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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 11 months ago

Matt Kazam

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This was an awesome episode. Matt Kazam joins me in the Huddle this week and it is one of the best times I have had on the show. The hour went by way too fast! I think we needed 3 to discuss everything! You got to check out Matt's website, https://theylaughyouwin.com. Matt is bringing laughter back to the workplace. The revolutionary public speaking and humor training program of They Laugh You Win can turn anyone into an extraordinary public speaker. His story about Richard Branson is great and he has worked with many other CEOs who have all seen the value in humor training and teach their employees how to use the tools of stand-up comedy. Matt is a veteran comic who can be seen performing at the nation’s top comedy clubs, casinos, and theatres. He has performed stand-up comedy over 6,000 times in 45 states and 7 countries. Matt has also performed at over 1,000 corporate and private events. He has an amazing ability to work for any crowd, anywhere, any venue. At the age of 10, Matt saw his first comedy show in Las Vegas at the legendary Riviera Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. He knew right then that was what he wanted to do with his life. In 2014 Matt’s boyhood dream was realized and amazingly at the same iconic property where the dream was born, the Riviera. Matt’s one-man comedy show, “40 Is Not The New 20,” was an instant success. Becoming a Las Vegas “must-see” show month after month. He was the last headliner to perform at the Riviera that saw the likes of Frank Sinatra and Elvis rise to fame. Matt’s energetic style, witty observations, and unassuming charm are the driving forces behind his unique and hilarious comedy & learning events.  Growing up in New York City, he started performing shows for family and friends at the age of three, but it wasn’t until graduating college from George Mason University with a degree in finance that Matt finally took the plunge as a full-time stand-up comedian. While in DC he also was an on-air sports personality talking Skins Football and all things sports in DC. He has made television appearances on NBC’s “Last Comic Standing”, Fox’s “Big Red Couch”, Comedy Central’s “Stand-Up Stand-Up”, VH-1’s “Fools For Love”, TLC’s “Two For Vegas”, The Discovery Channel’s “Lux List”, WGN’s “The Bob & Tom Show. He has appeared with Tommy Davidson on the Rascal’s Comedy Club Webcast “Live Caught On The Net”. In addition, Matt’s comedy special, “Stand-Up and Sit-Down with Matt Kazam,” is currently airing on XM Satellite Radio. In addition to these television projects, Matt was a writer for the 2008 “Fox Reality TV Awards” on the Fox Reality Channel. Matt’s 1-man show, “40 Is Not The New 20,” had a residency at the Riviera Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The hilarious show tackles the subject matter both literally and figuratively. The material explores how much the world has changed in the past 40 years. The show is a mid-life celebration of the knowledge and experience that can only be gained with age. The show is like comfort food for the soul. It puts the notion that 40 is the new 20 on trial and breaks down the concept into categories such as technology, the media, politics, relationships, family, our priorities, and even how much our bodies have changed over the years. Matt walks the audience through specific and general examples on how the 40 is not the new 20 and more importantly why?  All the while, the audience is being thoroughly entertained as well as feeling an overwhelming sense of nostalgia. Everyday topics like marriage, fashion, parenting, work, commuting, bills, and exercise, just to name a few, will be compared and contrasted through the eyes of a 40+-year-old taking a look at today’s 20-year-old young adult.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with Guss,I'm your host fifteen year, NFL quarterback Gusfra. We are here in theNe Sand, sixundred andthirty, one digital news studio. If you want tolearn more or listen to previous shows, you can check us out at our websitehuddle up with Guscom or you can listen to us on the new RADIOCOM applewherever you listen to your favorite podcast, while in the huddle our guestsdescribe how sports shapes their life. Now, let's join the huddle. Hey everyone on Jur halt to pol up withDu Tetenor NFL quarterback, and you know I want to thank everyone forlistening to us. You can find us on hotdl up with guscom. You can listen tous on the RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast you're.Also listening to us from the new Sixeen, thirty one digital new studio.I know it doesn't look like it right now, because I'm in a room in my housedoing this, but we are partered with sixteen thirty one digital news out ofWashin theand. We are glad to partner with them, and also you can listen to us on aradio every Sunday morning and and am on Ksix down a corpous. Christi TexasGoes Out Sunday morning before the game sowe're happy to play our podcast forthem down there in Texas joining us today, on Howdo up with gus is alongtime standup, Vegas comedian. He has thirty years of comenic experience.He has a foundation or he's founding a companycalled they laugh. You Win and I think that it's an amazing thing and I know alot of CEOS out there that probably need this wuld probably have a bettercompany if they use Matt but joining us today, no o none other than longtimestandup comedians been on many many shows. I don't have a lot e. We needmore than an hour to talk about everything down a squeer, but joiningus today is Matt Casam Man. How are you doing I'm? Well, I'm one of thanks forhaving me. I was so excited when, when Terry reached out to me, because you'reactually the last DC quarterback, I light so you know- and it made me think about the timewhen you know in the S and and- and I think you know you probably the lastfrom the Jack and cook error- probably hat- I think about the timing. You know to you know. Once Dayn we gotthe team, you know t the landscape definitely changed and I think JeffGeorgie might have been the guy that replaced you. So he things got a littlecrazy after you. So you left town is a good time. Bat Sowe with you, yeah yeah. I know I'm glad you know, and Ilove talking to people who are who kind of are fans of the teams that I'veplayed for and we can go back and talk about some of the history. I think itwas Brad Johnson who replaced me, because I know that the TEC who knows but so matt, let's getinto your story, Yeah Yeah. I want. I want to hear about allright. So you up in New York, you said you moved when you were ten years old.What did you do? What was it like growing up in New York and what wasthat first experience for you where you fell ports because everybody a memorymoment? No, I it's funny. You know I knew prettyearly on in life. I didnt win the genetic lottery, so sports weresomething I kind of envied a little bit. You know that that you know everyoneelse seemed to be better, and you know if there was a crack in the soisidewalk.I fell over it. So I knew that sports weren't going to befor me as a player, even though I played in high school not well but but fell in love with sports early on,like like most most young people- and you know I grew up- you know watchingthe steelers and Terry Rachel and and all them, but my comedy career kind ofresembles. It's going to sound, probably pretty familiar to your sportscareer, because I came out of the woom being able to make people laugh. My Dadwas thisinsane comedy fan, so I used to play comedy records for me in the wonand by the time I was three years old. I was already doing shows for familyand friends. Six years old I got paid for it ten years old. I knew I wantedto be a comedian. My parents took me to Vegas. I saw my first show ever Joanrivers and shecky green at the Riviera, and I knew right then, that that's whatI wanted to do with my life and then thirty. Five years later, I got my ownshow forty Ni twenty. In the same room, I saw the show when I was ten years oldand then two nd abis later they blow up the casino, but that's the part of thestory. You got ta Ba Atotherwi, Eno, nobeautiful deloyeah. So were you sothen so ere? U Sports Fan growing up OHBG, but you know I grew in New York S.I was a Jeds Fan. I don't know that technically. That makes me Makin me asports fan. I don't know if theyve played they're actually playing thesport. Everyone else is, but I don't now big time I mean we played footballin the streets and an you know, basketball. You Know New York City withno net, so totally grew up. A Big...

