Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Marnie Schneider

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Granddaughter of former Philadelphia Eagles owner Leonard Tose, Marnie Schneider joins the huddle this week with Gus and Dave. Schneider is known a lot more than just her Philadelphian roots, listen as she breaks down her family life, book career, and the importance of giving back to the community. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with Gus, where we talked to our guests about how sports shape their life. I'm your host, Gust Farat, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top with the sports circus and ring master sow. Look for us on amp TV, a a MP tvcom. Hello everyone, welcome to another episode of puddle off with Gus. I'm your host, Gusts Frat, fifteen year NFL veteran quarterback and father, whatever you want to call me, but I'm usually joined by my friend and long and Co host Dave Hagar, but Dave is not here today, so I'll be doing this interview Solo. You can catch our podcast on RADIOCOM or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast, and also look for us on amp TV, a MP TV. So today's guest, I've known Marnie for a long time through mutual friends of ours that we met her and her mother, Susan, through Dr Mayre and his wife Marine, and so Marnie has been doing some amazing things. She comes from an amazing family background. She's written some great books. That really shows her love for sports, football, Freddy and the fumble, a fumbledog. Is that right? Yes, I'm going to show them. I'll pull I will pull them up, but you've written a lot. You're going through every city. Today our guest is Marnie Schneider. Marnie, how are you doing? How's everybody been through this time with covid well, thank you, guys, thanks for having me. Thankfully, everybody is doing really well. I'm really fortunate and my mom, as you were just saying, you know, we're a really close family. My mom is now living with us and so that's been a really great thing because I get to kind of oversee some of the daytoday activities that that she's doing. But my kids are doing great. They're, you know, all teenagers and somehow they're managing to, you know, be able to follow the roles and listen to me and still keep smiling. So that is a good thing. I'm very grateful for that. Yeah, no, it is hard and it's time to have everyone home. We've had a kind of rejust go back to our high school days when the kids were home every day and you know, my wife and I re empty nesters for a little bit now everyone's back home, but we really enjoy spending time and getting a laugh with them every day and finding out a little bit about, you know, the adults they're becoming. So, going back before we were adults, when you were kid growing up in Philadelphia, what is that first memory that you had of falling in love with sports? So, you know, I had this very unique opportunity to get to go to a professional football game as a young girl because as my grandfather, Leonard Toes, own the Philadelphia Eagles. So I remember that whole walking into a stadium and seeing thousands of people cheering for the team and being like well, what is this, and then learning the game and I think once I learned a little bit about football and that you get, you know, for chances to get another four chances and just some of the nuances that happen with it and the cheering and just the whole camaraderie of it, I fell in love with football and I'm so grateful for all the experiences that I've been able to have just based on knowing the game of football just a tiny bit, not as much as you gust but certainly knowing it a little bit and and pressing from people at times. Now I'm sure you know a lot of it and probably just as much as me. But so if you think about going back when you were kid and you were walking to those stadiums and thinking about your grandfather, was he like was see an owner, because that's something he saw as as economical and it's a franchise that I can build and I can generate well from it, or was he a fan? I know he...

...was definitely a fan, but I think that for my grandfather, what he saw football as was a way to give back to the community. My grandfather was an incredibly generous man and, you know, he wanted to be able to do big things and, like coach for Mual would say, to do big things you got to do big things. So I think that for my grandfather, owning the Philadelphi Eagles, he bought them in the late s, he realized that when you own something like that, it's not just for your self, like the greedy, grabby kid. It's like, let's open this up to the entire community and invite people to be part of our team, versus, you know, just making it kind of an exclusionary thing. So I would say that my grandfather, probably as an owner, did not use owning the team to be a revenue maker for him. He definitely gave away a lot of things and use it as a tool to give back to the community and get back to others, which is really what he loved to do, and so I guess they say love your job, he really loved his job. Right now, as as the granddaughter of the owner, when you started going to these games, you would see the game day stuff, right you go there and all the fans and all the everything that's going on. But every other day, you know there's six other days in the week. Did you get to go meet the players when you were a kid? Did you get to go hang out at the stadium or their practice facility? I did, you know? I'm in the daughter my mother was a teacher and today's teacher appreciation day, so I love teachers. My mother started out as a teacher and then my mom ended up going to lock becoming a businessperson, going to law school and then ended up taking over the position of first the first female general manager, Legal Council and Vice President of a professional football team. So there I am. My mother is a single mom at the time with a young daughter. So you bring your kids to family business, you bring your kid to work. So I spend a lot of time kind of watching what was going on at the stadium. Obvious slee I had. I could have been a leper from Calcutta. Gus and my friends were, you know, my High School Guy Friends were always invited to the Games and got to go into the locker room. But I did learn that it is a business. My Mom was trying to run it as a business. My grandfather was really trying to do some big things to give back to the community. So they were a good a good blend. But I definitely had an opportunity to watch what was going on, meet the coaches, meet the players, learn the language, see the dedication, see the discipline, you know, study a little bit from coach for me, Oh, and some of the great and they definitely help shape where I am today and learn the stories and just hear all those great stories. So I'm so grateful to have had those opportunities. So yeah, my daughter was always that way. She was always upset that she never liked after the game I would take my son's into the locker room. They always got to go with me and you know, because I couldn't bring my daughter in there. So I think she's still always a little upset with me that she never got to do that. I said, honey, didn't want to go in those locker rooms after the games, believe me. So I know my still talk about it. I mean I did travel on the team plane but you know, at that point I was kind of sent to the I got on the plane, I had my bag with my walkman of my cassette and my batteries and was sent to the last row of the plane because, you know, they were trying to do business and it wasn't a place for a young girl to necessarily be kind of, you know, reading team beat or whatever. Right. So you grew up in Philadelphia. Did you play sports as a okay and Philly. I don't know what area of Philly you guys lived in, in the suburbs, you know. I was a horseback rider, I definitely did that and I played field hockey. Kind of all the General Sports Field Hockey, and then I managed the baseball team. I Love Baseball. I had a really unique opportunity because my mom was a working mom and at the time the Eagles shared the stadium with the Philadelphia Phillies. So during the dog days of summer when I was hungrity and there was no activity on the football side, I could open up a door and wander around to the Philly side and they would take me in and give me a hot dog and a seat to a baseball game. So I got to learn a lot about baseball just from those. Were the you...

