Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Mark Bryan

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to Huddle Up with Gus, featuring 15-year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! You’re in for a very special treat today as Gus interviews the hugely famous Mark Bryan of Hootie and the Blowfish. Who’d ever think that Mark is a bit Washington Football Team fan and is from the Washington, DC area! Gus and Mark talk about the early days of Hootie and how the band evolved as the individual musicians great in talent and fame. Mark shares some exclusive behind-the-scenes moments of those “special times” he shared with bandmate Darius Rucker at the University of South Carolina and then later the road to fame. Then, it’s onto Gus’ favorite subject, football! The guys discuss the current situation with The Washington Football Team, the options the team must make for a great season this year and how some select teams around the league are going to perform. If you ever wanted to hang out with one of the Hooties, here’s your chance!  

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 1631 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never Read. Digital News dot com. Go to 1631 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at Wide. Digital News.com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sports advantage, clients of Vegas sports advantage are winning big in 2021 you can be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100 bettors are up $3700 500 dollars. Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000 bettors are up $37,000 and $5000. Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in the description below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your package today. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, okay, welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are one. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Strange variety, big play two Aleve. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of huddle Up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFL quarterback. I am so excited today for our incredible guests, but before we get to him, I want to tell all of our sponsors. Thank you Vegas sports advantage. Uh go and use them, put my coat in, huddle up And save 25%. Those guys will help you win some real money, with your if you're a better and a gambler don't follow me. I'm terrible at it. I also want to thank 16 31 Digital News Studio for always helping us. Super producer brian and terry uh for help me with this show. And then I also want to thank Sounder F. M. Sounder FM is where we host our platform and our huddle and our podcast. So thank you Sounder FM for all your new technology that you use for us and helping us transcribe all the shows. So today show, I'm really excited. I'm sure that all of our fans will know this gentleman have seen him play, have heard his music. Uh he's got a new solo album out. But uh you know back way back when, I don't know, I think it was maybe 1986. Uh he was going to the University of south Carolina, met a guy named Darius Rucker and they co founded a band called the Wolf Brothers. But you, they added a few more guys and you may know them now as a hootie and the blowfish. So joining me today is Mark brian, co founder, lead guitarist and writer for Hootie and the blowfish and Mark brian music. How you doing buddy Gus, I'm doing great man. Thanks so much for having me here. You're an old time friend of the band. Used to come see us play, I remember that and we used to go see you play too. So it's really cool to be sitting here talking with you man. Yeah, you know, I used to really like your music until you guys let Tony Siragusa singing all the time and then I had to quit listening that he's such a ham and uh Marino's house and that's the only thing you do is him exactly drunk and singing your songs, You get him around a band anytime. He's...

...like, oh do they knew Sinatra, can I do Sinatra? That was great, that was great man. What good times, you know, and time flies. And I mean Thinking back to all those great times that when you guys were just on the rise and now my kids have all graduated college. My daughter's a vet down in D. C. It's like what happened, where the whole time go? Yeah, I'm turning 50 this week. It's like what happened? Well, midlife, priceless baby. That's right. I'm racist. I love I have I have a kid out of college and and one in college and when getting ready to go in college, so I'm right there with your brother. Oh it's a lot of work, isn't it? And uh you know and and uh I I was really hoping for scholarships but they weren't in my future for all my kids had to spend some of that old money I guess. Um But so we want to go back to you growing up in silver spring Maryland. and what that time was like for you, Were you an athlete and a musician? Like did you do both? I mean because you have such a love for sports, but you also have a love for music. I think they're both wonderful. That's a great question. I was born in Silver Spring and grew up in Bethesda and Gaithersburg, all Montgomery County there and my father, my father was uh basketball coach growing up and he catch like the beltway league team for our neighbor, for our area in Gaithersburg. And, and so I was a gym rat from a very young age and kind of learning the concept of team and how to work with the team and and um just how to hone your skills and whatever you're doing through just watching my dad coach these kids for my whole, the whole time I was growing up and I think that that sort of developed in me that that attitude developed me of how to work with other people and how to um you know, grow something and um I played football, basketball, baseball and really adopted that mentality of team team mentality. And then um once I got a little older and I became a teenager, I just became fascinated with music and the energy and rock and roll kind of shifted my focus over to playing guitar and being advanced and writing songs and um was able to take that sort of sports mentality that I grew up with, that my dad instilled in me and that helped a lot, I think in in working together with other musicians and bands and helping grow that. So I definitely think that was a fundamental part of who I am and what I do, right? So then when did you, like when you tell me like this specific timeline, like when you kind of quit playing sports and then really started to focus on music? I was a junior in high school and my dad was coaching the summer league team for our high school and we were good, we had a really good program, jean, don't was the coach and he would, he sent off a lot of players to play in college and all that. And we were at Seneca Valley High School in Montgomery County. And um, and junior year, I was, I was getting ready to try out for the team and everything. And my dad came to me and he's like coaches, thinking about you being a starter by senior year, so you're gonna have to really dig in if you want to do this. He's like, he's like, but I noticed that you're all the time you used to spend out of the court, you know, practicing your in your room on guitar now. I'm like, yeah, I guess so. You know, I hadn't really thought about it, but he was right. I mean, I was kind of committing, my time was committed more to music than it was to sports. And so he's like, you know, this is this is the time for you to make an adult decision here, you know, which do you really want to do? Which would you rather do? And so I had to like, for the first time in my life, sit there and think about it and I was like, wow, you know, when it comes down to it, I think my passion is more geared towards creativity and music and that energy that I was finding from rock and roll could not replace that anywhere with sports. And so I just sort of, the sports thing fizzled out a little bit. And I went to the coach on my dad's recommendation and told him, hey, I'm, I'm more into music right now, that I am basketball and I can't commit to you, that I'm going to give the time I need to be a starter by senior year. And he...