Sports Fan of my dad was also atremendous boxing fan. So you know I remember back then fights er on TV andsitting there with them, and you know, like any other. You Know Red BloodedAmerican boy, my Best Mo memories that my dad or watching games watching theYankees took me my first Yankee game. I remember it even to this day and it wasforty six years ago you know walking in and seeing that green field for thefirst time and and then the love for sports actuallyhelped my career, because I did sports radio MDC for probably twelve years. Iwas on with Mike Wise on Wj ofk and you know ID did various other littlethings on on ESPN, Nin D. Eighty would be Mitchan Dack, so you know I it. Thelove of sports has always been there, even though it may be different. Youknow from some of the athletes you talked to, who were actually good at it.You know, but you know, do Lov sports for sure,but that's what's great about why I love doing this podcast, becauseo can talk to many different people and they all have a different sportsbackground. Some people played sports. Some people enjoyed sports on peoplecollected sports item. I talked to gentleman one of the company and he was just a hustler and he lovedcollecting sports items. So I think what your story is is that you knowlike a lot of us. You know forts play such an inaintegral part of our lives,doesn't necessarily mean we get to go on and play it our whole life. I waslucky. I was really really lucky that I got to do it for as long as I did andbut there's so many people that sports influences. That's why I were thenumber twelve, because I Terry Bradshaw, you know, and then I get the DC as as arookie and I'm just in owd, Sam huff and Sunny Jerginson and all those olderplayers, all the hogs and and just standing on the field at RFK wasamazing to me so- and I was thinking about this like for me that first game was when I was with the redskins anowince going to be the starter. I go to Indianapolis and we win that firstgame to give me a similar experience for you as a comedian on a stage orsomewhere. You went that said Man I am here. This is yeah and it probably is Vegasthe first time because you know for every comedian. Wecan work anyway. Once you get an act, you know if you're willing to travel toTOLSA or wichatal falls or anywhere in America. You pretty much get the Gig,but Vegas is always like the sign that that you've made it and and then thenyou're at that next level. So I remember doing that show and then then realizingyou know what that that you are able to break through Tis. Thisis the hardest one. So you know I'm now at another level, but now that youmentioned it sports wise. I've done two shows, and this is one thing I teach Almy students most comedians painfully shy. Like I write this up as a defensemechanism, you know fo New York, city Chubby Little Kid at two options: Learnhow to fight? U Learn how to be funny and fight me N. I goo that right away-and I knew is G- probably eve- get good at Ike. So I wound up being funny andin that- and I find you know, bully was after me, I'd find a bigger bully thanhim make him laugh, make him ligkt me, and you know Acsic Hime, O on Othe Guy.That was SAF to me, but I've done two shows that were huge, even though I'mpainfully shy can't write in an elevator five social anxiety, but I didshow at Glemson's homecoming game and it was when they had a quarterback callwoody danceler and he was as supposed to be like the next bat mahomes. Reallyat that point- and you know, Hehe was you know, isn the trophy guy, so esbancovered that homecoming game to death valley, which is actually buil as theworld's biggest pepper ally, and there were thirty eighthousand people at thatshow, and when I, when I got in the plane to go down there, I thought I wasdoing a show for thousand people. I didn't know that it was going to be sowhen they picke me up from the airport. They drove me past the past e deacevalley and they're like Oh, that's, where you're going to be performing,and I always listem sort of anx or you know a theater attached to it. They gono wh You'e gonna be performing on the poor, yeah and and in thirty eightthousand people. Itwas the first time w e I never heard laughter. I just heard the volume ofthe planet rice, and that was another big memory and then later on in mycareer, Ivihave, some friends in the union, so it was new years eve in Houston and itwas there no girls season, and so I called my buddy I lank and you gave Meusome tickets to the game. He calls the communication guy the Texans and whenwe show up he goes outits fan appreciation day. Would you mind atevery stop age you play Givi Away, you know prize based on their seat and thenin half time. Would you go down to the field and do a show? You know fiveminutes and then give away a car, and...

