Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Matt Kazam

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This was an awesome episode. Matt Kazam joins me in the Huddle this week and it is one of the best times I have had on the show. The hour went by way too fast! I think we needed 3 to discuss everything! You got to check out Matt's website, https://theylaughyouwin.com. Matt is bringing laughter back to the workplace. The revolutionary public speaking and humor training program of They Laugh You Win can turn anyone into an extraordinary public speaker. His story about Richard Branson is great and he has worked with many other CEOs who have all seen the value in humor training and teach their employees how to use the tools of stand-up comedy. Matt is a veteran comic who can be seen performing at the nation’s top comedy clubs, casinos, and theatres. He has performed stand-up comedy over 6,000 times in 45 states and 7 countries. Matt has also performed at over 1,000 corporate and private events. He has an amazing ability to work for any crowd, anywhere, any venue. At the age of 10, Matt saw his first comedy show in Las Vegas at the legendary Riviera Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. He knew right then that was what he wanted to do with his life. In 2014 Matt’s boyhood dream was realized and amazingly at the same iconic property where the dream was born, the Riviera. Matt’s one-man comedy show, “40 Is Not The New 20,” was an instant success. Becoming a Las Vegas “must-see” show month after month. He was the last headliner to perform at the Riviera that saw the likes of Frank Sinatra and Elvis rise to fame. Matt’s energetic style, witty observations, and unassuming charm are the driving forces behind his unique and hilarious comedy & learning events.  Growing up in New York City, he started performing shows for family and friends at the age of three, but it wasn’t until graduating college from George Mason University with a degree in finance that Matt finally took the plunge as a full-time stand-up comedian. While in DC he also was an on-air sports personality talking Skins Football and all things sports in DC. He has made television appearances on NBC’s “Last Comic Standing”, Fox’s “Big Red Couch”, Comedy Central’s “Stand-Up Stand-Up”, VH-1’s “Fools For Love”, TLC’s “Two For Vegas”, The Discovery Channel’s “Lux List”, WGN’s “The Bob & Tom Show. He has appeared with Tommy Davidson on the Rascal’s Comedy Club Webcast “Live Caught On The Net”. In addition, Matt’s comedy special, “Stand-Up and Sit-Down with Matt Kazam,” is currently airing on XM Satellite Radio. In addition to these television projects, Matt was a writer for the 2008 “Fox Reality TV Awards” on the Fox Reality Channel. Matt’s 1-man show, “40 Is Not The New 20,” had a residency at the Riviera Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The hilarious show tackles the subject matter both literally and figuratively. The material explores how much the world has changed in the past 40 years. The show is a mid-life celebration of the knowledge and experience that can only be gained with age. The show is like comfort food for the soul. It puts the notion that 40 is the new 20 on trial and breaks down the concept into categories such as technology, the media, politics, relationships, family, our priorities, and even how much our bodies have changed over the years. Matt walks the audience through specific and general examples on how the 40 is not the new 20 and more importantly why?  All the while, the audience is being thoroughly entertained as well as feeling an overwhelming sense of nostalgia. Everyday topics like marriage, fashion, parenting, work, commuting, bills, and exercise, just to name a few, will be compared and contrasted through the eyes of a 40+-year-old taking a look at today’s 20-year-old young adult.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with guests. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback, gusts frout. We arehere in the new thirty one digital news studio. If you want to learnmore or listen to previous shows, you can check us out of our website, huddle up with Gustscom, or you can listen to us on the newRADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. While in the huddle, our guests describe how sports shapes their life. Now let's join the huddle. Hey, everyone on dust drop, host of huddle up with Gusts fifteen, your NFL quarterback, and you know, I want to thank everyone for listeningto us. You can find us on huddle up with Gustscom, youcan listen to us on the RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favoritepodcast. You're also listening to us from the new thirty one digital news studio. I know it doesn't look like it right now because I'm in a roomin my house doing this, but we are partnered with six thirty one digitalnews out of them. We are glad to partner with them, and alsoyou can listen to us on the radio every Sunday morning and an am onksix down at Corpus Christy, Texas. It goes out Sunday mornings before thegame, so we're happy to play our podcast for them down there in Texas. Joining us today on huddle up with gusts is a long time stand upvegas comedian. He has thirty years of comedic experience. He has a foundation, or he's found in a company called they laugh, you win, andI think that it's an amazing thing and I know a lot of CEOS outthere that probably need this. Would probably have a better company if they usedMatt. But joining us today none other, none other than long time stand upcomedians been on many, many shows. I don't have a lot. Weneed more than an hour to talk about everything done in his career,but joining us today as Matt Kaz. I am Matt, how are youdoing? I'm well. I'm well. Thanks for having me. I wasso excited when when Terry reached out to me, because you're actually the lastDC quarterback I liked. So you know, it's and it made me think aboutthe time when you know, in the s and and I think youknow you probably the last from the Jack and Cook era, probably, Ithink about the timing, you know. So you know what's Dandy, gotthe team. You know, the the landscape definitely changed and I think JeffGeorge might be the guy that replaced you. So he things got a little crazyafter you. So you left town of a good time. Well,so be with you. Yeah, yeah, I know. I'm glad you knowand I love talking to people who are who kind of our fans ofthe teams that I've played for and we can go back and talk about someof the history. I think it was Brad Johnson who replaced me, becauseI know that the DC. Who knows? But so, Matt, let's getinto your story. Yeah, yeah, I want. I want to hearabout all right, so you up in New York. You said thatyou moved when you were ten years old. What did you do? What wasit like growing up in New York, and what was the first experience ofview where you fell sports, because everybody memory a moment. No,I it's funny, you know, I knew pretty early on in life Ididn't win the genetic lottery. So sports were something I kind of envied alittle bit. You know, that that, you know, everyone else seemed tobe better and you know, if there was a crack in the suicidewalk, I fell over it. So I knew that sports weren't going tobe for me as a player, even though I played in high school.Not Well, but but fell in love with sports or early on, likelike most most young people. And you know, I grew up, youknow, watching the steelers and Terry Bradshaw and and all of them. Butmy comedy career kind of resembles, it's going to sound probably pretty familiar toyour sports career, because I came out of the womb being able to makepeople laugh. My Dad was this insane comedy fan, so I used toplay comedy records for me in the womb and by the time I was threeyears old I was already doing shows for family and friends. Six years old, I got paid for it. Ten Years Old I knew I wanted tobe a comedian. My parents took me to Vega said so. My FirstShow Ever Joan rivers and checky green at the river era and I knew rightthen that that's what I wanted to do with my life. And then,thirty five years later, I got my own show for the Sns a newtwenty in the same room. I saw the show when I was ten yearsold and then two and Ay of you, Isla, they blow up the casino. But that's the part of the story. You got a podcast.Otherwise, a beautiful no, no deal about a yeah, so were youso that? So we're you a sports fan growing up? Oh, bigbut you know, I grew up in New York's I was a jets fan. I don't know if that technically that makes me makes me a sports fan. I don't know if they've played they're actually playing the sport everyone else's.But Oh no, big time. I mean we played football in the streetand you know basketball. You know,...

