Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Matt Kazam

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This was an awesome episode. Matt Kazam joins me in the Huddle this week and it is one of the best times I have had on the show. The hour went by way too fast! I think we needed 3 to discuss everything! You got to check out Matt's website, https://theylaughyouwin.com. Matt is bringing laughter back to the workplace. The revolutionary public speaking and humor training program of They Laugh You Win can turn anyone into an extraordinary public speaker. His story about Richard Branson is great and he has worked with many other CEOs who have all seen the value in humor training and teach their employees how to use the tools of stand-up comedy. Matt is a veteran comic who can be seen performing at the nation’s top comedy clubs, casinos, and theatres. He has performed stand-up comedy over 6,000 times in 45 states and 7 countries. Matt has also performed at over 1,000 corporate and private events. He has an amazing ability to work for any crowd, anywhere, any venue. At the age of 10, Matt saw his first comedy show in Las Vegas at the legendary Riviera Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. He knew right then that was what he wanted to do with his life. In 2014 Matt’s boyhood dream was realized and amazingly at the same iconic property where the dream was born, the Riviera. Matt’s one-man comedy show, “40 Is Not The New 20,” was an instant success. Becoming a Las Vegas “must-see” show month after month. He was the last headliner to perform at the Riviera that saw the likes of Frank Sinatra and Elvis rise to fame. Matt’s energetic style, witty observations, and unassuming charm are the driving forces behind his unique and hilarious comedy & learning events.  Growing up in New York City, he started performing shows for family and friends at the age of three, but it wasn’t until graduating college from George Mason University with a degree in finance that Matt finally took the plunge as a full-time stand-up comedian. While in DC he also was an on-air sports personality talking Skins Football and all things sports in DC. He has made television appearances on NBC’s “Last Comic Standing”, Fox’s “Big Red Couch”, Comedy Central’s “Stand-Up Stand-Up”, VH-1’s “Fools For Love”, TLC’s “Two For Vegas”, The Discovery Channel’s “Lux List”, WGN’s “The Bob & Tom Show. He has appeared with Tommy Davidson on the Rascal’s Comedy Club Webcast “Live Caught On The Net”. In addition, Matt’s comedy special, “Stand-Up and Sit-Down with Matt Kazam,” is currently airing on XM Satellite Radio. In addition to these television projects, Matt was a writer for the 2008 “Fox Reality TV Awards” on the Fox Reality Channel. Matt’s 1-man show, “40 Is Not The New 20,” had a residency at the Riviera Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The hilarious show tackles the subject matter both literally and figuratively. The material explores how much the world has changed in the past 40 years. The show is a mid-life celebration of the knowledge and experience that can only be gained with age. The show is like comfort food for the soul. It puts the notion that 40 is the new 20 on trial and breaks down the concept into categories such as technology, the media, politics, relationships, family, our priorities, and even how much our bodies have changed over the years. Matt walks the audience through specific and general examples on how the 40 is not the new 20 and more importantly why?  All the while, the audience is being thoroughly entertained as well as feeling an overwhelming sense of nostalgia. Everyday topics like marriage, fashion, parenting, work, commuting, bills, and exercise, just to name a few, will be compared and contrasted through the eyes of a 40+-year-old taking a look at today’s 20-year-old young adult.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with guests. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback, gusts frout. We are here in the new thirty one digital news studio. If you want to learn more or listen to previous shows, you can check us out of our website, huddle up with Gustscom, or you can listen to us on the new RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. While in the huddle, our guests describe how sports shapes their life. Now let's join the huddle. Hey, everyone on dust drop, host of huddle up with Gusts fifteen, your NFL quarterback, and you know, I want to thank everyone for listening to us. You can find us on huddle up with Gustscom, you can listen to us on the RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You're also listening to us from the new thirty one digital news studio. I know it doesn't look like it right now because I'm in a room in my house doing this, but we are partnered with six thirty one digital news out of them. We are glad to partner with them, and also you can listen to us on the radio every Sunday morning and an am on ksix down at Corpus Christy, Texas. It goes out Sunday mornings before the game, so we're happy to play our podcast for them down there in Texas. Joining us today on huddle up with gusts is a long time stand up vegas comedian. He has thirty years of comedic experience. He has a foundation, or he's found in a company called they laugh, you win, and I think that it's an amazing thing and I know a lot of CEOS out there that probably need this. Would probably have a better company if they used Matt. But joining us today none other, none other than long time stand up comedians been on many, many shows. I don't have a lot. We need more than an hour to talk about everything done in his career, but joining us today as Matt Kaz. I am Matt, how are you doing? I'm well. I'm well. Thanks for having me. I was so excited when when Terry reached out to me, because you're actually the last DC quarterback I liked. So you know, it's and it made me think about the time when you know, in the s and and I think you know you probably the last from the Jack and Cook era, probably, I think about the timing, you know. So you know what's Dandy, got the team. You know, the the landscape definitely changed and I think Jeff George might be the guy that replaced you. So he things got a little crazy after you. So you left town of a good time. Well, so be with you. Yeah, yeah, I know. I'm glad you know and I love talking to people who are who kind of our fans of the teams that I've played for and we can go back and talk about some of the history. I think it was Brad Johnson who replaced me, because I know that the DC. Who knows? But so, Matt, let's get into your story. Yeah, yeah, I want. I want to hear about all right, so you up in New York. You said that you moved when you were ten years old. What did you do? What was it like growing up in New York, and what was the first experience of view where you fell sports, because everybody memory a moment. No, I it's funny, you know, I knew pretty early on in life I didn't win the genetic lottery. So sports were something I kind of envied a little bit. You know, that that, you know, everyone else seemed to be better and you know, if there was a crack in the suicide walk, I fell over it. So I knew that sports weren't going to be for me as a player, even though I played in high school. Not Well, but but fell in love with sports or early on, like like most most young people. And you know, I grew up, you know, watching the steelers and Terry Bradshaw and and all of them. But my comedy career kind of resembles, it's going to sound probably pretty familiar to your sports career, because I came out of the womb being able to make people laugh. My Dad was this insane comedy fan, so I used to play comedy records for me in the womb and by the time I was three years old I was already doing shows for family and friends. Six years old, I got paid for it. Ten Years Old I knew I wanted to be a comedian. My parents took me to Vega said so. My First Show Ever Joan rivers and checky green at the river era and I knew right then that that's what I wanted to do with my life. And then, thirty five years later, I got my own show for the Sns a new twenty in the same room. I saw the show when I was ten years old and then two and Ay of you, Isla, they blow up the casino. But that's the part of the story. You got a podcast. Otherwise, a beautiful no, no deal about a yeah, so were you so that? So we're you a sports fan growing up? Oh, big but you know, I grew up in New York's I was a jets fan. I don't know if that technically that makes me makes me a sports fan. I don't know if they've played they're actually playing the sport everyone else's. But Oh no, big time. I mean we played football in the street and you know basketball. You know,...

