Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 3 weeks ago

marquesogden

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus with 15-year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! Today, we turn to one of the most inspiring individuals Gus has met as he hosts Marques Ogden to the huddle. Growing up in a single parent home with a father that inspired perseverance and fairness, Marques Ogden learned how to define his values and set goals. Ogden attended Howard University from 1998-2002 where he played Division I football. He then followed his dream and his brother Jonathan’s footsteps, eventually getting drafted into the NFL in 2003. Overall, he played for 5 years as an offensive lineman with the Titans, Bills, Ravens and Jaguars. Even during the off season, Ogden helped train football players in Europe, both physically and mentally. This is one huddle you’ll be glad you joined!! 

Hey everyone. Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital newsdot com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sportsadvantage, clients of Vegas. Sports advantage are winning big in 2021 youcan be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100. Bettors are up $3700 500dollars. Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000. Bettors are up $37,000 and $5000.Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in thedescription below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your packagetoday. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans. Whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say welcome to this week's huddle up withgusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the gamesare one. Uh it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up.Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it'skick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left, 15 year NFL quarterback and I want towelcome you to our second show on this new platform called Super. Uh it's apart of facebook, which I'm really excited about. This is powered by theNFL alumni. They're excited. I'm excited and it's just a way to take mypodcast at the next level. As you can see, we have our guests live and I amreally excited to get this platform rolling and to find out more about ourguests and let our fans interact with us, which is really cool. Um but beforethat I want to thank some of our friends and sponsors. Obviously Superthe NFL alumni thank them. Uh, Sounder FM, that's where we host our podcast,but you can listen to us wherever you listen to. Your favorite podcast. Nextweek, we're gonna start something really cool where our fans can come onand they can uh take part in. So Vegas sports advantage is gonna give you 500bucks to anyone who wins that so they can go on and use my code huddle up andthey can go on to Vegas sports...

...advantage and they're gonna win 500bucks. So we're gonna start that next week. So I'm really excited for that.We're gonna do giveaways as we go on and we learn how to use this greatplatform. But joining me today, which I'm really excited about is anotherformer alumni NFL player. Uh you know uh Marcus has done so much, he was bornin D. C. Which was my first place of of I call myself a baby in the NFL backthen and you know he went to ST albans high school, then he ended up at HowardUniversity, which is awesome. Then he was drafted in the sixth round byJacksonville jaguars and now I can't wait for you guys to hear his stories,the ups and downs and the transitions that we all go through. And Marcus hassome of the most amazing stories that you want to hear, but he's a keynotespeaker, he's an executive coach, a celebrity coach and he's also an author.So you talk about a guy that's done you know everything and we're gonna get tothose stories today but joining me today is Marcus ogden Marcus, how youdoing buddy? Well guess how are you sir? I am doing wonderful, I'm doingwonderful. I'm excited for this new platform. I know that you work with alot of people uh in teaching them how to deal with different situations andand be better as a coach, as a speaker uh in marketing and all those things.So what advice can you give me right off the top here in dealing with a newplatform. So first thing I'm gonna tell you is figure out what you do well onthe platform. You have a lot of energy, you're very well spoken, charismatic,use those things that you have, I call that you need to assess your skill setsand your resources when you know what you do Well, gus you can take that andyou can build for a better tomorrow. I always tell my people I work with, Iwant to know your story, I want to know three things that you do well, yourbiggest strength if you possess and then from there, what do you want toimprove upon? We can figure out a strategy and a customized game plan,get you from where you are to where you want to be. So, anybody is startinganything, especially like you said, you're on a new platform. Gus got thiswhole thing, rolling what you do well, you focus on that executed at thehighest precision level and then things you don't do well on the platform,delegate out so you're able to take the brand and take the platform and likeyou said earlier, Elliot your podcast to another level. Yeah, I hear you, youknow, things that I don't do well is trying to run this whole thing. So Igot my son's gunner and gave in the background trying to help me out. So uhso I have somebody actually to blame it all on if it doesn't go well right,that's what quarterbacks are good at. Anyway. Uh Hey, so you know youmentioned all these things about what you're good at. So tell me aboutgrowing up D. C. In D. C. And the first time that you fell in love with sports,what was that like for you? Because that's eventually what you becamereally good at. So I felt that with sports gus for the first time isprobably about nine or 10 I saw my brother playing football in high schooland I fell in love with it but at that age I was too big to play because theydidn't have any of those like super heavyweight leagues and things likethat. Pop Warner had weight limits. How big were you? Oh God. So when I wasprobably nine or 10 probably about 57 probably about a buck 80 bucks, 70. Butthey didn't have like the stripers like you can only play on the on the on theline in youth. No man, you know back then now they have it today but backthen like it was all weight limit so if you were like a certain win, theydidn't have a heavyweight football division like they do today. So Icouldn't play football though man. And I played a couple games here there, youknow it's kind of you know, scrimmages all that. But I couldn't play organizedfootball gusts to my freshman year of high school because when I went to highschool and so I went to ST john john with the ST offense johns we didn'thave uh seventh grade football. Now they had basketball which I played butnot football. So I started playing football my freshman year of highschool and I really fell in love with the game because my junior year mybrother got dressed to the Ravens. We all thought he was going to go to theCardinals so we really don't know what Yeah, all that I thought was gonna goto Cardinals. So number one was Keyshawn johnson to the Jets. Numbertwo was kevin Hart to the Jacksonville jaguars, third was the Cardinals. Andthey took simeon rice at three. They hit me. Yeah they took 17 and three.And then we were like man because everybody thought that Baltimore isgonna draft Lawrence phillips, They had Tony jones at left tackle, they hadOrlando Brown at right tackle and we don't need to tackle when Baltimoretook johnson at four. It was amazing for me because baltar was only an hourand a half away driving from D. C. So I...