...that was sixty eighthousand people andjust insane to be able to do state that many that many people? So you know it's?U Like. I sa it's funny. Sports has crossed and been mingled in my life fora long time. The early one in my career. I did a you know back when you couldmake fun of things. You know t the The Washington football team after you leftbecame a great source of material. I mean Albert Hainsworth, came to townand I wrote ons about I and the Shanahins came to town and- and it wasjust one thing after another t that you know allow f me to kind offeed off of the material that was already there, because you know sports. You know you never know from one Di tothe next. What the stories are going to be an and they were tremendous you know. So you know I've always kind of drawnmyself to sports related material and and then those audiences and then, eveneven before I came to Vegas, I had to write fortis not to Nu Twenty and ittook me. You know six seven years to write the show and I took it out tocountry clubs and I performd different golfers. You know and just again make them laugh. You canmake anybody laugh right absolutely, and it was also you know I wrot Thoshow to their neighborhood. You know so you know they didn't, have to get ababysitter and drive all the way down to the comedy club and so for years. II performed in the golf space, so you know now that we're thinking about itit, I think, I'm a tiged a lot more lot, more te sports than than even higthought. So, but you know it's great water. Ibecause Audienceis Ginton, sports audiences and least they love something.You know they love Spoa. So you know people were different than people whodon't love sports and if you look at right now, where would we be duringthis pandemic? With the houseports? I mean I thought about this the other day.Imagine if we didn't have you know they're playing in stadiums to nobody,but at least we can watch it and it's the only time I probably feel normaliswhen I'm watching a football game. Well, I would definitely rather watch sportsthan all the politics going on. That's for sure, but at you know, somet thatmade me Le Cud in my head. Laugh was when you said that you know you can'teven get on he elevator you got a social distance and I'm like thinkingin my head is is really bad, but I'm like, oh, he probably loves thepandemic that he has to stay six feet away from everyone, Socia Isn, for the last ten years I goithey g limit to Gatherin O less than ten people a D. I got three friends,they collectively got one friend me, you know. So it really is. You know if you got social anxiety, pademic iis a great place for you tothat breathin, because you know nobody's calling me Anvitin mediathings. They just don't stat happening, but Rightin, I'm on the state. You know,I think, athletes probably the same way. You know I mean there's a lot of peoplethere with anxiety and depression and but once they put that elmet on youknow it's the free. You know that the like I control the moments on one stage:They don't control me and the rest of alr lives. You know we're kind of atthe mercy of politics or or whatever's going on, but you know for that: OuWhend, I'm on stage. It's all me and that s that parter, that I love wellyeah. That's what we say when you cross that white line everything goes awayright. You don't hear that you don't hear the crowd. I mean obviouslythey're loud if you're, home or away depending on where you are. But youknow you just kind of get into the moment and everything kind of fadesaway, and you just focused on your job and what you're supposed to be doing-and you know it's kind of fun. That way, and I wish I could go back because whatyou talked about in sports and how how couldn't live without I wish I wouldhave written down all the funny things that have happened to me through. Youknow twenty five years of being in football through high school collegeand the pros, because just being yeah, my wife and we laugh, our kids laughWen. We're all pretty funny- and you know Laushter- gets us through so muchbut some of those times I've had in thelock room, because I was a Prankster, I mean I pranked everyone, that's what Ilove to do and, and you know I tell people what I did, but I don't know ifthey always necessarily believe me like when I took Ryan FitczpatrickIanthrough, the preseason and every week I made him asige smaller, but kept the same size on the tag and he thought he was gettingFatte. But you know it's justand, so I think what comedy is like it said ittook you six to seven years to write your show andthat's remarkable and it will happen.How did you? How did you Itaith the idea? So I always know I wanted to come toVegas, but coming to Vegas with the one man show is, is much different thanjust coming here. With your regular act, I mean hat one man shows kind of like aplay and it's it's got to prove something. So I didn't have the ideafor the show, but I knew that Vegas was where I wanted to go so I'm thirty,eight years old and I'm getting ready...

...to go to the DC mproven do a show and Ifell in the shower and I crackd my head open right here and, as I was layingdown on the floor bleeding all I could think of was why did people say? Fortyis the new twenty. When I was in my twenties, I was having sex to mishawernow fi around here, aby myself and and it was that joke and then I kind ofPatche myself up and I needed eagt stitches, but I knew I was ontosomething so I kind of Patche myself up put a baseball ad on, went to the clubon the way to the club, I'd written three more jokes kind of around thatidea, O forts nit Teo. Twenty you know about you know when I was in my ties.You know you know now I e got hair on my shoulders. You know I mean you knowthat doesn't happen. You know you. You know you pretty much spring Breakis oerwhen you got a couple of throwback atropulps on your shoulders. You know,and now they turning gray I go when I take off my shut. I look like open,rader fan so and then you know so I had wed. I knewI had the show and then all the other material came from that, but once I wasgoing to take it to Vegas show Ma got one shot. You know I being new and andgetting reviewed, and all of that, so it did take me six years to write theninety minute show seventy five minute showe that I do here now, but yeah it S. it's like anything else.You know it's nobody. They only see game they. You know they don't see allthe work that goes into look get you the game, dy right! Well, yeah! Youknow it's so similar because we I spent five years in college right. I spentfive years in college working on my craft only doing what those coachesthink I should be doing, and then you get to the Redskins as a rookie and thecoach comes and says: Hey, you're, going to start this week in front ofthe whole team, and you say to yourself: This is my shot. You get one shot andyou see it all the time in the NFL right, here's some new rookiequarterback going out and try to play the last kid I remember t was a kidfrom Dallas Ben Danuci right. It says one shot he'sfrom Pittsburgh. SOAS following his story did not have a good game, did nothave a good showing gets benched, and it's probably not going to happen againfor and en yeah. So for you, when that shot happens, do you go perform infront of the people that are going to hire you? How does that work? Well, you know I had T I had a coupleof Little Mini Residec seas in Vegas and and one of them was at stationcasinos, which the fratiguers on both the UFC, which is, which is whypeoplewill know their name, but they they brought me in here early onto just because they saw thet that whatever I was doing, works well withcasino audiences and that and that's a huge thing in vegas, because half theAudienceisn't even from the United States, you know some of theirEnglishes in their primary like for the ones that offer the United Statesthey're from everywhere, and they have to walk through a casino that isdesignidg to distract them and not really conducive to what you know I'moffering, which is to kind of sit there and listen to every word. And so you know it. You got ta kind of youknow really dial in Vegas and in in a different way, and so I had a couple ofthe residency here when the Riviera got sold. One of my guys from one of theseother Casitos I worke, went over there and he said you got to bring this thisguy in that it I so I got the show and the first time I don't know how manytimes I've even told this, but the first time I actually did the full showin its entirety was a media nite. So you know, but I knew it was going towork. I had done pieces of it here and there, but it wasn't really finished until Iactually got the show my daughter was born. I was in the delivery room kindof working on the collateral and th the Postis for for the show, but then, onceyou get here, you have a soft opening three weeks to got to work out thekings, but then, by that third week opening nights I mean the every mediaoutlet is here reviewing it, and this is tough to being a performer thesedays, because you can have a thousand great reviews. You have one bad reviewon yelp or trip advisors, so every single show has to be great whether theaudience is great, whether you know it's a Pat House, not a backhouse,because you know somebody goes out there and writes a bad review and youknow it ruins everything you know, and people will rebowill believe the onebad review, not Tfo, thousands of good reviews. You know, but something you mentioned about beingin the locker room and is something I teach Tho people all. The time now isand I'm trying to bring humor back to the workplace because it existsorganically in every cultural organization group, from the militaryto the courthouse to sports teams, to you know anywhere where you know youneeded, as for what it does, which is a stress, relieve or coping mechanism. Away to you know kind of relieve stress:...