New York City with no nets. So totally grew up a big sports fan. Of My dad was also a tremendous boxing fans. So, you know, I remember back then fights were on TV and sitting there with him and, you know, like any other you know, red blooded American boy. My Best Moment Memories with my dad or watching games, watching the Yankees. Took me my first Yankee game. I remember even to this day, and it was forty six years ago, you know, walking in and seeing that green field for the first time and and then the love for sports actually helped my career because I did sports radio in DC for probably twelve years. I was on with Mike Wise on w JFK and you know, did did various other little things on on ESPN. Nine hundred and eighty would be Mitch and doc. So you know it. The love of sports is always been there, even though it may be different. You know from some of the athletes you talked to who were actually good at it. You know of that's you know, I do love sports for sure, but that's what's great about why I love doing this podcast, because I can talk to many different people and they all have a different sports background. Some people played sports, some people enjoyed sports on people collected sports item I talked to a gentleman is one of the company and he was just a hustler and he loved collecting sports items. So I think what your story is is that you know, like a lot of us, you know, sports play such an integral part of our lives. Doesn't necessarily mean we get to go on and play it our whole life. I was lucky, I was really, really lucky that I got to do it for as long as I did. And but there's so many people that sports influences. That's why were the number twelve, because the Terry Bradshaw, you know. And then I get to DC as a as a rookie, and I'm just in awe of Sam huffs and Sonny Jergenson and all those older players, all the hogs, and just standing on the field at RFK was amazing to me. So, and I was thinking about this, like for me that first game was when I was with the Redskins, announce I'm going to be the starter, I go to Indianapolis and we win that first game. So give me a similar experience for you as a comedian on a stage or somewhere you went that said, man, I am here. This is yeah, and it probably is vegas the first time, because you know, for every comedian we can work anyway. Once you get an act, you know if you're willing to travel to tolso or which at all falls, or anywhere in America, you pretty much get the GIG. But Vegas is always like the sign that that you've made it and and and then then you're at that next level. So I remember doing that show and then then realizing, you know what, that that you're able to break through this. This is the hardest one. So you know I'm now at another level. But now that you mentioned it, Sports Wise, I've done two shows and this is one thing I teach all my students. Most comedians painfully shy like I wrote this up as a defense mechanism. You know, from New York City, Chubby little kid had two options. Learn how to fight or learn how to be funny, and fighting it I good at right away and I knew that I wasn't going to probably ever get good at but I wanted up being funny and that and I find you know, the bully was after me, I'd find a bigger bully than him, make him laugh, make him like me, and you know I'd said him on the guy that was after me. But I've done two shows that were huge, even though I'm painfully shy. Can't ride in an elevator. I five social anxiety. But I did show at Clemson's homecoming game and it was when they had a quarterback called Woody danceler and he was supposed to be like the next Pat Mahomes really at that point, and you know he's he was you know good heisman trophy guy. So ESPN covered that homecoming game a death valley, which is actually build as the world's biggest pepper rally. And there were thirty Eightzero people at that show. And when I when I got on the plane to go down there, I thought I was doing the show for a thousand people. I didn't know that it was going to be so when they pick me up from the airport, they drove me past the past death valley and they're like, oh, that's what you're going to be performing and I go always this some sort of annex or, you know, a theater attached to it. They don't know where you're going to be performing on the poor on the yeah, and and and Thirty Eight Tho people. He was the first time where I never heard laughter. I just heard the volume of the planet rise. And that was another big memory. And then later on in my career I've some friends in the unions. So it was New Year's Eve in Houston and it was there in all girls season, and so I called my buddy at Lan, can you get me some tickets to the game? He calls the communication guide the Texans and when we show up he goes out with its fan appreciation day. Would you mind, at every stoppage of play, giving away, you know, a prize based on their seat and then in halftime, would you go down to the field and do a show, you know, five minutes and then give away a car? And that was sixty eight thousand people and just...