...got to see a lot of time in that regard.The number five when cedric jones to the giants. So my brother really comingto Baltimore helped me to kind of get myself even more inspired to be betterat football when I was playing at ST john's. Yeah, so then you were at STjohn's, your brother was already in the NFL, correct, correct. And then whatmade you choose going to Howard? You know what does a lot of people knowsabout me? Well some dude I talked about a lot but something about pay attentionI think in any college scholarship offers from anybody until the end. Likeeverybody thought I was a junior when I was a senior. My coach messed up mytranscript as a result of that nobody offered me. The only offer I got wasHoward university and they showed up because like two weeks before thesigning day and they were like they sat down the living room table with mymother and father and he said Marcus we love your game, we love your education,we love your process, we want to offer you a full scholarship to come play forthe bison because I couldn't afford $25,000 a year to go. Yeah there's noway none of us could back then. It's not it's not even a prayer. So wereinteresting enough though what happened is I remember steve Wilson was my cosaid to my parents Marcus can be an NFL lineman. I'm thinking of myself at thetime I was only six ft throughout good. Almost 66 gusts before my first year.About uh it is it is gonna get bringing it up that you That's me in 1998 as anincoming freshman. However side my roommate who actually Alphonse and Iplayed against each other in high school. So I went to ST john's he wentto McNamara Bishop Mac, he was a W. C. A. C. Guy. So we played against eachother in high school. He became teammates at Howard. But for me that Igrew to almost six ft six and I got that offer. But I remember coach Wilsontell my parents Marcus can be an NFL line. I'm like what? Thinking to myselflike NFL lineman I can't even get an offer to college. And that's why I'mthinking to myself that he often was like okay well listen I'm going tocollege because I thought for the longest time gus my my my football crewis gonna be over after high school. That's what I thought. But it didn'tturn out to be that way. So in this picture, how tall are you in thispicture? I'm almost 6665 basically. Almost 60. Alfonzo's pretty tall. Tall.Yeah he's a tall D. And he's like he's all right so if you to race who wouldwin. Oh he has been waiting for, sure would speak. He's a he's a D. A. I hatehow fast defensive ends are, but I was, but again, it's interesting like inthat picture I'm probably about 3 25 ish. So and then it kind of went up alittle bit, I went down a little bit and then I just kind of went up alittle bit more. So it was it was definitely an up and down weight effectfor being. I mean you get to college, you probably didn't like everyone else.You don't lift a lot in high school, right? Because you're doing so much,you probably went on to play basketball And then you get to college and you getinto a lifting program and then your body changes. Right? I remember thathappened to me, I went from £200 to £225 in in like a year and a half justbecause we were lifted every day. That's just kind of, it's a job. It'swhat you have to do in college. But that right, one thing I want to ask youis now you're at Howard, your brother is playing for the Ravens. Your parentshad to be pretty happy that they didn't have to drive very far to go watch bothof you. You got that right man. So my father who also was a Howard bisongraduate, he ended up living about 10 or 15 minutes from Howard. So he couldsee me all of my games, all my homeless. He also went to almost all my way gamestoo. But he was always there 15 minute drive. So for me going to Howard was anabsolute just privilege because I carried on that bloodline with my dadbeing a bison and I was advice and then he can see me play all the time. Sothis is a picture of me, my grandson, my maternal grandfather is on the leftwith the Ravens one. We both have Ravens has on with the blue straparound his, That's your grandfather, that's my, that's my, that's mymother's father and then the other guy on the other side, that's my paternalgrandfather, my dad's dad, all of them have on the Ravens hats and all thatkind of stuff. And then that's my dad with his Baltimore Ravens hat on. Thenthat's Jonathan behind me. So that's, and uh, that's in 2000 and that'sactually The game after my 19th birthday. I remember we played MorganState that game, but that's at Howard back in, back in 2000. Yeah, I lovelike the picture though, your enthusiasm, your excitement, how happyyou are to be with your family, you...

...know, and there's Jonathan saying like,oh man, I used to call this kid, whatever name and you know when he wasgrowing up now look at him. So what, what nickname did Jonathan always callyou. So Jonathan always called me like little emo because you know, he wasalways big jail. So he always come a little emo. My dad should call mescooter because that was his nickname for me. I don't know where it came from,but I was, I was his scooter and I'll tell you what man, it was really coolbecause having my brother be that close to me where I can, I can talk to aboutto go to practices. I can going on the field, I could watch him doing like oneon one. You know him going against like Michael McCrary, uh, rob Burnett. Uh,you know all these other phenomenal players, it allowed me to learn thegame at a higher level which helped me become a better football player atHoward, which of course led me to being and then like my coach, I guesspredicted correctly an NFL office alignment. So were you at Howard fouryears? So I'm there five, so I went to college five years as well. So you've seen your brother get drafted,I'm sure that you guys were all together for that. Did you guys gettogether for the draft for your year as well? They, we did not, my brother wasin Vegas having to do some things for work related but my father mothergrandparents all came, we went, my brother's house in Baltimore watchingthe draft. Yeah, I know that that is awesome. So then you get drafted rightnow you're listening to all this just like me, I didn't get drafted to theseventh round, right? So you're there with your family and it's day one, it'sover. Then you gotta go to day two and there you you and I we're listening toyou tell the story about your brother. He went, he went forth instead of third.You know, for me it's like I always laugh because I was just excited andhumbled just to be a part and be lucky enough to be drafted no matter where itwas. Well that's how I was. You know, people thought, I think maybe as highas the third round because of, you know, I went to the hula bowl. I had a reallygreat cooler bowl, which I enjoy a lot. I had a lot of experience in playingagainst guys in that game from my Miami texas rice. My head coach for that gamewas Mack Brown, who is now back in Chapel Hill and I played against theother coach. On the other side was Larry coker from Miami. So I'm playingagainst guys like my good friend Brett Romberg on the other team, uh JordanJordan, uh Jordan black tackle out of Notre Dame's on the other team. Uh youknow had some really good competition man. And but I played with a guy,Alonzo Jackson who was a second round draft pick, that draft class to theSteelers out of florida state on my team and he had like five sacks in thatgame under the game game. And so I always get him all week. And I gave upno sacks on him all week. And I get, you know, I was this hard person to goagainst, you know, everybody want to go against me. And I'm like, man, this isawesome. I'm gotten here from Howard is showing everybody that no matter whereyou go to school, as long as you put the work in and Howard had greatcoaches like steve Wilson was an NFL player fred Dean who was one of thehalls for the reds game, NFL Mac Austin play for the Jets. You know, we had, wehad some great coaches that play in the national Football League. So thecoaching was that we don't have the facilities that texas or florida theyhad at the time. But as long as you go and do the work, it doesn't matter. Youknow, bitch looks pretty or if it's in the dungeon, like it's a, it's a bitchthat's all that matters. You know, for me going to that game and showingeverybody that I could compete with the best of the best in college reallyhelped elevate my status and the draft. And so when I fell to the top to thefifth and I got a call from Dallas and they say, hey Marcus, it's drafting you.I'm like, this is awesome. Like I mean from Washington, I'll go to Dallasshore, no problem. And I said, you guys gonna pick this around and said no, mythinking myself and why are you calling me? I mean, But then I ended up gettingdrafted by Jack and the jaguars. And then Dallas took torn tucker after Iwas gone from old miss. Yeah. And you didn't, you didn't really want to go toDallas. I mean you're from Washington. You know, I mean, that's just one ofthe biggest rivalries in football today. Yeah. And so for me, you know, it wasto be a jaguar and to be part of Jack's first draft class was huge. Was wasBrunelle your quarterback. Yeah, I had, yeah, but Barbara was our first rounddraft choice. Yeah. We had rasheen Mathis was drafted in the second round.We had third round was um, we didn't...

