Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 4 months ago

Mark Bryan

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus, featuring 15-year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! You’re in for a very special treat today as Gus interviews the hugely famous Mark Bryan of Hootie and the Blowfish. Who’d ever think that Mark is a bit Washington Football Team fan and is from the Washington, DC area! Gus and Mark talk about the early days of Hootie and how the band evolved as the individual musicians great in talent and fame. Mark shares some exclusive behind-the-scenes moments of those “special times” he shared with bandmate Darius Rucker at the University of South Carolina and then later the road to fame. Then, it’s onto Gus’ favorite subject, football! The guys discuss the current situation with The Washington Football Team, the options the team must make for a great season this year and how some select teams around the league are going to perform. If you ever wanted to hang out with one of the Hooties, here’s your chance!  

Hey everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 1631 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never Read.Digital News dot com. Go to 1631 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at Wide. Digital News.com.Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients ofVegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of thewinning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700 500 dollars.Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000 bettors are up $37,000 and $5000.Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in thedescription below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your packagetoday. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say, okay, welcome to this week's huddle upwith gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the gamesare one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up.Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it'skick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us.Strange variety, big play two Aleve. Hey everyone,welcome to another episode of huddle Up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte,15 year NFL quarterback. I am so excited today for our incredible guests,but before we get to him, I want to tell all of our sponsors. Thank youVegas sports advantage. Uh go and use them, put my coat in, huddle up Andsave 25%. Those guys will help you win some real money, with your if you're abetter and a gambler don't follow me. I'm terrible at it. I also want tothank 16 31 Digital News Studio for always helping us. Super producer brianand terry uh for help me with this show. And then I also want to thank Sounder F.M. Sounder FM is where we host our platform and our huddle and our podcast.So thank you Sounder FM for all your new technology that you use for us andhelping us transcribe all the shows. So today show, I'm really excited. I'msure that all of our fans will know this gentleman have seen him play, haveheard his music. Uh he's got a new solo album out. But uh you know back wayback when, I don't know, I think it was maybe 1986. Uh he was going to theUniversity of south Carolina, met a guy named Darius Rucker and they co foundeda band called the Wolf Brothers. But you, they added a few more guys and youmay know them now as a hootie and the blowfish. So joining me today is Markbrian, co founder, lead guitarist and writer for Hootie and the blowfish andMark brian music. How you doing buddy Gus, I'm doing great man. Thanks somuch for having me here. You're an old time friend of the band. Used to comesee us play, I remember that and we used to go see you play too. So it'sreally cool to be sitting here talking with you man. Yeah, you know, I used toreally like your music until you guys let Tony Siragusa singing all the timeand then I had to quit listening that he's such a ham and uh Marino's houseand that's the only thing you do is him exactly drunk and singing your songs,You get him around a band anytime. He's...

...like, oh do they knew Sinatra, can I doSinatra? That was great, that was great man. What good times, you know, andtime flies. And I mean Thinking back to all those great times that when youguys were just on the rise and now my kids have all graduated college. Mydaughter's a vet down in D. C. It's like what happened, where the wholetime go? Yeah, I'm turning 50 this week. It's like what happened? Well, midlife,priceless baby. That's right. I'm racist. I love I have I have a kid outof college and and one in college and when getting ready to go in college, soI'm right there with your brother. Oh it's a lot of work, isn't it? And uhyou know and and uh I I was really hoping for scholarships but theyweren't in my future for all my kids had to spend some of that old money Iguess. Um But so we want to go back to you growing up in silver springMaryland. and what that time was like for you, Were you an athlete and amusician? Like did you do both? I mean because you have such a love for sports,but you also have a love for music. I think they're both wonderful. That's agreat question. I was born in Silver Spring and grew up in Bethesda andGaithersburg, all Montgomery County there and my father, my father was uhbasketball coach growing up and he catch like the beltway league team forour neighbor, for our area in Gaithersburg. And, and so I was a gymrat from a very young age and kind of learning the concept of team and how towork with the team and and um just how to hone your skills and whatever you'redoing through just watching my dad coach these kids for my whole, thewhole time I was growing up and I think that that sort of developed in me thatthat attitude developed me of how to work with other people and how to umyou know, grow something and um I played football, basketball, baseballand really adopted that mentality of team team mentality. And then um once Igot a little older and I became a teenager, I just became fascinated withmusic and the energy and rock and roll kind of shifted my focus over toplaying guitar and being advanced and writing songs and um was able to takethat sort of sports mentality that I grew up with, that my dad instilled inme and that helped a lot, I think in in working together with other musiciansand bands and helping grow that. So I definitely think that was a fundamentalpart of who I am and what I do, right? So then when did you, like when youtell me like this specific timeline, like when you kind of quit playingsports and then really started to focus on music? I was a junior in high schooland my dad was coaching the summer league team for our high school and wewere good, we had a really good program, jean, don't was the coach and he would,he sent off a lot of players to play in college and all that. And we were atSeneca Valley High School in Montgomery County. And um, and junior year, I was,I was getting ready to try out for the team and everything. And my dad came tome and he's like coaches, thinking about you being a starter by senioryear, so you're gonna have to really dig in if you want to do this. He'slike, he's like, but I noticed that you're all the time you used to spendout of the court, you know, practicing your in your room on guitar now. I'mlike, yeah, I guess so. You know, I hadn't really thought about it, but hewas right. I mean, I was kind of committing, my time was committed moreto music than it was to sports. And so he's like, you know, this is this isthe time for you to make an adult decision here, you know, which do youreally want to do? Which would you rather do? And so I had to like, forthe first time in my life, sit there and think about it and I was like, wow,you know, when it comes down to it, I think my passion is more geared towardscreativity and music and that energy that I was finding from rock and rollcould not replace that anywhere with sports. And so I just sort of, thesports thing fizzled out a little bit. And I went to the coach on my dad'srecommendation and told him, hey, I'm, I'm more into music right now, that Iam basketball and I can't commit to you, that I'm going to give the time I needto be a starter by senior year. And he...