...said, well, thank you for coming to me and telling me that. And so I moved on and then senior year I'm in jazz ensemble and I'm playing a recital and in the back of the room is the basketball coach watching me and he came up to me after and he's like, man, I'm really impressed. That was, I think he made the right choice. And again, I really respect you for coming to me. And so it was, uh, that was a sort of a pivotal moment for me. Um, and a lot of, for a lot of reasons. And it was a really, it was really good advice from my dad and uh, well that was just carried on from there. Yeah, I mean, I think that's just so progressive, like your dad just had the forethought to say, you know, a lot of people say that they want the best for their kids, but a lot of dads who are athletics and coaches like your dad, they don't want their kids to give up sports. I thought that's, that's a great story, is give you the ability to choose. Yeah. I mean, he could really see that my passion had shifted and I couldn't even see, I wouldn't think I wasn't conscious of it and he was, he could see it. So he kind of made me aware of it and he was right, and uh you know, never turned back after that. So when you were putting albums on or tape decks, I don't know what you're a little older than me. I think whatever you listed, who was you, who are you listening to? And who, who were you trying to emulate when you would play guitar? Yeah, it was a lot of vinyl back then and a lot of Zeppelin, the who was my main influence Pete Townsend something about, he was a great guitar player, but he also put this energy into the songs that was that I couldn't find anywhere else. And and he was a great songwriter and composer and that started to really appeal to me, like I didn't really want to be Eddie van Halen as much as I did Pete Townsend. Right. It's one thing to be able to sit there and shred, but he also has to be able to write great songs. And so to me, I shifted my focus more on what's what's a really good composition. And uh and so I while I became better at guitar, I also became a better songwriter and had a message that I wanted to share through songs and all that. And so that became very important to me. And it still is guys like, I'm still really fired up about that, and this is my fourth solo album. Whenever who needs done making albums, I go take all the leftovers and go make albums and that kind of thing. Yeah, it's still really what I'm fired up and passionate about and I feel like my best songs could possibly still be ahead of me, you know? Yeah. So where do you, where does your inspiration come from writing? Because uh, you know, my wife has always wanted to write, but there's other things that have pulled her away and and sometimes I think it's no different than writing um starting to write a book and you get blocks and and does it just come from your life, or is it coming from things you see? Or where does your inspiration come from? Yeah, sometimes there's something that hits you really hard that you're going through in life or that you see, and you you the words just come flying out of you, sometimes it's like that, and um, you know, you have to write about it, that kind of thing. Other times, other times it might be simmering below the surface and you have to put in a little time, and and just you kind of, right, let your subconscious flow and you don't have to be writing about anything specific or you don't have to be writing what you think would be a finished version, You're just writing to, to get your thoughts out. And a lot of times that type of writing, that stream of conscious type of writing leads to uh something greater, something that I can, something I can pull from and then write more about later. So you kind of, it's almost like exercising your mind, like you would, when you go out to work out for a sport or something like that, once you get that mind flowing, you're working that muscle and it produces for you. So that, that's kind of, that's amazing. It's like, so I want to ask you this. So when I go back and I look at old VHS tape me playing in high school and I'm like, who's that skinny gangly dude out there? What is how, why did I make that throw or what happened to me? Like if you go back and look at your writing from when you were in high school and stuff, you're like, what was I thinking about? I mean it's unlistenable dude.

There might be like, there might be one out of 10 songs that was good, you know? And, but those are the ones that keep you going. That's what makes you go okay, maybe I can do this. You know? It's like my golf game, one shot, every game gives me coming back. Oh, it's exactly like that. I quit golf to life and my career all the time. There's so many things you can so many comparisons you can draw from your golf, right? Exactly. Exactly. Yeah. No, that's just amazing because you've been doing it for so long. So then you go from high school and how did you pick south Carolina? Um I was aside from coaching, my dad also was a sports broadcaster in the D. C. Area and he and Mike Patrick did G. W basketball games before Mike Patrick became a national broadcaster on ESPN. And so I was in like middle school when that was happening and I would go to the G. W. Again with my dad and and listen to me and Mike Patrick, you know, on the, on the radio, that kind of thing. I was, I thought that's this is what I want to study. I didn't, for whatever reason I didn't want to study music. Rock and roll isn't about studying, you know, it's about energy and playing. So when it came to school I wanted to focus studying on broadcast journalism based on kind of, again, my dad, you know, um, and university of south Carolina had a really good broadcast journalism school. And when we went down and visited, um, it was the best of all the campuses I had visited. It was just like it looked like it would be the most fun. And um, so I picked that school and then I went and talked to our bass player from my high school band dean. And he had also picked south Carolina without us really ever talking about it. And so he ended up down there too. And we, and they put us in the same dorm on different halls and Darius lived on my hall. So by the end of freshman year, you know, we were a bad. That's amazing. So like you didn't know Darius can moving down there, right? Just met him that freshman year. So how do you say, like does he hear you playing? Do you hear him playing? How does that work? Because well I brought my guitar down to school and then and he would just sing all the time really. And the famous story is like he, I'd hear him singing in the shower. We used to, everybody would take showers together on the hall. And uh and so and he and he would just sing, he would sing even while he was getting ready after the shower and you could hear him down the hall and he just had a great voice. And so Um I had my guitar and we just sat down one night with some beers, like what songs do you know what songs do you know? And next thing you know, we had a set of like 10 or 12 songs and we went across the street and played them at this chicken wing joint uh as the Wolf brothers, you know, as you mentioned earlier, wait, where'd Wolf brothers come from? That's a funny story to one of the guys that lived in the dorm with us. His nickname was Wolf and he introduced us the first show he did and he didn't know what to say. He's like, ladies and gentlemen, he's from Bahamas. Ladies and gentlemen, this is Mark and Darius, the Wolf brothers. He named us after himself on the spot. That's great. Yeah, yeah. Look at each other like that works kind of look like him. But anyway, so we did that for about three or four shows and then turned it into a band and, and two guys had that various, we're friends we're friends with, had walked into a party and he had nicknamed them separately the blowfish and hoodie and they came into a party together and he's like, hey, look hootie and the blowfish and then he's like, hey, that's, that should be the name for a band. And uh, not thinking that anything would ever come from and I was like, sure, that sounds great, right, right. And uh, and then a couple years later we were graduating and we hated the name, but it was too late because we're already known by that, so we kept it and I'm pretty sure it worked out pretty well. So yeah, it's like an animal house. When you're john Belushi goes, your new nickname will be flounder. Exactly that. Exactly like that. Darius gave you guys a nickname. That's how you got your band. That's great. Yeah. Oh man, I'm sure you guys didn't have any beers that party at all. Well, the first few shows we played, we...