...have a third round pick that. Yeah, wedid. We had this man, a wife from Hawaii was my good friend of guard outof Hawaii and we had the Brandon toe field running back from L. S. U. We hada man, you remember everybody got a great great loris rice stir out ofOregon. Remember dr Brandon gray out of rice? There was a man seven of us. Soremember when you remember Back to 94 when I was drafted a long time ago, acouple years after you man, you were more than a couple here. More than acouple your way after me. I'm old. All right. Hey, we got a question here andI know I screwed her name up last week and I, I apologize and I can't remember.But uh, this canoe if you want to get on and you can turn your camera on, youcan come on and you can ask Marcus the question yourself. So if you want to dothat, go ahead and do that, we'd love to have you on. But you know, shewanted to know what you're, you can see this question. What was your favoritememory of Howard University? My favorite memory of Howard University?You know, I would say that my first homecoming game as a starter wasabsolutely phenomenal. Howard was known for its homecoming. Like here's thething and I think her name is pronounced pacaya and Zakia willremember this if she's around my age or a little bit younger or older Back inthe late 90s, early 2000's Gus it was tv, it wasn't like cable, stuff likethat, but everybody, everybody was talking about Howard. So like Cosbyshow would have Howard sweatshirts on different world martin, living Single.Like all these phenomenal shows would have, yeah, it's you, you know, youknow how I love it. So again, that like that, you know, it was like, you know,and so I went to school with like some phenomenal people including ChadwickBoseman Chadwick was in my class at Howard, I remember, I worked in thetheater as a helper doing like things behind the scenes, pulling the curtainsall that, and I remember Chatwood was working there and I could tell he wastalented, I don't know, I was gonna be that talented, but you saw greatnesslike that, I was around that all the time at Howard. So first homecoming wasjust so surreal because all the people that you've seen, like, you know, jay,Z and DMX and cash money and you know, you got people like, you know, Felishawas shot, we're coming on campus and you know, all these people that youknow of and see on either music or tv or fame and all that will be walkingaround Howard's campus all talking about the game and you can see the gameand I'm like, hold on, I'm in this game and I'm the starting right tackle forHoward at 18 years old when I'm like, man, I was like, if I got a year or twoof starting and Howard max is gonna be awesome, but I got to be a four yearstarter. So as an 18 year old having that privilege of being a startingright tackle for Howard, when gus our entire o line, we're all seniors. Yeah. Uh huh. Yeah. Hey, heading up with Dustlisteners, Manscaped. Well, they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch oftools and formulations for their package three point oh Kit uh so youknow, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We allthink we got a perfect package. But they sent me the perfect package, threepoint oh kid, I want to show you what they sent me. So, it was crazy. It camein this great box. Uh, you know it and you can see what it says. They willthank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh, youknow, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent methis great, uh, some boxers, you what you get, right, protect them. And then,uh, you know, they sent me this, cool it, uh, sack, I guess you want to callit to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped, sent me abunch of product. Um, you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh,you know, if you can go to manscaped dot com and put in the code, uh, GusFrerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E get 20% off and free shipping when youuse that code. But you can get a kit,...

...you can get individual items like uh,this way cool rumor that has a little led light, um, ceramic. These thingscome apart. They're waterproof. You can do a lot with them. So, you know, manscape is great. You know, it's funny though. Um, I remember when I wasplaying with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, butthere was a gentleman who was playing on our team. And uh, you know, if youever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But hebrought his own clippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up hisgoatee and everything and he had him there for about two or three weeks andhe goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another playerthat is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So, you know, one of thethings is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use uphere. So, uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how longhave you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here aboutthree weeks ago and I've been using it ever since. So you know, there is alesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably if itwould have just said manscaped on it, but we wouldn't have had that issue,but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball storiesI've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so, uh, it's agreat story. Um, but you know, I always said, there was no way to know, there'sno name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, itwas not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So one of the best I'veever heard my 15 years playing in the league. Um, but you know, there's somany great things about Manscaped and what they're doing, uh, because guys,you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair, um, andgetting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right?And so, you know, we all work out for me. I like working in my yard doingthose things now that I'm retired, get a little sweat on and everything youwant to smell good. You know, you got to take care of yourself, They've gotsome great products, uh, you know, this one, a little, uh, you all deodorant,we'll need that here and there. Um, after, you know, working the yard,taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um, it's a great thing, butthere's so many great products. Um, I want to thank Manscaped for sendingthem to me. Um, uh, the lawnmower 3.0 obviously you can use it anywhere inyour body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this wasone just letting you know that the lawnmower three point comes with theperfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these productsindividually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can see the backof your balls will thank you and then here's the front. So it's an awesomeshirt to have a great gear and you know what? Sometimes you can just sit back,take care of your balls a little bit and and and read the paper. SoManscaped even has their own daily news, so which is great. So don't forget thatyou can go to the Code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E.Uh And you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh packagegift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use thecode just for a G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. Hey everybody spells my namewrong, they even spelled wrong back my Pro bowl jersey. So you know, I gotta Igotta help you guys out. So don't forget how important it is that you usethese products, take care of yourself down below and have some fun, right,there's nothing closer to you than your little buddies. So use the lawnmower uhUse the code Gus Frerotte, save 20% and get free shipping and uh order somegreat Manscaped products. Mhm. Mhm. Mhm. Right guard, center, left guard,left tackle, we're all seniors and I'm the only one not sitting on top of afreshman. So you're a freshman and you know, for me having that game andhaving that experience. it's like somebody never forget for the rest ofmy life. Yeah, that, that is awesome because there's certain experiences youhave in college that like for me going...