...said, well, thank you for coming to meand telling me that. And so I moved on and then senior year I'm in jazzensemble and I'm playing a recital and in the back of the room is thebasketball coach watching me and he came up to me after and he's like, man,I'm really impressed. That was, I think he made the right choice. And again, Ireally respect you for coming to me. And so it was, uh, that was a sort of apivotal moment for me. Um, and a lot of, for a lot of reasons. And it was areally, it was really good advice from my dad and uh, well that was justcarried on from there. Yeah, I mean, I think that's just so progressive, likeyour dad just had the forethought to say, you know, a lot of people say thatthey want the best for their kids, but a lot of dads who are athletics andcoaches like your dad, they don't want their kids to give up sports. I thoughtthat's, that's a great story, is give you the ability to choose. Yeah. I mean,he could really see that my passion had shifted and I couldn't even see, Iwouldn't think I wasn't conscious of it and he was, he could see it. So he kindof made me aware of it and he was right, and uh you know, never turned backafter that. So when you were putting albums on or tape decks, I don't knowwhat you're a little older than me. I think whatever you listed, who was you,who are you listening to? And who, who were you trying to emulate when youwould play guitar? Yeah, it was a lot of vinyl back then and a lot ofZeppelin, the who was my main influence Pete Townsend something about, he was agreat guitar player, but he also put this energy into the songs that wasthat I couldn't find anywhere else. And and he was a great songwriter andcomposer and that started to really appeal to me, like I didn't really wantto be Eddie van Halen as much as I did Pete Townsend. Right. It's one thing tobe able to sit there and shred, but he also has to be able to write greatsongs. And so to me, I shifted my focus more on what's what's a really goodcomposition. And uh and so I while I became better at guitar, I also becamea better songwriter and had a message that I wanted to share through songsand all that. And so that became very important to me. And it still is guyslike, I'm still really fired up about that, and this is my fourth solo album.Whenever who needs done making albums, I go take all the leftovers and go makealbums and that kind of thing. Yeah, it's still really what I'm fired up andpassionate about and I feel like my best songs could possibly still beahead of me, you know? Yeah. So where do you, where does your inspirationcome from writing? Because uh, you know, my wife has always wanted to write, butthere's other things that have pulled her away and and sometimes I think it'sno different than writing um starting to write a book and you get blocks andand does it just come from your life, or is it coming from things you see? Orwhere does your inspiration come from? Yeah, sometimes there's something that hitsyou really hard that you're going through in life or that you see, andyou you the words just come flying out of you, sometimes it's like that, andum, you know, you have to write about it, that kind of thing. Other times,other times it might be simmering below the surface and you have to put in alittle time, and and just you kind of, right, let your subconscious flow andyou don't have to be writing about anything specific or you don't have tobe writing what you think would be a finished version, You're just writingto, to get your thoughts out. And a lot of times that type of writing, thatstream of conscious type of writing leads to uh something greater,something that I can, something I can pull from and then write more aboutlater. So you kind of, it's almost like exercising your mind, like you would,when you go out to work out for a sport or something like that, once you getthat mind flowing, you're working that muscle and it produces for you. So that,that's kind of, that's amazing. It's like, so I want to ask you this. Sowhen I go back and I look at old VHS tape me playing in high school and I'mlike, who's that skinny gangly dude out there? What is how, why did I make thatthrow or what happened to me? Like if you go back and look at your writingfrom when you were in high school and stuff, you're like, what was I thinkingabout? I mean it's unlistenable dude.

There might be like, there might be oneout of 10 songs that was good, you know? And, but those are the ones that keepyou going. That's what makes you go okay, maybe I can do this. You know?It's like my golf game, one shot, every game gives me coming back. Oh, it'sexactly like that. I quit golf to life and my career all the time. There's somany things you can so many comparisons you can draw from your golf, right?Exactly. Exactly. Yeah. No, that's just amazing because you've been doing itfor so long. So then you go from high school and how did you pick southCarolina? Um I was aside from coaching, my dad also was a sports broadcaster inthe D. C. Area and he and Mike Patrick did G. W basketball games before MikePatrick became a national broadcaster on ESPN. And so I was in like middleschool when that was happening and I would go to the G. W. Again with my dadand and listen to me and Mike Patrick, you know, on the, on the radio, thatkind of thing. I was, I thought that's this is what I want to study. I didn't,for whatever reason I didn't want to study music. Rock and roll isn't aboutstudying, you know, it's about energy and playing. So when it came to schoolI wanted to focus studying on broadcast journalism based on kind of, again, mydad, you know, um, and university of south Carolina had a really goodbroadcast journalism school. And when we went down and visited, um, it wasthe best of all the campuses I had visited. It was just like it lookedlike it would be the most fun. And um, so I picked that school and then I wentand talked to our bass player from my high school band dean. And he had alsopicked south Carolina without us really ever talking about it. And so he endedup down there too. And we, and they put us in the same dorm on different hallsand Darius lived on my hall. So by the end of freshman year, you know, we werea bad. That's amazing. So like you didn't know Darius can moving downthere, right? Just met him that freshman year. So how do you say, likedoes he hear you playing? Do you hear him playing? How does that work?Because well I brought my guitar down to school and then and he would justsing all the time really. And the famous story is like he, I'd hear himsinging in the shower. We used to, everybody would take showers togetheron the hall. And uh and so and he and he would just sing, he would sing evenwhile he was getting ready after the shower and you could hear him down thehall and he just had a great voice. And so Um I had my guitar and we just satdown one night with some beers, like what songs do you know what songs doyou know? And next thing you know, we had a set of like 10 or 12 songs and wewent across the street and played them at this chicken wing joint uh as theWolf brothers, you know, as you mentioned earlier, wait, where'd Wolfbrothers come from? That's a funny story to one of the guys that lived inthe dorm with us. His nickname was Wolf and he introduced us the first show hedid and he didn't know what to say. He's like, ladies and gentlemen, he'sfrom Bahamas. Ladies and gentlemen, this is Mark and Darius, the Wolfbrothers. He named us after himself on the spot. That's great. Yeah, yeah.Look at each other like that works kind of look like him. But anyway, so we didthat for about three or four shows and then turned it into a band and, and twoguys had that various, we're friends we're friends with, had walked into aparty and he had nicknamed them separately the blowfish and hoodie andthey came into a party together and he's like, hey, look hootie and theblowfish and then he's like, hey, that's, that should be the name for aband. And uh, not thinking that anything would ever come from and I waslike, sure, that sounds great, right, right. And uh, and then a couple yearslater we were graduating and we hated the name, but it was too late becausewe're already known by that, so we kept it and I'm pretty sure it worked outpretty well. So yeah, it's like an animal house. When you're john Belushigoes, your new nickname will be flounder. Exactly that. Exactly likethat. Darius gave you guys a nickname. That's how you got your band. That'sgreat. Yeah. Oh man, I'm sure you guys didn't have any beers that party at all.Well, the first few shows we played, we...