...know, Mike Schmidt era, so that was a great thing. So during high school I managed, I got a varsity letter for managing the baseball team and I was definitely involved in sports and certainly saw a lot of football games and and and really enjoyed getting the opportunity to watch high school games. I Love High School football and then also see professional football too. Yeah, my daughter, I know field hockey is big and Philadelphia. My daughter played in college. She went to have afford. Yeah, yeah, that's as amazing. Yeah, so she was a goalie at have afford for four years and then now she's at pen in vet school. So I know Philly kind of well, not as well as you, but really enjoy going over there. So what high school did you go to in Philly? Went to Episcopal Academy. Oh, Episcopal okay, yeah, that and then after high school, you you go through high school and you know your grandfather owns the eagles and like. So what were some of the conversations of that you had with your mom and your grandfather about, like hey, you're going to go to college, here's some things that you should probably think about studying or doing. Did you have some of those kind of conversations with them? Well, you know, my grandfather was in the trucking business. Probably, you know, in addition to owning the Philadelphi Eagles, he did want you to be a trucker, though. Well, drive a lot now. I think I feel like a professional truck driver. I want so thank you to them right now. Boy, they're really helping us out. I think that my grandfather had said something about in some ways, I mean they were always reluctant and I guess it's kind of like having parents who were actors, like, you know, don't do anything in football, don't do anything of professional sports. But that was not really, you know, I think parents say that kind of as their their default mechanism. And when I deaited, so I always loved professional sports and I always loved, you know, writing and reading and things like that. So I went to Penn State and after I graduated, although I graduated in four years, and now what I'm realizing is like this. Smart people stay four five and happy valley like the dumb bells to get out in four years, like you know, it's such a good place. Why are you getting out in four years? Nobody wants to leave. Oh, I know, I got out for years. That was I probably, you know, I probably could have dragged it out a little bit, but I when I graduated from college and I had a great time at Penn State and coach Paterno was there and he and my grandfather were very close and it was just so fun going to football games up there. And then when I graduated, I work for the NFL films. I went directly to work for Steve Sable and again, you know, I wanted that position, but I mean I think a truthfully, Steve had to hire me. There wasn't going to be he really he had no choice. I mean I called his dad, Uncle Ed. So I have a feeling, you know, it was Steve was really convinced that, you know, I was going to, you know, not take the position, but of course I did, and so that was what happened and it was a great it was a great learning time for me to work for NFL films. I learned so much from Steve and his dad too, because there's such pioneers and what they were doing. What were you doing it in NFL films? Were you were you like editing? Were you just kind of figuring out what we're going to film? Were you just what was your job? And NFL films. So I started up I really knew nothing other than I knew about football. So when I first got there, I really I worked for Steve and I helped Steve. You know, Steve has such a great system of how he did his interviews. Everything was very consistent. I mean you kind of look like you could be doing a Steve Sable interview right now. Black T shirt, you know, never a white teacher was black or navy t shirt and everything. And so I would work with Steve and let the teams know what kind of some of the questions were going to be happening, what he wanted everyone to look like, how we really wanted to conduct his interviews and then also, in addition to that, I would cut negative, so the film would come in and I would get there because I had to learn everything, and that was what Steve Really suggested. So I said okay. So you go into the negative room, you take this precious, precious footage, you were gloves, and then you take...

...a list that the editors had then, you know, created what they the shots they wanted, and you would go into a room bundled up in a downcoat. It was very cold in those rooms, so that the film didn't get damaged, and you would splice negative and cut negative together and then help them create their highlight reels or the highlight film for that week. He said a think about how far we came. We went from this film that was, you know, on this big real and you had to go in and look at the negatives, you had to cut it, tap it back together. Yet it skip ten minutes or whatever it was, whatever people wanted, and then put it all back together for for a five minute highlight reel or whatever. Now it's all digital. You get on your phone, it's it's so fast that it's just incredible how we've come as a society for that, oh unbelievable. And the storage, I mean just this security to get this the where the film, because it's as precious footage and there were so many different shows that they were doing. They used to do the obviously the football follies, and they would do the this is the NFL show. So so many different things. And then part of I knew a lot of the inside stuff just because my grandfather on the team that you know whether the footage is allowed to be sold, whether it's not allowed to be sold. You get four or five days to air it for free in the local markets and then after that then they pay for it, and so it was so interesting to not just view it as okay, here's some great footage of some great plays that were made. That will be history from the, you know, professional football hall of fame eventually, but it was. It's really amazing. And then the where they store all the film is really why they needed so much space and they they kept building and building and building to keep all the footage safe so that we can continue to look at it and have it. Yeah, do you think that, Dave? I mean they've had to take a lot of that and made it digital and just kept all those negative back in a big vault, like you're saying, and so that we can have them forever and preserve the history of the NFL. I mean what Steve Sable did and his his thought process in his long game to this was really made, I would say, companies like ESPN, like, if it wasn't for Steve Sable, ESPN and I don't think would be around, right. I mean, and the whole history of how nfl films got started was because his dad Ed was, you know, filming his high school. He went to Haverford school, right not so uncle Ed was filming Steve's High School Football Games. And you know, Steve was an amazing marketer. So when you work for Steve, I mean Steve was really such a great filmmaker and a great storyteller and an amazing marketer himself. Of like what really how to prevent, you know, the collapse of the NFL. You know, he really provided us with this opportunity to learn about the inside nuances of you, for example, on his questions were always so good and his interviews were always so rate that everybody wanted to be part of NFL films. And today, I mean it really is the kind of the leader. I think it's falling off a little bit because now digital and everything else, but back then. I mean just the Super Bowl preparation. I work for Sive during the Super Bowl in one thousand nine hundred and ninety one, and that was the Whitney Houston singing the national anthem here and there was, you know, forty two cameras and where everybody was going to be. It just the logistics of it before the game started was really unbelievable. And now it's, you know, definitely a different a different scenario, but getting real footage of that was something so amazing to be part of. Thanks for listening to US on RADIOCOM. This is Gust Rott with Hullo up with gusts and you can find us on amp TV, a MP DOT TV. So, Marnie, I think back to that and talking about NFL films and the the what it has done for our game, and I mean it's really taken the NFL to the next level. Really has, because if you think about all the history and everything you did with NFL films, it put the NFL on the map really because as TV and as everything else started getting better and better, we needed that footage. So after...