...to Tulsa that you want to forget andother ones that you kind of remember forever, you know, like we beat texas Aand M and I wasn't even playing quarterback, I was the punter that gameand, and it's still talked about as one of the greatest wins ever in Tulsahistory, you know, and, and just because we were a small school and webeat this huge school from texas, so there's so many great memories ofcollege and I think we all have them. I think Franciscans wants to know whatwas the wall all about. So the wall was where we had it on the yard Francisca,so like Howard's really known for the yard, right? So like all of thedifferent fraternities and you know, uh, would do like different types of dancesand so like all their steps and then what happened is, is that when a newclass of, of people that were in the fraternity had kind of gone frompledging to crossing, they would go out to the yard to the wall and they woulddo all of the steps and all of the different festivities out in the yard,in front of the wall. So that's why you see the queues doing it, the sigma'sthe kappas, like that was their place when when guys would pledge and theywould cross the pledge, they would perform for all the students andanybody else. You know any faculty and any other, you know fraternity past ourpast or current members and that's where it ended up in the yard in frontof the wall. So did you, did you join a fraternity? No, I have football betweenfootball business interning and tell the truth man. I think pledging worksfor a lot of people but for me I just wasn't in that process. I just wasn'tthe guy to go and pledge and it was a lot to go through. I mean it was just alot of sex vice between football school fledging, all that type of stuff. Ijust didn't have the type of time because I was willing focusing onbecause again I said I was like I wasn't expecting to be this NFL player.I was like I'm going to go to college, I'm going to get education. I want tobe an investment banker and work on Wall street. Like my dad who worked innew york and then worked in D. C. And was a stocks and bonds trader. That waswhat I wanted to do. No that's awesome. We all kind of want to do things are,you know just because I don't know about you but like my dad is somebody Ialways looked up to. You know my dad worked in the mill and you know, histhing was I don't want you to do what I didn't want you to be better than me,right? And and that's kind of how it was and and going to college and anddoing all those things and and that, that is always amazing to me hear thosestories about how your parents influenced you, because I'm, onequestion I always ask is when you were on the field and something bad happenedto you, whether you got knocked on your can or you jumped offsides or somethinghappened to you, I always ask people like who was that person in your headsaying, get it right, right? Usually it's not the coach, like for me when Iwas get smacked and I'd be laying on the ground, it was always my dad and myhead thing, get your butt up and get back in there, yep, that was my, getyour butt up. My dad was definitely that for me again, having him come toall my games in high school, having him come to all my games at home and mostof my away games in college and having him be, because my dad played the lineat Howard, you know, he was a d tackle knows card and you know, he had adifferent mentality and I did, but having him to give me that guidanceabout how to continue to move forward was really important for me. Yeah, so Ithink that that we always derive information inspiration from ourparents and people that were close to us. So now I'm thinking about you whenyou're in Jacksonville, right? And you're you're starting, your brother'salready played for several years now. So if you ever played against somebodythat was the same, that your brother played against what you guys talk aboutit, and would you confer, because I think that would have been great. Iwish I would have had that, you know, playing quarterback all of a sudden I'mgonna go play the Giants and I wish I would have had somebody to talk to whoplayed them before or that coordinator. Oh yeah, absolutely. And havingsomebody like my brother to be able to help me and be there for me in thatregard was absolutely vital because it helped me to put myself in the positionof getting things done and accomplished and that's what I was wanting to do andthat's why I needed to be. And having him as that sounding board made itreally great for me. Yeah, that'd be awesome. So I want to remind all of ourguests that if you want to come on and be live with us, you can actually takea picture with us. You can ask a direct question, just make sure you turn yourcamera and your microphone on and we can do that. So Zika has anotherquestion for you while we're on the NFL...