New York City with no nets.So totally grew up a big sports fan. Of My dad was also a tremendousboxing fans. So, you know, I remember back then fights were onTV and sitting there with him and, you know, like any other youknow, red blooded American boy. My Best Moment Memories with my dador watching games, watching the Yankees. Took me my first Yankee game.I remember even to this day, and it was forty six years ago,you know, walking in and seeing that green field for the first time andand then the love for sports actually helped my career because I did sports radioin DC for probably twelve years. I was on with Mike Wise on wJFK and you know, did did various other little things on on ESPN.Nine hundred and eighty would be Mitch and doc. So you know it.The love of sports is always been there, even though it may be different.You know from some of the athletes you talked to who were actually goodat it. You know of that's you know, I do love sports forsure, but that's what's great about why I love doing this podcast, becauseI can talk to many different people and they all have a different sports background. Some people played sports, some people enjoyed sports on people collected sports itemI talked to a gentleman is one of the company and he was just ahustler and he loved collecting sports items. So I think what your story isis that you know, like a lot of us, you know, sportsplay such an integral part of our lives. Doesn't necessarily mean we get to goon and play it our whole life. I was lucky, I was really, really lucky that I got to do it for as long as Idid. And but there's so many people that sports influences. That's why werethe number twelve, because the Terry Bradshaw, you know. And then I getto DC as a as a rookie, and I'm just in awe of Samhuffs and Sonny Jergenson and all those older players, all the hogs,and just standing on the field at RFK was amazing to me. So,and I was thinking about this, like for me that first game was whenI was with the Redskins, announce I'm going to be the starter, Igo to Indianapolis and we win that first game. So give me a similarexperience for you as a comedian on a stage or somewhere you went that said, man, I am here. This is yeah, and it probably isvegas the first time, because you know, for every comedian we can work anyway. Once you get an act, you know if you're willing to travelto tolso or which at all falls, or anywhere in America, you prettymuch get the GIG. But Vegas is always like the sign that that you'vemade it and and and then then you're at that next level. So Iremember doing that show and then then realizing, you know what, that that you'reable to break through this. This is the hardest one. So youknow I'm now at another level. But now that you mentioned it, SportsWise, I've done two shows and this is one thing I teach all mystudents. Most comedians painfully shy like I wrote this up as a defense mechanism. You know, from New York City, Chubby little kid had two options.Learn how to fight or learn how to be funny, and fighting itI good at right away and I knew that I wasn't going to probably everget good at but I wanted up being funny and that and I find youknow, the bully was after me, I'd find a bigger bully than him, make him laugh, make him like me, and you know I'd saidhim on the guy that was after me. But I've done two shows that werehuge, even though I'm painfully shy. Can't ride in an elevator. Ifive social anxiety. But I did show at Clemson's homecoming game and itwas when they had a quarterback called Woody danceler and he was supposed to belike the next Pat Mahomes really at that point, and you know he's hewas you know good heisman trophy guy. So ESPN covered that homecoming game adeath valley, which is actually build as the world's biggest pepper rally. Andthere were thirty Eightzero people at that show. And when I when I got onthe plane to go down there, I thought I was doing the showfor a thousand people. I didn't know that it was going to be sowhen they pick me up from the airport, they drove me past the past deathvalley and they're like, oh, that's what you're going to be performingand I go always this some sort of annex or, you know, atheater attached to it. They don't know where you're going to be performing onthe poor on the yeah, and and and Thirty Eight Tho people. Hewas the first time where I never heard laughter. I just heard the volumeof the planet rise. And that was another big memory. And then lateron in my career I've some friends in the unions. So it was NewYear's Eve in Houston and it was there in all girls season, and soI called my buddy at Lan, can you get me some tickets to thegame? He calls the communication guide the Texans and when we show up hegoes out with its fan appreciation day. Would you mind, at every stoppageof play, giving away, you know, a prize based on their seat andthen in halftime, would you go down to the field and do ashow, you know, five minutes and then give away a car? Andthat was sixty eight thousand people and just...