...didn't even get paid money the guy would give pay us and beer, and one time he gave us a keg of stroh's. Oh my gosh, it's a Blues brothers story. Yeah, we got a keg of stroh's for playing a show in front of chicken wire. Yeah, that's great. That's great. So, you know, those things are just what kind of, those kind of stories that you guys can always go back to? Um And I knew you guys took some, like, you you went hard for a long time and rose to fame and then you took a break. Um what is it about bands like that? You Gotta, is it like a team, you kind of got to get away from each other for a little bit and then come back together. Yeah, I mean, we had, you know, when we took that break, we had been touring for 20 years straight. I mean, it took small breaks in there, but You know, every year for 20 years, we were doing at least 100 shows a year. So, um you know, that starts to take its toll. And then also um the last couple albums we had put out, we didn't have any commercial success with and therefore the crowds, even though there were still large, we're starting to dwindle. Like we couldn't go play the bigger venues that we had played in the past, and we're starting to play smaller venues, so we're like, you know what, maybe it's time to hit the reset button here. Yeah, and we we also had some personal stuff, everybody had families and wanted to take a break from that standpoint. And so it was just the right time. And uh and then that's when Darius decided to make a country album and that was obviously has worked out great for him. Um we got back together about two years ago to do a new album and tour and it was wildly successful. So, um you know, who knows what the future holds? I think, you know, we'll probably do something like that again, including a show in Mexico, this january that we're going to do. Oh yeah, that'll be great, That'll be wonderful. Yeah. Yeah. So when you guys are together and I think it's um special. How did you guys get involved in like golf tournaments and just athletes? Is it something that was mutual or did they search you guys up? Because I know you guys were always part of Merino stuff. Yeah, he absolutely loves you guys. Yeah, we obviously were, we always played golf. So that that was a little unusual at the time. You know, musicians that play golf, not a lot of people were talking about that. So that became a little bit of a story. And then when we did that only want to be with you video where it was like an episode of Sportscenter. Yeah, we were, you know, playing a bunch of sports on the, in the video, playing basketball against NBA players and marinas throw Darius footballs and we're playing golf with couples and all that. So I think that sort of gave us that reputation of a love sports, you know? Yeah, but those things are fun. Like dan Marino sculpt Germans were always fun. Uh, tell the story. I tell the story. I played with Sergeant slaughter one time you and I were walking down the fairways and people go, hey sergeant slaughter, they didn't know who I was, but they're like, because he has a whole gear on, totally go go over and body slam people and he's giving like the big elbow and I'm like, this is awesome. I was like a little kid that's going, but there's so much fun like they are services and it's so cool that you guys would take such a big part of it. Yeah, we loved it. And then south Carolina Junior golf had started this event where they were getting pros to come in after the masters, um, to, to Colombia, which is only an hour away from Augusta, you know, and they asked us to get involved and then after a year, one of being involved with that, we took over the event and it's monday after the Masters and we're now on our 27th year of doing that. That's amazing. Yeah, truly. So who's the best golfer out of you guys, Darius? Really? Yeah, when we took that break, like back in like oh eight or whatever it was, He's like, I remember him saying this, he's like, I'm gonna dedicate my myself to golf. And he went and got like the, you know, the uh indoor thing that you can put under your house and he could put a putting girls yard and he started taking...

...blessings and he went, were all like 12 handicap 15 handicap and he went down to like an 86 handicap and he's still there and so he is definitely the best, wow, that's that's awesome. So you know, one of, one of the things I was thinking about too is like you mentioned that you guys did, you toured forever, right? And then you're playing all your songs over and over again, you know? And it's like us when we, when we go out and we have to learn an offense, we put some new plays in, but we don't put a lot in because you stick with what you're good at, right? If all the time in practice, we put something new in and if it were not good at it in practice were like, we're not doing it. But how is that for you? Is it just go by like, you don't even think about it like, you know, sets and it's just coming coming through. Yeah, yeah. So we always are going to play a state a stable or staple of like old older songs, the hits that people know and love, you know, and the ones that work really well, live that kind of thing. But but for the, for the musicians in the band, it's always exciting for us to have a couple of new songs to do to, you know, challenge ourselves a little bit um, have some excitement in the moment with something new. And so we'll we'll always incorporate a couple of our new originals into the set and we always try to learn new covers to keep that um list ever changing. Um you know, you don't want to just if you just played D. C. For instance, you don't want to go back the next two years old and play the same set. Right? Right. But you have to play some of the same set, so it's kind of a tricky thing and and Darius is really good at making set list at this point, but he always asks us for our input and and then we'll also throw out, hey, what if we do this or that and he'll either be like or oh hey, great idea, you know, so um it's an ever changing thing and I think you do tailored to the specific show you're doing to where like what whatever town were playing in, we might try to do a cover of a band that's from that town. Something fun like that, you know? Yeah. Yes. So have you ever gone to a town and said the wrong name, like at the beginning of a counter, Like, I always think that like, you guys just travel so much, but you have to like, be so focused like when you open up the set, like, hey Atlanta, you know, then you're like, wait, we're in Chicago. Exactly. You will see, just to, just to avoid that, you will see a big all caps smelling of whatever town we're in at the top of each set list, so that if you step up to the mike and say something, you know where you are, you know? Okay, I'm going to concerts where they spent the wrong thing. Yeah, I mean it can get, if you are thinking about it like this, if you're playing four nights in one week and each you're leaving each night after the show, so you show up in the next town the next morning and then you get on stage that following night it gets a little confusing after four in a row, you know, you have to kind of be conscious of where, especially if all you're seeing in those towns is your tour bus and the backstage area. If you're not able to get out in ST louis and go see the arch then you don't really know you're in ST louis, you just, I just told you you are, you know, so it can get a little uh confusing is not the right word gets taxing on you, you know, it's sort of just to wear you down after a while and so I'm sure that does happen but I can honestly say I've never done that and I'm not, I would well that would be that would be tough and that that would be something that you're very conscious of, you know, and I'm sure back in the day when led Zeppelin and all those were playing they weren't very conscious of things, they just opened it up and said whatever and people were, you know, I mean there was probably a little more craziness flying around. They were the funniest all time stage matter is paul Stanley from Kiss. Oh yeah, I can't you just have to go google it or youtube um Just youtube like paul Stanley from Kiss like between songs or something like that when he's talking. It's the most hilarious banter you'll ever hear in rock and roll history Really? I'm gonna Yeah, yeah. It's just, he's doing that voice and that thing you're saying where like it doesn't matter what you...