...insane to be able to do stay that many that many people. So, you know, it's it's, like I said, it's funny. Sports has crossed and been mingled in my life for a long time. Early on in my career I did a you know, back when you could make fun of things, you know, and the The Washington football team after you left, became a great source of material. I mean Albert Haynesworth came to town and I wrote songs about and the Shanahans came to town and and there was just one thing after another that that, you know, allowed me to kind of feed off of the material that was already there, because you know sports, you know, you never know from one day to the next what the stories are going to be and and they were tremendous, you know. So you know, I've always kind of drawn myself to sports related material and and those audiences. And then even even before I came to Vegas, I had to write for these not to new twenty, and it took me, you know, six, seven years to write the show and I took it out to the country clubs and I performed different golfers, you know, and just a getting great lay to them laugh. You can make anybody laughs right, absolutely, and it was also, you know, I brought the show to their neighborhood, you know, so you know they didn't have to get a babysitter and drive all the way down to the comedy club. And so for years I performed in the golf space. So you know, now that we're thinking about it, I it. I think I'm a tied a lot more to, not more to sports than the even I thought so. But you know, it's great order because audiences give to sports. Audiences at least they love something, you know, they love sports. So you know, people would different than people who don't love sports. And if you look at right now, where would we be during this pandemic with the House sports? I mean I thought about this the other day. Imagine if we didn't have, you know, they're playing and stadiums to nobody, but at least we can watch it and it's the only time I probably feel normal was when I'm watching a football game. Well, I would definitely wear other watch sports and all the politics going on, that's for sure. But you know something that made me, let Kenny my head laugh, was when you said that, you know, you can't even get on an elevator. You got a social distance. And I'm like thinking in my head this is really bad, but I'm like, oh, he probably loves the pandemic. They has to stay six feet away from everyone. Social distance in for the last ten years, I go, I they go limits. You gather the less than ten people. I know I got three friends. They collectively got one friend me. You know, so it really is. You know, if you got social anxiety, pandemic is is is a great place for you to operate. And because you know, nobody's calling me inviting me to things. They just don't. It's not happening. But right, right, I'm on the stage. You know, I think athletes probably the same way. You know. I mean there's a lot of people they would anxiety and depression and but once they put that helmet on, you know it's there free. You know that, like I control the moments I'm on stage. They don't control me and the rest of all lives. You know, we're kind of at the mercy of politics or or whatever's going on. But you know, for that hour and I'm on stage, it's all me and and that that of that part of it I love. Well, yeah, that's what we say. When you cross that white line, everything goes away, right, you don't hear that, you don't hear the crowd me. Obviously they're allowed if you're home or way, depending on where you are. But you know, you just kind of get into the moment and every thing kind of fades away and you just focused on your job and what you're supposed to be doing. And you know, it's kind of fun that way. And I wish I could go back because what you talked about in sports and how couldn't live without. I wish I would have written down all the funny things that have happened to me through, you know, twenty five years of being in football, through high school, college and the pros, because just being yeah, my wife and I we laugh, our kids laughing when we're all pretty funny. When can you know? Laughter gets US through so much. But some of those times I've had in the locker room because I was a prankster. I mean I've pranked everyone. That's what I love to do and and you know, I tell people what I did, but I don't know if they always necessarily believe me. Like when I took Ryan Fitzpatrick ran through the preseason and every week I made him a size smaller, but it kept the same size on the tag that he was getting fatter. But you know, it's just stuff like that. And so I think what comedy is like. You. It said you it took you six to seven years to write your show and that's remarkable. Yeah, and it will hopes that. How did you how did you come up with the idea? So I always really want to come to Vegas, but coming to Vegas with a one man show is is much different than just coming here with your regular act. I mean one maid shows kind of like a play and it's it's got to prove something. So I didn't have the idea for the show that I knew that Vegas was where I wanted to go. So when I'm thirty eight years old and I'm getting ready to go to the DC...

Improv in do a show and I fell in the shower and I cracked my head open right here, and as I was laying down on the floor bleeding, all I can think of was why do people say forty is the new twenty? When I was in my twenties, I was having sex in the shower. Now for down here by myself, and and it was that joke. And then I kind of patch myself up and I needed eight stitches, but I knew I was onto something. So I kind of patch myself up, put a baseball add on, went to the club. On the way to the club I'd written three more jokes kind of around that idea of s not to new twenty. You know about you know, when I was in my s. You know. You know now I got hair on my shoulders. You know, I mean you know that doesn't happen. You know you're you know, you pretty much break is over when you got a couple of throwback Afro pulps on your shoulders. You know. And now the turning gray I go. When I take off my shirt, I look like open radar fan. So and then, you know. So I had to I know, I had this show and then all the other material came from that. But once I was going to take it to Vegas show and we got one shot, you know, being new and and and getting reviewed and all of that. So it did take me six years the right the ninety minute show, seventy five minute show that I do here now. But yeah, it's it's like anything else. You know, nobody. They only see game there, you know, they don't see all the work that goes into look gets you the game there. Right. Well, yeah, you know, it's so similar because really I spent five years in college, right, I spent five years in college working on my craft, only doing what those coaches think I should be doing, and then you get to the Redskins as a rookie and the coach comes and says hey, you're going to start this week in front of the whole team, and you say to yourself, this is my shot. You get one shot. And you see it all the time in the NFL. Right, here's some new rookie quarterback going out and try to play the last king. I remember it was a kid from Dallas, Ben Danucci, right, it says one shot. He's from Pittsburgh's. I was following his story. Did Not have a good game, did not have a good showing against benched and and it's probably not going to happen again for and then because he's so yeah. So for you, when that shot happens, do you go perform in front of the people that are going to hire you? How does that work? Well, you know, I had to had a couple of little mini residencies in Vegas and and one of them was at station casinos, which the fritidos own, what the UFC, which is which is why people will know their name. But they they brought me in here early on to just because they saw that whenever I was doing worked well with casino audiences and that, and that's a huge thing in vegas, because half the audiences and even from the United States, you know, some of them, English is in their primary langue. For the ones that offrom the United States, they're from everywhere and they have to walk through a casino that is designed to distrus back them and not really conducive to what, you know, I'm offering, which is to kind of sit there and listen to every word. And so, you know it, you got a kind of you know, really dial in Vegas and in a different way, and so I had a couple of the residency here. When the Riviera got sold, one of my guys from one of these other casinos I worked went over there and he said you got to bring this, this guy in. That it. So I got the show and the first time, I don't know how many times I've even told this, but the first time I actually did the full show in its entirety was a median night. So you know I but I knew it was going to work. I had done pieces of it here and there, but it wasn't really finished until I actually got the show. My daughter was born. I was in the delivery room kind of working on the collateral and the the the posters for the for the show. But then once you get here you have a soft opening three weeks to kind of work out the kinks. But then by that third week opening nights it. I mean the every media outlet is here reviewing it. And this is tough to being a performer these days because you can have a thousand great reviews you have one bad review on yelp or trip advisors. So every single show has to be great, whether the audience is great, whether you know it's a packed house, not a packed house because you know, somebody goes out there and writes a bad review and you know it ruins everything you know and people will re will believe the one bad review, not the thousands of good reviews. You know. But something you mentioned about being in the locker room, and it's something I teach the people all the time now is and I'm trying to bring humor back to the workplace, because it exists organically in every culture, organization group, from the military to the Court House, to sports teams to, you know, anywhere where you know you need it. As for what it does, which is a stress reliever or a coping mechanism, a way to, you know, kind of relieve stress, it's it's why it's in us.