...insane to be able to do staythat many that many people. So, you know, it's it's, likeI said, it's funny. Sports has crossed and been mingled in my lifefor a long time. Early on in my career I did a you know, back when you could make fun of things, you know, and theThe Washington football team after you left, became a great source of material.I mean Albert Haynesworth came to town and I wrote songs about and the Shanahanscame to town and and there was just one thing after another that that,you know, allowed me to kind of feed off of the material that wasalready there, because you know sports, you know, you never know fromone day to the next what the stories are going to be and and theywere tremendous, you know. So you know, I've always kind of drawnmyself to sports related material and and those audiences. And then even even beforeI came to Vegas, I had to write for these not to new twenty, and it took me, you know, six, seven years to write theshow and I took it out to the country clubs and I performed differentgolfers, you know, and just a getting great lay to them laugh.You can make anybody laughs right, absolutely, and it was also, you know, I brought the show to their neighborhood, you know, so youknow they didn't have to get a babysitter and drive all the way down tothe comedy club. And so for years I performed in the golf space.So you know, now that we're thinking about it, I it. Ithink I'm a tied a lot more to, not more to sports than the evenI thought so. But you know, it's great order because audiences give tosports. Audiences at least they love something, you know, they lovesports. So you know, people would different than people who don't love sports. And if you look at right now, where would we be during this pandemicwith the House sports? I mean I thought about this the other day. Imagine if we didn't have, you know, they're playing and stadiums tonobody, but at least we can watch it and it's the only time Iprobably feel normal was when I'm watching a football game. Well, I woulddefinitely wear other watch sports and all the politics going on, that's for sure. But you know something that made me, let Kenny my head laugh, waswhen you said that, you know, you can't even get on an elevator. You got a social distance. And I'm like thinking in my headthis is really bad, but I'm like, oh, he probably loves the pandemic. They has to stay six feet away from everyone. Social distance infor the last ten years, I go, I they go limits. You gatherthe less than ten people. I know I got three friends. Theycollectively got one friend me. You know, so it really is. You know, if you got social anxiety, pandemic is is is a great placefor you to operate. And because you know, nobody's calling me inviting meto things. They just don't. It's not happening. But right, right, I'm on the stage. You know, I think athletes probably the same way. You know. I mean there's a lot of people they would anxietyand depression and but once they put that helmet on, you know it's therefree. You know that, like I control the moments I'm on stage.They don't control me and the rest of all lives. You know, we'rekind of at the mercy of politics or or whatever's going on. But youknow, for that hour and I'm on stage, it's all me and andthat that of that part of it I love. Well, yeah, that'swhat we say. When you cross that white line, everything goes away,right, you don't hear that, you don't hear the crowd me. Obviouslythey're allowed if you're home or way, depending on where you are. Butyou know, you just kind of get into the moment and every thing kindof fades away and you just focused on your job and what you're supposed tobe doing. And you know, it's kind of fun that way. AndI wish I could go back because what you talked about in sports and howcouldn't live without. I wish I would have written down all the funny thingsthat have happened to me through, you know, twenty five years of beingin football, through high school, college and the pros, because just beingyeah, my wife and I we laugh, our kids laughing when we're all prettyfunny. When can you know? Laughter gets US through so much.But some of those times I've had in the locker room because I was aprankster. I mean I've pranked everyone. That's what I love to do andand you know, I tell people what I did, but I don't knowif they always necessarily believe me. Like when I took Ryan Fitzpatrick ran throughthe preseason and every week I made him a size smaller, but it keptthe same size on the tag that he was getting fatter. But you know, it's just stuff like that. And so I think what comedy is like. You. It said you it took you six to seven years to writeyour show and that's remarkable. Yeah, and it will hopes that. Howdid you how did you come up with the idea? So I always reallywant to come to Vegas, but coming to Vegas with a one man showis is much different than just coming here with your regular act. I meanone maid shows kind of like a play and it's it's got to prove something. So I didn't have the idea for the show that I knew that Vegaswas where I wanted to go. So when I'm thirty eight years old andI'm getting ready to go to the DC...

Improv in do a show and Ifell in the shower and I cracked my head open right here, and asI was laying down on the floor bleeding, all I can think of was whydo people say forty is the new twenty? When I was in mytwenties, I was having sex in the shower. Now for down here bymyself, and and it was that joke. And then I kind of patch myselfup and I needed eight stitches, but I knew I was onto something. So I kind of patch myself up, put a baseball add on, wentto the club. On the way to the club I'd written three morejokes kind of around that idea of s not to new twenty. You knowabout you know, when I was in my s. You know. Youknow now I got hair on my shoulders. You know, I mean you knowthat doesn't happen. You know you're you know, you pretty much breakis over when you got a couple of throwback Afro pulps on your shoulders.You know. And now the turning gray I go. When I take offmy shirt, I look like open radar fan. So and then, youknow. So I had to I know, I had this show and then allthe other material came from that. But once I was going to takeit to Vegas show and we got one shot, you know, being newand and and getting reviewed and all of that. So it did take mesix years the right the ninety minute show, seventy five minute show that I dohere now. But yeah, it's it's like anything else. You know, nobody. They only see game there, you know, they don't see allthe work that goes into look gets you the game there. Right.Well, yeah, you know, it's so similar because really I spent fiveyears in college, right, I spent five years in college working on mycraft, only doing what those coaches think I should be doing, and thenyou get to the Redskins as a rookie and the coach comes and says hey, you're going to start this week in front of the whole team, andyou say to yourself, this is my shot. You get one shot.And you see it all the time in the NFL. Right, here's somenew rookie quarterback going out and try to play the last king. I rememberit was a kid from Dallas, Ben Danucci, right, it says oneshot. He's from Pittsburgh's. I was following his story. Did Not havea good game, did not have a good showing against benched and and it'sprobably not going to happen again for and then because he's so yeah. Sofor you, when that shot happens, do you go perform in front ofthe people that are going to hire you? How does that work? Well,you know, I had to had a couple of little mini residencies inVegas and and one of them was at station casinos, which the fritidos own, what the UFC, which is which is why people will know their name. But they they brought me in here early on to just because they sawthat whenever I was doing worked well with casino audiences and that, and that'sa huge thing in vegas, because half the audiences and even from the UnitedStates, you know, some of them, English is in their primary langue.For the ones that offrom the United States, they're from everywhere and theyhave to walk through a casino that is designed to distrus back them and notreally conducive to what, you know, I'm offering, which is to kindof sit there and listen to every word. And so, you know it,you got a kind of you know, really dial in Vegas and in adifferent way, and so I had a couple of the residency here.When the Riviera got sold, one of my guys from one of these othercasinos I worked went over there and he said you got to bring this,this guy in. That it. So I got the show and the firsttime, I don't know how many times I've even told this, but thefirst time I actually did the full show in its entirety was a median night. So you know I but I knew it was going to work. Ihad done pieces of it here and there, but it wasn't really finished until Iactually got the show. My daughter was born. I was in thedelivery room kind of working on the collateral and the the the posters for thefor the show. But then once you get here you have a soft openingthree weeks to kind of work out the kinks. But then by that thirdweek opening nights it. I mean the every media outlet is here reviewing it. And this is tough to being a performer these days because you can havea thousand great reviews you have one bad review on yelp or trip advisors.So every single show has to be great, whether the audience is great, whetheryou know it's a packed house, not a packed house because you know, somebody goes out there and writes a bad review and you know it ruinseverything you know and people will re will believe the one bad review, notthe thousands of good reviews. You know. But something you mentioned about being inthe locker room, and it's something I teach the people all the timenow is and I'm trying to bring humor back to the workplace, because itexists organically in every culture, organization group, from the military to the Court House, to sports teams to, you know, anywhere where you know youneed it. As for what it does, which is a stress reliever or acoping mechanism, a way to, you know, kind of relieve stress, it's it's why it's in us.

