Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Mark Schulman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Professional musician Mark Schulman enters the huddle. Schulman is currently touring with P!nk, but has previously toured with acts such as Cher. On the show, Schulman talks about his time with Cher and P!nk, his connection with sports, being raised by English professors, and with what we can do in order to view quarantine as an opportunity during the COVID-19 crisis. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle with gusts. I'm your host, gusts for runt. I played quarterback in the NFL for fifteen years and I have lots of stories to share. I'm joined by my longtime friend at cost, Dave Hagar. Dave and I talked to our guests about how sports shape their success in life. We are RADIOCOM original podcast and you can catch us on the new RADIOCOM APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You can also find us under the big top at the sports circus hosted by Salar Ring Master. Look for us on amp TVCOM. That's a MP tvcom the next time you stay in hotels across America. I hope you enjoy our show and let us know what you think by going to our website, pllow up with gustscom. Please like and subscribe. Now let's get in the huddle with today's guest. Hello everyone, thank you to another episode of huddle off with Guss. I'm here with my longtime friend and cohost, Dave Hagar. US. Dave, grab the glad to have you today. Dave, we're joined by just a remarkable remarkable performer, artist, you name it, he's done it. He's a he's a speaker that goes out and just motivates crowds. I've watched the videos and at some point, Dave, he's got to motivate us today and then. And he's on tour right now with pink as their drummer, but I can't even tell you the number of bands he's worked with. And so for to have somebody of his caliber on hullow up with Gust Dave, we're really excited. So joining us in the huddle today on Radiocom is one of the original podcasts and also under the big top of south, the ring master and am TV. Joining us today is Mark Shawman. Mark, thank you so much for being on the show with us. My pleasure, and thank you, Sal for making all this happen. SALDS, the man you know, so sow is the man souths great. So we've been working with sal a little bit to try and put some of our content onto amp TV and all those hotel rooms. So it's been really good. sals been great and ever since I did his show a long time ago we've stayed friends and I'm sure you have. Yeah, yeah, well, that's and I've been trying to hook up sour with some other musicians, some other folks like me, because I think the platform is really unique in and outstanding. It's providing great opportunities for people that they it's so funny how much we are unaware exists on this planet and then all of a sudden something open your eyes, and that's the way I look at Salon Am TV. So there's your plug for you, Buddy. Yeah, there you go sell. So, mark, let's go back to when you're growing up in Los Angeles. We're going to start with a sport segment. I mean, I've read a lot about why you got into music, but did you ever play sports when you were young? Were you a fan at all? Did you go out in the neighborhood and play Wolf of ball or whatever? Yeah, you know, I mean I was. I was like an average at weed. I'm not, I ain't going to kid you. I was an average athlete and I was a really, really decent drummer when I was very, very young. I see the drums. I feel like drums chose me. So yeah, I mean I played basketball, played baseball, I never played football. I didn't even play on the marching band because I was playing in rock bands every weekend making money. So I wish I'd learned all the marching chops, but I got my experience doing other things. It was all about the drumming and the girls for me, you know, and it's at everything worked out. I got a beautiful wife and I've got played with some extraordinary people. But I draw parallels between you know, one of the things I talked about is we are all performers and so whether you're in sports, whether you are lie a middle manager,...