...if you want to know what team gave youthe best experience to develop as a player, which is a great questionbecause you played for several teams and you know we all have good coachesand bad coaches and sometimes you get that line coach that gives you the best,you know, you just hit it off with those people. So who helped me developbest as a player from a position coach standpoint without a doubt was Buffalounder Jim McNally Hall of Fame coach. He coached Anthony moon knows somephenomenal players and what we called him was Mouse was his nickname. Mousebrought to the game, a willy different perspective of how to play the game ata super high level with a technical aspect for that position. Then when itcame to a head coach as the best developer as a head coach without adoubt was Jacksonville under Jack del Rio. Jack was a phenomenal player inthe NFL. Jack was a phenomenal coach in the NFL. He still is a phenomenal coachtoday, the NFL for the Washington football team. But Jack, because of hisability to be a coach who played the game at the same time, it made it ahuge benefit for me to carry on how to be the best of the best when it came toplaying the game and having a guy that was a coach. Now he was a rookie headcoach but still he had been coaching, you know, with the Ravens, with thepanthers and he brought a huge, he bought a huge attitude as a player as acoach and also played the game that made it that much better. So I alwaysfound it interesting between somebody who played the game and who didn't uh Imean I played for 17, 15 years. um and I had a lot of coaches and I alwaysfound it interesting when I had a coach who played before that understood stoodlittle different nuances. I'm not saying they were better or worse, butI'm saying they understood things differently than then a coach whodidn't play, if you know what I mean? And I think that's what you're talkingabout with Jack of course, and that's what I'm talking about, you know, withMouse, you know, Mouse was the office of linemen back in the day, but heplayed the game and he knew the game and because of that and also I'll behonest with you because Mouse also learned so much from Anthony munoz. Ithink that was the kind of relationship that they had where Mouse could teachhim, but he can also teach Mouse. Yeah, I love the nickname Mouse. How do youget Mouse? So I saw Francis Francisco Francisco's question, so to be honestwith you guys, he looks like a mouse and a tiny like them out. I mean that'swhat it was like half the size of all the linemen, you're super tiny comparedto us, probably like five ft seven, maybe five ft eight, you know, just,you know, hunched over head like the glasses on top of his head pulled downup down. And but I tell you what man mouse when he talked players listen,because just like I tell people when I talk about my business, a speaker as acoach, you know, people are going to hire you or work with you or respectyou off your accomplishments. What you want to do is a goal, goals areimportant, but no one's going to hire you or pay you money out of theirpocket off of your goals, they're going to hire you and or pay you off youraccomplishments and mouse was the best of the best at his coaching uh, in theNFL as a lineman as o line coach and because of that, that's why I had somuch respect for him and I still talk to mouse to this day through facebookand you know, he was doing some consulting for the Cincinnati Banglesfor a while, helping them with a breakdown, pass rush Phil and thingslike that. It's great to know he's still attached to the game because alot of knowledge to get back to the game, right. One thing I want to knowand I want our audience to know is how much a room full of offensive linemancan eat because I've been around you guys and I've tried to keep up once ortwice. And because linemen are always who I hung out with and like I wentwith Matt Burke one time we went to um not chipotle, what's the other burritoplace? You know what? Yes and bert gets three burritos. I'm like, you're gonnaeat all those. He goes, yeah, I gotta keep weight on. So it's like amazinghow much offensive lineman can put down like breakfast, lunch, dinner and thenbefore the game they're all sick and nervous. Well, I mean like you said,man, and like matt said, you got to keep weight on and you've got to keepthe weight on as a result of that. It's like you have to put yourself in aposition to be able to maintain to do your job. So to that degree is 100%right. You know, I played with Kevin...

Malloy who was not the biggest guy inthe world and Kevin was a phenomenal Hall of Fame football player, but Kevinstruggled to keep his weight and he had to eat a lot. You know, remember when Iwas playing for Tennessee, I had some issues with my dad passed away and cameback to the game and I had some injuries, things like that and I hadtrouble keeping weight on. I have to eat a lot a lot a lot. So yeah man, Imean, I remember those days quite well. Yeah, that that's tough. So Terry wantsto know, is there any rivalry between you and your brother? Uh Terry? Wealready talked a little bit about how much help he gave, you know, when youguys would talk about other teams and everything. But did you guys have anylittle rivalry? Like hey, I didn't give up any sacks this week or I kick thisdefensive guys. But you know, yeah, you all, you would always chat about, gosh,you played against and then you know, who did what? And we really did a greatjob talking about, you know, the different teams and experiences andthings like that. But the robbery wasn't really that crazy because wewere both O lineman. I remember as a was my rookie year with the jaguarswere playing the Ravens at Baltimore and one of the D lineman paul Spicerwho was talking a lot, yeah. Talking a lot of jump that's going to run hismouth and he told me during and said we're going through one of Mark's gonnaput your brother on his ass today. I said paul, look, you know if you wantto do that, let's go for it because you know my brother. But I'm trying to wina football game, Baltimore crushed just but I remember this one play it was adraw play spicer has kept yapping off. I said dude, what are you doing? Likethe suspect? It's not you don't have any pressures now. I'm just gonna keepyou from getting his head and then on a draw play, my brother took like alittle drop set and then he got Interpol and he took him about almost15 to 20 yards and he dumped on his head and put them down and then paulgot up and was like, man, you hold me, hold me, nobody's gonna call holding onyou when you're down the field 15, 20 yards and you're on your back. Andevery time I look at that, look at that what he was doing, his hands wereinside his chest the whole time. Nobody, we're gonna call that again. Like itreminds me of all the craziness that happens in the NFL with the trashtalking and all that kind of stuff. Did people come up to feel and be like,yeah, I should have listened to you sure did. And I said, man, look, youknow what it's like, you know, you're going, it's a guy that is 693 75. Youknow, he has super long arms, great leverage, he knows the game, he knowsangles, body position. Why are you trying to get that done? Yeah. You know that, that, that I meanthere's certain guys that can talk trash, like Warren Sapp was always goodat talking a lot of trash, but you know, uh I never really noticed it rightbecause I had to focus on so much other stuff during the game. Uh, that Ididn't really talk trash back and forth to people because you're getting aheadof the play, the next play, even when you're laying on the ground and peopleon top of you, the coaches like all right, get up, we gotta go, here's whatwe're gonna run and you don't have time for that. But as a lineman, you're inthose trenches and Gabe wants to know what the Lyman talked. The best trashjeez talk, the best trash. You know, I would have to say, I never playedagainst him, but I did have guys that did play against him will be johnRandall, john Randall is stay talking trash. He stayed trying to getunderneath your skin. He stayed just yapping and yapping and yapping. Nowjohn Reynolds easy, one of the best defensive tackle to play the game. Butjohn also knew at certain times not to stop talking to stop talking trash. Solike for example, he played against Larry Allen and so he knew go againstLarry Allen trash talking is probably not gonna be the best idea, best move.You know, it's one. So, and, but there's other players, he knew that hewould like their skin. He could really work the angles and because of that hesaid, yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and talk trash. And so, and to me man, he sayseverybody's got that ability to do it. But john Brown in my opinion for whatI've heard from people that played against him was one of the best trashtalks that were doing the NFL, Oh yeah, he definitely was, I agree with you andhe's one of the greatest guys ever. Now, you know what I mean? When I see mygolf tournaments are different functions, uh, he's just just one ofthe happiest guys and that, that you're ever gonna see and he's always wearinghis purple, so it's always wearing his purple, you know, so now you made allthese transitions, I know you even play for, was it um, some other teams likedifferent organizations and then you came back to the NFL, what was thatlike for you? It was great man. I mean for me, I just wanted to really bearound, you know, different perspectives and you know, it was goodfor me to see different organizations, how things ran other leagues outsidethe NFL that came back to the NFL...