It's one of the two forms ofcommunication we're given at birth. So when you say used to do it inthe locker room, I'm like yes, I mean every locker room needs itand I'm sure you saw it and in every locker room and and in yourcase you will probably the you know, the architect of of the human butit needs to be there. Could imagine without it, trying to you know, played football every week, facing what you have to face every day,which is you know, your life ending, I mean career ending, injuries andthings like that. It's stress at the highest level and the humor isthere to help us deal with them. Yeah, Hey, everyone, we'retalking with macasam, you know, comedian, Long Time Lass Vegas comedian. SomeMatt, one of the things I wanted to talk to you about wasjust what we were saying is, you know, there is such kind ofstress and anxiety that was on the NFL, because they always say at the NFLstands for not for long, but you know, some of the Gamesthat I remember most are not always the great games that I was a partof, but some of the Games where I played poorly or, you know, and I remember fans booing or didn't go well. Do you remember orhave a show that you said, man, this was just a boy did notgo well, because you know, the next thing you have to dois go to work the next day and pick yourself back up and, justlike you said, the next show up and have to be better. Yeah, no, I mean there's definitely I would say I've only bombed three times. I've done it over sixty five hundred times and I've only bomb truly bombthree times. One time I was in West Virginia. I'd blame that onWest Virginia. Literally they turned but racel just thought the comedy show. Ifthat shows you how about bad. And then I'm still have this New Yorkaccent because my tongue is cursed. I'm going to sound this way forever.So you know, literally ten minutes into the show a guy stood up andhe's like boy, we don't get it. He goes. You could stay uptheir old night. We still going to get it. Turn on thedamn race. Literally that's not out. Another show was in up and saysthat what do you do? Do you just leave or do you just keepgoing? Or how do you own that? No, luckily enough I was onlyit was a two man show and I was it was early on inmy career. So I we just openings. Only had to do twenty minutes.So I think I stood up there for another five minutes and and andtried not to affect and anybody because I had to spend the night there andso I barrow through my but luckily enough I had somebody behind me. Butyou know, now I do a one man show. If that happens now, there ain't nobody coming. So enough then. And I've done also thethree prisons in my career and the two men's prisons. It's like a lockerroom, I mean, you know, it's just a bunch of guys,you know, and it wasn't death row. It was, you know, theyhad a ping pong table. So it's more like, you know,Right County jail or something like that. But it was a great show becausethey appreciated they loved it. But now the female prison, that's a totallydifferent animal, I think. And you know the things that those those ladieswere yelling at me, I don't even know if I could repeat him onthis show. I didn't even ask, but literally I didn't even get thefirst breath of the first joke out and they're like, you know, I'mdone. I don't know, but it was horrible and there was literally nothingI can do. The good news about that when you work a jail showis if the audience acts up, they just pull them out of there.So it's so they don't have a time, so they get they get one oftwo things in and then they pull them out of it. So Istarted the show with eighty and I think I ended with like twenty five andthey all yeah, throwing them out of there, but it was horrible.And then the last one that was really, really bad and they came again.You you way. You know what there are Mys Matt. That remindsme of if you go to a game in Philadelphia, if you start actingup, they just point you. Yeah, you know, throwing the throne.But then the tale in the basement. I think they do maybe do itthe new stadium, but the old one, you know, they throwbatteries. That Sanna the Eagle, all those game he playing in the oldyou probably played the old vet to. So yeah, I forget my familyeverywhere. My team, whatever team I was playing for, never wear myteam colors. When you go to the game, you they're going to getbeer, food, something thrown at you. Yeah, and you know. Soyou get those gigs. Another one was a prom show and I doneyou know, there's like a bunch of these, even the prison show.When I started my career, that was a pretty common show. That thatthat you know, bookings that you can get and they don't really do themanymore. But the prom show, you do the show at three in themorning for the kids. So they keep me at the school and the kidand they literally kids, eighteen year rookids, and I think I might have beenthirty five at that point. And and and they literally stop the kids. They say hey, kids, to stop having fun, come over here, this old man wants to talk to you. And it was just horrible. They it's I never did one of...

...those again, but those are theones I remember. But I've seen what I've seen from other people. Imean I've seen audience members gets offended by a comedian. They get attacked onstage and bottles thrown around. The goodness, I never never had that. MyDad, though. He wanted to get out of something, he usedme as an excuse and he will say, Oh, I've got to drive toa New York to pick up Matt because last he did a show andsomebody threw a bottle at them and well, somebody beat him up, and I'mlike, stop telling people that. They're going to think guys suck.And but he used to use the t story. Well, my dad usedme all the time. You know, every time I went home I hada his kitchen table was full of stuff for me to sign, no doubt, cards, hats, balls, you name it. Dad was giving itaway to somebody and I'm like, can I just come home and see youguys, or this not possible? And he's like, Nope, not possible. You got to sign all this stuff. So, Matt, that's one.Another he's like would play it too. What's that? He played sports tojust carry, did you dad didn't play sports to? Yeah, hedidn't really. He played high school football a little bit. He said hewas too mean and then kicked them off the team to play football. Andthen he played baseball. He loved baseball. He actually had a try out withthe Yankees, but back then he was one of twelve kids and soyou made more money working at the mill then you did playing for the Yankee. So his family was like, Dude, you're not there's no way you're goingto play baseball if you have no shot, you know what I mean? And it was just a different time back then. But you know,he's the one that taught me how throw everything, you know, knuckleball,curveball, fastball, and then his one philosophy. For me, this istypical dad stuff, right. He said, when you get into pitch, throwthe first one at their head and then throw the next one down themiddle and literally that's what I used to do a little bit. I hitso many kids in the head it was crazy. I hits both. Yeah, no, but my dad was a huge I had both her pack twins. They they batted backtoback. They were twins and they and I hit bothof them in the head. I remember that game and I felt so badand my dad's like, yeah, that's a way to do it. I'mlike, what's going on? But that's how he was brother. Yea.So, no, it's and it was to be able to get that tohim. You know, you got you played an NFL career. I mean, you know, for me, my father would have loved to have beena comedian. I mean he put he took me all over the world tosee, you know, some of the greatest comedians. I mean when Iwhen I was a kid, he was he like the gambles, so heplease get gamble the lot in Lake City, and so he would take me tothe shows and I got to see Bill Cosby and Don rickles and buddyhacking and then, because he was kind of a big time player, theycame and had dinner with us. They would stop in and say hello whenwe were having dinner. So you know, he kind of like Tiger Woods andin a way that from a very early age my father put everything hewanted to be into me and luckily enough, you know, I love it.But you know, he got as much of a kick out of mycareer as as I do. You know, and and that for son, togive that to your dad. I think it's super cool. Yeah,my dad definitely like that. Hey, well, we are talking to acomedian Magazam and we're going to take a quick break. Will be right back. Hi, this is former NFL quarterback gust far at six thirty one.Digital advertising is your onestop shop to promote your business and get new customers.For Award winning creative to getting as online in display video, Ott connected TVand streaming audio, go to sixteen thirty one. Digital advertisingcom amp, themultiformat network, is here to help create, produced, just tribute and sell yourcontent. For more information, send a message to Info at a aMP DOT TV. That's Info at double a MP DOT TV. Hey everyone, welcome back in the huddle. You can find us at RADIOCOM wherever youlisten to your favorite podcast. Now let's join the huddle hey everyone, welcomeback to huddle up with gusts on your host guest rat welcome to the sixthirty one digital new studio. You're listening to our podcast. You can findus on huddle up with gusts or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast.I'm joined today by comedian macazin. We were just discussing, you know,some of our our failures. And then, Matt, I want to talk aboutone thing that you know, you're on going on the stage after somebody'sperforming, right, just like if I'm at a game and somebody makes amistake and it's kind of an awkward moment, like if you're right there. Theyjust made a big air, they fumbled, they did something or youknow, whatever it is, and then you have to go control them.But what is that like like? So the comedian in front of you justbomb you just talked about getting bottle thrown...

