mean? He'd show up, hewouldn't even want to he would look at the place and go oh no oh no. Oh no nono no no this ain't meets all right. No. I mean if I could just get him in andlet and he'd be like man it's dinnertime yet you're like man it'sstill one PM. You know, slow through time down because you know his mindmoves fast. You know you have to slow him way down. Um He'd be uncomfortablefor a while but I think I think he'd get last, oh boy this is gonna be tough.But I I think I can keep him there for a week. Mhm. I'd have to put a helmeton him and a chin strap on him in the mouth guard because he'd be going outof his mind being being locked up out in the middle of the desert and cabinfor a week. But I think we've been there for a week. I'm definitely takingthe under on that one. It's no doubt in my mind, especiallywhen you pull out a head of lettuce and put some ketchup on it, you know, he'slike, I'm out of here, he's not eating that. Uh We'd have to have pastramisandwich. Yes, he's a foodie. Yeah, he's definitely foodie like bourbon andsome crackers isn't gonna cut it for him. Um You know, and I think this isgreat because you have been a fan so and you're not only a Washingtonfootball team fan but you're a huge texas longhorn fan and you've actuallyengrained yourself into that whole university community society In moreways than one. And so can you tell me what your favorite part of being atexas Longhorn is? Yeah. Look, you come to University oftexas. Mhm. To play athletics, you are expected to compete for nationalchampionships. Um Have the facilities, have the talent and the coachingpositions. Um It's an expectation. Um I am right now enjoying this, my role asMinister of Culture there, which is I'm trying to align the same values ittakes to put a winning team on the field with the same values it takes tohave a winner in the classroom in the university as a scholastic destination.Um They're very similar as, you know what it takes to win in the sport, asit does to take him to win in life. Um I'm also working on the relationship ofthe city of Austin with the University of texas. I'd like to see a futurewhere the city of Austin hires more graduates from University of texas thanany other city hires from their local university. I'd like to see uh, theuniversity in the city start to reciprocate and feed off each otherthat way. Um look, we've got a long standing uh pride. This is a great,here's a great example and there's a...

...lot of debate about the eyes of texasright now, so I don't want to get into that debate, but I will get into what Ithink is beautiful about the ritual of us singing that song. We sing that song,Win or lose. Now. The really beautiful part is that we sing that song when welose because what is it basically saying? We have a long view here. Wemay have lost the battle today, but we're going to win the war. Um that's asense of pride in history and tradition and expectations about the long futurewe're going to head into as a university that I that I really like.Um it's there's there's a great entrenched and rich tradition andexpectation of excellence and a halo of excellence that is expected um forbeing a long one. Mhm. Well, you know, and so following you and like I saidafter I finished, I've been trying to find my passion, my place, whatever youwant to call it, but you seem to have so many and you do them all so well andI don't know if you are somehow getting extra hours in the day, but I'm justtrying to figure out how you do so much at such a high level. Can you give us alittle insight to how you do that? Good question. I'm very organized. I mean,look, I have I heard about you keeping your list to go to the bathroom. Mhm.I'll put that on there, I'll put any any easy fun thing to do during the dayon the list. I love having a longer list and be able to mark mark morethings off of it. Um you know, a few years back, I did feel like I needed more hours inthe day and I felt like I was sort of making B minuses C plus and the fivethings that are on my proverbial monday morning desk. And I looked down and Isaid, you know what, this music company, this music label in this productioncompany, let's get rid of that, liquidate that, get rid of it. So I gotrid of two of the five things and they had three things in front of me actingthe foundation and my family. And I said instead of making B minuses andthese five things, let's make a s in these three things and put more energy.Um an intent into these three things and, and for the most part work I wasable to concentrate and give more time to the things that really matter to me.Um I do have a big life, I got a lot going on. I think I'm very good atcompartmentalizing. Um and here's the other thing though, I don't do anythingnow that I don't authentically have a passion for that I don't authenticallybelieve in. And if, you know, if we go do something, if we go do some workthat we don't believe in, it's the wrong kind of hard because all workshard, Good work is hard, but it's the wrong kind of hard if we don't believein it and I get it's the wrong kind of fatigue, I'll be the wrong kind. Idon't like being tired at the end of the day, feeling like I worked my buttoff, but I ran in circles and I'm like, I don't even know what I, if I, if Ibuilt anything today, I don't know if I pulled anything up. I don't like,that's the kind of fatigue. I don't like what I do like is a good day'shard work at the end of the day going, so, okay, cocktail is gonna taste goodbecause I earned it, you know? Um and so I've been pretty good and I just tryto keep work in front of me that I believe in. Yeah, I think that's so important foranyone. And I think what is great is that anybody of whatever your statuses orwherever you are in life, can read your book and get something a little bit