...it is it really comes down to performance. We are measured in our performance, and so that's where I that's where I draw the parallel between everything. So I believe that we all actually are very, very similar, because we have clarity about what we want to do and we've developed our cop are capability, because when you really clear about your goals and you really develop that capability, that's what leads to natural confidence and that's what needs leads to natural success in anything you do and any performance that you do. So, but that's why, oh, sorry, more good now we know you go and Soun know what I was going to say is I think, though, if you're talking athletically, drummers are probably the best athletes in the music world. Right, good hands and thing. That's another thing. Right on say. Well, yeah, the drummer for Blondie, Clem Burke, actually wired up a drummer with all of these electrodes and determine that a drummer that's playing like a one and a half to twohour rock show, like I play. I played with foreigner, play with billy idol, I play with pink, play with simple minds, and you know these bands and you know it's especially pink, like you think pinks, she's a pop artist. But I'm playing full out, not in my S. and what Clem Burke determine is it a drummer like us burns as many calories as like a pro soccer player. And they also did another study where they put guys like gusts and pro basketball players on a drum set and said okay, Buddy, play for three minutes or four minutes of drum straight and they'll get off like so it's all about the kind of training that you have. I mean I'm in my Fif S. I could sit in and play an hour and a half, two hour show and I'm fine. If if any body else like any pro athlete in their s trying to sit down and play a show that they would keel over. So it really is about what's your condition for like with all different types of sports, because every kind of athleticism will call drum looking at drumming like athleticism right now requires that conditioning and I put in, you know, four times, Malcolm Glad Wells, ten thousand hours at this point in drumming man I've been I played drums fortyzero awards, it might day or or more. Oh yeah, my life, building up my craft and then play and get on stage. And my wife and I were talking about it last night because I said, I just feel a bit out of shape, even though I'm working out and even though I'm I'm running, but because pinks, you know, wet two and a half years on the road with pain she broke all these sales and at tenance records. We played for stadiums for forty two, one hundred thousand people per night. She in the month of July she was the highest grossing artist in history for one month. I mean higher than you, two higher than springsteen. And my wife said, well, you know, remember you were like up there four days a week when you were touring playing that show. I said, Oh yeah, forgot about that. So right now we're on a break. So I'm not getting that it isn't you know. Yeah, that first time you go back you're going to be you're going to be a little bit winded. It takes me, it takes two weeks. I mean, you know the we were hers, the Band rehearses for two weeks and then we do full production rehearsals for six weeks. So I get I got a lot of ramp up time, man. Oh well, yeah, I can imagine. So so if we go back to the building blocks you were talking about when you were a child, what were those building block? Few becoming a drummer. Well, I feel so blessed in the sense that I believe that drumming chose me. You know, I was old enough to watch the Beatles when I was three years old on Ed Soivan, and you know, I'll these older guys are usually older. Me Say that was...

...the moment. Well, that was the moment. I remember seeing John Paul and George and just like like like my brother yelling at me front of the TV, and then I saw a ringo. You know, that smile that big beautiful nose in the way he was squashed and I said, you know, they're like Mama, I want to play drums. Say No, drums are too loud. Can't you play a nice instrument like your brother Randy? He plays Violin. I started playing cello and then I gradually got into playing drums. But I saded a drum set at five years old and I could play. I intuitively knew. I won't call myself a prodigy, but I'll say I knew what to do. And then I started playing in bands. When I was nine, they bought me my first drum set. They couldn't deny my passion. At twelve years old I started playing professionally, every every weekend, starting at the age of fourteen. I was playing, as I said. That's why I wasn't in the marching band, because we were putting on Tux's and actually making some money and playing right parties and weddings and Bar Mitzvahs and whatever we could. And so I just literally grew up playing in bands and practicing and listening. You know, I tell my students I listen to everything I could. So I diversified my vocabulary as far as what I could play, and then I had my own original band and that didn't work out. And then, twenty six years old, I got my first road Gig, playing with this artist named Brenda Russell, opening up for Billy Ocean. Remember those days? Oh yeah, and I never stopped and I just kept on going and you know, that led to me doing a bunch of smooth jazz gigs that I found out about the foreigner audition and I joined foreigner. And through foreigner I met producer named Keith forcee who ended up producing billy idol and simple mind and I became keith sky and I played for simple minds and and billy idol and I auditioned for share three times. Ended up playing which Cher on and off for years, foreigner on an off for twenty eight years. Played with the biggest Japanese artist, two of the biggest Japanese artists, him more and Itchen Yazz Allah, and then I got the big share tour and shares manager managed pink. I ended up playing with pink. As a result of that, I toured with Velvet Revolver, who was the you know, the Scott Wilan and and and and I yeas and roses. When Matt Sarm broke his wrist and I've done all kinds of sessions. I've done at all. That's what my career but I've also been very, very tenacious and fearless when it comes to communicating. You know, I tell people your net were, your network is your net worth, and so I was always the one on the phone saying, you know, if there was a GIG, Hey, I'll do it. Isn't. Matter of fact, when I got the foreigner Gig and then this guy named Keith for see, this producer. I heard from a friend of mine, Hey, foreigners recording, and I'm like, when I got this Gig, Guy auditioned for this big why don't they use me? And I called up with the manager and he said, well, that's because Keith Force doesn't really know you. He's using his own drummer, Tal Bergman, who was a friend of mine and I respect. And I told Keith and I said can I get keiths number? So I got keiths number, I called them on the phone. I mean that takes, you know, cahonees. I say, Keith, it's March showman at if teal can't ever make a session, give me a call. I'll be damned if, three months later he gives me a call. I come and I nailed it. I played at first take and from that point on I was Keith's guy. So Keith was a guy that co produced and Co wrote songs with Billy Idol and simple minds. You can now see the connection. He called me to play a song with simple minds. I turned into a record. Billy idol's drummer went in a rehab. I got a call from Billy's guitar players saying can you come and play on a song. I played on the end titled Theme For the Movie Speed. Then for the next eight years I was billy's and I was shifting. I was going between foreigner and simple minds and billy idol and and share. And then I left the...