...didn't even get paid money the guywould give pay us and beer, and one time he gave us a keg of stroh's. Oh mygosh, it's a Blues brothers story. Yeah, we got a keg of stroh's for playing ashow in front of chicken wire. Yeah, that's great. That's great. So, youknow, those things are just what kind of, those kind of stories that you guyscan always go back to? Um And I knew you guys took some, like, you you wenthard for a long time and rose to fame and then you took a break. Um what isit about bands like that? You Gotta, is it like a team, you kind of got to getaway from each other for a little bit and then come back together. Yeah, Imean, we had, you know, when we took that break, we had been touring for 20years straight. I mean, it took small breaks in there, but You know, everyyear for 20 years, we were doing at least 100 shows a year. So, um you know,that starts to take its toll. And then also um the last couple albums we hadput out, we didn't have any commercial success with and therefore the crowds,even though there were still large, we're starting to dwindle. Like wecouldn't go play the bigger venues that we had played in the past, and we'restarting to play smaller venues, so we're like, you know what, maybe it'stime to hit the reset button here. Yeah, and we we also had some personal stuff,everybody had families and wanted to take a break from that standpoint. Andso it was just the right time. And uh and then that's when Darius decided tomake a country album and that was obviously has worked out great for him.Um we got back together about two years ago to do a new album and tour and itwas wildly successful. So, um you know, who knows what the future holds? Ithink, you know, we'll probably do something like that again, including ashow in Mexico, this january that we're going to do. Oh yeah, that'll be great,That'll be wonderful. Yeah. Yeah. So when you guys are together and I thinkit's um special. How did you guys get involved in like golf tournaments andjust athletes? Is it something that was mutual or did they search you guys up?Because I know you guys were always part of Merino stuff. Yeah, heabsolutely loves you guys. Yeah, we obviously were, we always played golf.So that that was a little unusual at the time. You know, musicians that playgolf, not a lot of people were talking about that. So that became a little bitof a story. And then when we did that only want to be with you video where itwas like an episode of Sportscenter. Yeah, we were, you know, playing abunch of sports on the, in the video, playing basketball against NBA playersand marinas throw Darius footballs and we're playing golf with couples and allthat. So I think that sort of gave us that reputation of a love sports, youknow? Yeah, but those things are fun. Like dan Marino sculpt Germans werealways fun. Uh, tell the story. I tell the story. I played with Sergeantslaughter one time you and I were walking down the fairways and people go,hey sergeant slaughter, they didn't know who I was, but they're like,because he has a whole gear on, totally go go over and body slam people andhe's giving like the big elbow and I'm like, this is awesome. I was like alittle kid that's going, but there's so much fun like they are services andit's so cool that you guys would take such a big part of it. Yeah, we lovedit. And then south Carolina Junior golf had started this event where they weregetting pros to come in after the masters, um, to, to Colombia, which isonly an hour away from Augusta, you know, and they asked us to get involvedand then after a year, one of being involved with that, we took over theevent and it's monday after the Masters and we're now on our 27th year of doingthat. That's amazing. Yeah, truly. So who's the best golfer out of you guys,Darius? Really? Yeah, when we took that break, like back in like oh eight orwhatever it was, He's like, I remember him saying this, he's like, I'm gonnadedicate my myself to golf. And he went and got like the, you know, the uhindoor thing that you can put under your house and he could put a puttinggirls yard and he started taking...

...blessings and he went, were all like 12handicap 15 handicap and he went down to like an 86 handicap and he's stillthere and so he is definitely the best, wow, that's that's awesome. So you know,one of, one of the things I was thinking about too is like youmentioned that you guys did, you toured forever, right? And then you're playingall your songs over and over again, you know? And it's like us when we, when wego out and we have to learn an offense, we put some new plays in, but we don'tput a lot in because you stick with what you're good at, right? If all thetime in practice, we put something new in and if it were not good at it inpractice were like, we're not doing it. But how is that for you? Is it just goby like, you don't even think about it like, you know, sets and it's justcoming coming through. Yeah, yeah. So we always are going to play a state astable or staple of like old older songs, the hits that people know andlove, you know, and the ones that work really well, live that kind of thing.But but for the, for the musicians in the band, it's always exciting for usto have a couple of new songs to do to, you know, challenge ourselves a littlebit um, have some excitement in the moment with something new. And so we'llwe'll always incorporate a couple of our new originals into the set and wealways try to learn new covers to keep that um list ever changing. Um you know,you don't want to just if you just played D. C. For instance, you don'twant to go back the next two years old and play the same set. Right? Right.But you have to play some of the same set, so it's kind of a tricky thing andand Darius is really good at making set list at this point, but he always asksus for our input and and then we'll also throw out, hey, what if we do thisor that and he'll either be like or oh hey, great idea, you know, so um it'san ever changing thing and I think you do tailored to the specific show you'redoing to where like what whatever town were playing in, we might try to do acover of a band that's from that town. Something fun like that, you know? Yeah.Yes. So have you ever gone to a town and said the wrong name, like at thebeginning of a counter, Like, I always think that like, you guys just travelso much, but you have to like, be so focused like when you open up the set,like, hey Atlanta, you know, then you're like, wait, we're in Chicago.Exactly. You will see, just to, just to avoid that, you will see a big all capssmelling of whatever town we're in at the top of each set list, so that ifyou step up to the mike and say something, you know where you are, youknow? Okay, I'm going to concerts where they spent the wrong thing. Yeah, Imean it can get, if you are thinking about it like this, if you're playingfour nights in one week and each you're leaving each night after the show, soyou show up in the next town the next morning and then you get on stage thatfollowing night it gets a little confusing after four in a row, you know,you have to kind of be conscious of where, especially if all you're seeingin those towns is your tour bus and the backstage area. If you're not able toget out in ST louis and go see the arch then you don't really know you're in STlouis, you just, I just told you you are, you know, so it can get a littleuh confusing is not the right word gets taxing on you, you know, it's sort ofjust to wear you down after a while and so I'm sure that does happen but I canhonestly say I've never done that and I'm not, I would well that would bethat would be tough and that that would be something that you're very consciousof, you know, and I'm sure back in the day when led Zeppelin and all thosewere playing they weren't very conscious of things, they just openedit up and said whatever and people were, you know, I mean there was probably alittle more craziness flying around. They were the funniest all time stagematter is paul Stanley from Kiss. Oh yeah, I can't you just have to gogoogle it or youtube um Just youtube like paul Stanley from Kiss likebetween songs or something like that when he's talking. It's the mosthilarious banter you'll ever hear in rock and roll history Really? I'm gonnaYeah, yeah. It's just, he's doing that voice and that thing you're sayingwhere like it doesn't matter what you...