outof that because the way you just said that it can be anyone, it doesn't haveto be a professional athlete, a movie star, It could be anyone in any walk oflife and you can take these things and just tell yourself that today is gonnabe good day, I'm gonna go do work that I love and I'm gonna be happy when it'sover. Yeah. And you know, not everyone can dowork that they love. You know, I understand that, but I also know I'vedone things in my life and still do that. I may not love it, but but I'll,it had, it does enough for me that I need to do it, that I'll work to begood at it. And once I get good at it, I kind of learned to love it because itfeels good being good at something, you know what I mean? So I I still do workand I mean everyone people out there who are like, hey man, I got a job thatI don't love, you know what do you how are you talking to me? I'd say well I'mstill talking to you because you can go if you go do something well, even ifyou don't love it, you can learn to love something because it feels good todo something over and over again that you're good at. No, I I agree with that. And so youknow if I think about it When I was...

...playing because I never got to go to mydad's work when I was a kid, right? He worked for PPG for 42 years. I nevergot to go see where he worked. It was wasn't allowed in the factory. So forme, I took my kids in the locker room uh sadly my daughter couldn't go inthere a lot, but when I could take I would, but my boys were always in therebecause I wanted to see them and what I was doing all the time. Do you try todo that with your kids and show them what you're doing so that they can seethe work that you're putting in? Yeah, I do you know, I'm really fortunate inthat regard, you know, before Camille and I decided to have Children, shesaid to me on one condition, I said what? She goes, you go, we go. So myfamily comes with me wherever I go, work on set, all around the world, so Igo concentrate on my work all day. But when I walked through that door my kidsare there jumping up and we're saying hi and they're busting my my bubble,you know, and I'm out of it now, I'm dad. So you know that kept me fromhaving to go to work, be intensely at work for three months, then come backhome to see my family and have to make up for lost time because my family iswith me, I don't have to do that much. Um you know, I talked to a lot of uhmen that were fathers that were older than me that are in my business abouthow they do it and I talked to a few of them and each one of them said lookyou're gonna have to decide the kids are going to stay with their friends orthey're going to go with that and everybody I talked to let their kidsstay with their friends and didn't bring them with them to set and everysingle one of them in hindsight said they regretted it right. So, and we,they come with me. Um, and that that helps a lot in our relationship pluswith my relationship with my wife. No, I agree. You know, and I always thankmy wife too for being so supportive because I played for seven teams. Wefor 15 years, we traveled the country and we lived all over sometimes runninghome. Sometimes we bought a home. But that was the most important thing to me.And um, I couldn't have survived all those cuts and losses and winds andeverything that I went through the red light, yellow light in the green lightsunless I was able to go home and share it with every day. I thought it was soimportant. Yeah. And you know, good on you. You had a, you had a spouse thatsupport you, you know, and that's asking a lot of our spouses especiallyyou know nowadays when when um you know a lot of women have even moreindependence and and and and and go have their own roles and succeed intheir own ways of their own vocations in life. It's it's hard. It's aprivilege to be able to have a spouse on on either side that can support youwith their time that much and especially if you have Children. Yeah. Yeah. It is hard. I thank my wifeand every day and now she works as a nurse and a therapist and I try tosupport her. You know, the roles have changed and it's kind of funny how thatis and and uh I think that's what makes a family strong amp the multi formatnetwork is here to help create, produce, distribute and sell your content formore information. Send a message to info at a M P dot tv. That's info atdouble a mp dot tv. Hi, this is former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte 16 31digital advertising is your one stop shop to promote your business and getnew customers for award winning creative to getting as online indisplay video, O. T. T connected tv and streaming audio. Go to 16 31 digitaladvertising dot com. Are you a small business owner or pursuing the dream ofstarting your own company? Do you know where to start or how to grow thatexisting business? The american business trust company has the answersyou need. The american business Trust company can help you with start upcapital business strategy sales and marketing and establishing your companywith a physical location or on the internet. You decide. you bring theidea. The american business trust company can help with the rest for freeevaluation. You may visit them online at ab Trust co dot com. That's A B T RU S T C O dot com. Or call them at 65760 018 76. That's the AmericanBusiness Trust company. 65,760 01 876. Call them today. That can help yourbusiness right away. Hey everyone, welcome back in the huddle. You canfind us at radio dot com or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast.Now, let's join the huddle. Um you know, so you've spent some time in the huddlewith me today. But I wanted to ask you if you could go join any huddle rightnow out in the NFL, which one would you like to be in? Mm. What huddle would Ilike to be in right now? And I know you...