...billy idol band because I got an offer to go on tour playing Stevie Nixon Cheryl Crow and I went out with them and it was like so all these things and I'm jingling my career and I so blessed. But I do believe that it was my tenacity and my willingness to really, really put myself out there and be fearless about the communication that put me in the position. I mean, I practice my butt off. Oh yeah, so period. Well, so, going back to that. Well, all right, I think if he never made the call about the foreigner game like things, that the same. It could have been a whole lot different. If you never pick up that phonament that call. Did you imagine? And I had a similar story where I did the same thing with with Richard Marks, because I was contacted by Richard Marks as manager and that I got a chance to go and meet with him and he said, Oh, the old drummers just going to do one more little promotional show and then we're going to audition a bunch of drummers and we're going to go on a big world's tour. And I was the one that had this idea and I said, Alan, I said, why don't you let me play that one little promotional tour? That will be like my audition where I would have had audition against fifteen or twenty world class guys, and this was only would have been my second big GIG. I probably highly unlikely that would have gotten that Gig, but because I gave him that idea and Richard wanted to meet me and I played that show and after that show. Richards a congratulations, you're in the band and I played Richard's bigots world tour, but it's because I had come up with a spontaneous solution that was saving that manager time and energy and money of auditioning all these other Oh yeah, was something I created on the spot. What musicians love to do is improvised, but I improvised with my thoughts and with my ideas. So I do believe that we really create so much of our reality based on our awareness and the opportunities that we see. And I've been fortunate enough to be in the right place in the right time. I mean, you know, Godden universe and luck, there is some timing and all of this, but man, I also really added to that by being tenacious and recognizing the opportunities. One are the issues with people is they miss opportunities, they're not through, just not quite paying attention. And if you're really paying attention to opportunities, like even now, like my wife, literally it just so happens, timing is everything and I'm a drummer my wife. We just built this video photo studio for my wife. Literally just finished right as covid nineteen was coming in. How I just realize what I could do virtual presentations of my speeches. So now I'm putting out that Hey, if I let me, let me motivate your people, let me activate your people, let me talk to your your workforce and your employees right now. We can do it from right here, and I do what I call a rock show disguise as a key note with drums. We've got all this video equipment and audio equipment. It's like, Bam, here's the opportunity, right now, I can do it, and it was like a minute and it just again universe. The timing was great and organic, but we need to recognize those opportunities and do an adapting the situation such a key component to every single too. There's probably a million really good drummers out there that never got close to anything you've ever done because they didn't take that next stop. Ord think like you're saying, or be able to adopt or whatever. But abstract, well, that's that's the way to do it. Valet, stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer. Whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible...