...out of her. People attacking themand they're walking right at you. What do you say to them? Goodsaid, because the thing is, the funny thing in stand up is thathappens all the time and and you don't know if they realized it. Youknow they don't. You don't know if they realize they bombed, you know, because I've seen so many comedians go up there and then bomb and thenget off stage and go man, I killed and I'm like you that,you know, no way. So so, no matter what happens, I justI was somebody walks by me, I just say good set and youknow, hopefully you know there's no reason to to, you know, backit on. You know, hopefully they understand went on. But now whatsucks those sometimes is I got to go out to and climb out of thehole. You know, yeah, I don't like you know, I guessin your case as the quarterback, you know your people, the defense isclimbing out of your whole if you throw a pick or or something like that. But in my case I'm having to climb out of people's hole and I'dmuch try to stand on the mountain and then have to you know, andin some cases. You know, I was just thinking, like you weretalking about the worst bomb. So jake color, I remember one time againstthe skins, he threw four picks to d' Angelo Hole. Do you haveany like it? If two, three, maybe you don't throw in that directionanymore. Right right, yeah, how to help you to me right, one guy right. So, you know, it's almost like that whereI when I'm watching another comedian and I'm like pull the rip cord, likedon't keep talking to that that guy. You know, I mean like youmade it worse. You know, it's almost like quicksand they talk about quicksandin sports, where you know you do something and then you do something elseand then you make a mistake and next thing you know you can't get outof it. And but being in it is one thing. Watching it alwayssay, you know, a lot of a lot of my work is rewritingthe narrative and changing the mindset on humor and public speaking, because I think, you know, we've only been told one narrative that public speaking is hardand then it's something you should be afraid of, and that's totally not true, because I'm so FRA cant right in an elevator, but I could doa show for sixty eight thousand people. Obviously it's just a skill set.If you were shy, it's not. I mean, if you met ChrisRock, I always tell people, if you met Chris Rock and real life, you'd go there's no way that's Chris Rock. It must be his twinbrother comes down cells CDs or because he's really painfully shy as well. Soyou know. But so it is a skill, said that, that youcan develop. But it's also kind of looking a few moves ahead and doingthe math. For me, you know, all my choices are kind of justbased on the math, as I know as a quarterback, it isfor you as well, you know. I mean it's kind of like thoseAmazon web commercials now that they show. It's kind of like literally getting insidethe athletes head. But before I make a choice, I mean I kindof do my the thing. You go what is the outcome? But somepeople it's like, you know, it's like three or four moves and theystill, you know, making it worse and then then I have to goup there. But luckily enough, over the years, you know, youyou you figure out how to how to get the audience back on your sideor you know what you need to do right and and hopefully never throwing thatto Meetian under the bus unless you have to. You know, I meanI'm like listening. I'll try every way back on my side. But ifyou screwed it up and I got to throw you under the bus to getthem back. You going under right? Yeah, yeah, yeah, whateveryou got to do to make yourself looking right. So one thing I wantto ask you is, so in football we work all week, we planto be successful against the defense we're going at and then sometimes we go outthere and it's a totally different scheme than we're used to see, and sowe got to make an audible. But we know our system so well.But the audibles aren't hard to make because we we've done it over and overagain. So with your show, you kind of have a set like that? You Do? Do you'd always do it in order, or do youknow it well enough now that you can change it up as you're going sothat if you skip something you can come back to it? Or is itdepending on how your audience is? Or you know, that's kind of howdo you do your show day in and day out? Well, Forty's notto do. Twenty is a scripted show. So if you stop the show atsix minutes and twenty seconds, I should be exactly where I am,everywhere along the line, because that's that's how we marketed. You know thatit's this show. It's the same show every single time. And I guessactual I've been doing that show for years and he got I love doing it. I mean it's I it took me forever to write those jokes and Ilove doing it. And there's things I do it at five minutes that setup something in eleven minutes and it's really a three act play, you know, with the beginning, a middle and an end with the so I dothat one exactly the same way. So once, once I started doing moreshows, I wanted to go back to...