...it's it's. Why it's in us it's one ofthe two forms of Communication: Wete given it birth. So when you say youused to do it in the locker room, I'm like yes, I mean every lock of roomneeds it and I'm sure you soar. It N in every lockef room and in your caseyou'll, probably the you know the architect of of the humor but wel it needs to bethere ud. Imagine without it. Trying to you know, play football every week facing whatyou have to face every day, which is you know, your life ending te meancreer, ending injuries and things like that. It's stress at the highest leveland and the humor is there to help us deal with that. Yea, hey everyone, we're talking, awoutMacazam, you know comedian, Longtime Lost Vegas Comedian, so matt. One ofthe things I wanted to talk to you about was just what we were saying isyou know there is such kind of stress and anxiety that goes on the NFLbecause they always say it. The NFL stands for not for long, but you know some of the Games that Iremember most are not always the great games that I was a part of, but some ofthe Games where I played poorly or you know- and I remember fans, Boeing ordidn't go well. Do you remember or have a show that you said man? This was justa by did not go well because you know the next thing you have to do is go towork the next day and pick yourself back up and just like you said, thenext show an have to be better yeah. No, I mean thire's. Definitely Iwould say I've only bombed three times. I've done it over sixty five hundredtimes and I've only bombed truly bomb three times. One time I was in WestVirginia. I lane that on West Virginia literally they Urne the Racal to startthe comedy show if that shows you how bow bad and then I'm still have thisNew York accent, because my tongue is cursed, I'm going to sound this wayforever. So you know literally ten minutes into the show, a guy stood upand he's like boy. We don't get it. He goes. You coun stay up their own light.We still ain't Goinna, get it turn on the dame race. Literally, that's o aanother show was in up and says that what do you do? Do youjust leave, or do you just keep going or how do you all? Luckily enough? Iwas only it was a two man show and I was Iwas early on my career, so I wasjust opening, so henly have to do twenty minutes, so I think I stood upthere for another five minutes and and and tried not to offend anybody,because I I had to spend the night there, and so I barrowed through my,but luckily enough. I had somebody behind me, but you know now I do a oneman show if that happens now, thereain, nobody coming so ougthen and I've done also then three prisonsin my career and the two mens prisons. It's like a locker room. I mean youknow it's just a bunch of guys. You know and it wasn't death rol. It was.You know they had a ping pong table, so it was more like you know, rigt countyjail or something like that, but it was a great show because theyappreciate they loved it, but now the female prison, that's a totallydifferent animal. I think- and you know the things that those those ladies wereyelling at me. I don't even know if I could repeat them on this. Show Ididn't even ask, but literally I didn't even get the first breath of the firstjoke out and Theye like ack. You know I' done, but it washorrible and there was literally nothing. I can do the good news aboutthat when you work a jail show is if the audience acts up, they just pull anhand of there. So it's so they don't have the time, so they get they get oneor two things in and then they pull otit. So I started the show with eighty,and I think I ended with like twenty five and they loly yeah thrown them outof there but itwas horrible and then the last onethat was really really bad and egain. Again, you a you, know, whateer, myMatt. That reminds me of. If you go to a game in Philadelphia, if you startacting up, they just toi you, you know throwing me Throm Ene Cam onthe basemant. I think they stol, maybe do it the Nostatin, but the old one.You know they threw sbatteries at SANA. The Eagle abos game e playing in thethe old. You probably played the ovet too, so yeah O ye, my family Y, whatever team, I wasplaying for never wear my team colors when you go to the game youether goingto get beer food, something thrown at you and you know so you get those gigsanother one was a prom show, and I done you know, there's like a bunch of these.Even the prison show when I started my career. That was a pretty common showthat that that you know bookings that you cann get n. They don't really dohem anymore, but the prom show you do the show in three in the morning forthe kids, so they kam h at the school, then the kid and they they literallykids eighteen year olkits- and I think I might have been thirty five at thatpoint- and and they literally stopped the kids, they say: Hey, O kids, stophaving fun come over Het. This hole. Man Wants to talk to you and it was just horrible...

...its. I never did one of those again,but those are the ones I remember, but I've seen what I've seen from otherpeople. I mean I've seen audience members get so offended by comedian.They get attacked on stage and bottles, throwing no. Thank goodness. I nevernever had tho my Grad, though it's men to get out of something he used me asan excuse and he walway say. Oh, I got to drive to New York to pick up madbecause last night he did a show and somebody threw a bottle at him and orsomebody beat them up and I'm like stop telling people that they'r the guyssuck and but use to use it to Storyyeh. Well, my dadused me all the time you know. Every time I went home I had a his kitchentable was full of stuff for me to sign. No doubt cards, hats, balls, Yhou nameit dad was giving it away to somebody and I'm like. Can I just come home andto you guys or it we're just not possible and he's like no, not possible.You got ta sign all this stuff, so matt, that's one Ad Playitto what' that Di he play sports tod justcarry. Did Your Dad did o play sports to yeah. He did't really. He playedhigh school football a little bit. He said he was too mean and then Kipkethem off the team to play football, and then he played baseball, he lovedbaseball. He actually had a triout with the Yankees, but back then he was oneof twelve kids, and so you made more money working at the millthan you did plan for the Yankee, so his family was like dude you're, notthere's, no way you're going to play baseball. If you have no shot, you knowwhat I mean, and it was just a different time backthen, but you know he's the one that taught me how throw everything you know:knuckleball curve, ball, fastball and then his one philosophy. For me, thisis typical, dad stuff right. He said when you get into pitch, throw thefirst one at their head and then throw the next one down the middle andliterally that's what I used to do a little. I I hit so many kids in to head.It was crazy. I hitfyeahbut my dad was a Huyei hit,both turpack twins. They batted back to back. They weretwins and t and I hit both of them in thehead. I remember that game and Ifelt so bad and my dad's like yeah. That's a way to do it, I'm like what'sgoing on, but that's how he was, but an o. Now it in it was to be able togive that to him. You know you got to played an NF career. I mean you knowfor me my father would have loved to have been a comedian. I mean he put. Hetook me all over the world to see you know some of the greatest comedians. Imean w. When I was a kid he was he' like to gamble, so he bega Ganto theLadin Lake City, and so he would take me to the shows and I got to see BillCosby and Don rickles and Buddy Hackin and then because he was kind of a bigkimd player. They came anhead dinner with us. They would stop it and say Alowhen we were having dinner. So you know I kind of like tige woods in a way that,from a very early age, my father put everything he wanted to be into me andluckily enough, you know I love it, but you know he he got as much of a kickout of my career as I do you know, and then then Soppor son, to give that toyou Dan. I think it's Su Cool Yeah, my dad. Definitely like that. Hey Wr! Weare talking to comedian macisam you're, going to take a quick, greak, O h rightdown hi. This is former NFL quarterbackGusterat sixhunded ndthirty one digital advertising. Is Your one stop shop topromote Your Business and get new customers for awardwinning creative togetting as online in display video o TT connected TV and streaming audio? Go toThosandshixhunden nd thirty one digital advertisingcom amp, the multiformatnetwork, is here to help create, produce, distribute and sell yourcontent for more information. Send A MESSAGE TO INFO AT AA MP, DOT TV,that's Info at a MP dot TV, hey everyone welcome back in the hoddle.You can find us at RADIOCOM wherever you listen to your favorite podcast.Now, let's join the huddle DD welcome to the EN thirty one digitalnews, studio, you're listening to our podcast, you can find us on Huddloe upwith gus or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, I'm joined today byComedia macazan. We were just discussing. You know some of our ourfailures and then Matt. I want to talk about one thing that you know you're on going on the stage aftersomebody's performing right just like if I'm at a game- and somebody makes amistake and it's kind of an awkward moment like if you're right there, theyjust made a big air, they fumbled, they did something or you know whatever it is, and then you have to gocontol them. But what is that like? Like so the comedian in front font, Oyou just bombed? You just talked about...