...to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation, or call one, two hundred and three, six, two four one thou and ask for Promo Code PSF. So, Mark, how did your parents like? Because I think your parents were professor's right, English professors. So they're going through they're probably like old school kind of this is how you do things, and then you come along. You're change in a way that you look at the world. Were they still on you about hey, you still got to go to class, you got to do these things, and then you're I mean to me, that's kind of where you're all your building blocks have come from. Your parents had to say, okay, at some point we're gonna go let him be him, and I got so important, though. I gotta Tell You, God bless my parents, man, they were the most tolerant people in the world and I I speak to I've given thousands of drumming seminars to kids and I always sound you better. Thank your parents for them giving you the opportunity. My Room was right next to my parents room. Imagine having a drummer and when I got that drum set at nine years old, I played. All I did was play. My parents were so incredibly tolerant and I can't I don't know. We're going to move me to tears because I just lost my moma recently. They were just, you know, or well, she was ninety. She had a blessed. He was so happy. She went with no regrets. That's, you know, she right left. She left with a ninety eight year old boyfriend. She, she, you know, said her life was full. That writing great. But what I got from my parents was not only tolerance and and them understanding who I am, because, I mean they I you know, I was very high IQ. You got to Iq, you're the got to be a doctor, a lawyer, like my brother was a systems programmer, high level, and they thought, Oh, it's a hobby, it'll pass he'll get you. I get these Jewish parents, it path, you know. But then they started to realize, right a minute, this isn't passing and I quit college. I don't even have a bachelor's degree because I quit to play full time. But the moment I got my first road Gig, it's like, oh ROC is making money and other from the Bronx, it's like Mac is making money. Then they became my biggest fans, but they were right so tolerant of me with my bands. Plus they gave me the teaching Jene God bless that's what I abled me to get up in front of people. Now I was a grammar and composition tutor. My Mom ran the tutorial center at the local college. At nineteen years old, she illegally gave me my own class to teach because she had so much faith in my ability to get up in front of the class. I taught a esl English as a second language class. But when I got up in front of the class and then I did my first drum clinic Clintic, quote unquote, you know, like put on their gloves and whatever, right hate R I don't call it workshops, I call a play shops. But when I got up and I realized, wait, I inherited the gift of communication. I just need to really develop this, and that's what I've done and that's what eventually led to my speaking career, a along with studying, with to speaking coaches and an acting coach and as storyteller and a director. You know, we build our skill set, but I believe that my parents gave me so much and I have just just eternal gratitude and I am a man of gratitude. I talked about gratitude all the time, as gratitude is actually a powerful attitude to shift that you can use your advantage. So it's there. Has There been a mentor of Yours that you've always kind of gun back to, because you know, in football we have like a high school coach that you can always go back? You really close with them and you can go back and share family situations, you know what's going on and work and all these different things because you're usually close to somebody like that. Did you have a mentor like that growing up? I still have a mentor. I met this gentleman when I was twenty two years old, Dr Jim Samuels, and, as matter of fact, I'm writing my second book.

That's what I want to interview you for. Guess Right, based on my my speeches, I met Jim and twenty when I was twenty two years old, I stopped drinking, I stopped doing drugs. He was teaching these classes just on you know selfdevelopment and he's unique and he's a brilliant a thinker, as like a Tony Robbins. He just never cared about the fame but he has such brilliant concepts that I've adapted some of his concepts and that's a lot of what I sort of teach as the foundation when I do my seminars. And we are writing our second book on the power of attitude, because I think when you really break it down, what he had determined is that we know we can't control what happens to us, as evidence by what is going on in the world. We get the serious curves. This is the most serious curve I can remember ever. But we can always control change, or what I call shift our attitudes about what happens to us. And your attitude is your point of view. It's where you're looking from, where you're looking from determines what you see and what you perceive, because your attitudes are what drive your behaviors. Right when one attitude can drive many behaviors, and your behaviors are what determine the consequences of your life. It's a times be equal see, and it's actually exponential. And so by understanding that at any moment in time you have the power to shift your attitude about something, your perception, where you're looking from, you are driving more desirable behaviors and driving outcomes you never thought possible. So this is a challenging time and I'm not going to downplay how challenging this is for so many people. But there are opportunities in this time, depending upon how you look at it. As an example, the opportunity for me to do virtual presentations, the opportunity to spend time with my family, the opportunity to finish my book, the opportunity to look for alternate methods, of ways and means that I can communicate the alt the opportunity to be philanthropic and help others and to be selfless. And if we break out of the limiting be sort of mindset that we have and understand that we have the power to shift that, it is huge. It becomes everything and I believe I attribute almost all of my successes to this particular formula that I learned from Dr Jim so many years ago that I implement my life every single day. And the best way to implement it, even in your work and in your situation, is to reverse engineer it. If you look at the end result that you want, you look at the consequence you want, to get really specific, then you back up and go, okay, what kind of behaviors would I need to drive consistently these types of outcomes? And then you back up even further and say what attitude do I need to foster and maintain and to drive these behaviors to then produce these consequences? And it is so critical. So I wake up every single morning and I choose my attitude and then when I give my speeches, I talk about and I give examples of different attitude ships. I tell stories about how paink almost died and I tell stories about my friend Tony Shade, the CEO of Zappos, and you see how great people, through shifting their attitudes, then drive different behaviors and different consequences. I'm sure you both have your own stories. That's why I want to interview you, guys, because I'm sure there were moments, whether you knew it or not, what you were doing, you were consciously creating an attitude shift, and that's what drove a behavior that produced a consequence, and that's to achieve my my success, and I believe that's how all great people achieve their success. Well, I kind of agree with that, because that's why I played for seven teams, because my attitude was I'm going to be a starter, I want to play in this league, I don't...