...having some flexibility and being able toImprov so I created a show called back to the jokes, where I don'tknow what I'm going to do. It's basically me going out on stage andletting the audience kind of dictate where I'm going to go. If it's ayounger audience, I you know, I'll so, you know, I doa joke. You know, when I was a kid we only had threestations on TV, and and I don't mean at once, I mean that'syeah, we had, you know, and TV midnight. You know,and you're you're I think you're about fifty probably, so you know, you'remy age, you know, and the home of the brave. So right, if I have an audience able forty plus people, I'm tell that jokefrom a very commonality standpoint because I know all of them have a frame ofreference. But if I get to the show and they're all younger, thenthey have no frame of reference or what this is like. So I've gota may we tell it a little differently and then tell it from the pointof view of could you imagine how they had all lives sucked? You knowthat we only had three stations on TV. Now you guys that we can onlywatch rudolph the red nose rainted that one time of year it came on. You know, because you've missed all the time. You know that.Yeah, and but that also gave us appreciation and you know, you knowa lot of things, creativity and work, ethnic and self reliance and and howwe grew up. But you know, if you have a just a bunchof young people, you could tell it a wet that way. Youknow, the same way I tell it to a to an older audience,and they want have the same response. But if I just change it whereI'm making fun of that, they have it so much better now because youknow, we used that to use real maps like we were Magellan. Youknow, every every family vacation, your father on the side road with thatbig paper map. You know, and and you know, it's like,and I always ask the audience, I'm like, what do you think?This is a map up probly in the world. Right. I go,no, just Cleveland. That's it. You you want to go to Akron, your mother's got to get out of the car. That's all. Whoanother map? You know? So, so I do cold and then alsoI tell my tell all my students all the time to milk the shit that'sworking and pull the rip quart on the stuff that's not. Don't say don'tsay it. Stay so little rigid, into the into the plan because,like Mike Tyson says, everybody got a plan until you get punched in theface. And and and being able to adapt is order, the huge partof the job. Well, we're talking with macazam every one. Matt.One of the things, you know, when we usuld go and play awaygames, even we were home, one of the fun things with interacting withthe fans, even though it wasn't always what you should do. But likewe were at the raiders when it was in Oakland. You know, thefans there were crazy. They had the paint on, they had the shoulderpads with the spikes, a crazy helmets, everything, and they loved heckling youright, but you were kind of heckling them back, but it wasall kind of part of the game the show. Do you interact a lotwith your audience or you just kind of do your set and sometimes you askhim things, but you're really not asking them things. How? What?How do you do that? In some cases it's improblem. I'm just Idon't know this person and I want to learn about them, and then Ifind out they got some weird job with it from a weird place. Or, you know, it's a it's a couple who's been married and divorce threetimes. You know, I mean just just crazy things where you know I'mreally going to them to try to create comedy on stage, you know,because my instinct say that something's there. But most of the time I'm onlyasking the questions as just a way to kind of engage the audience, butI know where I'm going. Or, depending on his answer, they werehurrins, so I got different outs, you know. So they say this, then I go this way. If they say this, I go thisway. So like there's a there's a point, you know. I knowyou can tell the look at me, but you know, everybody want iswhat I am. You know what of my ethnic background is, and Igo you never guess in a million years. My mother's a Jewish girl from NewYork, my father's Irani and but some I came out Puerto Rican.And you know, Yellow and green makes blue. So then I'll last theaudience. I'll list them all. There any Jewish people here? And ifthere's a lot of Jewish people, then you know I got something I'll say. If there's no Jewish people, then I'll say, well, is anybodycircumcised? I'll take that tonight, you know. So kind of based onwhat their answer is, I know where I'm going to go. But there'sa point in the show where I need a twenty one year old boy forforty s not to know twenty. It's kind of in the third act,and so I'll talk to the twenty one. You'RE A boy, I'll get hisname, where it's from, all that kind of stuff, but reallyhe's just kind of the focus of the joke. It doesn't matter. Thejokes can be the same joke, whether he's cool, whether he interacts,whether he's into it, you know. So sometimes I'll milk it on thefly, but it doesn't even matter. It's just me just kind of extendingit until I know what I'm going to go into, which is it's thekind of a show like forty's not the new twenty. Needs a finger joke, you know. I mean he needs a price. Think you know,I wanted to lie is you know.

So that's so. But really,when I wanted to do that, I always thought about if I had ason, you know, I would be in a fishing boats and I wouldtell him, you know, I'd be the ghost of Christmas future and belike, one day you're going to be visited by a man with the glove, you know, and he is. It's not doing a play catch,I is, you know. And so, yeah, so this place is inthere where it's planning in. But you know, I just did ashow back when we could do show. So it's February back then and theguy picks me up at the hotel and he's like, Oh, you gonnawing it tonight, and I'm like you know I'll wing parts of it,but I think the initial you know, plan. It's kind of like,I've heard this in the NFL and I know Joe gibs did this, butyou script out the first fifteen plays right. I mean you'll know what your firstfifteen plays are going into a game. I know what my first fifteen minutesis going to be, because if I do that right, then Ican do whatever the hell I want later on. You know, you situp the run, you could get the pass calling later on. So there'sthings I do, but I certainly I have walked up there and just Wungit, you know, but that that's that's not the norm. Usually Iknow exactly what I'm going to do. Yeah, so let's get into alittle bit about what you're doing next. Right. So now you've kind ofgone through where you're dealing with your show in Vegas and now you said I'mgonna do something different and through this pandemic and I think doing all these virtualthings that everybody is doing. I look at your site and you're doing alot of that, and tell us a little bit about they laugh, youwin, and really how that came to be for you. You know,I it actually started in DC about now. It's been about sixteen, seventeen years, but I was performing at the DC Improv which know if it waswhere you went there when you were there. But some people came in from theSmithsonian and they've been getting a lot of requests from their fellows because it'sthe Smithsonian, they have fellows and but they were getting request that they wantedto learn stand up comedy, but not because they wanted to be comedians,because they were judges or they were leaders or CEOS or doctors or or whatever. They just wanted to learn stand up comedy to apply to their, youknow, their day today. And that really interests me because I did.I have taught people who wanted to be comedians and and that mets you know, I don't think there's any hacks to that. I think you have togo out on the road. You got to pay your dudes. It's likeyou know, because you know once you get that first snap in, thosethree hundred pound guys are running down on you, you know you you've gotto be, you know, programmed to be able to do it, whereasif you're CEO, all you have to do is be better than the otherCEOS and you have to, you know. So if you apply some of thescience I teach them, it's so powerful in their world because humor wasn'tthe expectation. They never saw a coming. But you know, it's stand up. They show up. They both to take it on Wednesday expecting tolaugh on Saturday. You better be great, you know, and there's no way, right, right? I don't think so. So I taught theclass of the Smithsonian and it was it was great, and then I woundup teaching for a long time, but you know, my boyhood dream hadnever been realized yet I still wanted to get back to Vegas, so Ikind of put teaching on hold so I could write the show and focus onthe show. And and then I got the show, and now it's moreabout agency and and and and the fact that, you know, I'm teachingsomething that people believe can't be told. You know, this is this ismy legacy because, you know, I had to teach myself the science andreally and since then I've understood the neuroscience of it, like what happens whenwe laugh? You know that we feel emotionally safe. We never, youknow, where at all best woman making each other laugh. That you know, and I asked the audience. I'll say how many of you think you'refunny? Now you I know it's a big part of your personality, orhe said, with the pranks, but only a third of the hands willgo up. That means two thirds of these people I've shut down that partof their personality that was given to them as a coping mechanism, as adefense mechanism, as a as as just a way to look at things differently, because the neuroscience says when when you try to look at something, youknow it's to be funny, and I see this with joke writing. Youhave to look at it differently, but when you look at it from fearor hate or anger, you're only looking at it the one way. Soso you know, all of this kind of happens, because the at leastnow what I'm doing. Once I had been teaching it to CEOS, butit's mostly for to be a better leader, to be a better salesman, tobe a better communicator. But once the pandemic happen, HR companies willcontacting me asking me if I could help them with from the wellness standpoint.You know because the daters out there on how humor can help corporate Cole sureand help with mental health and raise emotional intelligence. And I had already knownthat science. It just was nothing that people cared about pre pandemic. Butnow I think it's it's our best chance...