It's one of the two forms of communication we're given at birth. So when you say used to do it in the locker room, I'm like yes, I mean every locker room needs it and I'm sure you saw it and in every locker room and and in your case you will probably the you know, the architect of of the human but it needs to be there. Could imagine without it, trying to you know, played football every week, facing what you have to face every day, which is you know, your life ending, I mean career ending, injuries and things like that. It's stress at the highest level and the humor is there to help us deal with them. Yeah, Hey, everyone, we're talking with macasam, you know, comedian, Long Time Lass Vegas comedian. Some Matt, one of the things I wanted to talk to you about was just what we were saying is, you know, there is such kind of stress and anxiety that was on the NFL, because they always say at the NFL stands for not for long, but you know, some of the Games that I remember most are not always the great games that I was a part of, but some of the Games where I played poorly or, you know, and I remember fans booing or didn't go well. Do you remember or have a show that you said, man, this was just a boy did not go well, because you know, the next thing you have to do is go to work the next day and pick yourself back up and, just like you said, the next show up and have to be better. Yeah, no, I mean there's definitely I would say I've only bombed three times. I've done it over sixty five hundred times and I've only bomb truly bomb three times. One time I was in West Virginia. I'd blame that on West Virginia. Literally they turned but racel just thought the comedy show. If that shows you how about bad. And then I'm still have this New York accent because my tongue is cursed. I'm going to sound this way forever. So you know, literally ten minutes into the show a guy stood up and he's like boy, we don't get it. He goes. You could stay up their old night. We still going to get it. Turn on the damn race. Literally that's not out. Another show was in up and says that what do you do? Do you just leave or do you just keep going? Or how do you own that? No, luckily enough I was only it was a two man show and I was it was early on in my career. So I we just openings. Only had to do twenty minutes. So I think I stood up there for another five minutes and and and tried not to affect and anybody because I had to spend the night there and so I barrow through my but luckily enough I had somebody behind me. But you know, now I do a one man show. If that happens now, there ain't nobody coming. So enough then. And I've done also the three prisons in my career and the two men's prisons. It's like a locker room, I mean, you know, it's just a bunch of guys, you know, and it wasn't death row. It was, you know, they had a ping pong table. So it's more like, you know, Right County jail or something like that. But it was a great show because they appreciated they loved it. But now the female prison, that's a totally different animal, I think. And you know the things that those those ladies were yelling at me, I don't even know if I could repeat him on this show. I didn't even ask, but literally I didn't even get the first breath of the first joke out and they're like, you know, I'm done. I don't know, but it was horrible and there was literally nothing I can do. The good news about that when you work a jail show is if the audience acts up, they just pull them out of there. So it's so they don't have a time, so they get they get one of two things in and then they pull them out of it. So I started the show with eighty and I think I ended with like twenty five and they all yeah, throwing them out of there, but it was horrible. And then the last one that was really, really bad and they came again. You you way. You know what there are Mys Matt. That reminds me of if you go to a game in Philadelphia, if you start acting up, they just point you. Yeah, you know, throwing the throne. But then the tale in the basement. I think they do maybe do it the new stadium, but the old one, you know, they throw batteries. That Sanna the Eagle, all those game he playing in the old you probably played the old vet to. So yeah, I forget my family everywhere. My team, whatever team I was playing for, never wear my team colors. When you go to the game, you they're going to get beer, food, something thrown at you. Yeah, and you know. So you get those gigs. Another one was a prom show and I done you know, there's like a bunch of these, even the prison show. When I started my career, that was a pretty common show. That that that you know, bookings that you can get and they don't really do them anymore. But the prom show, you do the show at three in the morning for the kids. So they keep me at the school and the kid and they literally kids, eighteen year rookids, and I think I might have been thirty five at that point. And and and they literally stop the kids. They say hey, kids, to stop having fun, come over here, this old man wants to talk to you. And it was just horrible. They it's I never did one of...

...those again, but those are the ones I remember. But I've seen what I've seen from other people. I mean I've seen audience members gets offended by a comedian. They get attacked on stage and bottles thrown around. The goodness, I never never had that. My Dad, though. He wanted to get out of something, he used me as an excuse and he will say, Oh, I've got to drive to a New York to pick up Matt because last he did a show and somebody threw a bottle at them and well, somebody beat him up, and I'm like, stop telling people that. They're going to think guys suck. And but he used to use the t story. Well, my dad used me all the time. You know, every time I went home I had a his kitchen table was full of stuff for me to sign, no doubt, cards, hats, balls, you name it. Dad was giving it away to somebody and I'm like, can I just come home and see you guys, or this not possible? And he's like, Nope, not possible. You got to sign all this stuff. So, Matt, that's one. Another he's like would play it too. What's that? He played sports to just carry, did you dad didn't play sports to? Yeah, he didn't really. He played high school football a little bit. He said he was too mean and then kicked them off the team to play football. And then he played baseball. He loved baseball. He actually had a try out with the Yankees, but back then he was one of twelve kids and so you made more money working at the mill then you did playing for the Yankee. So his family was like, Dude, you're not there's no way you're going to play baseball if you have no shot, you know what I mean? And it was just a different time back then. But you know, he's the one that taught me how throw everything, you know, knuckleball, curveball, fastball, and then his one philosophy. For me, this is typical dad stuff, right. He said, when you get into pitch, throw the first one at their head and then throw the next one down the middle and literally that's what I used to do a little bit. I hit so many kids in the head it was crazy. I hits both. Yeah, no, but my dad was a huge I had both her pack twins. They they batted backtoback. They were twins and they and I hit both of them in the head. I remember that game and I felt so bad and my dad's like, yeah, that's a way to do it. I'm like, what's going on? But that's how he was brother. Yea. So, no, it's and it was to be able to get that to him. You know, you got you played an NFL career. I mean, you know, for me, my father would have loved to have been a comedian. I mean he put he took me all over the world to see, you know, some of the greatest comedians. I mean when I when I was a kid, he was he like the gambles, so he please get gamble the lot in Lake City, and so he would take me to the shows and I got to see Bill Cosby and Don rickles and buddy hacking and then, because he was kind of a big time player, they came and had dinner with us. They would stop in and say hello when we were having dinner. So you know, he kind of like Tiger Woods and in a way that from a very early age my father put everything he wanted to be into me and luckily enough, you know, I love it. But you know, he got as much of a kick out of my career as as I do. You know, and and that for son, to give that to your dad. I think it's super cool. Yeah, my dad definitely like that. Hey, well, we are talking to a comedian Magazam and we're going to take a quick break. Will be right back. Hi, this is former NFL quarterback gust far at six thirty one. Digital advertising is your onestop shop to promote your business and get new customers. For Award winning creative to getting as online in display video, Ott connected TV and streaming audio, go to sixteen thirty one. Digital advertisingcom amp, the multiformat network, is here to help create, produced, just tribute and sell your content. For more information, send a message to Info at a a MP DOT TV. That's Info at double a MP DOT TV. Hey everyone, welcome back in the huddle. You can find us at RADIOCOM wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Now let's join the huddle hey everyone, welcome back to huddle up with gusts on your host guest rat welcome to the six thirty one digital new studio. You're listening to our podcast. You can find us on huddle up with gusts or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. I'm joined today by comedian macazin. We were just discussing, you know, some of our our failures. And then, Matt, I want to talk about one thing that you know, you're on going on the stage after somebody's performing, right, just like if I'm at a game and somebody makes a mistake and it's kind of an awkward moment, like if you're right there. They just made a big air, they fumbled, they did something or you know, whatever it is, and then you have to go control them. But what is that like like? So the comedian in front of you just bomb you just talked about getting bottle thrown...