...say, Everybody screams and he says someof the most ridiculous shit miller. Well that was good because that was aneasy first concert 72. So it wasn't really a bit, let's do. Yeah. Yeah. Soyeah, you know, it's just amazing to me that, that you had such a long andsuccessful career and, and the name of your solo album, Midlife Priceless isjust, it's just like, hey, I'm halfway, but I got a long way to go. Yeah, Imean, and everything, I'm doing it so, so right on. And it's just, you know,everybody, once you get to this age 50, everybody's been through some shit intheir life. Everybody, no matter who you are varying degrees or levels ofcrap that you have to survive and go through in your life. And you know, Idid go through a midlife crisis and I came out on the other end and now Ireally appreciate things in a way that I didn't before and that's where thealbum title came from, you know, Midlife Priceless instead of crisis,you know? Yeah, I know that that's that's awesome. And how are your kidsdoing? Like, I mean, because that when you go on tour, like I would go asaturday night to go play a game, right? And I'd be away one night, butsometimes when you guys are torn, you have to be away from your family for along time. How does that affect you? Because I would be hard for me when Iwas younger and the kids were younger, it was death. There were definitelysome difficult times with that. But from a very early age they understoodwhat I do and so we were able to manage that and now when I look at them asyoung adults, I really think they're doing great. I'm sure that there'ssomething that happened, it will affect them, you know, just like any family,you know, they might end up in counseling or therapy about it. Whoknows? I sure did from, you know, whatever I went through. But all ofthat aside, I can honestly say that, you know, our families in a really goodplace, even after everything we've been through and I'm really proud of allthree of my kids. They're amazing people. So good reports from thatstandpoint. Yeah, that's awesome because I feel the same way. But youknow, the good thing about your kids, they never had to see their dad hit awall in a stadium in the morning, so my kids have to deal with that all thetime, so they are definitely gonna need therapy. Well they might have seen theequivalent. Trust me, I got I can tell you some stories, so, you know, anytimeyou do what we do and you put yourself out there, there's gonna be someembarrassing moments and it's it's how you bounce back from those moments thatdefines who you are. You know, and and and that applies to anybody in life, nomatter who you are and what you do, it's all about that that survival andcoming back from those things that that's what really marks your character.And so I've had some moments like that in my career where like I've madehorrible mistakes or and I and you filled with self doubt after it. Um andthen you just fight through it and then you hopefully you get back to thatreally good show after that and you go, oh wait, I can do this, you know? Andso uh my kids have seen me go through some of that too, and it's a struggle,but hopefully they've seen me survive it, and that's the that's the messageyou want them to see, that's what you want them to leave, you know, that'swhen I do my every radio show or sports talk I do, you know, they always haveto ask me that question. And one of the things is that I laugh about it, right?I don't get mad about it, I try to really laugh about and some unlesssomebody is being a real ass about the whole thing, of course, you know, butthat was always the thing for me, is to show my kids that look, you're gonnahave ups and downs in life and you can find a way to get around that roadblock,it can go over it and go around it and go under it. There's just don't evergive up and that's kind of what my mantra was, because that was a bigthing that happened. It was, you know, everywhere in the Washington post, ESPN,like I'm on ESPN once a month. Yeah, no, you're right. It is, it was a big thingand um, and yeah, it was a chance for you to say, how am I gonna, how do Ibounce back from this in it? And I know the feeling goes full on buddy. Um, andso, you know, I think, again, that's, that's what the funds, who we are,that's that's what the funds are...

...character and here we are sitting heretalking to each other, enjoying our time and and respecting our careers andthat's what it's all about, brother. Yeah, definitely. Hey everyone, uh, wewere talking with Mark brian, uh, we're gonna take a quick commercial break,but before we do that, I wanna, you know, there's a question I get everyweek, Zakia canoe um, from Bethesda Maryland, Mark, your old stompingground, she asked me, what do you think the Washington football team recordwill be this season? And how do you think Ryan Fitzpatrick is a good fitand why? So? I think the records, I think they're going to be um, wellthere's an actually extra game right this year. So I think they're going tobe, what is it? Nine and eight? That's me too. That's why, yeah, I thinkthey're right right in that because their division is going to be waybetter. Um, and so I think they're gonna be pretty good. They're going tobe right on that cusp of, of being in the making the playoffs. I think Ithink I think the defense is good enough to give us a winning season forsure. And so But that the question mark for the offenses, why I'm only going togive him nine wins. I think Fitzpatrick was a great move for the short term andI think he could get us off to a good start, maybe even have and we got tohope for this a career season for him. If Fitzpatrick has a career season, wego to the playoffs. But how many career seasons has Fitzpatrick had? You know,well, 17, You know what I'm saying? I know what you're saying, but you know,like even last year, many of those 17, we need his best one. Yeah, yeah. Andand he shows some brilliance and he's been on teams. I mean Ryan is a verygood friend of mine and we've known each other for like I played so manypranks on that guy and when in locker rooms. But I think the thing is that hebrings an energy to the team that they need. Like last year in Miami, I don'tknow why they, I wanted to put two in when they were winning. Like he washaving a career year, he totally was. And so that, that, that back to mypoint, if we get that Fitzpatrick all year long were a playoff team. Um, ifwe don't, then, you know, we're still struggling a quarterback possibly andreally like Hi Nikki, but I mean, is he, is he a full season starter yet? Wedon't know. So you know, I think that question mark is my only thing thatkeeps keeps me from saying 10 wins. Um, And I think it's very possible that weget that kind of season out of Fitzpatrick and get our 10 wins, butI'm gonna go with nine and 8. Yeah. So I think that for Ryan, he saidsomething that I haven't seen him say before that he feels the mostcomfortable and like, this is the best fit he's ever had in the NFL for a guythat's a journeyman like I was, um, that's a big thing that you're that,that they're taking you on as the starter and they're saying, okay,you're our guy, let's go, let's go do something special this year. So I hopethat happens. I think Ryan is, will be a good fit in the short term, you know,because obviously he's older, he played longer than I have. So, you know, hedoesn't have that many more years unless he's tom brady. Yeah, I meanhe's, I just, like I said, I hope it works out to where this is. We get theguy we saw last season and I love to see him work out long term, but I justdon't, I don't see it. You know, I'm just being realistic, I don't see it,but I hope it does. I hope I'm wrong. I really like the guy and I really likehis skills and I love for him to have a career season and take us to theplayoffs. We love it. I would too, and I'd love to see all the fans back inthe, in the stadium. All right, we'll take a quick break and then we'll beright back. Mhm Yeah. Hey, how come up with uslisteners Manscaped. Well, they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch oftools and formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh so, youknow, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We allthink we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, threepoint oh kid, I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It camein this great box. Uh you know, uh and...