...come here to watch Rad even though it was very hard to move my family into stay together through all those moves, it was worth it to me because I got to play in a lot of football games. I got to go out and do what I love. It's it'd be like if you just said, okay, I'm going to be the drummer with this band, but you know there's another drummer in front of me and I'm just going to sit and watch him for fifteen years. Nobody wants to do that. That's why you get to go play for a bunch of different bands. So one question I have is when you're in the NFL and you're in the free agency and that's, you know, same thing as being out of work, because what we call it, and you have to go out and try out for different teams. So they bring you in and they say okay, here's our playbook, here's the place we want you to throw, the routes we want you to run. Do you understand any of this? That bring you all these concepts? Compare that to when you have to go out, and me explained it a little bit, but when you have to go out and kind of perform for a band, do you? I mean you get nervous and I'm s sure it's a lot of very similar qualities in that. Yeah, we're auditioning. Well, coincidentally, my first book is called Conquering Life Stage Fright. Three steps to top performance, and I talked briefly about these concepts. Work in triads because our brains thinking in terms of three. So it's based on clarity, capability and offidence. So if you have a real, succinct, clear goal about what you want to do, then you develop your capability so you're really, really prepared it. Be Like you, you're not going to be out of shape and then go and then try to play for these teams. So I develop my capability if I'm going to go audition. I learned that stuff backwards and forwards, and that leads to real confidence, not false confidence. False confidence can be very very misleading. And so what I've realized? I've realized that I can create. It all goes together with the attitudes if I have a clear goal. And one of the things that's really saved me is what is my focus, because I can it. So many people get nervous and I coach so many people on this. I said, if you're nervous, what are you thinking about? And I get them to realize that they get about themselves. It's and who should you be thinking about? Everybody else. If you're a team player, you're not thinking about yourself, you're thinking about the team. I F I'm a team player. I'm thinking about the band, about the audience, about the artist. I'm putting my energy out and that takes it out of my brain and puts it forward. So I have the right focus. Also, I have the attitude that I'm going to have the best time possible, and it's funny you, if you really embrace that as an attitude, you will go out and you're going to be incredibly focused, but but in your heart you're also going to have a good time and you're going to be really conscientious of how you can be of service to everybody else. So it's not about me, me, me, it's about we. We, we, and the greatest bands of the audience. I've studied the greatest bands on the planet, from Beatles to you two, to imagine, dragons to the food fighters, and none of these bands, like none of the teams, could have the magnitude of success without any or all the players. It truly is the collective energy and influence and intelligence and willingness of everybody that makes the sum greater than the parts, and that's the key. When you're looking at auditioning or you're looking at going out for a team, it's understanding that you are there to be of service. I look at everything I do as being of service for the moment I get on that stage. Man, I'm up service to pink, I'm of service to all the band members that are my dear friends. I'm of service to the audience. I'm of service to the crew. I want to make things easier for the crew. I think about this stuff. I don't just think about hey, how cool am I? How many chops can I play? Hey,...