...out of her. People attacking them and they're walking right at you. What do you say to them? Good said, because the thing is, the funny thing in stand up is that happens all the time and and you don't know if they realized it. You know they don't. You don't know if they realize they bombed, you know, because I've seen so many comedians go up there and then bomb and then get off stage and go man, I killed and I'm like you that, you know, no way. So so, no matter what happens, I just I was somebody walks by me, I just say good set and you know, hopefully you know there's no reason to to, you know, back it on. You know, hopefully they understand went on. But now what sucks those sometimes is I got to go out to and climb out of the hole. You know, yeah, I don't like you know, I guess in your case as the quarterback, you know your people, the defense is climbing out of your whole if you throw a pick or or something like that. But in my case I'm having to climb out of people's hole and I'd much try to stand on the mountain and then have to you know, and in some cases. You know, I was just thinking, like you were talking about the worst bomb. So jake color, I remember one time against the skins, he threw four picks to d' Angelo Hole. Do you have any like it? If two, three, maybe you don't throw in that direction anymore. Right right, yeah, how to help you to me right, one guy right. So, you know, it's almost like that where I when I'm watching another comedian and I'm like pull the rip cord, like don't keep talking to that that guy. You know, I mean like you made it worse. You know, it's almost like quicksand they talk about quicksand in sports, where you know you do something and then you do something else and then you make a mistake and next thing you know you can't get out of it. And but being in it is one thing. Watching it always say, you know, a lot of a lot of my work is rewriting the narrative and changing the mindset on humor and public speaking, because I think, you know, we've only been told one narrative that public speaking is hard and then it's something you should be afraid of, and that's totally not true, because I'm so FRA cant right in an elevator, but I could do a show for sixty eight thousand people. Obviously it's just a skill set. If you were shy, it's not. I mean, if you met Chris Rock, I always tell people, if you met Chris Rock and real life, you'd go there's no way that's Chris Rock. It must be his twin brother comes down cells CDs or because he's really painfully shy as well. So you know. But so it is a skill, said that, that you can develop. But it's also kind of looking a few moves ahead and doing the math. For me, you know, all my choices are kind of just based on the math, as I know as a quarterback, it is for you as well, you know. I mean it's kind of like those Amazon web commercials now that they show. It's kind of like literally getting inside the athletes head. But before I make a choice, I mean I kind of do my the thing. You go what is the outcome? But some people it's like, you know, it's like three or four moves and they still, you know, making it worse and then then I have to go up there. But luckily enough, over the years, you know, you you you figure out how to how to get the audience back on your side or you know what you need to do right and and hopefully never throwing that to Meetian under the bus unless you have to. You know, I mean I'm like listening. I'll try every way back on my side. But if you screwed it up and I got to throw you under the bus to get them back. You going under right? Yeah, yeah, yeah, whatever you got to do to make yourself looking right. So one thing I want to ask you is, so in football we work all week, we plan to be successful against the defense we're going at and then sometimes we go out there and it's a totally different scheme than we're used to see, and so we got to make an audible. But we know our system so well. But the audibles aren't hard to make because we we've done it over and over again. So with your show, you kind of have a set like that? You Do? Do you'd always do it in order, or do you know it well enough now that you can change it up as you're going so that if you skip something you can come back to it? Or is it depending on how your audience is? Or you know, that's kind of how do you do your show day in and day out? Well, Forty's not to do. Twenty is a scripted show. So if you stop the show at six minutes and twenty seconds, I should be exactly where I am, everywhere along the line, because that's that's how we marketed. You know that it's this show. It's the same show every single time. And I guess actual I've been doing that show for years and he got I love doing it. I mean it's I it took me forever to write those jokes and I love doing it. And there's things I do it at five minutes that set up something in eleven minutes and it's really a three act play, you know, with the beginning, a middle and an end with the so I do that one exactly the same way. So once, once I started doing more shows, I wanted to go back to...