...finish up at my career Tennessee. Andyou know, for me it was playing against the best of the best. And I seeFrancisco, this question about defined best to me, Francisca best means thatyou can do your job at a high level all the time as a high performer and thateverybody in your way or anybody you play against, you compete against willsay the same exact thing. Right? Nobody's ever gonna question thatJonathan was one of the best of the best Not gonna question, Anthony wasone of the best of the best you're not gonna question was Larry allen, you'renot gonna question was tree ate me. You're not gonna question, you know,any of these guys that are considered the best of the best Junior say out,you know, you're not gonna do that. And so what the best, the best to meFrancis, this means that other people that you play against are going to saythat you are the best of the best. Again, two of the best of the bestJonathan ogden Jr sale, Nobody will ever say those two aren't the best ofthe best. Well yeah, you know, and you're right, that that's how it alwaysgoes. These, these guys that get into the Hall of Fame that you see that arejust incredible people. Uh my son Gabe got to work at the Hall of Fame and seeall these guys and hear their stories and what do you think makes them the best of the best. It'sthe mindset. Like the mindset, you have to persevere, adapt, pivot throughanything because just like in life in the NFL you're gonna win some battles,you're gonna lose some battles, you're gonna, you're gonna win games, you'regonna lose games, you're gonna kick that guy's ass in front of you and giveup no sacks one day, you might give up two sacks the next week. Like, you knowwhen Taylor Loon got deeper, five sacks. Well I think I think she would have got556 forward on taylor loon. I think that made him realize that man, look, Igot to do better. You know, I gotta have the right mindset, I've gotta comeback, I've got to fix this. And what I feel makes money the best of the bestfor what I call the elite is the mindset to get out of a negativesituation, a negative thought process quickly and rebound and go into thenext phase from there. Yeah, I mean that's important, right? Because thatworks the same in business and you went through a program after you retired buta little later because when you first retired from the NFL, uh I think youstarted another company and you had some ups and downs with that company.So tell us a little bit about that and how you really learned from thatexperience. But how the NFL got you through, you know, in all the years offootball and competing got you through that hard Time. So when I retired fromthe game and the 0708 season I ended up getting addicted to alcohol narcoticpainkillers. You know, nightlife gambling for about six months because Ihad no plan, I had no strategy and where I was going with myself in mylife and I'll never forget that when I finally put the bottle down and thepainkillers down. I started this construction company, k premiereenterprises and by the third year we became the largest african americanowned subcontracting company in the city of Baltimore in the state ofMaryland for two years. Unfortunately as the company grew so that my ego, mybravado, I thought I knew it all. I thought I could do everything. As aresult of that, I end up putting myself in a really bad position where I becamean ego meaning at boss, not a good sound leader. And when I ended uphaving my best people start to leave the organization because I was notallowing inclusion, I was now allowing people to share their thoughts withoutfear of being judged. People left and that in conjunction with a job where Ispent about close to $3 million in 90 days for a developer in a generalcontractor. And when that change order got denied us Filing a Chapter sevenComplete bankruptcy. In 2013 I lost my home, lost both my cars 800 creditscore down to zero. I was a multi millionaire in April 2012 I had $400 tomy name in April 2013 and I ended up working for Merrill lynch for a shorttime. I got fired from that job after two months went to a constructioncompany the next day was fired from that job five days later and the onlytime I could get Gus was a custodian, making $8.25 an hour on the graveyardshift, I never forget this Gus, I end up having my rock bottom moment ofclarity where somebody's trash and rotten meat and nasty banana peel andhorrible patreon garbage covered my...

...body, my skin and my clothes. And thatwas my wake up call Gus to say if I don't get out of this in my mind set ifI don't make a change in how I think and stop playing victim oh and stopplaying poor Marcus pour me. Got an idea if I don't get out of this mindsettoday, I'll be here for the rest of my life and living what I call Gus at thetime, Al Bundy syndrome. How great was back in the day playing football, scorefour touchdowns in one game in high school, nobody cares, no one cares. SoI really focus my energy on getting things done in that regard. So onceit's over it's over, it's done. Yeah. Unless you, unless you are one of thoseguys that go into the Hall of Fame when it's over, it's over. And so when youtell me about like you have this ego as a boss, you know that is to me is like,OK, what does that mean? Like were you just not listening to people? Uhyelling to people? I have an acronym for ego, gus exaggerated glorifiedopinions. So I always exaggerate how good I was as a construction companyowner because in reality like no, my job glorified, I always chased glory,fame, notoriety, money, what I call external motivating factors that meanabsolutely nothing and then always have to have the last word, so that's theopinion. So, but then after I lost everything Gus and I was that custodian,I woke up and I had that moment I came home, I wrote down my three biggeststrength and I said I'm a good storyteller, good communicator. I wantto help people. That's when I said I would become a keynote speaker, took me2.5 years, got to get my first paid speaking job. The NFL taught me aboutfortitude, mental conditioning mindset approach where I didn't give up, a lotof people would have given up first paid job in april 2016 for miller, mycollege in Wilmington north Carolina, small college off the Washington coastand I got that job and then I started to learn the business. Got coach, gotbrought up in Today Gus, I've worked for 27 fortune to come into the speaker.I've done, I've written two bestselling books. I have, I'm a consultant, I'm acoach, I have my own podcast. Uh I'm just always the person that's trying tohelp others with their life. And because of that mindset of the NFLtaught me and now I have no ego ego is the biggest killer. Silent killer thatis. Yeah, brand because once your ego gets in the way, if you can't remove it,it will eventually remove you. Yeah. And everybody uh for right now you cansee you can go to uh gonna put up Marcus website, you can go to hiswebsite, check out everything that he does and uh you know, I mean I've beenon it, it's so much information because you are doing so much is incredible.But one of the things I wanted to ask you, so you're going through this timewhere you talk about your ego and your losing a business and you have abrother who has been successful. What was that relationship like for you? Didyou lean on him at all or did he did you know that you couldn't and you hadto do those things yourself because you know that's what he was gonna tell youanyway. Well it wasn't job this problem, he's going to do with it. So if I go toJonathan to borrow money to get bailed out situation, gus what do I learn?Right, okay. zero. So I literally had to start from the bottom of the bottom2013 september I'm work as a custodian. We've got a little bit of money becausewe got approved by the gene upshaw trust fund through the Player CareFoundation paid a few months of our bills to help us get some things going,but they never put any money in my pocket. They didn't see him under his10 grand, here's why now they just paid the bills. So I have had to work us asagain, Merrill lynch two months fired construction company the next day firefive days later coaching kids football to keep money coming in. Great seasonstarts. I start getting less and less clients. Okay, go get a job as acustodian. 8 25 an hour, 10 p.m. To five a.m. Developing money and workingthere. And then I had that moment of clarity that rock bottom spoiled milkmoment and I still after that was working as a custodian for another sixmonths, didn't quit that job until March 2014 when I started doingfootball training and start running camps. I was a birthday clown atbirthday parties. I did it all. Oh man,...