...you can see what it says, They willthank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh, youknow, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, you know, they sent me thisgreat uh some boxers, even what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, youknow, they sent me this cool, you sack, I guess you want to call it to storeall your stuff in. So uh it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch ofproducts. Um you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh you know,you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh Gus Frerotte, that's GU S. F R E R O T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code.But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like um this way coolrumor that has a little led light um ceramic. These things come apart,they're waterproof, you can do a lot with them. So you know, get Manscapedis great. You know, it's funny game. I remember when I was playing with theDenver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was agentleman who was playing on our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears thestory, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But he brought his ownclippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up his goatee andeverything and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes inaround the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player thatis actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So, you know, one of thethings is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use uphere. So, uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how longhave you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here aboutthree weeks ago and I've been using it ever since. So, you know, there is alesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably, uh, ifit would have just said manscaped on it, but we wouldn't have had that issue,but it's probably one of the funniest, uh taking care of your ball storiesI've ever heard, or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so, uh, it's agreat story, um, but you know, I always said there was no way to know, there'sno name on it, and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, itwas not good, but it's a heck of a funny story, so one of the best I'veever heard in my 15 years playing in the league, um but you know, there's somany great things about Manscaped and what they're doing uh because guys, yougot to take care of yourself even though I got great hair um and gettingolder, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so uhyou know, we all work out to me like we're going in my yard doing thosethings now that I'm retired, getting a little sweat on and everything. Youwant to smell good. Uh You know, you got to take care of yourself. They'vegot some great products um you know this one uh little uh all deodorant,we'll need that here and there um after, you know, working the yard, taking ahike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um It's a great thing, but there's so manygreat products. Um I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. UmThe lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'msure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this is one justletting you know that the lawnmower three point oh, comes with a perfectkit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these productsindividually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can see the back,your balls will thank you. And then here's the front, so it's an awesomeshirt. They have great gear. Uh and you...

...know what? Sometimes you can just sitback, take care of your balls a little bit and read the paper. So the man'scape even has their own daily news, so which is great. So don't forget thatyou can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E R O T T. E. Uhand you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh packagegift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use thecode Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F. R. E R. O. T. T. E. Hey everybody spells myname wrong, they even spelled wrong on the back of my pro bowl jersey. So youknow I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forget how important it isthat you use these products, take care of yourself down below uh and have somefun right, there's nothing closer to you than your little bugs. So use thelawnmower uh Use the code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shipping and uhorder some great manscaped products. Uh Yeah. Uh huh. Mhm. Thanks. Hey everyone we're back on huddle upwith Gus please go to my website, huddle up with guest dot com like andsubscribe our show and you'll be able to listen to all of our great guestslike today's great guest Mark brian uh Mark. It's it's a pleasure, it's apleasure to have you on. I know that we've met way in the past and it's sonice that you can just reconnect with people like you that are just goodpeople and it feels like we I know we haven't talked in a long time but itfeels like we haven't missed a beat. So it's nice, thank you for joining metoday. Right back at you got to feel the same way. So tell me about likewriting, so you were with a group, you know you write songs for a group andyou got a bunch of guys saying I like this, I don't like that and youprobably have to collaborate a lot, but when you write a solo album you'vewritten I think for now. And so when you write a solo album it's just you,or do you have somebody saying like how many people do you bounce things off?Right. So uh the way this this one worked out was that all of these songsthat are on my fourth solo album, we're most of all of them were pitched forthe last 20 albums. So I did a lot of Working out these songs in that process.And when we do the Hoodie album, we we have 60 or 80 songs to pull from, andwe can only record like 18 of them. So uh there were several that were sittingthere that I felt like we're really worthy And and sort of so that the thatprocess sort of honed it down to knowing which 12 I was going to do formy solo album. It was the best ones that didn't make it to the studio,basically, you know? And it's such a subjective thing, it's like, who knowswhat the best songs are. It's not really about that, It's about, I meanit is but it's about what are the best songs for these four guys. And so we'llbe going to make a hoodie out. You know, what are the ones that Darius isenjoying singing? What are the ones the band has the best groove on, that kindof thing? And so and so that process sort of weeds itself down. And and oncethat was over with hoodie, then I kind of knew right away which songs I wantedto do from from my album. Um and you know, and outside of that, I'm alsowriting all the time. There's a project I did just recently uh for rosa parkstribute with an organization in Washington D. C. The Street Mansion OhMansion was doing a Rosa Parks tribute. And they put me together withsongwriter paul Williams and became with the Rosa Parks tribute song. Andthis is a line from it that I just think it's amazing. Hope is a hungerthat hate can't control. Oh, I love...