...having some flexibility and being able to Improv so I created a show called back to the jokes, where I don't know what I'm going to do. It's basically me going out on stage and letting the audience kind of dictate where I'm going to go. If it's a younger audience, I you know, I'll so, you know, I do a joke. You know, when I was a kid we only had three stations on TV, and and I don't mean at once, I mean that's yeah, we had, you know, and TV midnight. You know, and you're you're I think you're about fifty probably, so you know, you're my age, you know, and the home of the brave. So right, if I have an audience able forty plus people, I'm tell that joke from a very commonality standpoint because I know all of them have a frame of reference. But if I get to the show and they're all younger, then they have no frame of reference or what this is like. So I've got a may we tell it a little differently and then tell it from the point of view of could you imagine how they had all lives sucked? You know that we only had three stations on TV. Now you guys that we can only watch rudolph the red nose rainted that one time of year it came on. You know, because you've missed all the time. You know that. Yeah, and but that also gave us appreciation and you know, you know a lot of things, creativity and work, ethnic and self reliance and and how we grew up. But you know, if you have a just a bunch of young people, you could tell it a wet that way. You know, the same way I tell it to a to an older audience, and they want have the same response. But if I just change it where I'm making fun of that, they have it so much better now because you know, we used that to use real maps like we were Magellan. You know, every every family vacation, your father on the side road with that big paper map. You know, and and you know, it's like, and I always ask the audience, I'm like, what do you think? This is a map up probly in the world. Right. I go, no, just Cleveland. That's it. You you want to go to Akron, your mother's got to get out of the car. That's all. Who another map? You know? So, so I do cold and then also I tell my tell all my students all the time to milk the shit that's working and pull the rip quart on the stuff that's not. Don't say don't say it. Stay so little rigid, into the into the plan because, like Mike Tyson says, everybody got a plan until you get punched in the face. And and and being able to adapt is order, the huge part of the job. Well, we're talking with macazam every one. Matt. One of the things, you know, when we usuld go and play away games, even we were home, one of the fun things with interacting with the fans, even though it wasn't always what you should do. But like we were at the raiders when it was in Oakland. You know, the fans there were crazy. They had the paint on, they had the shoulder pads with the spikes, a crazy helmets, everything, and they loved heckling you right, but you were kind of heckling them back, but it was all kind of part of the game the show. Do you interact a lot with your audience or you just kind of do your set and sometimes you ask him things, but you're really not asking them things. How? What? How do you do that? In some cases it's improblem. I'm just I don't know this person and I want to learn about them, and then I find out they got some weird job with it from a weird place. Or, you know, it's a it's a couple who's been married and divorce three times. You know, I mean just just crazy things where you know I'm really going to them to try to create comedy on stage, you know, because my instinct say that something's there. But most of the time I'm only asking the questions as just a way to kind of engage the audience, but I know where I'm going. Or, depending on his answer, they were hurrins, so I got different outs, you know. So they say this, then I go this way. If they say this, I go this way. So like there's a there's a point, you know. I know you can tell the look at me, but you know, everybody want is what I am. You know what of my ethnic background is, and I go you never guess in a million years. My mother's a Jewish girl from New York, my father's Irani and but some I came out Puerto Rican. And you know, Yellow and green makes blue. So then I'll last the audience. I'll list them all. There any Jewish people here? And if there's a lot of Jewish people, then you know I got something I'll say. If there's no Jewish people, then I'll say, well, is anybody circumcised? I'll take that tonight, you know. So kind of based on what their answer is, I know where I'm going to go. But there's a point in the show where I need a twenty one year old boy for forty s not to know twenty. It's kind of in the third act, and so I'll talk to the twenty one. You'RE A boy, I'll get his name, where it's from, all that kind of stuff, but really he's just kind of the focus of the joke. It doesn't matter. The jokes can be the same joke, whether he's cool, whether he interacts, whether he's into it, you know. So sometimes I'll milk it on the fly, but it doesn't even matter. It's just me just kind of extending it until I know what I'm going to go into, which is it's the kind of a show like forty's not the new twenty. Needs a finger joke, you know. I mean he needs a price. Think you know, I wanted to lie is you know.

So that's so. But really, when I wanted to do that, I always thought about if I had a son, you know, I would be in a fishing boats and I would tell him, you know, I'd be the ghost of Christmas future and be like, one day you're going to be visited by a man with the glove, you know, and he is. It's not doing a play catch, I is, you know. And so, yeah, so this place is in there where it's planning in. But you know, I just did a show back when we could do show. So it's February back then and the guy picks me up at the hotel and he's like, Oh, you gonna wing it tonight, and I'm like you know I'll wing parts of it, but I think the initial you know, plan. It's kind of like, I've heard this in the NFL and I know Joe gibs did this, but you script out the first fifteen plays right. I mean you'll know what your first fifteen plays are going into a game. I know what my first fifteen minutes is going to be, because if I do that right, then I can do whatever the hell I want later on. You know, you sit up the run, you could get the pass calling later on. So there's things I do, but I certainly I have walked up there and just Wung it, you know, but that that's that's not the norm. Usually I know exactly what I'm going to do. Yeah, so let's get into a little bit about what you're doing next. Right. So now you've kind of gone through where you're dealing with your show in Vegas and now you said I'm gonna do something different and through this pandemic and I think doing all these virtual things that everybody is doing. I look at your site and you're doing a lot of that, and tell us a little bit about they laugh, you win, and really how that came to be for you. You know, I it actually started in DC about now. It's been about sixteen, seventeen years, but I was performing at the DC Improv which know if it was where you went there when you were there. But some people came in from the Smithsonian and they've been getting a lot of requests from their fellows because it's the Smithsonian, they have fellows and but they were getting request that they wanted to learn stand up comedy, but not because they wanted to be comedians, because they were judges or they were leaders or CEOS or doctors or or whatever. They just wanted to learn stand up comedy to apply to their, you know, their day today. And that really interests me because I did. I have taught people who wanted to be comedians and and that mets you know, I don't think there's any hacks to that. I think you have to go out on the road. You got to pay your dudes. It's like you know, because you know once you get that first snap in, those three hundred pound guys are running down on you, you know you you've got to be, you know, programmed to be able to do it, whereas if you're CEO, all you have to do is be better than the other CEOS and you have to, you know. So if you apply some of the science I teach them, it's so powerful in their world because humor wasn't the expectation. They never saw a coming. But you know, it's stand up. They show up. They both to take it on Wednesday expecting to laugh on Saturday. You better be great, you know, and there's no way, right, right? I don't think so. So I taught the class of the Smithsonian and it was it was great, and then I wound up teaching for a long time, but you know, my boyhood dream had never been realized yet I still wanted to get back to Vegas, so I kind of put teaching on hold so I could write the show and focus on the show. And and then I got the show, and now it's more about agency and and and and the fact that, you know, I'm teaching something that people believe can't be told. You know, this is this is my legacy because, you know, I had to teach myself the science and really and since then I've understood the neuroscience of it, like what happens when we laugh? You know that we feel emotionally safe. We never, you know, where at all best woman making each other laugh. That you know, and I asked the audience. I'll say how many of you think you're funny? Now you I know it's a big part of your personality, or he said, with the pranks, but only a third of the hands will go up. That means two thirds of these people I've shut down that part of their personality that was given to them as a coping mechanism, as a defense mechanism, as a as as just a way to look at things differently, because the neuroscience says when when you try to look at something, you know it's to be funny, and I see this with joke writing. You have to look at it differently, but when you look at it from fear or hate or anger, you're only looking at it the one way. So so you know, all of this kind of happens, because the at least now what I'm doing. Once I had been teaching it to CEOS, but it's mostly for to be a better leader, to be a better salesman, to be a better communicator. But once the pandemic happen, HR companies will contacting me asking me if I could help them with from the wellness standpoint. You know because the daters out there on how humor can help corporate Cole sure and help with mental health and raise emotional intelligence. And I had already known that science. It just was nothing that people cared about pre pandemic. But now I think it's it's our best chance...