...getting bottles thrown at thim orpeople, tacking them and they're walking right at you. What do you sayto them good set? Because the thing is the funny thing instandup. Is that happens all the time? And, and you don't know if theyrealized it, you know they. Don't you don't know if they realized they bombed.You know, because I've seen so many conedians go up there and Ben Bo em andthen get off stage and go man. I killed and I'm like Yo you that you know so so, no matter what happens I justlike Wi somebody wants buy me. I just say good set and you know hopefully youknow. There's no reason to you know back it on tha. You know, hopefullythey understand went on, but now what sucks, though sometimes is I got to goout there and climb out of their hole. You know on like you know, I guess inyour case as the quarterback you know you people, the defense, is climbingout of your hole. If you throw a pick or something like that, but in my caseI'm having to climb out AF people's hole and I' much have to stand on themountain and then have to you know and n some cases you know. I was justthinking why you would talk about the worst bottom, so j cutler. I rememberone time against the skins. He threw four picks to Deangela Holl. Do youhave any like a after three? Maybe you don't throw in that direction anymore,right, right, a heyoone guy, yea right. So you know it's almost likethat when I, when I'm watching other comedian and I'm like pull the ripcordlike don't keep talking to that that guy, you know, I mean, like you made itworse. You know it's almost lake quicksand. They talk about quick sandand sports. Where you know you do something and then you do somethingelse, and then you make a mistake and next thing you know you can't get outof it and but being in. I is one thing watching it always say you know. A lot of a lot of my work is rewritingthe narrative and changing the mindset on humor and public speaking, because Ithink you know, we've only been told one narrative that public speaking ishard and then it's something you should be afraid of, and that's totally nottrue, because I'm sofracin even riding an elevator, but I can do show vensixty eighttosano people. Obviously it's just the skill set. If you wereshy, it's not. I mean if you make Chris Rock. I ways tell people if you metChris Rock and real life. You'd go there's no way. That's Chris Rock. Itmust be. His twin brother comes oun and sell CDs or because he'sreallyhainifully shy as well. So you know, but so it is a skill said that that you candevelop, but it's also kind of looking a few moves ahead and doing the math.For me, you know all my choices are kind of just based on the math. As Iknow as a quarterback, it is for you as well. You know I mean it's kind of likethose Amazon Leb commercials now that they show it's kind of like literallygetting inside the athlete Hent. But before I got make a choice, I mean Ikind of do m the thing: an go. What is the outcome, but some people? It's likeyou know it's like three or four moves, and they still you know making it worseand then then I have to go up there, but luckily enough over the years youknow you figure out how to how to get the audience back on your side, or youknow what you need to do right and and hopefully never throwing thatcomedian under the bus. Unless you have to you know, I mean I'm like Lis I'll,try every way the back on my side, but if you screwed it up and I got to throwyou onto the bus to get thim back you going under right, yeah, Oh yeah, yeah, whateveryou got to do to make yourself look ood right. So one thing I want to ask you is so infootball we work all week. We plan to be successful against the defense we'regoing at and then sometimes we go out there andit's a totally different scheme them than we're used to seeing so we got tomake an audible, but we know our system so that the audibles aren't hard tomake because W we've done it over and over again. So, with your show, youkind of have a set like that. You do you always doit in order or do you knowit well enough now that you can change it up as you're going so that if youskip something you can come back to it or is it depending on how your audienceis, or you know that's kind of? U Know, how do you do your show day in a dayout, well forts Lav to do twenty is ascripted show? So if you stop the show in six minutes and twenty seconds, Ishould be exactly where I am everywhere along the line, because that's that'show we marketed. You know that it's this show it's the Save, show everysingle time and I did okay, Actualy I've been doing that show for years andit got I love doing it. I mean it's. It took me forever to write those jokesand I love doing it and there's things I do it at five minutes hat set upsomething at eleven minutes and it's really a three act play. You know witha behanding, a middle and an end with a so I do that one exactly the same way.So,...