...that shirt. The legendary paul Williams,I guess you want if you really want one. Yeah, I can get, you're just probably amedium. I need a big double edge. Um but yeah, so, I mean, I'm I'm involvedwith the projects all the time, trying to stay creative and and trying toexpress myself, but also write about things like Rosa Parks, things thatmatter. You know, there's there are messages out there that need to beshared. Yeah, I saw that you did something with Denny Hamlin. You'veyou've you've really tried to engage in all kind of different projects. Uh youknow, just trying to research you, you've been really busy, like, eventhough like who do you guys took a break? You've tried to really stay busyin in finding other projects for yourself? Is that, was that veryimportant to you? Yeah. So obviously when Hoodie took a break, it was like,well I've done that for 20 years, what else can I do? Yeah. And so that'swhere it started, I started teaching music industry at the College ofCharleston. Um I got really involved with the nonprofit that I run hereCarolina studios, which is like an after school recording studio. And thatled to the event with Danny hamlin, which is a fundraiser for that. And andDanny's fundraiser is for cystic fibrosis here at M. U. S. C incharleston. So we part we partner and and raise a bunch of money for both ofthose causes. Um I uh, you know, I'm just built a new recording studios onproducing other artists, that kind of thing. So I mean there's things I cando in my skill set that are outside of just writing songs and playing live,you know, which is awesome. So when you have somebody come into the studio,like are you like, where do you draw your like coaching from? You thinkabout your dad? Do you think about, you know what I mean? Like this basicallywhen you're running a studio, your coaching those people coming in andwriting and singing those songs. Without a doubt. It's so funny you saythat because I make that analogy all the time that the producer of an albumis very similar to a coach of a team and the band is the team and you're andyou have to keep the big picture in mind as the producer of what, what'sthe goal that we're going for. And then you try to bring the best out of eachof those musicians and band members to where we get the best possible sound.And so it's very similar to coaching up a team. Um and I, like, as I saidearlier at the beginning of our conversation, that came naturally to mefrom being a gym rat when I was a kid around my dad, you know, catching theMini Terps in Gaithersburg, The mini church. That's awesome. Do you thinkthat all the sports you played and growing up and you were very diverse inthe sports you played? How did you think that really like besides the teamaspect? But athletically help you be a better guitar player and in a group um,when you are in fifth grade and you strike out to win the game, like youhad a chance to win the game and you strike out right, that's the worstfeeling in the world. It happens to every kid at some point, you know, andyou have your story from when you were a kid and whatever sport it was whereyou you failed. So you learn failure through sports, you have to learnfailure and you learn at a young age, especially if you start playing sportswhen you're a kid, you know, when you're a young kid and you're not gonnawin every game, you're not going to make every shot, you're not gonna getevery hit, you know, that kind of thing. So you learn early on how to overcomethose things and I think that was a huge thing for me of once I got out andstarted playing out live, I didn't always have the best shows. I wasn'talways singing on key, I wasn't always playing the part right on guitar. Andit's Making those mistakes and coming back from them that teaches you who youwho you want to be and how to get better at what you're doing, you know?And so that I think I got a lot of that early on sports, I can rememberstriking out when I had a chance to win game in 6th grade And you know, that Istill remember it. So obviously it affected me deeply, but but having hadthat happened at that young age, wants...

...something like that happened once I was16 or 18, it was like, Okay, those things are gonna happen, How do youbounce back from it, you know? Yeah. So did you do your kids play sports? Notreally, a little bit, they dabbled, but they were not able to, as I was therereally in the music, all three of them got that gene from me and they can allsing on key. They can all play instruments. Um It seems to come verynaturally to them. So that's awesome. But I'm sure they were in the studiowith you From here. The get go. Yeah, they were here and there. I mean, I'verecorded songs that they were when they were like eight and 9 and 10 years oldand stuff, you know, just for fun. So they did get a little taste of thatearly on. Um, And, and they all played a little bit of sports just, they justweren't nobody committed to anything, you know? Yeah. Well that's like Ialways say about Gunnar and Gabe right there like, oh, they were footballplayers. Well, I'm like, yeah, they kind of had to be because they were inlike the locker room with me every day playing with the guys that I playedwith, They were hanging out shooting basketball, whatever we had the lockerroom, right? So that was kind of what they loved and they just fell in lovewith that. I'm sure it's the same with your kids. You know if there hangingout in the studio and they're they're seeing how much, you know what it'slike it's work, But you know, they're also having fun. Yeah, it is a lot offun and I think that definitely has had an influence on them. So if you thoughtabout like saying someday, all right, we're we're gonna get together andwe're gonna We're gonna we're gonna put a little album together all of us, oris it always just, oh, that would be awesome. It just it just hit me lastthanksgiving. Um 2020. Uh We did there was, we did a little show. There's a,like a thing in my neighborhood where you play on Wednesday nights. It's like,it's not really an open mic, you have to book it. But um, you can, you can, alot of bands play on Wednesday nights and it was the Wednesday night beforethanksgiving last year and all of my kids were in town and I had had, I hadgotten that date to play there and I said you guys want to do this set withme? And they were all like, yeah, so so my three kids and my sister, the fiveof us did a set together and played on each other's songs. Everybody sang,everybody played. Did you smile the whole time? I mean it must have beenPerma grin. Do you still have to be so awesome? Yeah, so we, that gave me therealization that, hey, you know, I could collaborate with my family uh,musically if we ever want to. But there's a big difference between doingthings like that for fun and then making an album and taking it reallyseriously because everybody has to dig in enough. So we're not really to thatlayer of commitment yet to it. I think everybody just wants to do it for funright now. But the fact that we can collaborate is so cool. Yeah, I knowthat is cool because the moment that dad says, we gotta dig in and you guysare gonna be here for 10 hours, they're going to be like, oh dad, I don't know.You know what? So that's when you become their, your coach. Yeah, that'snot good. Oh, so like my kids get mad at me because I'm saying too much orwhatever they call me coach, that's what they call me. I know I said, oh,I'm in trouble, they just call me coach, but they call me, they call me brisker,I don't even know where they got biscuit and that's why I like, I likethem already. Just like, oh yeah, you love them. They sound a lot like yourkids, like they're just good, good kids, good people and there's just a lot offun to be around. I'm actually golfing with the boys more and more now. Theythey go, dad, why don't you make us golf when we were young? I'm like, whatwas I gonna take too whiny little boys to golf every day and they hated it.Like, I wasn't doing that. That's cool now though. That's really cool. Oh yeah,we have fun like, but they still can't beat me so I can't beat my dad by theway. He was just really he just turned 80 last year and he shot 78 a couplemonths ago. I can't I can't beat my dad, but he's playing from the senior teethbut I can't beat him. Where do you guys go play usually if you go back to him?Um He actually lives down here now in Sunset Beach, north Carolina and I livein charleston. So we kind of meat in...