NFL films, you spent your time there. You did a lot of great work and learned a lot about marketing and everything else. What was your next step in life? Then? I, against everyone's better wishes, including Steve, you've I moved to Hollywood. I was like, you know what, I'm going to go check out Hollywood, and everybody, and Steve in particular, he said, Oh, they don't like they don't, they don't. Sports is a very different and this was back in the S. and he said to me, Marnie, you know what, I don't think that's a good idea because people don't understand sports in Hollywood. They're very different. Now, obviously sports is the biggest game in town, but back in the S it really wasn't so. But, you know, against Steve and my family's wishes, I packed up my suitcase and I said I'm going to go to Hollywood and I'm going to I'm glad, certainly glad, that I did. It was a great experience. I was there for quite a while and to ended up acting in a couple movies and learning a lot about them, making in the writing process and the entertainment business, which is, you know, certainly has changed now, dramatically too, but you know, it was far from the East Coast and so a couple of years we moved back back east, but I love being in Los Angeles. When I was there, definitely the business was changing and I learned a lot as well, and that's kind of always been my my my motto of life is just to go and learn and listen and pay attention and then hopefully you can translate that into something relatable going forward. So you know, you hear all these stories about like when you go to Hollywood, it's very tough to break into and you have to have all these side jobs right to keep keep your living and make some money. Did you have to do any that where your waitress or anything like that to have your side job where you were trying to be Gett into the movie business? Yes, my side job was I worked in the mail room at the William Morris Agency. So and and so I was in the mail room and it legitimately was a mail room. It was a room filled with mail slots and you would put the mail or you would have a little pulley cart that you would distribute the mail to the different agents. And then the when you've got promoted, when you were able to really do the mail slot very well, then you got promoted to be driving around delivering packages, and I will say this because it's funny. And so there were a few different routes that you would take. There was, you know, Hollywood route, there was the studio route, then there was the west side route and sometimes, because I, you know, was not from Los Angeles and not from that area, they would say that I was Mr which meant missing on Rodeo hey a lot longer. I couldn't read a map. I was like wait, what is this Thomas Guide book with this thing this thick, and you had to, you know, map out where you were going and really was all on the Oh, the go over the Canyon and the this, forget it, but yeah, so then I would drive around and deliver packages and then they kind of figured out, wait a minute, that might not be the best idea for a bunch of young, relatively attractive women to be knocking on the right people's homes and delivering packages. So they said, oh no, I think everybody's going to come back in the office and they started hiring out, you know, mail services to deliver the mail and the packages. And then I ended up getting promoted and work for an agent and learn the business and at the same time was pursuing a little bit of an acting in a writing career. So I got to kind of learn it from the backside of what was the agent job. In addition to then having some inside activity to go do some auditions. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets and enjoy breakfast for two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for to on US each day you stay for reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for b appears in the Promo Code box when making your online reservation at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW...

...or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and ask for a promotional code S Four B. So what were the two movies set you got to act in? So I well, I think the biggest one that people still can quote, and I get my really nice residual checks, and when I say Nice I mean they're not. I mean it's always nice to get a residual check. That I'm not they're not huge checks, but the wedding singer. So yeah, Joyce, the flight attendant in the wedding singer, and that was lots of fun and Adam Sandler is very funny and very nice and a great person to work with, and so that was a great thing. And then there was a Renaei lwegger Chris O'Donnell movie called the back Cheler that I was in and and for Continuity Sake, not performance sake, my part was kind of edited out a little bit, but I still get some some residual checks on that. But so that was fun and then I realized I was like, you know, I think I'd rather go do some writing and kind of go back to my roots, which was sports and football versus that, you know, Hollywood movie star thing. I was kind of over it and said I think I like sports. I think Steve Sabel was right. Should have listened to all right, right, fall and sports or my thing. But when you're young you got to try everything right and that's what I tell my kids. You know, if you have a passion, you want to go try something, go do it. You only live once and you're only young once and and that's the time to do it. When you when you have those kind of urges. You got to go fall through with all of that, and I think that's great that you did that, because you probably learned so much. And and the worst part is if you would have never done it and always say what if, what if I would have been out there right, I think that's that's definitely true, and that's the thing. I think that, like I was Sol I was so fortunate that I had really supportive family members to understand that to say, okay, well, we don't really believe in it and we don't really necessarily think it's the right thing for you, but go do it and we trust you and we know you're going to be safe and we know you're going to be responsible and reliable on all those things. And so I'm glad that I did it. And you know, the fun thing is that, like lately the wedding thing has been on a ton, so all my friends will screenshot my scene and then well like Oh, that thank good, so nice. That's a great way to keep in judge of everybody, because they, you know, they see me handing out hot towels to Adam Sandler on the plane, so that's not too right. Well, you know, I think what's amazing is, if you think about editing like movies, is like the biggest edit of all. I mean how many times you have to actually shoot that scene? A Lot, I mean then you do it from different camera angles, and that's the one thing that I love about sports is that there are no doovers, and I think that that was one of the things, like with entertainment, was that, you know, you get oh, you can redo it if you have a bad day, you don't have to show up. You don't. But with sports, you know, you have a game, you're suiting up, you're playing, you might have family issues, you might not be feeling great, you might have something that's bugging you, something, whatever it is, but no, no, no, you are going to suit up, you're going to bring your best performance and you're going to play. And I love that about sports and that's really how life is. You know, you really get now, obviously during a game you get a certain timeline to, you know, bring your best, but you don't get a chance to kind of uh, I'm not tie, I'm tired today, I'm just going to stay home. So that's what I love about sports and what I love certainly about football is that we get to see people doing things that maybe a we could never really do, but also at that moment we're sitting in our you know, armshare, having some chicken wings and mill watching amazing athletes perform despite the odds. Yeah, you know, and yeah, it is and you do hear, that's such a good point, that you hear about athletes that have gone through so much off the field and then they get on the field, and that's why, as an athlete, you're taught to once your cross those white lines, you just leave everything else go and you focus on the game because there's nothing else that you can do besides play the game. And ask and a lot of coaches when you're young and where you're teaching sports as a young age, that's what they'll tell you all the...