...to to unpack what's been done to us and engage each other from not the the the the fear part of what's going on to us, but what we have in common and how we're all going to kind of get through this. So I kind of pivoted to the virtual and then came up with these joke writing workshops where I teach them a little joke writing, then they break out too little groups and I give them a premise and they write jokes as a group and then one of them comes back and performs. And I took Improv Games and and change them so that they they you can use the science of Improv for problem solving and creativity and innovation and so and and. But this was always what they left you when was supposed to be. And then I got out there in the world and realized here is what people are willing to do. You know, they're not willing to to imbed it into their their corporate culture. But you know, they they'll let me teach a public speaking class or leadership class or sales class. But now, you know, this is something really exciting for me because, you know, if there's a silver lining and covid for me and my family, it's that it brought me back to what this company was always supposed to be. And and and then I you know, I kind of looked into to this program created called the Entrepreneur CEO stand up challenge as where I take high level CEOS running, you know, fifty two, three hundred million dollar companies, teach them virtually my program and then they performed on Broadway at the end and as free from having was awesome. It was a great program and we're about to scale it. We were going to do three in Europe too, and Australia one in South Africa, and that that all went away. So I had to rethink my business. And then I realized, not even knowing how powerful, you know, bringing humor at this time could possibly be, and the fact that companies are really out of options. So then, you know, they if they're coming to me, you know, I mean that means that you know they their think tank of PhDs, you know, couldn't come up with anything. And it's so simple, but no one's ever really kind of broken it down to you know, how somebody can mind for the material and and look for their truth. Because really, we give comedians way too much credit. All we know how to do is do the job. But the real fuel for comedy, the real power, lives inside of every every person out there, because they have the stories, the real life experiences. Comedians only have chipotle and trump and, you know, lading at Romata in you know, they don't have much more. And that's not to put them down, but you know, CIFEL wasn't a really I think sile's a much better comedian now as a father, husband and wife, and I mean father and a husband, because he has real, real stuff to talk about instead of what's the deal with Patins? You know, that's what he did before. So right, you know, I love tea the people. Yeah, I love teaching this to two people and then going you know what, I'm not expecting you to go become a standup comedian, but now at least you'll understand how to kind of create this content and and be and that's what it is. I have content, jokes that I know will work and could be replicated. Do we get because they tell the same way every single time. I can teach people how to do that with their stories, their life experiences. And then, and then, because I teach the long form stand up, which is very conversational, it doesn't sound jokey. So really it's like and then what happens is I teach me. I've never got a speeding ticket, not ever in my life, because I can engage the officer through and that's the other thing. humors based in empathy. In order for me to make you laugh, I have to understand you, have to think about you and your football career and where you grew up in your dad and all this other kind of stuff. But that becomes super, super engaging. You know, you want to talk about a public speaking situation. The traffic stop is it. And most people don't think about the officer. Yes, there are some bad cops out there and I don't want any those bleed throughs to come through, but they're a lot of most of them are incredibly brave people that we need and and and the traffic stop is the most is the most stressful part of their job because they pull over, that's when they die. When they pull over the wrong car, the guy shoots them. So we escalate that. Every single time we get pulled over. We reach for the glove box, we try to put on our seat belt. What do you think he sees from the back? You know, I mean he's just the tension is getting is is just going up. So and then you lie to them. You know, I mean, you know it so well. Everything we do is negative and just. So I put my hands on the steaming while I roll down the window. You know, when he comes there, I tell him the truth. That freaks them out. I try to make them laugh. I look to see if me as a wedding rings I can make some humor connection with them, but it really is using humor to persuade, to get what you want, and that's what they laugh you win. Is it's just right now it's kind of kind of a bigger purpose to kind of heal us and give us hope, but in general it's your best first choice, no matter what you're doing, to get what you want, for sure. Right. Well,...