...say, Everybody screams and he says some of the most ridiculous shit miller. Well that was good because that was an easy first concert 72. So it wasn't really a bit, let's do. Yeah. Yeah. So yeah, you know, it's just amazing to me that, that you had such a long and successful career and, and the name of your solo album, Midlife Priceless is just, it's just like, hey, I'm halfway, but I got a long way to go. Yeah, I mean, and everything, I'm doing it so, so right on. And it's just, you know, everybody, once you get to this age 50, everybody's been through some shit in their life. Everybody, no matter who you are varying degrees or levels of crap that you have to survive and go through in your life. And you know, I did go through a midlife crisis and I came out on the other end and now I really appreciate things in a way that I didn't before and that's where the album title came from, you know, Midlife Priceless instead of crisis, you know? Yeah, I know that that's that's awesome. And how are your kids doing? Like, I mean, because that when you go on tour, like I would go a saturday night to go play a game, right? And I'd be away one night, but sometimes when you guys are torn, you have to be away from your family for a long time. How does that affect you? Because I would be hard for me when I was younger and the kids were younger, it was death. There were definitely some difficult times with that. But from a very early age they understood what I do and so we were able to manage that and now when I look at them as young adults, I really think they're doing great. I'm sure that there's something that happened, it will affect them, you know, just like any family, you know, they might end up in counseling or therapy about it. Who knows? I sure did from, you know, whatever I went through. But all of that aside, I can honestly say that, you know, our families in a really good place, even after everything we've been through and I'm really proud of all three of my kids. They're amazing people. So good reports from that standpoint. Yeah, that's awesome because I feel the same way. But you know, the good thing about your kids, they never had to see their dad hit a wall in a stadium in the morning, so my kids have to deal with that all the time, so they are definitely gonna need therapy. Well they might have seen the equivalent. Trust me, I got I can tell you some stories, so, you know, anytime you do what we do and you put yourself out there, there's gonna be some embarrassing moments and it's it's how you bounce back from those moments that defines who you are. You know, and and and that applies to anybody in life, no matter who you are and what you do, it's all about that that survival and coming back from those things that that's what really marks your character. And so I've had some moments like that in my career where like I've made horrible mistakes or and I and you filled with self doubt after it. Um and then you just fight through it and then you hopefully you get back to that really good show after that and you go, oh wait, I can do this, you know? And so uh my kids have seen me go through some of that too, and it's a struggle, but hopefully they've seen me survive it, and that's the that's the message you want them to see, that's what you want them to leave, you know, that's when I do my every radio show or sports talk I do, you know, they always have to ask me that question. And one of the things is that I laugh about it, right? I don't get mad about it, I try to really laugh about and some unless somebody is being a real ass about the whole thing, of course, you know, but that was always the thing for me, is to show my kids that look, you're gonna have ups and downs in life and you can find a way to get around that roadblock, it can go over it and go around it and go under it. There's just don't ever give up and that's kind of what my mantra was, because that was a big thing that happened. It was, you know, everywhere in the Washington post, ESPN, like I'm on ESPN once a month. Yeah, no, you're right. It is, it was a big thing and um, and yeah, it was a chance for you to say, how am I gonna, how do I bounce back from this in it? And I know the feeling goes full on buddy. Um, and so, you know, I think, again, that's, that's what the funds, who we are, that's that's what the funds are...

...character and here we are sitting here talking to each other, enjoying our time and and respecting our careers and that's what it's all about, brother. Yeah, definitely. Hey everyone, uh, we were talking with Mark brian, uh, we're gonna take a quick commercial break, but before we do that, I wanna, you know, there's a question I get every week, Zakia canoe um, from Bethesda Maryland, Mark, your old stomping ground, she asked me, what do you think the Washington football team record will be this season? And how do you think Ryan Fitzpatrick is a good fit and why? So? I think the records, I think they're going to be um, well there's an actually extra game right this year. So I think they're going to be, what is it? Nine and eight? That's me too. That's why, yeah, I think they're right right in that because their division is going to be way better. Um, and so I think they're gonna be pretty good. They're going to be right on that cusp of, of being in the making the playoffs. I think I think I think the defense is good enough to give us a winning season for sure. And so But that the question mark for the offenses, why I'm only going to give him nine wins. I think Fitzpatrick was a great move for the short term and I think he could get us off to a good start, maybe even have and we got to hope for this a career season for him. If Fitzpatrick has a career season, we go to the playoffs. But how many career seasons has Fitzpatrick had? You know, well, 17, You know what I'm saying? I know what you're saying, but you know, like even last year, many of those 17, we need his best one. Yeah, yeah. And and he shows some brilliance and he's been on teams. I mean Ryan is a very good friend of mine and we've known each other for like I played so many pranks on that guy and when in locker rooms. But I think the thing is that he brings an energy to the team that they need. Like last year in Miami, I don't know why they, I wanted to put two in when they were winning. Like he was having a career year, he totally was. And so that, that, that back to my point, if we get that Fitzpatrick all year long were a playoff team. Um, if we don't, then, you know, we're still struggling a quarterback possibly and really like Hi Nikki, but I mean, is he, is he a full season starter yet? We don't know. So you know, I think that question mark is my only thing that keeps keeps me from saying 10 wins. Um, And I think it's very possible that we get that kind of season out of Fitzpatrick and get our 10 wins, but I'm gonna go with nine and 8. Yeah. So I think that for Ryan, he said something that I haven't seen him say before that he feels the most comfortable and like, this is the best fit he's ever had in the NFL for a guy that's a journeyman like I was, um, that's a big thing that you're that, that they're taking you on as the starter and they're saying, okay, you're our guy, let's go, let's go do something special this year. So I hope that happens. I think Ryan is, will be a good fit in the short term, you know, because obviously he's older, he played longer than I have. So, you know, he doesn't have that many more years unless he's tom brady. Yeah, I mean he's, I just, like I said, I hope it works out to where this is. We get the guy we saw last season and I love to see him work out long term, but I just don't, I don't see it. You know, I'm just being realistic, I don't see it, but I hope it does. I hope I'm wrong. I really like the guy and I really like his skills and I love for him to have a career season and take us to the playoffs. We love it. I would too, and I'd love to see all the fans back in the, in the stadium. All right, we'll take a quick break and then we'll be right back. Mhm Yeah. Hey, how come up with us listeners Manscaped. Well, they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh so, you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package, three point oh kid, I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box. Uh you know, uh and...