...you've done it all and great. There's agreat link to a video that you sent me today that shows you talking to kidsabout you know, life and how to be better and all that. So gunner, can youput that up as well? That link, it's a great video on Youtube and I love it.But you know, Marcus people think of NFL players as once you're in the NFL,they think you're just everybody's a multimillionaire and everybody has gotit made and you know, we're not like that, we're just normal people. Yeah,we've been lucky. But when you're our age at a young age and you get somemoney, you're still, you're not mature, Right? Like my wife and I, we've beentogether for a long time, but we got money when we were 24, 25, 26 and wehad no idea what to do with it. Now. Our kids probably would have liked usto be a little smarter about it so they could have a little more. But um, youknow, that's just how it goes and, and uh, I think that what you've done andwhat you're telling people is no matter what you've been through, you can makeit on the other end, Man, Gus, and I love gunners comment through that.That's awesome. Old uh, you know, on the real side, man life is a journeyAnd you know, it's kind of like I read this book by a friend of mine calledAlways Four by a guy named uh is Bill Would Itch. And he talks about how when,when back in the days when the Greeks would go attack different provinces,they would take their boats, go and drive to the other enemies. You know,provinces, their boats, their, you know, their shorelines, get out of theirboats and they would burn their boats, they burn the boats because by burningthe boats, you can't retreat, go back to your area, you're either going towin or you're gonna, you're gonna die battle trying. That was back then andthat was the way the times were. But there's a lesson in that, in that theywere programmed not to give up. Yeah, A lot of times back in the back in theday, people were programmed not to give up. Now. They may not be as smart as weare today or definitely sophisticated, but there's a lot to be said and nevergiving up again. I saw a great quote thing on social media by one of myfriends by babe Ruth. It's hard to be a person never gives up. So for me guys,yeah, I had some Sleepless Nights. That's my first book is calledSleepless Nights. I've had the ups and downs. I've had the, how am I going topay my bills? I've had the uh, the repo man could be coming for this car thatwe had, that's a piece of crap that we bought, you know, for eight grand andpay like 40% interest because our credit was shot. But I never gave upand you know, in our podcast that we have things that we do. I'm all about.Just never giving up. Because if you have the mindset where you're not goingto give up or get beaten by somebody, then that's what I call the winner'smentality the winning mindset. So who is your partner in the podcast? Hisname is Leverett Ball. And we met because I was doing, I was on hispodcast and I lost the podcast just in 2017 which failed miserably after a fewweeks I said, this is not gonna work. I'm done through the talent. So I wason his show, did his show and it was good, it was fun. And so he hit me uplike two weeks later, Hey man, we should do a show today. I'm like, no,I'm good. Let's do a show together. No, I'm good. Let's do a show together. No,I'm good. Let's do a show together. What do you want to talk about? Whatkind of content? What are you thinking about? So we came up with a plan and wesaid, and then we'll try for a month. We'll shoot for a month. Put out fiveepisodes, people think put out five episodes of people were listening to it.They were loving it. They're like, this is awesome because then we startedgoing forward and some more. So now four months after being on all podcastplatforms, we're in the top 2% globally. Most down. Listen to podcasts. We'vehad a phenomenal guests on from dr jen Welter to tom Ryan, who's the headwrestling coach at the Ohio State. We're gonna be interviewing TysonBeckford, the supermodel here a couple of weeks. And my point is is that thepodcast is another example, Gus when I threw the towel and because I justdidn't, I didn't have the resources, I didn't, it came back around, but thistime I started to help people when I started the first time because I'm oddsperson. I was trying to promote our brand and make money Added zero for 0on both. Second time around. I did the right way with the right intentions,the non external motivating factors. That's when life got better. That'swhen things start to work out and here we are today. Well and also to when youstart a podcast, like when I start a podcast, you don't have any clue what'sgoing on. You think that it's going to be easy. There's so many things that gointo it. Like even for your instance,...