...time. Hey, you know, you might had about your parents dropped you off and they were yelling at you, but forget about it, let's go, go and focus on football. So you learn those things as a young person in sports and basketball and baseball and everything else. Cross those white lines. Now it's this, just this, and then when you get back there you can focus on everything else. So now you're you're flying back from California, you're going back to Philadelphia. What's your next step in life? So you know, philanthropy has been wait, one thing about what you just said about crossing the white lines. There's two things that really strike me about that. Is that a couple years ago I saw this beautiful interview with no Sean Moreno and at the time he was playing with the Denver Broncos, and they said and he and every time they would play the national anthem he would be in tears, and absolute tears and beautiful. It was just so poignant and they said, well, no, Sean, why are you crying? You know what is it? Is it the song? And he said, Oh, it's the song, definitely, and I'm with my teammates, he said, but what it is is the fact that I am appreciating this moment. I might I will never get this moment again. I might get injured. Everybody's here right now. Next week it might be somebody different, something's him. We're not going to be playing at home. Who knows? So I want to embrace it all and soak it up and appreciate it as much as I possibly can, right here and right now. And I just thought that was so beautiful and it's such a great way to live life and he really got it, like he totally understood the importance of appreciating the now and everything else. And so for me I always like, Oh, I love to. I don't know him personally, but I would love to one day have a chance to thank them, even just for that reminder that we are doing this and like just to enjoy the moment, because they are fleeting and we just don't know what is next. And so you know, and I think that and I'm not sure, I think it was Buddy Ryan and before football games he would not only would he do his practice with his teammates, but he would also practice the lineup of the national anthem because he wanted, because what his whole thing was that's the first time that the team that your opponent gets to see you suited up, and he's like, and I want my guys looking tough and I want them looking like they're ready to play. If they are scraggly and if they're not prepared for that national anthem lineup, then the ut we're we lose. We automatically lose. So I just love that mentality that you know, you suit up to play, but you really have to have it to understand a the presentness of being there, but also that when use it up to play, it's for real and it's not a joke, and that's why me, as a fan like I just love the whole sixty minutes of football. So, which segues into the next step for me, was really you know, obviously philanthropy was a huge part of my life. My grandfather is one of the original founders of the Ronald McDonald House, something I'm incredibly proud of. When he owned the Eagles Fred Hill, who played football for him, Fred and his wife frand their daughter was diagnosed with leukemia. That turned into this wonderful charity called eagles fly for Leukemia, and then that turned into the Ronal McDonald House. So what I wanted to do was to figure out a way, and you know, my mom is very philanthropic, loves high school sports, loves getting families out there to support the local high school kids playing sports, doing things like that. So what I wanted to do with my mom and I said let's figure out a way to highlight all these great experiences that I had as a young girl traveling football, all these wonderful things that I got to do that people don't even. They don't even, you know, going to a game as a luxury, letting, letting on, going to a lot of games. So we came up with this idea of writing a children's book series called Football Freddy. Freddy's based loosely on me. Well, not loosely, she's based she is me, but and fumble the dog Game Day, and in all of our books, and so far we have seven of them, they take you on this great tour through the city. So in Philadelphia you get to go to the National Constitution Center, the Liberty Bell, learn about Ben Franklin, learn about Betsy Ross, some of the great things that are part of our country, and then you end up at the stadium to learn a little bit about football,...

...because I think football and sports is the universal language. Yeah, right. So, getting back to your grand follow starting the Ronald Mcdonald House. It started in Philadelphia. Is it headquarters in Minnesota now? No, okay, so the headquarters are in Chicago. CHICAGO, Chicago, which is where the McDonald's corporation is headquartered. But I do out of work in Minnesota and I've become very, very close and I've been very fortunate. I've met some of my most amazing friends that run or work at the Ronald Mcdonald House is all throughout the United States. I'm so fortunate amazing people. So the first house is in Philadelphia and they just celebrated their forty five anniversary. Yeah, yeah, it was. It's amazing. It's really truly remarkable and now they're almost like many hotels what they do over there. It's a big operation. So the first house opened up in Philadelphia in one thousand nine hundred and seventy four and then, you know, the NFL picked up, literally picked up the ball and ran with it. The Second House, you know Mr Hollis, he was a huge supporter of it. The second house open up in Chicago and Mr Croc they were really supportive of the whole charity and what it meant and calling it the Ronal McDonald House. That really started because of raising money through the sale of shamrock shakes. The former president of McDonald's in the mid S, a great man named Ed Renzi, said okay, we'll do this shamrock shake thing and you're just going to name the Ronal McDonald House the Ron McDonald House and my grandfather was like fine, is like the Leonard Toes House. He's like, I can't even get one of my wives to say in my house. But too well, McDonald found a lot better than one ARJOE's house. So that's really how it happened and now there's houses all over the world, there's hospital floors dedicated at helping families and it's really truly a remarkable, remarkable charity. So I get to do a tremendous amount with the Ronald McDonald House and I'm so fortunate. I meet tons of families and I love to hear their stories and share my history with the house, which I think once people here that it really started from a family who had a sick child, it changes everybody's perspective. A lot of people don't even know the history of Urmh and once they do they love the charity even more. And today's giving Tuesday, so I'm definitely making, you know, a big push to give back to the charities that that one likes. Obviously, for me I have a few favorites in Ronal McDonald House is definitely one of them. So tell us a little bit more about the specifics of the Ron McDonald house. Of If I have a fan or somebody listening and they need to use it, what is it for and how can they get in contact with with the Ron McDonald house? Okay, so if they're if the Ronal McDonald house, they are an amazing charity. You can if you have a sick child, and the ages, you know, very I think it's like twenty one and under, but they're always exceptions. If you have a sick child and you need a place to stay, then you can reach out to the local Ronal McDonald House. So a lot of times families travel from all over the world. So, for example in Chicago there's families that are coming from Russia, coming from Africa. They will reach out to the Ronald McDonald House and they will get a place to stay. So the Ron McDonald House has a beautiful you know, you get a room with your own bathroom and you get all these wonderful perks of staying at the Ronal McDonald House, a family type community. There's always food there. They do amazing programs for volunteers. Right now they can't do that because of the covid virus, but you can go in and you can donate your time to make meals for the families. So the families stay there. It's free of charge. I mean maybe sometimes a small little fee. It really does vary, but you get this amazing experience of really knowing that you're taking care of and that you have a place to stay so that if you're if your child is in the hospital or if you're dealing with a sick child, you have a place to stay. And that's something that as a my oldest son, when he was nine months old, he...