...you can see what it says, They will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh, you know, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, you know, they sent me this great uh some boxers, even what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this cool, you sack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So uh it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of products. Um you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh you know, you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh Gus Frerotte, that's G U S. F R E R O T T E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like um this way cool rumor that has a little led light um ceramic. These things come apart, they're waterproof, you can do a lot with them. So you know, get Manscaped is great. You know, it's funny game. I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But he brought his own clippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up his goatee and everything and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beard trimmer. So, you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So, uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since. So, you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably, uh, if it would have just said manscaped on it, but we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard, or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so, uh, it's a great story, um, but you know, I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it, and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story, so one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing in the league, um but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing uh because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair um and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so uh you know, we all work out to me like we're going in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, getting a little sweat on and everything. You want to smell good. Uh You know, you got to take care of yourself. They've got some great products um you know this one uh little uh all deodorant, we'll need that here and there um after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um It's a great thing, but there's so many great products. Um I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um The lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point oh, comes with a perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can see the back, your balls will thank you. And then here's the front, so it's an awesome shirt. They have great gear. Uh and you...

...know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and read the paper. So the man's cape even has their own daily news, so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E R O T T. E. Uh and you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know, you can save 20% and get free shipping. So use the code Gus Frerotte. G. U. S. F. R. E R. O. T. T. E. Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong on the back of my pro bowl jersey. So you know I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below uh and have some fun right, there's nothing closer to you than your little bugs. So use the lawnmower uh Use the code Gus Frerotte save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some great manscaped products. Uh Yeah. Uh huh. Mhm. Thanks. Hey everyone we're back on huddle up with Gus please go to my website, huddle up with guest dot com like and subscribe our show and you'll be able to listen to all of our great guests like today's great guest Mark brian uh Mark. It's it's a pleasure, it's a pleasure to have you on. I know that we've met way in the past and it's so nice that you can just reconnect with people like you that are just good people and it feels like we I know we haven't talked in a long time but it feels like we haven't missed a beat. So it's nice, thank you for joining me today. Right back at you got to feel the same way. So tell me about like writing, so you were with a group, you know you write songs for a group and you got a bunch of guys saying I like this, I don't like that and you probably have to collaborate a lot, but when you write a solo album you've written I think for now. And so when you write a solo album it's just you, or do you have somebody saying like how many people do you bounce things off? Right. So uh the way this this one worked out was that all of these songs that are on my fourth solo album, we're most of all of them were pitched for the last 20 albums. So I did a lot of Working out these songs in that process. And when we do the Hoodie album, we we have 60 or 80 songs to pull from, and we can only record like 18 of them. So uh there were several that were sitting there that I felt like we're really worthy And and sort of so that the that process sort of honed it down to knowing which 12 I was going to do for my solo album. It was the best ones that didn't make it to the studio, basically, you know? And it's such a subjective thing, it's like, who knows what the best songs are. It's not really about that, It's about, I mean it is but it's about what are the best songs for these four guys. And so we'll be going to make a hoodie out. You know, what are the ones that Darius is enjoying singing? What are the ones the band has the best groove on, that kind of thing? And so and so that process sort of weeds itself down. And and once that was over with hoodie, then I kind of knew right away which songs I wanted to do from from my album. Um and you know, and outside of that, I'm also writing all the time. There's a project I did just recently uh for rosa parks tribute with an organization in Washington D. C. The Street Mansion Oh Mansion was doing a Rosa Parks tribute. And they put me together with songwriter paul Williams and became with the Rosa Parks tribute song. And this is a line from it that I just think it's amazing. Hope is a hunger that hate can't control. Oh, I love...