...like pawleys island area lot to playgolf somewhere around there or he'll come down and play Bulls Bay where weplay down here in charleston and then he's got a couple of course is up byhim that I go up and play with his buddies too sometimes. Oh yeah. Do youdoes he let you know it too that you can't beat him? He's not a big trashtalker, but you know, he's got that wry smile going like. Yeah. Yeah. That'sawesome that I do that. I do I don't say much, I don't talk about trashbecause they get pretty pissed. But you know like I'll be at the, at the on thegolf cart like Gunner 92 gave 87 dad 80, you know, out loud enough so they couldhear it. That's right, yeah. So with your new album, how does this work nowwhen you guys want to go, when you're gonna go, are you going to go back andtour with, who do you said talked about going to Mexico, Are you going to goout on a solo album tour? How does that work for you now? I'm doing selectshows. So I just played here in charleston at the Windjammer, which islike the greatest all time beach venue there is um last month and then I'mplaying in october at Rams Head on stage in Annapolis awesome. Yeah, whichwill be a blast and that would be and then maybe another charleston show andthen solo and then Hoodie is doing Mexico in january and there are stilltickets available for that. It's called Hoodie fest and it's like a bignineties, you know festival kind of show on the beach in Mexico. And itwill have like blues traveler and spin doctors and better than Ezra and thelist goes on. It's gonna be a lot of fun and that's in january. And whatpart of Mexico where uh not not pla del Carmen. It's in between, right? It's inbetween plot ray and like um and like Cancun it's just it's like one of thosebeach resorts that's in between the door and take your take your bottledwater, right? Exactly. Yeah. That's the last thing. What have you ever had anissue like that where you, because you know we all, we're all human like whereyou got on stage and you're like, oh God, it's hit me right now. Like, Imean all the years you've done it, you've had to have something happenedlike twice, twice on this has happened, everybody in the band at least once,twice in our career. I had a, something happened on stage where I was sick. Ihad, I had the show must go on, I had to take the stage sick. And both timesI had somebody put a trash can like right off the stage, you know behindthe speaker and I'd just be playing and pretending like everything's okay. Andthen I just go over and curl and the second time that had happened, um wewere in L. A. Playing universal amphitheater and Anthony and flea fromthe chili peppers were in like the second row in front of me. And so like,I mean they're like idolized these people and they're sitting herewatching me play and I'm trying to act like nothing's wrong, but I was sick asa dog and I had to keep going over and throwing up on the side. Um Yeah, thatwas, that sucked. But I got through both shows and I mean, you know, that'swhat, you know, you do what you gotta do and if there's anybody that probablyhas done that before, it's probably Anthony and flea. Exactly many, manysure you're right, I'm sure. Yeah. Okay. And so like when I, when you playsports, like for me, I'd go to a game, you know, let's say we're playing. Iwas with the broncos were playing in Kansas City, it's a big game and youjust get under center, it's the first snap of the game. You got butterflies.Do you still get butterflies at all, or you put out a doubt? Without a doubt?And I have a warm up routine that I do that helps me through the, but like theworst, I don't know if this is the way it was for you guys before a game, butthe worst part is like the last hour before you start. Oh yeah, like it'llbe, let's say the showtimes at eight...

...o'clock and like, you know, 6 36 45rolls around and you've already eaten, you've already done all the stuff, sowhat else can you do? So I, so you're just sitting there waiting. And so Icame up with like a really good warm up routine that I do on guitar and vocalsum and just try to get my, get myself warmed up so that when I hit the stage,everything is ready to go and that sort of takes care of that nervous butterflytime. But I definitely still get them and if we're ever doing anything onlive national tv, I get the worst butterflies. Really? Oh man. But youknow, you guys superstitious. Not really, we do, we do do a shot beforeevery show there, we'll do that a little shot of something. That's just atradition we have, but that'll get your ring. And then the other thing is whenwe used to share hotel rooms, it was don't turn the tv off when you leavethe hotel room always leave the tv on. That was the superstition we had. Sonow we all, we all have our own rooms, we still all do that, I'll do that.I've seen so many guys like I've had guys like come into the locker room,they put their whole uniform on like how it's gonna look on them, on theground in front of their locker, they wanted this. I'm like why? Like, butthere's routines. I had buddies who throw up like every game before theyplay, you know, and everybody like they're like, don't you have asuperstition? I'm like just get dressed, I have a cup of coffee, get dressed,let's go. But you're right. It was like We warmed up, we come back in and wehave to wait for something going on outside and you've got that 30-40minutes and you've got and you're sitting in your locker likecan we just go out already? Let's start. Why isn't I know Exactly. And it isrough sometimes like that. Especially when the butterflies are kickingbecause your mind starts wandering and you just can't get comfortable. Youknow, like sitting down and going to do it standing up. You're like, oh, I'mgonna be standing up for the next two hours, so I kind of want to rest.That's just the weirdest place. So I just pull out a guitar and startnoodling and and warming up my voice and that seems to pass that time reallywell. Yeah. Okay. Mhm. Hey, gus I just lost you bud. Right?Yeah, he's uh he's freezing up on us. Can you hear him? Yeah? No. Okay, let'sget him birdie there. Let me see. Uh We can barely hear you guys. All right.What happened? Uh touching? It's like a single no kids. Yeah,blaming and I'm like, bad. Not really. Not really. Can you reallyhate now? You're back? That was that was clear. All right, good, good. So Iwas going to ask you, you know, played in some in front of some big stadiums,but you had to play in front of a lot of people. It's the biggest crowdyou've ever played in front of. Um It's uh I think it's 60 to 70,000 people.And it happened once here in charleston back in the day, right? When we werefirst starting to blow up, there was a Radio fist here called Wave Fest inCharleston. And they did it in this park downtown. And um it was us in likea bunch of other big bands at the time, and there were 60-70,000 people in thatpark. And then about a year later or two, we played in Germany at thisfestival called Rock AM Ring, and it was us van halen bon Jovi slashesSnakepit which was his first solo thing. Right? An ugly kid joe. Do you rememberthat? Yeah I remember that. And the five of us and hoodie and we playedthese these festivals in Germany that were on these auto race tracks and itwas called Rock Am Ring. And I mean 60-70,000 people out in front of youout in these racetracks. One was on, one was in East Germany and one was inWest Germany in the 90s. And and those...