...still watch all the games to do and in all of sports now, let's just say the NFL right now in the NFL, what huddle do I want to bein right now? Um, do do do do do do do dude, I want to be in where there's somany quarterbacks down and out right now, aren't there? Don't say the cow.Don't say the cowboys because you would just get annihilated. No, no, no, no, no, no. You know what Itell you who I like um, as a quarterback end, as a person and how inthe demeanor with which he runs his offense and huddles up in the poisethat he keeps russell wilson Seattle. Yeah. You know what, you know what'sfunny? It was I was thinking that because I feel like that's exactly howyou would be in the huddle because you never see him frazzled, You see himtaking care of everyone around him and he's always in the right spot at theright time. And that's just, that's kind of what I was thinking. That's howyou would be, you would be that guy in the huddle. No, I would hope so. He does have quitea bit of poison, especially for that height. You know, I gotta say, I tellyou a funny story. I did this movie too for the money where I played this uhquarterback in college who went on to become a game tower and and picker. Butwe went out and shot this scene that was cut back to days, you know, earlieryears of my character where he was playing football and he was aquarterback and he got to go line, went for the running, got hit, broke his leg.But the scenes leading up before they got the leg broken were his greatpasses, completions and winning drive. Well. The crew that they hire on themovies to be the stunt football teams are X Division one football players.All right. I'm 5 11, 3 quarters. Not little guys. I'm 5 11 3 quarters. Andlook, they're all told this is a scene. Whatever you do, don't hit number oneon the call sheet me. So I know they're not going to hit me. But The first sixpasses where I drive back and I know the route. It's a it's a 15 yard cross.I'm throwing it. Lead him in. I got a good arm, all that stuff. I airmailthat receiver by 23 ft because these monsters coming at six ft five, I'm notgoing how do the drew Brees and the Russells and see over this? Finally Ihad after on the sixth take, I was like, okay, you drop back here, you look left,look right at this point when he cuts throw it, that I had all I could seethe scoreboard way above all the guys, the defensive lineman and I said throwit at that scoreboard, just throw it about 25 yards. That was the only passthat I completed. And that was the take we used. But all the 65 early ones,just airmail man, just out of sheer fear going, oh my gosh, they're gonnacrunch, they're gonna crumble on top of me. Um, So yeah, it's a, it's a, it's ahell of a job to have the poise back there. Well, that's, you know, when,when you talk about that and earlier you were talking about golf, right? Tome, it's a little bit of same when you're playing quarterback, everythingis out, right? It's just me, that receiver, I'm beating the D. B. I can'tcontrol anything else, right? Like you control how I throw it to that guy.Maybe if I make a guy missed because I move my feet or whatever, but it's amind game and you gotta focus, you gotta get rid of everything else andgolf is so like that and and you know, you might throw a pick, it's just likeI might put my drive to fairways over, I got to let it go and go to the nextplay, but you it's great. You've got to kind of fill that. Mhm. You know what Imean? Because when you get knocked, you get your dick knocked in the dirt andyou got to get back up and make the next big play, it's one of the hardestthings to do in the world. I uh Yeah, but that's it. You said it,you got to get you get back up, dust off, forget the last one move on. Sohave you ever been on set or It just hasn't been a good day and you had thathappened to you over and it just wasn't going. And so how did you pull yourselfout of that? What I mean? You were going through a red light after redlight. I've been there, I've done it right and I got to get out of this. Howam I gonna get the green light? Well, there's 22 mentors. I've done it bothways. I have gritted my teeth and force my way through it and said I'm comingout the other side and I'm sticking, I'm gonna out endure this until Iabsolutely just get it. And I've also had to take the more eastern view whereI'm like, you know what, I'm gonna take...