...that shirt. The legendary paul Williams, I guess you want if you really want one. Yeah, I can get, you're just probably a medium. I need a big double edge. Um but yeah, so, I mean, I'm I'm involved with the projects all the time, trying to stay creative and and trying to express myself, but also write about things like Rosa Parks, things that matter. You know, there's there are messages out there that need to be shared. Yeah, I saw that you did something with Denny Hamlin. You've you've you've really tried to engage in all kind of different projects. Uh you know, just trying to research you, you've been really busy, like, even though like who do you guys took a break? You've tried to really stay busy in in finding other projects for yourself? Is that, was that very important to you? Yeah. So obviously when Hoodie took a break, it was like, well I've done that for 20 years, what else can I do? Yeah. And so that's where it started, I started teaching music industry at the College of Charleston. Um I got really involved with the nonprofit that I run here Carolina studios, which is like an after school recording studio. And that led to the event with Danny hamlin, which is a fundraiser for that. And and Danny's fundraiser is for cystic fibrosis here at M. U. S. C in charleston. So we part we partner and and raise a bunch of money for both of those causes. Um I uh, you know, I'm just built a new recording studios on producing other artists, that kind of thing. So I mean there's things I can do in my skill set that are outside of just writing songs and playing live, you know, which is awesome. So when you have somebody come into the studio, like are you like, where do you draw your like coaching from? You think about your dad? Do you think about, you know what I mean? Like this basically when you're running a studio, your coaching those people coming in and writing and singing those songs. Without a doubt. It's so funny you say that because I make that analogy all the time that the producer of an album is very similar to a coach of a team and the band is the team and you're and you have to keep the big picture in mind as the producer of what, what's the goal that we're going for. And then you try to bring the best out of each of those musicians and band members to where we get the best possible sound. And so it's very similar to coaching up a team. Um and I, like, as I said earlier at the beginning of our conversation, that came naturally to me from being a gym rat when I was a kid around my dad, you know, catching the Mini Terps in Gaithersburg, The mini church. That's awesome. Do you think that all the sports you played and growing up and you were very diverse in the sports you played? How did you think that really like besides the team aspect? But athletically help you be a better guitar player and in a group um, when you are in fifth grade and you strike out to win the game, like you had a chance to win the game and you strike out right, that's the worst feeling in the world. It happens to every kid at some point, you know, and you have your story from when you were a kid and whatever sport it was where you you failed. So you learn failure through sports, you have to learn failure and you learn at a young age, especially if you start playing sports when you're a kid, you know, when you're a young kid and you're not gonna win every game, you're not going to make every shot, you're not gonna get every hit, you know, that kind of thing. So you learn early on how to overcome those things and I think that was a huge thing for me of once I got out and started playing out live, I didn't always have the best shows. I wasn't always singing on key, I wasn't always playing the part right on guitar. And it's Making those mistakes and coming back from them that teaches you who you who you want to be and how to get better at what you're doing, you know? And so that I think I got a lot of that early on sports, I can remember striking out when I had a chance to win game in 6th grade And you know, that I still remember it. So obviously it affected me deeply, but but having had that happened at that young age, wants...

...something like that happened once I was 16 or 18, it was like, Okay, those things are gonna happen, How do you bounce back from it, you know? Yeah. So did you do your kids play sports? Not really, a little bit, they dabbled, but they were not able to, as I was there really in the music, all three of them got that gene from me and they can all sing on key. They can all play instruments. Um It seems to come very naturally to them. So that's awesome. But I'm sure they were in the studio with you From here. The get go. Yeah, they were here and there. I mean, I've recorded songs that they were when they were like eight and 9 and 10 years old and stuff, you know, just for fun. So they did get a little taste of that early on. Um, And, and they all played a little bit of sports just, they just weren't nobody committed to anything, you know? Yeah. Well that's like I always say about Gunnar and Gabe right there like, oh, they were football players. Well, I'm like, yeah, they kind of had to be because they were in like the locker room with me every day playing with the guys that I played with, They were hanging out shooting basketball, whatever we had the locker room, right? So that was kind of what they loved and they just fell in love with that. I'm sure it's the same with your kids. You know if there hanging out in the studio and they're they're seeing how much, you know what it's like it's work, But you know, they're also having fun. Yeah, it is a lot of fun and I think that definitely has had an influence on them. So if you thought about like saying someday, all right, we're we're gonna get together and we're gonna We're gonna we're gonna put a little album together all of us, or is it always just, oh, that would be awesome. It just it just hit me last thanksgiving. Um 2020. Uh We did there was, we did a little show. There's a, like a thing in my neighborhood where you play on Wednesday nights. It's like, it's not really an open mic, you have to book it. But um, you can, you can, a lot of bands play on Wednesday nights and it was the Wednesday night before thanksgiving last year and all of my kids were in town and I had had, I had gotten that date to play there and I said you guys want to do this set with me? And they were all like, yeah, so so my three kids and my sister, the five of us did a set together and played on each other's songs. Everybody sang, everybody played. Did you smile the whole time? I mean it must have been Perma grin. Do you still have to be so awesome? Yeah, so we, that gave me the realization that, hey, you know, I could collaborate with my family uh, musically if we ever want to. But there's a big difference between doing things like that for fun and then making an album and taking it really seriously because everybody has to dig in enough. So we're not really to that layer of commitment yet to it. I think everybody just wants to do it for fun right now. But the fact that we can collaborate is so cool. Yeah, I know that is cool because the moment that dad says, we gotta dig in and you guys are gonna be here for 10 hours, they're going to be like, oh dad, I don't know. You know what? So that's when you become their, your coach. Yeah, that's not good. Oh, so like my kids get mad at me because I'm saying too much or whatever they call me coach, that's what they call me. I know I said, oh, I'm in trouble, they just call me coach, but they call me, they call me brisker, I don't even know where they got biscuit and that's why I like, I like them already. Just like, oh yeah, you love them. They sound a lot like your kids, like they're just good, good kids, good people and there's just a lot of fun to be around. I'm actually golfing with the boys more and more now. They they go, dad, why don't you make us golf when we were young? I'm like, what was I gonna take too whiny little boys to golf every day and they hated it. Like, I wasn't doing that. That's cool now though. That's really cool. Oh yeah, we have fun like, but they still can't beat me so I can't beat my dad by the way. He was just really he just turned 80 last year and he shot 78 a couple months ago. I can't I can't beat my dad, but he's playing from the senior teeth but I can't beat him. Where do you guys go play usually if you go back to him? Um He actually lives down here now in Sunset Beach, north Carolina and I live in charleston. So we kind of meat in...