...once once I started doing more shows Iwanted to go back to having some flexibility and being able to improp.So I created a show calld back to the jokes, where I don't know what I'mgoing to do. It's basically me sgoing out on stage and letting the audiencekind of dictate where I'm Goingno go. If it's a younger audience, I you Konil,so you O, I do a joke. You know when I was a kid. We only had three stationson TV and- and I don't mean at once- I mean that's Ayeah. We had you know and tmidnight. You know you' You, I think you're about fifty, probably so youknow you're my age, you know and the whole mo Te Brav so rea. If I have an Ordience, a boll,forty clas people, I don tell that joke from a very commonality standpoint,because I know all of them have a frame of reference. But if I get to the showand they're all younger, then they have no frame of reference or what this islike. So I've got Ta, maybe tell it a little differently and then tell it from the point of view of.Could you imagine how bad our lives sucked you know that we only had threestations on TV. Now you guys are. We can only watch Rudoff, the rednoseRainde that one time a year it came on. You know, because II, all the time youknow yeah and but that also gave usappreciation- and you know you know a lot of things cractivity andwork as they an self reliance and and how we grow up. But you know, if youhave a just a bunch of young people, you could tell it a wet that way. Youknow the same way, I tell it to a to an older audience and they want have thesame response, but if I just change it wher I'm making fun of that. They haveit so much better. Now, because you know we US have to use real maps likewe were Magellan, you know every every famile vacation, your father on theside, the road with that big paper map. You know and- and you know it's likeand- and I always ask the oding, so I'm like what do you think this is a map op,probably the world right? I go! NO JUST CLEVELAND, THAT'S IT! You! You want togo to Atran your mother's got to get out of the call. That's al another map,you know so a O. I do coldand. Then also I tell my fellow my stuments allthe time to milt the shit. That's working and pull the ripcord on thestuff. That's not don't say, don't say, stay Solit, Ridg ID into the into theplan because, like my Tyson says, I'V readly got to play until you getpunched in the face and and then being la Ta. Adapt is ote of the fuge part ofthe job. Well, we're talking about Macazam,everyone matt one of the things you know when we used to go and play awaygames. Even we were home one of the fun things wath interacting with the fans,even though it wasn't always what you should do, but like we were at theraiders when it was in Oakland. You know the fans there were crazy,they had the pain on they had the shoulder pads with the spikes at crazyhelmets. Everything and they love heckling you right, but you were kindof keckling them back, but it was all kind of part of the game. The show doyou interact a lot with your audience or you just kind of do your set, andsometimes you ask him things, but you're, really not asking them things.How what? How do you do that in some cases it's improbem? I'm just I don't knowthis person and- and I want to learn about them and then I find out they got some weird job, wher theyrefrom a weird place or you know it's, it's a couple. WHO's been married indivorce three times you know, I mean just just crazy things where you knowI'm really going to them to try to create comedy on stage. You know aibecause my instinct say that something's there, but most of the timeI'm only asking the question as just a way that kind of engaged theaudience. But I know where I'm going or depending on his answer, though heranswer, I got different outs, you know so f. They say this thand. I go thisway if they say this. I go this way. So, like there's there's a point, you knowI know you can tell the look at me, but you know everybody wonders what I am.You know what my ethnic background is, and I go you never guess. In a millionyears, my mother's, a Jewish girl from New York, my father's Iranian but Somei,came out Puerto Rica and you know, Yellow and green makes blue. So then Ilas the audience I list them. Are there really Jewish people here and ifthere's a lot of Jewish people, then you know I got. I got something: I'sesay: If there's no Jewish people, then I'll say well. Is Anybody CircumciseI'll take that tonight? You know so kind of based on what their answer is.I know where I'm going to go, but there's a point in the show where Ineed a twenty one year: old boy for fortys, nine Tunde, a twenty, it's kindof in the third act, and so I'll talk to the twenty one year, boyI'll get his name where he's from all that kind of stuff, but really he'sjust kind of the focus of the joke. It doesn'tmatter the joks Coan be the same joke whether he's cool, whether he a rags,whether he's into it. You know so sometimes I'll milk it on the fly, butit doesn't even matter it's just me. Just kind of extending it until I knowwhat I'm going to go into, which is it's the kind of show like Orys nittwenty needs a finger joke. You know, I mean it needs a Priceti. I on get oo. Iwanted to Lii, you know so that so, but...

...really when I wanted to do that, Ialways thought about. If I had a son, you know I would be in a fishing boatand I would tell him you know I'd be the ghost of Christmas future and belike one day, you'R Goin, to be visited by man with the glove. You know andHeis. It's not GOINGTO pluy catch, I you know, and so yeah, so there'splaces in there where it's planned. But you know I just did a show back when wecould do show so it's February back then, and the guy picks me up at thehotel and he's like. Oh you going to wing it tonight and I'm, like you, knowI'll weing parts of it, but I think the initial you know plan it's kind of likeI've heard this in the NFL, and I know Joe Gimes did this, but you script outthe first fifteen playes right, I mean Youl, know what your first fifteenplays on going into a game. I know what my first fifteen minutes is going to be,because if I do that right then I can do whatever the hell I want later on.You know you sit up the run. You coul get the past Callin later onf. So histhings I do, but I certainly I have walked up there and just Wong it. Youknow, but that's that's not the norm. Usually I know exactly what I'm goingto do yeah. So, let's get into little bitabout what you're doing next right so now you've kind of gone through where you're dealing with your show in Vegasand now you said, I'm gonna do something different and through thispandemic, and I think doing all these virtual things thateverybody is doing. I look at your site and you're doing a lot of that and tellus a little bit about. They laugh you win and really how that came to be foryou. You know I actually started DC aboutnow. It's been about sixteen seventeen years, but I was performing at theDCMPRO, which I don't know if it was where you Wen there, when you werethere, but some people came in from this Misonian and theyhave been gettinga lot of requests from their fellows because it's Tysmisonian they havefellows and but they were getting requested. They wanted to learn standupcomedy, but not because they wanted to be comedians because they wore judgesor they were leaders or cos or doctors or or whatever they just wanted to wantStan e comedy to apply to their. You know they day today and that reallyinterests me because di I have taught people who wanted to be comedians and,and that met you know, I don't think, there's any hacks tothat. I think you have to wr on the road. You got to big your duws. It'slike you know, because you know once you get that first snap and those threehundred pound guys are running down on you. You know you've got to be, youknow programmed to be able to do it, whereas if you're co, all you have todo is be better than the other CEOS and you have to you know. So if you applysome of the science, I teach them it's so powerful in their world, becausehumor wasn't the expectation they never saw er coming, but you know withstandup. They show up. You know they bought the tiket on Wednesday.Expecting Tho laugh on Saturday. You better be great. You know an there's,no way right rig, I don't think so. So I taught the classis is Wassonnian andit was. It was great and then I wound up teaching for a long time. But youknow my boyier dream had never been realized, yet I still wanted to getback to Vegas, so I kind of put teaching on hold. So Icould write the show and focus on the show and, and then I got the show andnow it's more about legacy and and the fact that you know I'm teachingsomething that people believe can't be taught. You know this is this is mylegacy, because you know I had to teach myself the science and really and sincethen I've understood the neural science of it like what happens when we laugh,you know that we feel emotionally safe. We never, you know were at all bestwhen we're making each other laugh that you know, and I asked the audience I'llsay how many of you think you're funny now you I know, if ha big part of yourpersonality or e Sa with the pranks, but only a third of the hands will goup. That means two thirds of these people have shut down that part oftheir personality that was given to them as a copig mechanism as a defensemechanism as a as that's just a way to look at thingsdifferently, because the neural science says when, when you try to look atsomething, you know it to be funny- and I see this with joke writing- you haveto look at it differently, but when you look at it from fear or hate or anger,you're only looking at it, the one way. So so you know all of this kind of happens,because theat least now what I'm doing onceI've been teaching it to CS, but it's mostly for to be a better leader to bea better salesman to be a better communicator. But once the pandemichappen, HR companies were contacting me askingme if I could help them with from the wellness standpoint. You know becausethe the Datas out there on how humor can help corporate culture and help witmental health and raise emotional intelligence, and I had already known that science-It just was nothing that people cared...