...so those crowds are the biggest I'veever played too. So when you go overseas obviously there's a languageburied but they sing your songs like I mean obviously there's a lot of songsthat can be, everybody knows english speaking countries especially you knowlike you know obviously the U. K. And and um the Scandinavian countries inGermany a little bit you know they speak some english they'll they'll listen. But italy spainnot so much, haven't we didn't have as much luck over there with withtranslating um for whatever reason, um South africa and Australia and NewZealand. We were huge, everything in those places, so anywhere englishspeaking, we were as big there as we were in America and then the otherother countries that sort of was dependent on how much crossover theenglish was in that country, I think do you get do you still get kind of likeum the goose bumps when you go over and fly and you do concert tours all overthe world and you're like, I was just this kid from Silver Spring Maryland,now I get to go play in front in New Zealand and Australia, like that has tobe amazing. It is amazing. So there is this all, there is this constant, um,you know, back and forth between, oh my God, I'm just this kid and I still getto do this and wait, I'm this man who has already done all this and I canstill do this much more, I can build on this, you know? So it's that constantflux between the two of like, just like I'm still wowed by it all, but I'm alsostill like, uh, inspired and, and still, uh, I still want to achieve with itwith my musical ability, you know? Yeah. You know, I just think it's great that,you know, you've had all the success and you keep achieving your personallife, you keep in chief for your work and then you really want to give backto your community where you've been a teacher, you've done nonprofit thingsand it all seems so important to you, which I absolutely love. And I thinkit's so special. Thanks for staying with us. Yeah, man, I mean it reallygoes back to a lot of like we said at the beginning of conversation, my dadand what he instilled in me early on and uh, I've always been goal oriented.Um, and you know, you gotta work hard to reach your goals. And so that's,that's it. That's the approach. And I'm still there. Well, I think that, youknow, people want to ask why I can interview all these people on my show.And I said, look, sports affects all of us in one way or another. And I loveyour story about what you learned from your dad and how it translated for youinto music. And I love the fact that he was able to see your true passion, Whata gift that was. Yeah, he gets a lot of credit for that and, and I and I liketelling that story on his behalf, number one to give him credit, butnumber two so other people can hear it and take that same mentality and maybethey were able to instill that in their kid or whatever, you know? And he wasprobably thankful you like guitar instead of the drums. You're rightabout that. My son wanted to play the drums and I got him those electric oneslike that that you put the headphones on so you can hear it's not like thereal drums, but uh and you're smart here is like a little tap and it waslike the best thing. You're very smart. Yeah. Yeah. I was like I'm notlistening to that all night because it wasn't good music. Hey buddy, Iappreciate you. So why don't you tell our fans and everybody where you'regonna be, how they can follow you? Maybe check out your website? Yeah.Yeah. So like I said, the next show coming up is a Ram's head on stage inAnnapolis October 15. There are still tickets available so you can just goonline and you can go to Rome Set on stage dot com and buy tickets for that.Um And then the album, Midlife Priceless is kind of everywhere thatyou would get music. Um There are there's vinyl and cd that you can orderif you still do that thing online or from buying from stores and then it'son Spotify and Apple music and all of that as well. And I also made sixvideos for this album because I figured...

...why not like let me just have some funwith this, you know? And uh, and so every time you make a video, you givethe song a new life that it wouldn't have had otherwise. And so I made sixvideos for this album and they're all on Youtube, on my Mark brian music pageon Youtube. So yeah, so that's worth checking out. I think, I mean, thatthat's as good a way to check the album out as any is just going watch thevideos, you get half the album right there, you know? Yeah. And I did watchthe Gotta Get out of town, right? Yeah. That video, I think you you talkedabout how you um somebody, some producers saw it and loved it and said,here's what we gotta do. And there's a lot of good looking girls in that video.Yeah, he's the director, his name is Mark Pellington. And he had this imagelike if you listen to the song, it sounds like a guy who's like, you know,a very in a very urgent situation. So he pictured the guy like, just livinthe life and partying or whatever. Then all of a sudden he's in trouble andhe's got a he's got a scoop town. So that's how he made the video. And uhyeah, he put beautiful girls in there, he put, like, skateboarders andanything that brought a little mayhem into the look of the video, and thenI'm in the car, like trying to escape it all, you know, right now. It wasawesome. I loved watching it. Um and and you're right, you know, from youand I growing up to the first time MTV came on videos, Make songs so much, youknow what I mean? Like it kind of adds a different dimension to the songs. Itgives him a new life, you know, and that's all I can ask for for thesesongs. I want to give him a life of their own. I mean, you know, it's onething to make them, that's another thing to put them out there and hopepeople hear him. And so a video just gives it a chance to get two more eyesand ears, you know? Oh my God, remember when thriller, like the video thrillercame out, Michael Jack, like the anticipation and how everybody wantedto watch it. I forget how many people saw it. Like that first day it came outon MTV. It's crazy. But it was a game changer, You're right. Yeah. So hey,I'm really happy for you man. You look great. My wife was commenting said hishair looks exactly the same as a way to look at that. Look at your hair, it'slike the next same, I don't know, like minds all gray, I got all great. Yeah,I know my mind. I'm getting to the sideburns and the eyebrows and thebeard are all great, so I'm right behind you there. Yeah, very fortunateat 54 to have a full head of hair. I mean, you know, there's no question.That's what I say to every time I get my hair cut, somebody's like, you'vegot a lot of hair, and I'm like, is that a good thing? They're like, ohyeah, most guys your age, it's true, man. I mean, you look around, we'repretty lucky. Yeah, we are lucky. Well, I'm lucky to call you a friend and Iappreciate you joining me on huddle up with us and sharing your story with us,man. It was great to see you gus right back at you man. Thanks for having me.Yeah. So every everyone uh what what a great story. You should all getinspiration from Mark and hearing about his childhood growing up in and howsports helped shape his life, even though he's a world renowned musician,he's, you know, he's just done at all and he's given back to the communitynow and helping really kids and people understand how to play music and theenjoyment they can get out of arts and entertainment. So Mark, thank you again.Hey everyone, I appreciate you listening to huddle up with Gus. We'llsee you next week. I want to thank Vegas sports advantage. Don't forget touse my code, huddle up, save 25% and I also want to thank 16 31 Digital Newsand Sounder. FM. Thank you brian, thank you terry and thank you, Mark, have agreat day. Thanks Shell. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanksfor joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another. Actuallyhuddle up with Gus, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus. Theron, huddle upwith GUS is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on Applemusic.

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