...your website, your website is great. Ireally like how it is, but it's like okay if I'm gonna do this all myself,it's gonna take me a lot of time and I am old and I don't know how to do allthis technology stuff. I literally almost erased my whole website one timebecause I hit the wrong button, right? But I think what you're doing iswonderful. Your story is incredible And the people that you're helping by beingan executive coach, a keynote speaker, I've watched so many of your key noteson your website. I love how you put them up there so we can all check themout. But one thing I want to say is when you see this, what's it make youthink of? It makes me think of a time in my life where I beat the odds, youknow, being drafted to the National Football League, you have a betterchance of being struck by lightning right then to make it, you had a 15year career. I have almost a six year career to have a career long, like 1.21point three years in the NFL is also beating the odds. So to see that jersey,which is actually right beside me in my office, we just close to our new homeon monday and it reminds me of in my life, I've always been the person tobeat the odds. You know, Marcus, you know, you're never gonna be the NFLathlete. Just going, cows have fun, Okay, it sounds great. I'm drafted tothe national football and I'm the only office of Lyman Gus to this day that'sbeen drafted from Howard University, the National Football League, the onlyone. That's it. And I've lost my construction company after that, nevergonna work, build a massive $50 million dollar business, lost it all on my ownnutrition and my own stupidity speaking, I was coaching football to the youthprivate sessions, I was coaching at Campbell University under mike mentoras we get close to wrapping this up. I want to say this to people man when Iwas working at Campbell as an office of his analysts, they offered me a job thenext year. I did that first one for free For $40,000 to work for them bethe 11 months out of the year. But I knew if I took that Gus I wasn't goingto pursue my speaking. So I made a hard decision. I told my wife I don't wantto do this, I'm gonna just continue to do what I'm doing, training pins andfootball, making less money trying to work towards a better tomorrow. And Iended up, you know, eventually getting high for my first page speaking jobabout a year later I ended up being Ramat today. But if I took thatCampbell job for $40,000 a year working in there and again love Campbell, lovecoach, mentor, great people, great organization, great area, great, greattown wasn't for me and I tell everybody in life you have to make toughdecisions turning down a $40,000 job at the time to a man that had Maybe $3,000in the bank. If I was lucky I had no, I had were paying out of pocket forinsurance, I had no health insurance, I had no dense, so I had nothing but Isaw a better picture for myself through going down this path of trying to worktowards, you know, doing, you know, I had my main jobs but my side hustlejobs to become a speaker and because of that never give up on my side hustlegusts, that's where I'm at today. Well there's two things in there that Ithink about when you tell that story is first you talk about your wife andthere's a lot of things that we can't do in life without the support ofothers, right? And so when you have those support and you have a dream andthey support you, um that helps us along with that road, you know, youknew that she said, I'm sure, Yes, I trust you, right? And that's why youprobably got married and been married the whole time. The second part is youtalked about hustle, right? There's nothing that we can do without a littlehustle. Like I I look back at me and I say, yeah, I probably need to do alittle bit more hustle. And there's things that get you motivated. I watch,you made a speech about, you know, if you want to lift, if you want to dothings right, don't wait for external motivators, go do them for yourself.And I love that. And that's just that's just an internal hustle. And it seemslike you have a tremendous amount of that got to because in this like us,nobody's gonna hand you anything if you hand me something my experience tellsme, I don't want to anyway, I keep on moving, right? So if you're gonna sitdown with one of our audience members and you're gonna tell them one thing,what would that one thing be? I would tell them all right, uh huh in order tobeat out your competition, you have to do these three things. It's kind oflike my one pillar because three aspects of our case outsmart.Outperform the competition. Outpaced them by showing up, outsmart them bycreating a better strategy. Outperform them when the lights turn on and it'stime to shine. You shine brighter than...

...anybody else in your way. If you wantto be the best of the best and watch this episode, Outpace out. Smart.Outperform your competition, doing that will put you in and put you in the bestposition to succeed. Yeah, that is awesome. That is awesome. So, to wrapit up a little bit, so tell all of our fans and everybody when this podcastgoes out and what we're doing live here today, how they can find Marcus ogdenand exactly what your website is all about because it's phenomenal. So youcan go to our website www dot Marcus M A R Q U e s ogden O G D N dot com Andcheck us out. We do we have a lot of speaking things on there. When we talkabout from a keynote perspective, one on one coaching consulting. We havesome online programs, different books, different things like that. And again,it's all about your ability to know what you want in life and figure outwhat you're good at. We need to improve upon and then bring somebody in to helpyou get from start to finish and beyond when you do that. Gus, everything elsetakes care of itself. Yeah. You know what, you just have an amazing storyand people would think like, oh, his brother, you know this, and then heplayed in the NFL and I'll tell you what, it's not that easy for all of usand you have proven that if you have a little hustle, a little hard work and amindset, obviously we all have down parts in our life, We've all beenthrough ups and downs and you're no different than anybody else, and I'msure if we talked to Hall of Famers, they've all been through them to, youknow, and you just keep a perspective of, of moving forward, putting one ftin front of the other. It may be I gotta go take a janitorial job, but Iknow that's gonna be the next step to something else in my life. So, you know,I appreciate you joining us and telling us your story today. It's an amazingstory. And one thing I left that I have to ask if you and your brother wentgolf and who would win? Oh, him, yeah, he's awake and he's a way better. Youwere telling me before that he doesn't leave the golf course? No, he has his75 purple golf courses have for like for ages, he is a member of anthem, andhe's always on that damn golf course so far. He's a much better golfer. Wellwe're gonna get brother episode all one time, let you guys pick on each otherfor a while. That would be great unfortunate. Hey I appreciate youtaking time interacting with our guests and join us on this new platform, we'rejust gonna grow this and it's gonna get better and better, especially if youand I can work together and uh you will push me a little bit because you know Ialways need a lot of coaching. We'll talk on saturday man, I know it's gonnabe awesome. Zakia thank you so much Francisca gave gave done a great jobkeeping your old man in line there, I know it's hard work for you guys sidebut keep it going and doing a great job, we'll give this one a little lessHoward, you know it's you you know there you go. There you go. Alrightwell hopefully we answered some questions, hopefully everyone got someinsight from Marcus today and man do I appreciate you joining me uh as gunnersays go bison's Gunner went to William and mary uh you know down there in thatarea but you know being in D. C. Growing up they're going to Howard yourbrother's there, I think it's awesome man. What a great story and Iappreciate you joining me Marcus and everyone check us out on huddle up withgusts if you go to my website huddle up with gusts dot com, you can go there,find all of our episodes, we'll see you next week at the same time on thursdayat five. I appreciate super the NFL alumni for helping us out with all ofthis. And also you can check me out on Sounder F. M. So take care. Uh Marcus,I appreciate you. Thank you for joining us and everyone, we will see you nexttime here on Super. And huddle up with gusts have a great weekend. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Mhm. Ah. Mhm. Mhm. There's yeah. Mhm. Uh huh. Yeah. Yeah. Mm. Yeah. Mhm. Mhm.

And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanksfor joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another actually,huddle up with Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parent huddle upwith Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on applemusic.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (139)