...like pawleys island area lot to play golf somewhere around there or he'll come down and play Bulls Bay where we play down here in charleston and then he's got a couple of course is up by him that I go up and play with his buddies too sometimes. Oh yeah. Do you does he let you know it too that you can't beat him? He's not a big trash talker, but you know, he's got that wry smile going like. Yeah. Yeah. That's awesome that I do that. I do I don't say much, I don't talk about trash because they get pretty pissed. But you know like I'll be at the, at the on the golf cart like Gunner 92 gave 87 dad 80, you know, out loud enough so they could hear it. That's right, yeah. So with your new album, how does this work now when you guys want to go, when you're gonna go, are you going to go back and tour with, who do you said talked about going to Mexico, Are you going to go out on a solo album tour? How does that work for you now? I'm doing select shows. So I just played here in charleston at the Windjammer, which is like the greatest all time beach venue there is um last month and then I'm playing in october at Rams Head on stage in Annapolis awesome. Yeah, which will be a blast and that would be and then maybe another charleston show and then solo and then Hoodie is doing Mexico in january and there are still tickets available for that. It's called Hoodie fest and it's like a big nineties, you know festival kind of show on the beach in Mexico. And it will have like blues traveler and spin doctors and better than Ezra and the list goes on. It's gonna be a lot of fun and that's in january. And what part of Mexico where uh not not pla del Carmen. It's in between, right? It's in between plot ray and like um and like Cancun it's just it's like one of those beach resorts that's in between the door and take your take your bottled water, right? Exactly. Yeah. That's the last thing. What have you ever had an issue like that where you, because you know we all, we're all human like where you got on stage and you're like, oh God, it's hit me right now. Like, I mean all the years you've done it, you've had to have something happened like twice, twice on this has happened, everybody in the band at least once, twice in our career. I had a, something happened on stage where I was sick. I had, I had the show must go on, I had to take the stage sick. And both times I had somebody put a trash can like right off the stage, you know behind the speaker and I'd just be playing and pretending like everything's okay. And then I just go over and curl and the second time that had happened, um we were in L. A. Playing universal amphitheater and Anthony and flea from the chili peppers were in like the second row in front of me. And so like, I mean they're like idolized these people and they're sitting here watching me play and I'm trying to act like nothing's wrong, but I was sick as a dog and I had to keep going over and throwing up on the side. Um Yeah, that was, that sucked. But I got through both shows and I mean, you know, that's what, you know, you do what you gotta do and if there's anybody that probably has done that before, it's probably Anthony and flea. Exactly many, many sure you're right, I'm sure. Yeah. Okay. And so like when I, when you play sports, like for me, I'd go to a game, you know, let's say we're playing. I was with the broncos were playing in Kansas City, it's a big game and you just get under center, it's the first snap of the game. You got butterflies. Do you still get butterflies at all, or you put out a doubt? Without a doubt? And I have a warm up routine that I do that helps me through the, but like the worst, I don't know if this is the way it was for you guys before a game, but the worst part is like the last hour before you start. Oh yeah, like it'll be, let's say the showtimes at eight...

...o'clock and like, you know, 6 36 45 rolls around and you've already eaten, you've already done all the stuff, so what else can you do? So I, so you're just sitting there waiting. And so I came up with like a really good warm up routine that I do on guitar and vocals um and just try to get my, get myself warmed up so that when I hit the stage, everything is ready to go and that sort of takes care of that nervous butterfly time. But I definitely still get them and if we're ever doing anything on live national tv, I get the worst butterflies. Really? Oh man. But you know, you guys superstitious. Not really, we do, we do do a shot before every show there, we'll do that a little shot of something. That's just a tradition we have, but that'll get your ring. And then the other thing is when we used to share hotel rooms, it was don't turn the tv off when you leave the hotel room always leave the tv on. That was the superstition we had. So now we all, we all have our own rooms, we still all do that, I'll do that. I've seen so many guys like I've had guys like come into the locker room, they put their whole uniform on like how it's gonna look on them, on the ground in front of their locker, they wanted this. I'm like why? Like, but there's routines. I had buddies who throw up like every game before they play, you know, and everybody like they're like, don't you have a superstition? I'm like just get dressed, I have a cup of coffee, get dressed, let's go. But you're right. It was like We warmed up, we come back in and we have to wait for something going on outside and you've got that 30-40 minutes and you've got and you're sitting in your locker like can we just go out already? Let's start. Why isn't I know Exactly. And it is rough sometimes like that. Especially when the butterflies are kicking because your mind starts wandering and you just can't get comfortable. You know, like sitting down and going to do it standing up. You're like, oh, I'm gonna be standing up for the next two hours, so I kind of want to rest. That's just the weirdest place. So I just pull out a guitar and start noodling and and warming up my voice and that seems to pass that time really well. Yeah. Okay. Mhm. Hey, gus I just lost you bud. Right? Yeah, he's uh he's freezing up on us. Can you hear him? Yeah? No. Okay, let's get him birdie there. Let me see. Uh We can barely hear you guys. All right. What happened? Uh touching? It's like a single no kids. Yeah, blaming and I'm like, bad. Not really. Not really. Can you really hate now? You're back? That was that was clear. All right, good, good. So I was going to ask you, you know, played in some in front of some big stadiums, but you had to play in front of a lot of people. It's the biggest crowd you've ever played in front of. Um It's uh I think it's 60 to 70,000 people. And it happened once here in charleston back in the day, right? When we were first starting to blow up, there was a Radio fist here called Wave Fest in Charleston. And they did it in this park downtown. And um it was us in like a bunch of other big bands at the time, and there were 60-70,000 people in that park. And then about a year later or two, we played in Germany at this festival called Rock AM Ring, and it was us van halen bon Jovi slashes Snakepit which was his first solo thing. Right? An ugly kid joe. Do you remember that? Yeah I remember that. And the five of us and hoodie and we played these these festivals in Germany that were on these auto race tracks and it was called Rock Am Ring. And I mean 60-70,000 people out in front of you out in these racetracks. One was on, one was in East Germany and one was in West Germany in the 90s. And and those...