...had neuroblastoma. So he did not walk or talk to us. On this five we traveled with time. We were living in California, but we traveled a lot to Philadelphia. We did not stay at the Ronal McDonald House because I had family in Philadelphia. But I mean I know what it's like to have a sick child. I've had a sick child. Thankfully, Jonathan now is my Av guy, in addition to, you know, addition to other things. You know, a great student and a nice man and of love is playing football and so forth, but I having a sick child. When you have a sick child, all you think about is you're a sick child, getting your child well. So the Ronal McDonald House provide you with a place to stay so that you can really focus on your child and if you have family members, then other children can stay there. It really eases the burden of knowing that you're going to be dealing with doctors and hospital appointments and all sorts of things that, as a parent, you never really plan on and now suddenly you have this in your life. So the Ron McDonald House gives you the tools to deal with, you know, managing your child's healthcare and not, you know, having to worry about all the other things that go on when you're a parent. Now, do they also have therapists? And I'm trying to think of other things, you know, because if you come in, yeah, if you're if you come in as a parent and your child was just diagnosed with this debilitating disease or whatever may be, and you have no idea what it is. You know, my luckily, Annie was when her mom had a Glib bus stoma multiformate, she had brain cancer, and he was a nurse, so she knew how to diagnose, she knew how to write about it, she knew how to tell everybody about it. But a lot of people don't have that. So is that something that the Ronald McDonald House also provides the families? They are so, so, so wonderful with that. They offer so many programs, they offer opportunities for families to be together. They really are so sensitive and and and sensitive and also managing to be incredibly and I love this world relatable to everybody's experience because it's different and you might have you might have eating restrictions and they're sensitive to that. You might have certain things that are part of your lifestyle and the Ronal McDonald House is very sensitive and empathetic to all of those needs that you have as a family. And if you're not from our country, if you're from a different city, they certainly open up their arms and their motto is keeping Families Close. So that's really what they do. The old motto used to be the House that love built, and it really is true, because it really is all about love and about giving back to the community. And that really goes back to what my grandfather and certainly what he wanted to do when he own the Phildelph Eagles, was fine ways to give back to the community. I know that when the eagles made her to the Super Bowl in one thousand nine hundred and eighty one. He took everybody. He was really the first owner who said, every the janitors are conning, let's go. You know, he had eight hundred people that he paid to bring to New Orleans, because his whole thing was at the team effort. Yes, we've got amazing a athletes on the field and great coaches and great minds and great scouts and great everybody in there, you know, rolling up their sleeves to make it on the field. Operations happen, but it doesn't happen without the janitors, without the ticket takers. Certainly that the cheerleaders everything. So I think that that's really also one of the things that the Ronal McDonald house does too, is it really lends itself to opening up an opportunity to a family that they might be able to go to a game, they might meet new friends in that community. They'll certainly get an opportunity to work with the social work or learn new things. I've done a bunch of you know, I've gone to a bunch of Ron McDonald houses and had the amazing privilege to do book readings and share my books with families and get to hear their stories and they always bring in great guests and at the Super Bowl a couple of years ago, this is something I'm really kind of proud of. I say it jokingly. Some of the MOMS were actually more interested in hearing for me do a book reading than when Brett Farve walked in, and I was like no, no, let me educate you everything and go to Brett far please.

Just he's old. Go Talk to Brett Bar I'm not that goal, he is, you know. So know that that is great. We're joined by MARTIE SCHNEIDER and we're here on RADIOCOM. You listen to gusts fraud and huddle up with guss. So, Martie, if you think about that and and you know you have this incredible book you wrote about you know these experiences you have when you go to sporting events, I think the way you did it was brilliant. Your you and your mom, come up with this idea. Now, does every Ronald McDonald House have your books in them? Well, a lot of them. I'm not every because there's over three hundred, but my books are all okay. When the coronavirus hit, I had called my publisher and said what can we do? My books are all available on Amazon and Barnes and noble through the publishing company. So what we did over the past couple weeks is now we put the PDF on our website. So if we got to football Freddycom, the books are all available for free on the website. Tons of Rona McDonald houses do have my books and I've donated a lot of books and a lot of certainly a lot of materials to those houses, but not every house has it. That's one of our goals is to give, you know, books to every house. Certainly Philadelphia, Long Beach on, Minneapolis, Miami, a lot of places, Pittsburgh, a lot of places do. CHICAGO. I've done a ton of work there too, but our goal going forward is to make sure that it's to you know, potentially put together a little library and all these houses, because I think reading is a great coping skill for families and obviously I want to share my love for travel, my love for tourism, my love for history, my love for football through my books. Yeah, no, Great. So I think what's great about your books too is that you give this whole description of the cities. So like I can imagine when you come to Pittsburgh, you may visit, you know, the Hind's history center, you may, you may go see, you know, the stadium, the pirates stadium, everything that Pittsburgh is about, the incline, you know. Everybody talks about promnities and it's an old sandwich shop it, you know. But so when you go to a new city, I think you said you've written what seven books? Seven, yeah, seven, so that they're all NFL cities. Yes, so now they're all NFL cities. So the Carolinas was a little bit different because it's to states, one team. So you take a through north and South Carolina. But otherwise, yeah, so it's Philadelphia, it's Pittsburgh, Chicago, Green Bay, Dallas is just you know, Dallas done. It's about to come out. It's available on my website. Atlanta and the Carolinas. So you can get a four of those cities. So do you take your family with you and said, okay, we're going to go write a book about the Miami Dolphins? All right, we're going to go visit Miami, we're going to spend two weeks there and go to some great places. It's going to give us ideas. Is that how you do it? How do you count up with the ideas of what to put in your book? All right, so that is a great question. Thank you. A lot of it is based on some of the things that I really loved when I was a kid. So growing up I had this really unbelievable experience of get it. Okay, now, nobody would do this. When you let we would land in a city and my mother and grandfather would get in a car and they would go work and I'd be put in a car with a strange person around a sin. Could you imagine if somebody did that? Now? You wouldn't do maybe, Uber, maybe, but I mean no, you don't put like a fourteen year old girl in a car with a stranger be like well, see you at dinner. Okay, yea happened to me. So I would be in San Diego and I would go to the zoo, I would get to go to the Gat, you know, all these different places, and so a lot of it was based off some of the things that I like to do when I was younger, but definitely nowadays I do take once we kind of get some of the we highlight the places that we definitely think we want to put in the book and then I will take a tour down there and say, okay, this is great, let's do this, let's do that. Fine ways to make it fun and interesting so that families can either do the Football Freddy and Fumbledog Game Day tour themselves or they can say, Oh, I was there, oh I know that place, or you guess. Like you said, I love him any brothers. That's...