...it makes me think of the statement laughter is the best medicine. Right, because we found our family and my wife is really funny. My kids are all super funny. They get that from her or not for me, but you know, we've used caught of laughter, we've our favorite movies or comedies. We've done all that and that that really gets us through. We've seen tons of COMEDIANS. I wish we've. We would have seen you at some point and now. Definitely we will when you're out in the road next and we can all get out again. But I think it's amazing what you're doing because sometimes when you are having like a CEO and you're talking to a board or you're making I mean I've done presentations and business and things, and if you can make it lighter and people want to engage with you more, just like you're saying, if you get engage with the police officer in a tense situation, you can engage with somebody in a board room at any moment. So tell us a little bit about your most famous CEO. I think that that. What I've read is that he was. He's a big fan of yours. So Richard Branson. Who was? You know, when I thought about see, because it's, trust me, some places this still so antiquated. You know they're they're living in the past and then not really thinking about the future. And that's the great thing about humor. Nobody knows how to engage the younger people, you know, and they're the biggest consumers are comedy on the planet. You know. I Tell People Netflix is put out for comedy specials since we've been doing this podcast, and then not for you and me, you know, and we don't have time for that. So it really engaged the younger people. But but I look for places fertile ground where they might get it and Virgin and Richard Branson, I remember he was the first one to ever make the safety airline video funny. You know, I don't know if you have a food virgin America, but the it was hilarious. The the safety of it that nobody watches, you know, fashion the seatbelt, don't smoke, all this kind of stuff. But that one was intentionally funny. And this is another thing. Once I start on, you know, unveiling all the signs, people only remember ten to twenty percent of anything you tell them. You embed the message with humor goes up the fifty of sixty percent. So just as a learning tool it's great. So so I wanted up, you know, a connecting with some entrepreneurial groups that add a path to Richard Brandson and I wanted up writing two rows of Richard Branson that he loved and and so much so that he had the slides from the roast hanging in his office on Neckar island when the hurricane came in and wiped them out. So somewhere in the the the Caribbean Ocean, the bottom or sitting my slides right now, because they wiped out everything on Neckar Island. But since then I've worked with two sharks from shark tank. You know, it's the celebrity CEOS. You know they speak is you know they're mostly they're outspeaking. So so they all need to be funnier, you know, and they've tried everything. Every tonight show rider and everyone will write them jokes. But what I do is I learned about them and find out they are truth, how they grew up, you know, you know what what their motivation, what their origin story is, and then then be able to what I'm really good at is is now putting myself in the mind of the audience and and and really thinking about them as we construct the material instead of what I think is funny, but what I think is going to work for them. So, but and, Richard Brandson, I'm trying to turn the entrepreneur, the CEO stand up challenge into a TV show. So it's kind of like undercover boss meets comedy and you know, they can now take the humor and bring it back to the workplace. Understand sometimes that he would do it. Yeah, yeah, and but, but, I mean, you know, he's probably the most famous one. But you know, there's got Kevin Harrington, event to the INFOMERCIAL. You know, he was the you know, but weight or he was that guy, you know, and up and in them working with him. Read about this is I get to figure out and learn how they became them. And some of the most famous people and the most successful people on the planet are Selfmade, you know. I mean it's not. You know, my father, you know, was a real estate guy in New York and every gave me the real estate and that's that's how I became successful. You know, Kevin Harrington, you know, worked in his father's bar and in Cincinnati at ten years old and and then came up with the idea when cable came out it TV used to. They didn't have twenty four hour program like the Discovery Channel. was just eighteen hour programming thing. And once he saw that, he realized he could buy the other six hours and then run his infommercial commercials. So he is like, you know, Mary, I have of just growing up, you know, watching infommercials, and now I'm working with the guy who created it and helping him tell that story to the world. You know, it's it's like if I was...

...able to work with Rockefeller or Henry Ford, you know, back in the day. These are the people I'm working with now. So and I missed that so much of because they're not speaking that I performing with me and you know. So there's less of that. And but it has freed me up to try to help the rank and file of the company directly, because before it was I'd help him and then it would, you know, filter down. But now I'm in their boots, on the ground, working with people and and I just sometimes see how it changes them and I just and I have ten coaches that work on to me now that I trained. Wow, and these are guys alway will favors. You're certifying comment. Basically, yeah, yes, sir, if I yeah, all right. So before from ATT before we wrap it up, I got one last question for you. Give me your prediction on this, on the Washington football team, as we call him, the skins. Do you think they're gonna win the division? Somebody's got a right. I'm sorry as to let me so. That's what I go. Somebody's gonna have to win the NFC, ANFC East and host a playoff game. Host the playoff game whether they like it or not. You know? Do I think? You know what? I saw? Great things, I tell you. I said You my last quarterback. I liked the Alex Smith story is amazing, but I cringe every time somebody gets in the air, and I didn't mean it's yeah, I don't know the wall. So what are you gonna do? Right y? Yeah, Oh my God, I we got about that story. That was you. That's great. Remember that. I remember that like it was yesterday. And you hurt your neck, didn't you? When you're out for a game because of yeah, I got a Stinger. I got a Stinger, a singer from it. That's a absolutely remember, but it's do I think they're gonna they're gonna. You know what? I think they're probably the best team in the NFC East right now. Quite the way that. I thought they tackled really, really well on against the cowboys. That's something. You know, they seem the care and I think Rivera might be the guy and and maybe the name change is what's going to do them. And the endecy is down this year. So you know what, you host the playoff game, maybe you beat Seattle, you know, at home, and you know, maybe, maybe. So, yeah, I think I think the only because the rest of the team sucks so bad. I do think they might. They might. They make me well. The thing I thought said about the name change was there's not a team in the NFL that needs more of a reboot than the skins did. And I think the whole name change broad because since to Dan signers own the team, things haven't gone the way that everybody in Washington thinks they should. So I think they were in desperate need of a reboot. So, Matt One last thing. Please tell us, tell all of our listeners how they can get ahold of you, what you're working on, where they want, where you're going to be next, how they can find you all that information so that we can put it out in our social media. Awesome. Well, they left you windcom. You can learn about the programs in the standup challenge and and all of that and email me or you can find me on Linkedin. That kiss am on Linkedin or facebook. We're actually doing our first virtual entrepreneur CEO stand up challenge on December nineteen and it's free for anybody who wants to to watch it. If we're going to do a virtual show with seven CEOS from from actually one's coming in from Denmark, another one is in Australia, so from all over the world, we can perform a virtual show and raise some money for Jose Andreias is the food kitchen so we can feed some people on this holiday season. So if they find me on there, I can shoot him a link. Right now, I don't know what the links going to be, but you know, if you email me on they left you wincom, you know I'll send you an invite and then you and your family Austo. It's going to be PG thirteen family goat. Yeah, my kids are all in college and older, so they can they team to me new things right so they're old enough they've been through it. So I learned a lot from them. But, Matt, it was a budder man. I you know, I hope we can do this again sometime. I'd love to connect with you again. It was great having you on huddle up with gusts. I think your story is amazing, I think what you're doing is amazing and for me, laughter is the best medicine and I appreciate you so much for joining me on huddle up with gusts today. Thanks for having me. Take care. I hope I see you soon. All Right, thanks, Matt, everyone at Matcazam. Thanks for joining us on huddle up with guys. You can find a fun huddle up with gustscom wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and you can catch us right here next week on the new six hundred and thirty one digital new studio, and also listen to us on Ksix. I'll quick. The Christy Texas have a great deal.

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