...a little walk, I gotta press reset, Igotta go get a new perspective, I got to come back into this scene fresh. UmI gotta go think about something else or let my mind wander to nowhere inparticular and both have worked, I would say from my job where tension isan actor's worst enemy, that Eastern approach of, I'm gonna take a littlewalk, check out, have a new perspective, come back in and start a new, is abetter way to do what I do when I'm stuck at a red light. Yeah, mm. Yeah, II think that that's so smart. So you know, I just appreciate you telling ussome stories about how sports has helped you, How has affected your life,good and bad and how you're gonna, you know, maybe take some of these thingson and teach your kids about them because I think that passing thosestories on are so important and you know, we're lucky. I don't know whichcover you, like better the one with you on it or the one with just your, youknow, green light on it. But I think green Lake under it. I know. Well thankyou. I think it much for reading it. Thanks for talking me about it. Yeah,No, it's awesome and I appreciate you sharing your life with us because youknow, you grew up like a lot of americans, it wasn't easy growing up,you know, you had struggles, right? And if you love something you have apassion. It's just what you love the part where you told your dad, dad, I'mnot going to be a lawyer. I want to go to film school and you just said thatthat's what made him happy that you had a passion and you were going to followyour dream. That is what made him happy. He saw hisyoungest son choose his own path at that time. And I think in my brotherand my dad's heart, he was happy even though I was not going to do what I wasalways expected to do. He, I think he took some honor and going, yes, my sonis being a rebel. He's going to go his own way. He didn't even ask mepermission to yes, that's what you need, that's what you need to succeed. Yeah,well hey, I appreciate you joining me. Matthew was great to catch up with you.It's been a long, long time and you know, thank you for sharing yourstories. I look forward to, you know, hopefully seeing you sometime in thenear future and you know, sharing this book with everyone because I think wecan all get so much out of it. So tell us how everybody can get your book oryou know, some last words of wisdom for all our fans out there. Hey, green lights go to green lightsdot com. You want to find out you get the book there. But it's it's it's atany bookstore all over all over the world right now. I mean from the, fromthe, your local bookstores to your Barnes and nobles. It's it's out there.Um, and the audible version is out there to which I do read and I performum look to, to say howdy and uh, and altro see you later. Here's to catchingand creating more of these green lights in our own lives and in other people'slives. And I would say this, you know a lot of times we think that creating agreen light in our own life and in someone else's life, we often thinkthat's a contradiction that those two don't go together. But I don't believeit's true. There's ways which we can make a choice that is both selfish forus, us and self less and the best choice for the most amount of people aswell. And that's the place I hope we get to, especially right now at a timein our nation where we have such great divide, we gotta start, we gotta figureout what trust each other again. We've got to figure out how to believe ineach other again. Um and I think it's through our values where we can say,you know what, let's at least have a conversation even though we may nothave the same points of view or the same politics. Meet you in the middle. Well, thank youfor spending some time with me and huddle up with Gus, uh and the new 1631 digital news studio. We really appreciate your time uh and good luckwith the rest of everything and hopefully I'll see your kid, your sonplaying out for the texas longhorns someday. You never know. That mighthappen. There's one of them might happen, I don't think will happen withall of them, but it might happen with one. I can dig it up. I would love tosee it. I guess. I appreciate, I enjoy nice catching back up with and that's a wrap sports fan. Thanksfor joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another, huddle upwith Gus, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus, parent huddle up with.Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on applemusic.

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