...look at me, aren't I great? You know, I'm doing things very, very consciously to make it for mostly make it easiest for pink and pink choose is her people. Very, very well, two hundred and twenty five people on the road, for God's says the Traveling Corporation. I mean that's like that. That's a big, you know, bunch of people, and it all begins with her. So right, she's very energetic. So after a while people that aren't, they don't fit in the organization, whether it's blatantly or suddenly, they either quit or they get fired. And eventually the organization becomes exactly what she wants, and that's what enables her to sell out stadiums in Europe. We're playing for forty to a hundredzero people, including we did my bucket list, which was rock and Rio and right, single person is a rock store at what they do. Every person is so great at what they do. Because if there's one week link, you know, you look at the Gal who's responsible for bringing her the water on stage, well, if she runs back and she's exhausted and she's thirsty and that water isn't on stage, well, who's the most important person to her at that time? Is the person get out of the water on stage. So every single person matters. So I never look at my position as being any more important than anybody else. It's a matter of fact. I idolize like the rigors, the guys that get into five in the morning, the guys that are doing the geometry to hang all the PA and the lights, the guys that are climbing up and risking their lives. My boss, Triss her life, for God's Sakes, she's doing all you there real stunts. Man. I'm just I look at my life like I got it easy, man, I'm just sitting down here, just playing drums. Home girls up there, like you know, doing crazy stuff in which she can die. And I tell a story about shallow. She almost died when something went wrong with one of the aerial steps. So what's, yeah, really true and you guys, is football players. Man, wow, you guys are taken such a beating. I mean, Holy Moli, you can die. And the interesting dot Dr Jim Samuel's my mentor. He played high school football. He broke his neck twice. He was walking around with a broken neck and like my hand hurts, he goes for an x ray and the doctors are like, Oh my God, how are you standing? You broke your neck. Hey, I did that in ninth grade as well playing football. So and look at you. Sand still played, still played a long time. So mark you never you were never in like a Tommy Lee Drummers cage spinning around. No, I never did that. It's already been done. And you know, fortunately I was toilet trained at an early age, so I didn't need to wear it. Yeah, Tommy, ladies met, I mean what a magnificent and unique and incredible thing for the audience. I mean that's dedication bad yeah, talk about a guy in a band who's dedicated to prefect providing the greatest show. I mean the music industry, you know, we have are are are are complete formula has flipped. You know, we used to tour to promote our records. Now we give away music to promote the tour. There's two and a half generations of kids that don't pay for music. So you're touring. is where your revenue streams are, your merchandise in your touring. And the beautiful thing about the industry, see, I look at the opportunities. So the opportunity there is that now we have all these native American Casinos in corporation. So every s band, s band, s metal band, hair band. Everybody's out touring now, is a matter of fact. The accountant for pink was telling me. He said, you know, man, you want to get in the business and buy some tour buses, because there short as your tour buses. Yeah, because, you know, we need to adapt, we need to evolve. Evolution is important. We need to recognize those opportunities and that's how we need to go out, and I...

...mean you. You Know Pink, the stadium shows sold out fifteen, twenty minutes, fortyzero to a hundredzero people. Yeah, might tell you, can tell pink that my wife got our first tattoo because she saw her and you were probably there as well in Chicago all. I was there, baby, I've been. Yeah, yeah, so that night to leaders man and Dave's wife. Got To tell you that night to mind got the Tattoo, also from the same show with all line of them got the same tattoo from going to the pink concert. So I think they had a good time. I still wanna store remember the call when when Kelly called home and told us she got a tattoo. The our kids are real young. At a time they started crying. What? That's not my mom. But now it's cool the mom and or southern. But Yeah, Oh yeah, I'm sure, I'm sure. So, mark, if I could do something that I kind of was thinking about, if you could just kind of give me some answers, I was going to go through like a NFL team, comparing it to like pinks team. Right, okay, who would be the owner? Like pink is the owner? Would you say thanks, the owner? Pinks the owner. Okay. Then we go to the general manager. WHO's the general manager? Her Personal Manager, Roger Davis? Roger Davies, okay. So then then we get down to the head coach. Right, you got a head coach on the team. He's the one that's kind of putting everybody in their spots. Do you have a WHO's your head coach that says, okay, this is this is where we're going and when we get to Chicago, that's what everybody's doing. Well, we have a director, Bass Helper, who's directed her shows and and everybody from kiss to Taylor's swift. So he's the head coach. And then he's also got two choreographers, RJ and his partner, and they are doing all the choreography. So they all work together. And but bass is the he's the has the final say, so to speak, with Roger, because Roger, the personal manager, definitely has his hands on every single fan. And then we have and then we have a musical director as well. So the musical director or will define what we're doing musically, and Paul Mrkovich was acting as our musical director. He's a musical director for the voice. And now Jason, the keyboard player on the road, is the road musical director, so he kind of runs the band. And then a couple of the dancers, Tracy and Loriale, sort of run the dancers on the road. And then we also have gape, who is the head rigger. Who is Rut? WHO's in charge of all of the aerial stuff, because we have many, many aspects of stuff that are very, very critical. So yeah, that's what I was going to get to. Who's your flip manager? Yes, some, we have an equipment manager, we have a we have trainers, athletic trainers in the NFL. So like if somebody gets hurt, twist her ankle, who do they go see? You guys just go to the doctor. Do have some? Now we go. We got we got DR D who is it's a chiropractor and a A. He's a registered chiropractor. He's a registered might be a sports therapist as well, but her he does. He does, I'm sorry, because he does chiropractor, he does acupuncture, he does sort of a hybrid of he takes care of everybody. So it's usually the dancers and me, because we're the physical ones, the dancer. So then usually getting injured. So then, like at the beginning of the week, we get our playbook right what we're going to play. If I'm playing for the Detroit Lions, we're going...