...amazing. I went there when I was younger, just so that everybody kind of has a frame of reference of some of the big things are in Philadelphia. Obviously it's Pat Stakes or Oh yes, I loved going to the stadium and here's what the stadium looks like, just so that everybody can really share their story. And while there are words, and I definitely spend a lot of time writing my books, there's also wonderful pictures, like you said, you know, of hindes field, of the incline, of all these different places, whether it's if you're in Chicago, you know having the opportunity to see soldier field, what that looks like in the history of that. So I just get excited being able to share my experience of those places and what they really meant to me, and then also new places that weren't there. You know, twenty five years ago, when I was traveling around, Valet stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Western Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation or call one two hundred and three, six, two four one thou and ask for Promo Code PSF. Oh yeah, like when you used to go to DCES URFK and now it's I don't even Fedex field, because I guess spaceship landed in the middle of nowhere. You know, I loved RFK for what it was and you know, think about even when I came in the NFL and you were riding around. You know, all these new places. A lot of the stadiums aren't even there anymore, which is not kind of crazy. I know, and that's one of the things. I will say this that you know, I loved having games. Now, I'm not an I did not play there. I actually you know, sometimes football players will come up to me if they know my history, like Willie Mc Ginnis is one of them, and he'll show me like a gigantic broken finger and he's like this happened at the vet. I'm like, I'm sorry, I'm sorry, Willie, don't you know, I'm so sorry. Apologize and like yeah, but you still want a lot of games. It's fine, okay to right. The thing is like, yes, I love the history of the older stadiums and I do think that we kind of have gotten a little bit away from some of that stuff. Like the history of veteran stadium really was about. You know, my grandfather loved hosting games at the vet. He was a veteran. It was really important to him. He loved having the Army Navy game at veteran stadium. He was, you know, he served our country. So I think for him the pride of that is definitely different than going to a game at Lincoln financial. But you know, it's also again it's just about finding new ways to create your own family history together when you cheer on your team, whether you're watching it live or this year I think we're going to be watching it from our arm chairs, and that's why I think my books are so great, certainly right now. Now is that we can't travel to these cities potentially, but you can certainly pick up a copy of Football Freddy and learned about those cities without necessarily being there and getting ready for the day that we can travel there. Yeah, no, I think that's that's wonderful. And so you're doing football Freddy, you're doing the Ronald Mcdonald House and I know you have another charity that is very important to you and your mother. Can you tell us a little bit about that? Yes, so recently, and you know my mom and she's such a champion of so many causes. So yes, certainly for me, Ron McDonald House. There's another great charity that matters to me, which is dog is my co pilot because I have rescued dogs and I love animals and that's really important to me. And Autism. My best friend from college, or son, is autistic. So acing autism, which is a great charity in Pittsburgh. They're really important to me. We've done a lot with them, but also something that's really hit home hard to me is Alzheimer's. My mother, who is my best friend, my biggest cheerleader, my I mean the matriarch of the family and certainly has been such a great advisor to so many, was recently diagnosed with frontal lobe dementia. And, you know, a it's a devastating disease.

All diseases are devastating. What I've learned about Alzheimer's and dementia is that you know the first time you get diagnosed or that a family member gets diagnosed, it literally is like getting punched in the face. And then, unfortunately, this disease there's no hope. You don't have the hopefulness of like well, if we do this, this and this, we maybe no, there's no hope. It is a dead end street. So you kind of keep getting punched again and again and again until the end and then you have to mourn the loss of what just happened. So I've really become very dedicated to working with the Alzheimer's Association helping them with whatever it is that they need to be done. I know that that finding a cure or finding any sort of remedy is definitely not I mean it's definitely not going to help my mother because we're way beyond that. But knowing that there's so many other families out there that are going to be suffering this disease, it would be out of my DNA to not roll on my sleeves and try to find ways to help out so that going forward I'm not a casualty but that I have friends I can say, Oh, you know, here, go do this or this might help, and really feel like I've been evolved and been an active participant, you know, on the on the field of sorts, helping out and trying to make a difference. Yeah, so you're extremely busy. It sounds like that that, you know, your life's work now seems to be giving back, helping others, raising your three kids, taking care of your mom. So you're extremely busy. How do you fit all that in to a day a week? I mean it sounds like you just you need an awful lot of help. Well, you know, I have an amazing bunch of friends, my kids are really great, my animals are certainly very supportive of me and I've been blessed with a lot of enter with a lot of energy. So that's I mean, I know, I mean, that's really is a gift. So I take care of myself because I don't want to squander that. Like I know, that's a gift by feeling good and being energetic, and those are things that I'm blessed with. Not Everybody has that in their in their body. So I try to take good care of myself and I don't drink and I don't smoke and I've never really been that kind of person anyway. And in addition to that, I really try to just kind of follow the basic guidelines of humanity. I wash my hands, I don't touch my face too much. I've tried not to. I try to be a good person and for me, the best way to feel good is to give back. It's the only way that I can really reset myself is by giving back. So I think that that's made a huge difference to me, is knowing that if I'm feeling kind of melancholy from some of the things that are going on, certainly watching my mother, who is such a bright shiny light, definitely kind of get a little bit dimmer the by me giving back. That kind of puts more energy into me, and I know I have. I'm lucky. I have some really nice caregivers that are part of our daytoday life and and I'm so thankful. I've got great friends and I am very fortunate and that is something that I am very appreciative of and I want all my friends and family and loved ones to know how much I appreciate them, because it's really a gift. It is a gift and you're doing an incredible job and we appreciate you for all the work that you do and of helping and giving to others. I mean that's that's a lot of selflessness and I think that that you do a great job with all of that. One last thing we do here on huddle up with guests. We call it the no huddle. No huddle was brought to you by amp TV, so hopefully everybody can go onto amtv and check us out on hotel television. But it's the no huddle where I'm going to ask you some questions. You can make him shorter, long, whatever, but it's our time. We're going to take this time to drive it in and hopefully score the winning touchdown here. All right, so first question Marny is what is your biggest pet peeve? My biggest pet peeve it's probably something that I do, which is it's not me,...