...so those crowds are the biggest I've ever played too. So when you go overseas obviously there's a language buried but they sing your songs like I mean obviously there's a lot of songs that can be, everybody knows english speaking countries especially you know like you know obviously the U. K. And and um the Scandinavian countries in Germany a little bit you know they speak some english they'll they'll listen. But italy spain not so much, haven't we didn't have as much luck over there with with translating um for whatever reason, um South africa and Australia and New Zealand. We were huge, everything in those places, so anywhere english speaking, we were as big there as we were in America and then the other other countries that sort of was dependent on how much crossover the english was in that country, I think do you get do you still get kind of like um the goose bumps when you go over and fly and you do concert tours all over the world and you're like, I was just this kid from Silver Spring Maryland, now I get to go play in front in New Zealand and Australia, like that has to be amazing. It is amazing. So there is this all, there is this constant, um, you know, back and forth between, oh my God, I'm just this kid and I still get to do this and wait, I'm this man who has already done all this and I can still do this much more, I can build on this, you know? So it's that constant flux between the two of like, just like I'm still wowed by it all, but I'm also still like, uh, inspired and, and still, uh, I still want to achieve with it with my musical ability, you know? Yeah. You know, I just think it's great that, you know, you've had all the success and you keep achieving your personal life, you keep in chief for your work and then you really want to give back to your community where you've been a teacher, you've done nonprofit things and it all seems so important to you, which I absolutely love. And I think it's so special. Thanks for staying with us. Yeah, man, I mean it really goes back to a lot of like we said at the beginning of conversation, my dad and what he instilled in me early on and uh, I've always been goal oriented. Um, and you know, you gotta work hard to reach your goals. And so that's, that's it. That's the approach. And I'm still there. Well, I think that, you know, people want to ask why I can interview all these people on my show. And I said, look, sports affects all of us in one way or another. And I love your story about what you learned from your dad and how it translated for you into music. And I love the fact that he was able to see your true passion, What a gift that was. Yeah, he gets a lot of credit for that and, and I and I like telling that story on his behalf, number one to give him credit, but number two so other people can hear it and take that same mentality and maybe they were able to instill that in their kid or whatever, you know? And he was probably thankful you like guitar instead of the drums. You're right about that. My son wanted to play the drums and I got him those electric ones like that that you put the headphones on so you can hear it's not like the real drums, but uh and you're smart here is like a little tap and it was like the best thing. You're very smart. Yeah. Yeah. I was like I'm not listening to that all night because it wasn't good music. Hey buddy, I appreciate you. So why don't you tell our fans and everybody where you're gonna be, how they can follow you? Maybe check out your website? Yeah. Yeah. So like I said, the next show coming up is a Ram's head on stage in Annapolis October 15. There are still tickets available so you can just go online and you can go to Rome Set on stage dot com and buy tickets for that. Um And then the album, Midlife Priceless is kind of everywhere that you would get music. Um There are there's vinyl and cd that you can order if you still do that thing online or from buying from stores and then it's on Spotify and Apple music and all of that as well. And I also made six videos for this album because I figured...

...why not like let me just have some fun with this, you know? And uh, and so every time you make a video, you give the song a new life that it wouldn't have had otherwise. And so I made six videos for this album and they're all on Youtube, on my Mark brian music page on Youtube. So yeah, so that's worth checking out. I think, I mean, that that's as good a way to check the album out as any is just going watch the videos, you get half the album right there, you know? Yeah. And I did watch the Gotta Get out of town, right? Yeah. That video, I think you you talked about how you um somebody, some producers saw it and loved it and said, here's what we gotta do. And there's a lot of good looking girls in that video. Yeah, he's the director, his name is Mark Pellington. And he had this image like if you listen to the song, it sounds like a guy who's like, you know, a very in a very urgent situation. So he pictured the guy like, just livin the life and partying or whatever. Then all of a sudden he's in trouble and he's got a he's got a scoop town. So that's how he made the video. And uh yeah, he put beautiful girls in there, he put, like, skateboarders and anything that brought a little mayhem into the look of the video, and then I'm in the car, like trying to escape it all, you know, right now. It was awesome. I loved watching it. Um and and you're right, you know, from you and I growing up to the first time MTV came on videos, Make songs so much, you know what I mean? Like it kind of adds a different dimension to the songs. It gives him a new life, you know, and that's all I can ask for for these songs. I want to give him a life of their own. I mean, you know, it's one thing to make them, that's another thing to put them out there and hope people hear him. And so a video just gives it a chance to get two more eyes and ears, you know? Oh my God, remember when thriller, like the video thriller came out, Michael Jack, like the anticipation and how everybody wanted to watch it. I forget how many people saw it. Like that first day it came out on MTV. It's crazy. But it was a game changer, You're right. Yeah. So hey, I'm really happy for you man. You look great. My wife was commenting said his hair looks exactly the same as a way to look at that. Look at your hair, it's like the next same, I don't know, like minds all gray, I got all great. Yeah, I know my mind. I'm getting to the sideburns and the eyebrows and the beard are all great, so I'm right behind you there. Yeah, very fortunate at 54 to have a full head of hair. I mean, you know, there's no question. That's what I say to every time I get my hair cut, somebody's like, you've got a lot of hair, and I'm like, is that a good thing? They're like, oh yeah, most guys your age, it's true, man. I mean, you look around, we're pretty lucky. Yeah, we are lucky. Well, I'm lucky to call you a friend and I appreciate you joining me on huddle up with us and sharing your story with us, man. It was great to see you gus right back at you man. Thanks for having me. Yeah. So every everyone uh what what a great story. You should all get inspiration from Mark and hearing about his childhood growing up in and how sports helped shape his life, even though he's a world renowned musician, he's, you know, he's just done at all and he's given back to the community now and helping really kids and people understand how to play music and the enjoyment they can get out of arts and entertainment. So Mark, thank you again. Hey everyone, I appreciate you listening to huddle up with Gus. We'll see you next week. I want to thank Vegas sports advantage. Don't forget to use my code, huddle up, save 25% and I also want to thank 16 31 Digital News and Sounder. FM. Thank you brian, thank you terry and thank you, Mark, have a great day. Thanks Shell. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another. Actually huddle up with Gus, featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus. Theron, huddle up with GUS is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available on Apple music.

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