...about prepandemic. But now I think it's OIT's a best chance to toOntack, what's been done to us and and engage each other from not the the fear part of of what's going onto us, but what we have in common and how we're all going to kind of getthrough this. So I kind of Pivitedto, the virtual and en came up with thesejoke writing workshops. where I teach them a little joke writing. Then theybriag own the little groups and I give hem a premise and they write jokes as agroup and then one of them comes back and performs, and I took Improv Gamesand and change them so that they, you can usethe science of Improv for problem solving andcreativity and innovation, and so and and but this was always what they laugtyou win was supposed to be, and then I got out there in the world and realizedhe is what people are willing to do. You know they're not willing to embed it into their corporate culture,but you know they'll, let me teach a public speaking class or a leadershipclass or sales class. But now you know this is something reallyexciting for me, because you know if there's a silver lining and covid forme and my family, it's that it brought me back to what what this company wasalways supposed to be and and and then I you know, I kind of looked into to this program. I created called theAntripreneur Seo standup challenge Atat's, where I take, I level COSrunning. You know. Fifty to three hundred million dollar companies teachthem virtually my program and then they performed on Broadway at the end andICROS stre from Hav itwas awesome. It was a great program and we about Tho scale. We were going to dothree in Europe to on Australia, one in South Africa and that that all wentaway. So I had to rethink my business and then I realized not even knowinghow powerful you know bringing humor at this time o could possibly be and thefact that companies are really out of options so think you know they. Ifthey're coming to me, you know, I mean th. That means that you know t theirthink tank of PhDs. You know. Couldn't come up with anything and it's sosimple, but no one's ever really kind of brokenit down to you know how somebody can mind for the material and look fortheir truth, because really we give comedians way too much credit. All weknow how to do is to the job, but the real fuel for comedy the real powerlives inside of eveevery person out there, because they have the stories.The real life experiences comedians only have chapotle and trump, and youknow mading a Romate in you. Now they don'thave much iththatyou now and that's not to put them down, but SIFOL wasn't really. I think sidals aremuch better comedian. Now as a father, husband and wife, and I mean father anda husband because he has real real stuff to talk about. Instead of what'sthe deal with pens, you know that's all he did befor so right. You know, I lovets to people. I love teaching this to people and then going you know what I'mnot expecting you to go become a standupd comedian, but now at leastyou'll understand how to kind of create this content and and be, and that'swhat it is. I have content jokes that I know will work and C be replicatedDoigat because it teme the same way every single time. I can teach peoplehow to do that with their stories, their life experiences and then andthen, because I teach lawn form standup, which is very conversational. Itdoesn't sound Joky, so really it's like and then what happens is I teach peopleI've, never gotte a speaking ticket, not ever in my life, because I canengage the officer through and that's oe thing humoros based in empathy. Inorder for me to make you laugh, I have to understand you. I have to thinkabout Ra you and your football career and y whey. You grew up and your dadand all this sor ther kind of stuff, but that becomes super super engaging.You know you want to talk about a public speaking situation. The trafficstop is in and most people don't think about the officer. Yes, there are somebad cops out there and I don't want any of those blead throuhs to come through,but ther a lot of most of them are incredibly brave people that we needand and and the traffic stop is the most its the most stressful part oftheir job because they pull over that's when they die when they pull ove thewrong Carl. The Guy Shoots Hem, so we escalate that every single time we getpulled over we reach for the glovebox we try to put on our seat belt. What doyou think he sees from the back? You know I mean he's just the tension isgetting rob is just going up so and then you lie to them. You know I meanyou know it' soal, everything we do is negative, and just so I put my hands onthe stair. When I roll down the window, you know when he comes there. I tellhim the truth, thet freaks them out. I try to make them laugh. I look to seeif he as a wedding ring. So I can make some mumic connection with them, but Iit really is using humor to persuade to get what you want and that's what theylaugh. You win is it's just right now. It's kind o kind of a bigger purpose tokind of heal us and give us hope, but in general it's your best. First Choice,no matter what you're doing to get what...