...it's gonna beything that I do which is, let's see, leave dishes in the sink. And it's thing that I do and I'm like God, I can't believe dishes in the sake. So that's right. Yeah, I know Annie, with just four years of a jail, at me to g wash. She hates when dishes are in the sink. I finally, after twenty five years, I think I broker of it, but she still yells at me. All right. Second, what is your favorite sports movie? Oh, Jerry McGuire. Jeremy, very good. I love that choice. I mean I love Cameron Crow. He's my favorite movie director, almost famous all his movies. I love Jerey McGuire. It's great. And then, okay, wait a minute, but that's there's a Coveyat net. Of course. Invincible is my other like I'm tied Jerey McGuire because I know Vince. I love Vince. I know the story. I was there, you know, young girl, but definitely invincible. So you know, Vince's an amazing Vince and Janet are wonderful people and they've supported my mom and heard, you know, charitable endeavor. So between Jerry McGuire and invincible, you can't come. So invincible. I've watched you like six times. I love the movie too. How close is it to the real story? How do you feel when you watch it? Do you feel like it takes you back to when you were living through it? Yeah, Oh, definitely. I mean I was very young, but I mean, okay, so in the in the real world, I think, you know, Vince was, I think vins was a teacher. I'm pretty sure Vince was a teacher and I don't know if they touched on that in the movie, but it's legit. And I will say this that coach for meal, with a few exceptions, coach with Meil like three kids in real life and only two in the movie. But Mark Wahlberg did an amazing job. Great canere as coach for meal. The guy that played my grandfather had the suits down pat. I mean it really it's very, very close to home and I love that story and it really is such a great story about overcoming the obstacles, putting, you know, putting in the work, and everybody says and I'm fortunate enough to be friends with and it's amazing. Like whenever I get an email or attacks from coach for meal or Vince Patali, I'm like I'm the luckiest person in the whole entire world. Coach for meal have my number and he'll send me all the pictures of him and my grandfather. So I feel really that's a huge and I feel very, very fortunate to have that. But he truly if you could survive coach for meals training camp, everybody says that was the hardest training cam up. You can survive that, you could do anything in the world. That's great. I'm a little jealous as well. All right, I got a Philly and eagles question for you real quick. Who was the number one picked by the Philadelphia Eagles this year in the draft? Oh shoot, wait a minute, but oh my goodness, see I'm a football fan now, Gus not? Okay, so I do know that that they that. I do know that Jalen hurts came in the second round. Okay, so I do know that. So let's see. That's a that's a good question. My son is going to sleep torture me because he's really picked up the baton as the Eagles Fan I now, with all of my books and now just a football fan. Okay, will say that was the first pick of the draft as sure it was football, Freddy. Yeah, all right. If you had to go back in time and and visit a young Marty right, what advice would you give her? You flying on these planes, you're going all over the place. When advice would you give her? Stay in your lane of sports. That's what I would say is don't try to do things that weren't really in your family history. Stay with the charity side of it or stay with the football side of it, because that's where your nexus is and when you kind of go to when you veer too far off from your nexus, it creates it's not a bad thing and I've learned a tremendous amount, but it doesn't really it's going to take you a little bit. The court correctings going to take a little bit longer. So that's what I would say was to stay, you know, stay with consistency of your family business, which is sports and charity. Doesn't listen to Steve Sable rights in the season. I know Steve. He was all right, you're a big...

Philly Fan. All right, you love all Philly Sports. WHO's your Mount Rushmore of Philadelphia Sports Legends? My Man. Okay, well, I would say this, probably forgetting football, but I do love Jaworski and I do love Wilber Montgomery and those old no nineteen eighty one eagle guys. But I think that the one thousand nine hundred and eighty phillies might be, you know, tug McGraw, Mike Schmidt, those that team, just the grit, Bob Boone, that team to me and watching them, and I was there when they won the world series. That was something just so fun because it was the first national championship that I'd ever seen happen, so being able to be part of that. So I would say that. And then, of course, you know the most I love coach Peterson and and Nick Falls and Carson Wentz. Those guys the new the new crop, although nick is not phildelf anymore, but coach Peterson's amazing. He'll never be forgotten, that's for sure. Oh, definitely not. Okay, what is your favorite album or song? Okay, well, I would say that my favorite album. I love the I mean, of course I'm going to say this but I do love the band the eagles. Hotel California could be one of them, but certainly more current. I am a huge fan of Florida Georgia line. Okay, love Florida George a line. I love them and pretty much all their all their songs, I think are great. If I was had to pick one of their songs, I would probably pick, let's see here, cheese. I like some of of their songs. All Right, wait, I might have to now change it to no, I'm going to go with, let's see, Florida Georgealy. And what's my favorite song? Crews, crews, right, we'll take it, we'll take it. Okay, so your mom, your mom, was one of these women who broke all the rules, right. She was first GM legal counsel. She did all these things that that no woman has done before. And if you think about that, there's been women who have led the way for equal equal opportunity and justice and everything else. What do you think your Mount Rushmore would be of women who have who have broken that glass barrier, that ceiling? Well, certainly my mom is definitely at the top of that list. And I think as far as women, you know, getting an opportunity to a lot of my friends who might not necessarily be in the in the public eye. But I have so many friends who are great teachers and my best friend Stacy from college, she's a teacher in Pittsburgh and I'm so proud of her and seeing watching how she's done. My other best friend from college and she's done a lot of, you know, public health and World Health things. So I think that for me is, you know, not necessarily about the women that are in the in the public eye. It's really more about just doing the heavy lifting of the day to day responsibilities that often get overlooked just because they're not, you know, posting about it on their social media site. So much so I would give a huge shout out to all of my girlfriends and also now I would say this that, certainly because my mom is not been able to be as vocal of an advocate of mine, I, you know, my mouth Rushmore of the women out there are my friends, my heart sisters I call them, who have really picked up the the ball and are now advising me the way that my mom probably would have, and certainly I am so grateful for that. Right. Yeah, I like the word to use you all the heavy lifting. Right. There's this tweet that's going around. It says, you know, this is what the world would look like if women weren't in it, and it was just like guys going crazy running and no stop lights and it was there's no is, just all everything was unorganized, and I'm like, that's so true, like if, if, like the world would just be a crazy, crazy place if it wasn't for the incredible women we have in it. Well, thank you, guys. That's definitely true and it's nice that you are so sensitive and understanding of that. I...