...to play Chicago bears. We get a playbook and we go through everything. Do you guys, when you toured, you just kind of understand what you're going to play every night, or do you get a new playbook for every place you're going? Our set list pretty much stays the same. We will alter it slightly, but because everything is actually perfectly timed and we have what's called timecode, simptytime code running through the entire show and the simpty sinks up the electronics that we use musically. The sympty sinks up the lights, sinks up all the video. So for us to change something is takes a lot of work and we will alter things, will put a new songs every now and then, but it's a pretty well established show because it also takes us a while. We do a few shows until we get into the group now what's really working, and then we may take a song out and put another song and but after a while we're in a groove because it's very, very important that we get to perform as opposed to think. You know, there's a diffence between like being in the groove and and and just knowing what you're doing intuitively. See You could be present for the performance and in rehearsal moment in your head. So we don't want to be in rehearsal more where we're thinking about too much as far as like learning things right. So I would assume that you go through, do you look at a set list when you're playing it during a concert, that hey, this is the first quarter, second quarter, third quarter, now we're into the fourth quarter and we're going to bring it home right here. Oh yeah, it's a matter of fact. We break our setlists into acts. Now I want to back up one minute, because the dancers are amazing, because we, the dancers, will alter their routines based on different song orders and based on different venues because we have different stage sizes. So say we did arenas. Now RENA's are like the indoor basketball arenas, a stable center, big places like that, where you're playing for thirteen to twenty thousand. Then we go to stadium's playing forty to a hundred thousand in the stage is literally doubled in size. So the dancers are reworking everything they've done and sometimes they need to read. All the sudden we're going to do a song tonight and they're out practicing. So the dancers are big heroes of mine because for us, things don't really change too much. We might, you know, change a chorus or take a chorus out or modify and arrangement. Where's the dancers are working very, very hard. They put in a lot of hours and I have so much respect for them because they are wonderful and they do it without moaning. I mean sometimes they'll put in twelve hours a day of dancing, which is like a lot of work, because they're very physical. Right now, you talk about being in shape, you got to be in good shape for that. We we actually interview to dancer for share. His name is DJ SMART. All Right, DK, I was. I played with Dj because I played with share. He was on one of the one of the tours I did in Vegas. Yeah, he was great. We had a great time with him. Did we do yeah, yeah, how about talk about conditioning? He said. Is His publicity photo. It made me a shame to be the same gender. How would like this? I'm not see what different species here? This is a whole other level there, you know? Yeah, I know, they're, they're they're utterly fantastic and they're training is brilliant and they were very, very hard on maintenance. That's why Dr d, he's David Odom is his name. He's been on a lot of other tours. He works with Metallica and Dr d is actually he's an amazing trainer as well. So he puts them through training regiments. He trains pink every single day and they do yoga. I mean it's she is a ridiculous shape. I remember one tour she started training six months before she even stepped foot in rehearsal just to...