...you want for sure right. Well, it makesme think of the statement. Laughter is the best medicine right because wefound our family and my wife is really funny. My kids are all super funny.They get that from her. Not For me, but you know: We've used CA, laughter,we've, our favorite movies are comedies. We've done all that and that thatreally gets us through we seein tons of COMEDIANS. I wish we've. We would haveseen you at some point and now definitely we will, when you're out inthe road next and we can all get out again, but I think it's amazing whatyou're doing, because sometimes when you are having like a CEO and you'retalking to a board or you're making, I mean I've done presentations andbusiness and things and if you can make it lighter and people want to engagewith you more just like you're saying, if you can engage with the policehoffiser in a tent situation, you can engage with somebody in a boardroom atany moment. So tell us a little bit about your most famousy. You know. Ithink that that what I've read is that he was he's a big fan of yours, so Richard Branson, who was you know when I thought about seebecause because trust be some places, they're still so antiquated. You knowthe theyr living in the past and then thee not really thinking about thefuture and that's the great thing about humor. Nobody knows how to engage theyounger people, you know and then the biggest consumersare comedy on the planet. You know I thought People Netflix is put out fourcomedy specials since we've been doing this podcast and then affer you and me,you know we don't have to think for that. So it really engaged the youngerpeople, but but I look for places fertile ground where they might get itand virgin, and Richard Branson, I remember he was the first one to ever:make the safety airline video funny. You know, I don't know if you have aflu virgin America, but the it was hilarious. The the Sancty Vit thatnobody watches you know fashion, see both don't smoke all this kind of stuff,but that one was intentionally funny, and this is another thing once I starton. You know unbailing all the signs. People on you remember ten to twentypercent of anything. You tell them, you imbed. The message with humor goes upto fifty or sixty percent. So just as a learning tool, it's great. So so I wouted! U, you know connecting with SOM mentrepreneurialgroups that had a path to Richard Branson and I wond Hep writing tworoasts of Richard Branson that he loved and and so much so that he had theslides from the roast hanging in his office on Neckor island when thehurricane came in and wiped them out so somewhere the Caribbeano Ocean in the bottom or sitting my slidesright now because hit wiped out everything on Neckor Island. But sincethen I've worked with two shocks from sharp tank. You know it's the celebrity CEOS, youknow they speak is you know they'e mostly they're outspeaking, so so theyall need to be funnier. You know and they've tried everything every tonightshow rider and everyone will write them joke. But what I do is I learn aboutthem and find out their truth, how they grew up. You know you know what theirmotivation, what their origin story is and then then be able to. What I'mreally good at is is now putting myself in the mind of the audience and andreally thinking about them as we construct the material instead of whatI think is funny, but what I think is going to work for them so, but inRichard Branson I'm trying to turn the ATPRENEUR th, the Co standup challengeinto a TV show, so it's kind of like undercover balls meets comedy, and youknow they can now take the humor and bring it back to the workplace.undertanneed some Tim aneve do it yeah, yeah and but but o I mean you know, he'sprobably the most famous one. But you know there's got Kevin Harringtonhe event to the infamertial. You know he was you know, but waitted or he wasthat guy. You know endd up Ann working with him rigt about this, as I get tofigure out and learn how they became them, and some of the most famouspeople in the most successful people in the planet are selfmade. You know, Imean, that's not you know. My father, you know was a real state guy in newyou, lave and Y. Ever Lave me the real estates and that's O, that's how Ibecame successful. You Know Kevin Harrington, you know worked in hisfather's bar in Cincinnatia, ten years old and and then came up with the ideawhen cable came out. TV used to they didn't have twenty four hourprogram like the discovery channel was just eighteen hour, programming thingand once he saw that he realized he could buy the other six hours and thenrun his infomercial commercials. So he is like you know, a mimicry I have ofjust growing up. You know watching infomercials, and now I'm working withthe guy who created it and helping him tell that story to the world. You knowmean it's it's like if I was able to...

...work with Rockefeller Henry Ford. Youknow back in the day. These are the people I'm working with now so, and Imiss that so much of because they're, not speaking that, I'm performing withme- and you know so, there's less of that and but it has freed me up to tryto help the rank and file of the company directly because before it wasI'd, help him and then it would. You know, filter down, but now I'm in theirboots on the ground, working with people a d, and I just sum I see how itchanges them and I just and Ihave ten coaches that work under me now thatI've trained wow these are guys hat loen will fameyou're certifying Ancoman,basically yeah Yesiiyaoy, so before fom at before we wrap it up. I got one lastquestion for you give me your prediction on the on the Washingtonfootball teamers. We call them the skins. Do you think they're going towin the division? Somebody's got Ta Right, stesomeboy's gonna have to win theNDOFS SES and host the playoff game host the playoff game, whether theylike it or not, you know do I think you know what I sal greatthings. I tell you, I said You wer my the last quarterback I liked the AlexSmith story is amazing, but I crange every time somebody gets in the AAn. Imean EAI, don't Aniaso. What are you gonnado? Hyeah? Oh my God. I Fuck I forgot about that. SRRRR thatlie. It wasYeanyo neck didnt you when you out for a gate because of yeah I got a Tinger.I got a Stinger, a Stinger from it. That's a I absolutely remember, butit's do. I think they're going to theyregonna. You know what I think, they're, probably the best team in the EN FCEast right now. Quite the way that I thought they tackled really really wellon against the cowboys. That's something you know they seed the careand I think Rabera might be the guy and and maybe the name changes what's goingto do. Hem End up. Entersy is down this year, so you know what you host te playof game. Maybe you beat Seattle, you know at home and you know maybe maybeso yeah. I think I think only because the rest of the team sucksso bad. I do think they might they might they make me well h. The thing Isaid about the name change was there's not a team in the NFL that needs moreof a reboot than the skins did and I think the whole name changed e Brout,because since dance siters own, the team things haven't gone. The way thateverybody in Washington thinks they should so I think they were indesperate need of a reboot, so mat one last thing: please tell Os Tel all ofour listeners how they can get a hold of you, what you're working on wherethey want, where you're going to be next, how they can find you all thatinformation so that we can put it out in our social media awesome? Well, they left you wincom.You can learn about the programs of the Standur challenge and and all of thatand email me or you can find me a linked in that CISAM on Linkedin orfacebook. We're actually doing our first virtual entrepreneur, CEO standupchallenge on December Nineteenh, and it's free for anybody who wants to towatch it. We're going O do a virtual show with seven CEOS from from actuallyone's coming in from Denmark. Another one is in Australia, so from all overthe world, we're going to perform a virtual show and raise some money forJose. Andres is food kitchen, so we can peed somepeople as the SALIDY seeason. So if they find me on there, I can shoot hema link right now. I don't know what the link's going to be, but you know if youemail me on they left Uincom. You Know II'll send ot in by and then Youn yourFamiya. It's gonna BE PG thirteen he family can watch. Ah, my kids are all in college andorder. So they can. They can come new things right, so they're old enoughthey've been through it. So I learn a lot from them, but that it was a biderman. You know, I hope we can do this again sometime. I love to connect withyou again. It was great having you on huddle up with Gus. I think your storyis amazing. I think what you're doing is amazing and for me laughter is the best medicine, and Iappreciate you so much for joining me on huddleup with Gus. Today, thanks for aving me take care, O eSeeyou, some all right. Thanks Ma everyone, that's mad bcaz, an thanksfor dowing US on Hotdo up wit, Gos. You can find a fun Hoddo. U, with Guscomwhorever, you listen to your favorite podcast and you can get us right herenext week and a me sixte thirty one vigial new studio and also listen to uson ix have great.

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