...know you know you have a great wife and and she's lovely and my mom is a big fan of hers and I, you know, I definitely am grateful that I threw my mom and some of her relationships, that I get the opportunity, and that's really through football too, that now I'm friends with people like Vince and coach from meal and a lot of other people just through my family connections, and that is something that I am very appreciative of, and you too, because you know, I met you, you know, through my mom's connections, and that's so nice. Yeah, that is really nice and it's been wonderful and you know, I know everything that my wife went through raising our kids and and then after they were off to college, she goes back to college, she gets her master's degree and now she's a social worker and, you know, almost almost a license clinical social worker a few more hours ago before she can take your tests. So she's been working really hard and I'm really proud of her for everything she's been doing. So a couple more question gratulations. Thank you. Thank you. So, if you could switch with one person out of all the people that have ever lived in this world, alive or dead, who would that person be? If I get switch with one person for well, how long am I doing? You get one day. I get one day with that person. As that person, I mean I guess like for me it would probably be Tom Brady. Tom Brady, what are you? I want to see what that's like. I want to see, you know, I'm curious to see what at this point now, I mean Tom has had such a legendary career and you know, I'm curious to see what a day in the life of Tom Brady really is like, because we all think, I mean, we could do that job. You know, I've always said like a great game show would be like Oh, when people are like, Oh, I could have made that pass. Oh Yeah, if you do that pass, you can. You know, you put somebody in that kind of scenario and and see if they could make that actual play or whatever, and then they could get a salary for that day or whatever it is. But I think, you know, certainly I would like to see what it's like to be one of the best. Maybe it doesn't have desinitely be Tom Brady, but and I'm pretty open to being put into a position of do of anybody's job for one day, anybody that's really done something for a very long time. I want to I'm curious about that, versus somebody that's just kind of starting out. Yeah, I think I would want to go back in time just because, like now everything is recorded and you know so much about people through social media and and and how video is just sent out. Like to me to go back in time and be somebody that is that you knew about but you really didn't know anything about. You know, I'm saying. All right, so who would it be? I don't know, like sometimes I look and like go back. Okay, what would what was it like to be Johnny Unitis. Right, you know where? You know what he does on a football field like that every day to day. You don't know. Like I just think for me it would be going back in time a little bit and find it somebody that was famous, but not joe. Name it. I'm shown. Yeah, well, yeah, I mean I don't know if I could take it. One day might be enough. It's for sure, I think. Right. You know, what was it? Girlfriends three or something. What was the name of the Bar? Yeah, I don't know, I remember it's something like okay, one last question and I'll then we'll wrap up. Okay, why should somebody go and visit Philly? Okay, well, you know Philadelphia. Well, the city of brotherly love for one, all right, and that we document that in the book. But I think that Philadelphia, Philadelphia, gets a bad rap. I mean, and I love Philly. I grew up in Philadelphia because it's really truly before DC came along. Philadelphia is the birthplace of our country, so you get the history there. You have great, you know, great people. I mean Philly, we can sometimes be, you know, a little rough on on our you know, on our sports teams and so forth, but I think that's dissipated a little bit now that there's been some winning, but I think Philadelpphia is a great place if you're going to get an opportunity to go see some of the...

...historical sites, learn about Ben Franklin, Betsy Ross, great art museum, Their Amazing Food and it's an easy city to get around and if you're on the east coast, it's an easy city to get in and out of and I think that you would actually learn a lot and feel connected to the United States of America from visiting Philadelphia. Great, great, I love that answer. I love that answer. Okay, so tell us and all of our people that are listening where they can get ahold of you, how they can get your books and what every every connection that you have. I mean there's so many, but let it rip. Okay. So they can go to football readycom and that's where they can start to like research the books. They can go on Instagram, and I'm Marnie Schneider one on Instagram and follow me on instagram. They can go to facebook. I'm really active on facebook and instagram. So Marnie Schneider on Facebook, send me a message. Linkedin also is another great resource for me. I love Linkedin. I love learning about business and hearing what people are doing and kind of sharing with other people about what they're doing and seeing how I can help out. And let's say you can get my books on Amazon. Well, now you get them for free if you go to football READYCOM, because they're all available. You just download them for free. But if you want the actual hard book, they go to Amazon, go to Barnes and noble, you can go to Mascotcom, that's my publisher, and get the books. You can send me. Let's see my Gmail again. You can email me at at Marnie's one at Gmail. That that's my gmail account. So I will check that as well consistently. And you know, just if you want me to come on and do a zoom classroom reading, I've been doing a bunch of those and that's lots of fun. Then reach out to me and I'm I think I'm pretty accessible. I'm really I love sharing my books and I love sharing reading with everybody. It's a really great coping skill and certainly, and I was told that my books are not just for kids, that my books are really for all ages, because it really does take you on a tour through these great places where you learn about some of the great historical sites and about what makes the football game so special. Well, Hey, thank you for letting US know where we can go and find your incredible books and and please give your mom a big hug and a kiss for me, and I wish you guys all the best and and I know this is not an easy time, but I know she's loved by you and your family and and everyone around her. So God bless you and take care of your mom, take care of your family and I look forward to seeing you again at another super bowl or maybe even here in Pittsburgh. Absolutely. Wait, one more thing. I know that you're the Borsht King. I'm where. I'm wearing this color. This is Burgundy. I would you maybe in a guy, but I wore this an honor of you, the Borst King. Okay, so when I come to for I'm expecting I's abort because I wore my burden to my perfect burgundy color just for you. Gus, will have to go to the Germans, German store and get someone. You get here. Okay, good, I know it's very healthy. I probably go get my I need to look into a recipe and make my mom's amborst she would write, yeah, I would like that, God's she would love it, which me Borsht, and she's good to go. Well, thank you. Tell your son. Thank you for helping you get on skype. I know here ill cost me, but it's fine and worthing all right. Well, thanks again for join anymore and you have a great day. Thank you. Take care. By Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests, where we talked to a wide ranging guests about support shake to life. As always, been joined by my great friend and Cohost, a pager, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at...

...huddle up with Gust and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to.

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