...to to unpack what's been done tous and engage each other from not the the the the fear part of what'sgoing on to us, but what we have in common and how we're allgoing to kind of get through this. So I kind of pivoted to thevirtual and then came up with these joke writing workshops where I teach them alittle joke writing, then they break out too little groups and I give thema premise and they write jokes as a group and then one of them comesback and performs. And I took Improv Games and and change them so thatthey they you can use the science of Improv for problem solving and creativity andinnovation and so and and. But this was always what they left you whenwas supposed to be. And then I got out there in the world andrealized here is what people are willing to do. You know, they're notwilling to to imbed it into their their corporate culture. But you know,they they'll let me teach a public speaking class or leadership class or sales class. But now, you know, this is something really exciting for me because, you know, if there's a silver lining and covid for me and myfamily, it's that it brought me back to what this company was always supposedto be. And and and then I you know, I kind of lookedinto to this program created called the Entrepreneur CEO stand up challenge as where Itake high level CEOS running, you know, fifty two, three hundred million dollarcompanies, teach them virtually my program and then they performed on Broadway atthe end and as free from having was awesome. It was a great programand we're about to scale it. We were going to do three in Europetoo, and Australia one in South Africa, and that that all went away.So I had to rethink my business. And then I realized, not evenknowing how powerful, you know, bringing humor at this time could possiblybe, and the fact that companies are really out of options. So then, you know, they if they're coming to me, you know, Imean that means that you know they their think tank of PhDs, you know, couldn't come up with anything. And it's so simple, but no one'sever really kind of broken it down to you know, how somebody can mindfor the material and and look for their truth. Because really, we givecomedians way too much credit. All we know how to do is do thejob. But the real fuel for comedy, the real power, lives inside ofevery every person out there, because they have the stories, the reallife experiences. Comedians only have chipotle and trump and, you know, ladingat Romata in you know, they don't have much more. And that's notto put them down, but you know, CIFEL wasn't a really I think sile'sa much better comedian now as a father, husband and wife, andI mean father and a husband, because he has real, real stuff totalk about instead of what's the deal with Patins? You know, that's whathe did before. So right, you know, I love tea the people. Yeah, I love teaching this to two people and then going you knowwhat, I'm not expecting you to go become a standup comedian, but nowat least you'll understand how to kind of create this content and and be andthat's what it is. I have content, jokes that I know will work andcould be replicated. Do we get because they tell the same way everysingle time. I can teach people how to do that with their stories,their life experiences. And then, and then, because I teach the longform stand up, which is very conversational, it doesn't sound jokey. So reallyit's like and then what happens is I teach me. I've never gota speeding ticket, not ever in my life, because I can engage theofficer through and that's the other thing. humors based in empathy. In orderfor me to make you laugh, I have to understand you, have tothink about you and your football career and where you grew up in your dadand all this other kind of stuff. But that becomes super, super engaging. You know, you want to talk about a public speaking situation. Thetraffic stop is it. And most people don't think about the officer. Yes, there are some bad cops out there and I don't want any those bleedthroughs to come through, but they're a lot of most of them are incrediblybrave people that we need and and and the traffic stop is the most isthe most stressful part of their job because they pull over, that's when theydie. When they pull over the wrong car, the guy shoots them.So we escalate that. Every single time we get pulled over. We reachfor the glove box, we try to put on our seat belt. Whatdo you think he sees from the back? You know, I mean he's justthe tension is getting is is just going up. So and then youlie to them. You know, I mean, you know it so well. Everything we do is negative and just. So I put my hands on thesteaming while I roll down the window. You know, when he comes there, I tell him the truth. That freaks them out. I tryto make them laugh. I look to see if me as a wedding ringsI can make some humor connection with them, but it really is using humor topersuade, to get what you want, and that's what they laugh you win. Is it's just right now it's kind of kind of a bigger purposeto kind of heal us and give us hope, but in general it's yourbest first choice, no matter what you're doing, to get what you want, for sure. Right. Well,...

...it makes me think of the statementlaughter is the best medicine. Right, because we found our family and mywife is really funny. My kids are all super funny. They get thatfrom her or not for me, but you know, we've used caught oflaughter, we've our favorite movies or comedies. We've done all that and that thatreally gets us through. We've seen tons of COMEDIANS. I wish we've. We would have seen you at some point and now. Definitely we willwhen you're out in the road next and we can all get out again.But I think it's amazing what you're doing because sometimes when you are having likea CEO and you're talking to a board or you're making I mean I've donepresentations and business and things, and if you can make it lighter and peoplewant to engage with you more, just like you're saying, if you getengage with the police officer in a tense situation, you can engage with somebodyin a board room at any moment. So tell us a little bit aboutyour most famous CEO. I think that that. What I've read is thathe was. He's a big fan of yours. So Richard Branson. Whowas? You know, when I thought about see, because it's, trustme, some places this still so antiquated. You know they're they're living in thepast and then not really thinking about the future. And that's the greatthing about humor. Nobody knows how to engage the younger people, you know, and they're the biggest consumers are comedy on the planet. You know.I Tell People Netflix is put out for comedy specials since we've been doing thispodcast, and then not for you and me, you know, and wedon't have time for that. So it really engaged the younger people. Butbut I look for places fertile ground where they might get it and Virgin andRichard Branson, I remember he was the first one to ever make the safetyairline video funny. You know, I don't know if you have a foodvirgin America, but the it was hilarious. The the safety of it that nobodywatches, you know, fashion the seatbelt, don't smoke, all thiskind of stuff. But that one was intentionally funny. And this is anotherthing. Once I start on, you know, unveiling all the signs,people only remember ten to twenty percent of anything you tell them. You embedthe message with humor goes up the fifty of sixty percent. So just asa learning tool it's great. So so I wanted up, you know,a connecting with some entrepreneurial groups that add a path to Richard Brandson and Iwanted up writing two rows of Richard Branson that he loved and and so muchso that he had the slides from the roast hanging in his office on Neckarisland when the hurricane came in and wiped them out. So somewhere in thethe the Caribbean Ocean, the bottom or sitting my slides right now, becausethey wiped out everything on Neckar Island. But since then I've worked with twosharks from shark tank. You know, it's the celebrity CEOS. You knowthey speak is you know they're mostly they're outspeaking. So so they all needto be funnier, you know, and they've tried everything. Every tonight showrider and everyone will write them jokes. But what I do is I learnedabout them and find out they are truth, how they grew up, you know, you know what what their motivation, what their origin story is, andthen then be able to what I'm really good at is is now puttingmyself in the mind of the audience and and and really thinking about them aswe construct the material instead of what I think is funny, but what Ithink is going to work for them. So, but and, Richard Brandson, I'm trying to turn the entrepreneur, the CEO stand up challenge into aTV show. So it's kind of like undercover boss meets comedy and you know, they can now take the humor and bring it back to the workplace.Understand sometimes that he would do it. Yeah, yeah, and but,but, I mean, you know, he's probably the most famous one.But you know, there's got Kevin Harrington, event to the INFOMERCIAL. You know, he was the you know, but weight or he was that guy, you know, and up and in them working with him. Read aboutthis is I get to figure out and learn how they became them. Andsome of the most famous people and the most successful people on the planet areSelfmade, you know. I mean it's not. You know, my father, you know, was a real estate guy in New York and every gaveme the real estate and that's that's how I became successful. You know,Kevin Harrington, you know, worked in his father's bar and in Cincinnati atten years old and and then came up with the idea when cable came outit TV used to. They didn't have twenty four hour program like the DiscoveryChannel. was just eighteen hour programming thing. And once he saw that, herealized he could buy the other six hours and then run his infommercial commercials. So he is like, you know, Mary, I have of just growingup, you know, watching infommercials, and now I'm working with the guywho created it and helping him tell that story to the world. Youknow, it's it's like if I was...

...able to work with Rockefeller or HenryFord, you know, back in the day. These are the people I'mworking with now. So and I missed that so much of because they're notspeaking that I performing with me and you know. So there's less of that. And but it has freed me up to try to help the rank andfile of the company directly, because before it was I'd help him and thenit would, you know, filter down. But now I'm in their boots,on the ground, working with people and and I just sometimes see howit changes them and I just and I have ten coaches that work on tome now that I trained. Wow, and these are guys alway will favors. You're certifying comment. Basically, yeah, yes, sir, if I yeah, all right. So before from ATT before we wrap it up,I got one last question for you. Give me your prediction on this,on the Washington football team, as we call him, the skins. Doyou think they're gonna win the division? Somebody's got a right. I'm sorryas to let me so. That's what I go. Somebody's gonna have towin the NFC, ANFC East and host a playoff game. Host the playoffgame whether they like it or not. You know? Do I think?You know what? I saw? Great things, I tell you. Isaid You my last quarterback. I liked the Alex Smith story is amazing,but I cringe every time somebody gets in the air, and I didn't meanit's yeah, I don't know the wall. So what are you gonna do?Right y? Yeah, Oh my God, I we got about thatstory. That was you. That's great. Remember that. I remember that likeit was yesterday. And you hurt your neck, didn't you? Whenyou're out for a game because of yeah, I got a Stinger. I gota Stinger, a singer from it. That's a absolutely remember, but it'sdo I think they're gonna they're gonna. You know what? I think they'reprobably the best team in the NFC East right now. Quite the waythat. I thought they tackled really, really well on against the cowboys.That's something. You know, they seem the care and I think Rivera mightbe the guy and and maybe the name change is what's going to do them. And the endecy is down this year. So you know what, you hostthe playoff game, maybe you beat Seattle, you know, at home, and you know, maybe, maybe. So, yeah, I think Ithink the only because the rest of the team sucks so bad. Ido think they might. They might. They make me well. The thingI thought said about the name change was there's not a team in the NFLthat needs more of a reboot than the skins did. And I think thewhole name change broad because since to Dan signers own the team, things haven'tgone the way that everybody in Washington thinks they should. So I think theywere in desperate need of a reboot. So, Matt One last thing.Please tell us, tell all of our listeners how they can get ahold ofyou, what you're working on, where they want, where you're going tobe next, how they can find you all that information so that we canput it out in our social media. Awesome. Well, they left youwindcom. You can learn about the programs in the standup challenge and and allof that and email me or you can find me on Linkedin. That kissam on Linkedin or facebook. We're actually doing our first virtual entrepreneur CEO standup challenge on December nineteen and it's free for anybody who wants to to watchit. If we're going to do a virtual show with seven CEOS from fromactually one's coming in from Denmark, another one is in Australia, so fromall over the world, we can perform a virtual show and raise some moneyfor Jose Andreias is the food kitchen so we can feed some people on thisholiday season. So if they find me on there, I can shoot hima link. Right now, I don't know what the links going to be, but you know, if you email me on they left you wincom,you know I'll send you an invite and then you and your family Austo.It's going to be PG thirteen family goat. Yeah, my kids are all incollege and older, so they can they team to me new things rightso they're old enough they've been through it. So I learned a lot from them. But, Matt, it was a budder man. I you know, I hope we can do this again sometime. I'd love to connect withyou again. It was great having you on huddle up with gusts. Ithink your story is amazing, I think what you're doing is amazing and forme, laughter is the best medicine and I appreciate you so much for joiningme on huddle up with gusts today. Thanks for having me. Take care. I hope I see you soon. All Right, thanks, Matt,everyone at Matcazam. Thanks for joining us on huddle up with guys. Youcan find a fun huddle up with gustscom wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and you can catch us right here next week on the new six hundredand thirty one digital new studio, and also listen to us on Ksix.I'll quick. The Christy Texas have a great deal.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (147)