...get in shape because we'd been off for years, you know, when she had her second child, Jamison. We've been off so and you know she's she's not considered a young artist, which like younger me, but I mean she's an amazing shape and she works her tail off, man, and she needs to be on every night. I mean, you think about what she's doing and what some of these dances are doing with all the aerial stuff. Again, this stuff, they can die and these people are like twenty, thirty, forty, fifty feet in the air. And there and you know, as a pink ends with what we call the three hundred and sixty. She ends with that Song. So what where? She runs up from the back of the stage. She's wearing a little harness. They clipper in with two Caribbean her clips attest to ease carabe in her clipper too, high tension cables that lift over the audience. When she gives the signal to the computer operator, she goes up and she's flying around. I'm sure you've seen footage of that and she did one of the most amazing spectacles that that. I mean, it just totally was incredibly freaky. We play the AMA's, the American music words, a few years ago and she was hanging from a forty story glass building in downtown La suspended just by two cables on either side, doing aerial ballet, bouncing off the side of the building two hundred feet above the stage. Looking down. Now think about how I remember, though, that was awesome. So that really was really awesome. So you know, what I know about her and from my experience is that you know, you do this stuff so much, you develop your capability so much that you have that confidence. I talked about the CCC, clarity capability confidence. So we done with that thing. I finally asked her and I said, you know, I know with all these other stunts you do. You know, you're not really afraid anymore because you've done them enough as it. At what point did you stop being afraid? And she was singing live. Yeah, no point, she said. I was scared out of my wits the entire time down to the last performance. You know, but that's just who she is, because she always want incredible. He's the bar for her audience, because part of her brand is she's going to raise that bar and raise that bar and she always wants to outdo what she's done before. But she does aver. He's do you ever catch yourself just looking at her like just want like you're drumming you're like, holy call, I can't believe father. If I catch myself, I catch my heart going fast looking at her many times when I sound that stare at her even doing so what I need to sort of look away and stay focused on what I am doing. I couldn't imagine like what we played, what we played these stadiums. So, you know, we're used to doing arenas. Or was close in when we played these stadiums like rock and Rio. She was so far out I could barely even see her and she was so high because we were outside. Silly doubled the height that she did it. I mean, yeah, I mean there is a there are a lot of comparisons between what we do in our business and a sports team, because we are very this is a physical tour doing life threatened, name death defying stuff. Is it really is? It's amazing. It's amazing, so honored to be a part of this that every single day I've gratitude for being a part of this and understanding that I am part of something that will probably never ever exist again. And the interesting thing is there are no younger artists even trying to emulate what she's doing. You know, they mean doing little things, you know, but there they I mean she has a level of, for lack of better term, balls. Yeah, you know, I don't know anybody else that has that. And she refuses to have the vocals prerecorded. So she's singing live. So imagine you're doing all...

...the stuff. You can hear, you can hear the breaths, you can hear the inconsistencies, if she's out of breath, and it's beautiful. It's like real life, man, it's not. Yeah, that's amazing. Even a friend of mine played on some of the big Michael Jackson Tours, dangerous and bad, and he said that we're Michael was doing the really complicated dance steps. Even those vocals were we're in. We call in the box. They were recording so you wouldn't have to worry, but she refuses to do that. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets and enjoy breakfast for two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US each day you stay for reservations. Be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Mariottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and asked for a promotional code s four B. Yeah, she's in such good shape should have to Shineft, you know, and that probably helps her tremendously getting through those fears of heights and spinning and doing all those things that I couldn't even imagine doing. That a little bit different production of value than the mid s foreigner shows. Probably that's very, very but I got to tell you I played with foreigner up into two thousand and thirteen. I play a foreigner on and off for twenty eight years and I love that band. I was so emotional when I left the band to go back with paint that I was in tears. You know, love those guys because they are the real deal. Look Kelly Hanson, who took over for low Graham. I'll never forget we were playing a show in Germany. They put us on a heavy metal festival in Germany. Talk about being in the wrong environ like foreigners are great and great songs, but when you say heavy metal in Germany, you're talking about sixty ironclad metal German dudes. Right, it's really right. Telly was so committed. He's like, you know, I am not going to let this audience go that it was raining outside, it was during the day. He was climbing the scaffolding. Everybody was like amaze, he had sixtyzero German heavy metal fans going. I want to know what the never underestimate the power of a great performer who has that attitude that I am going to stop at nothing to get this audience, and that's why I that's how that's my approach. I will stop at nothing because I'd given a thousand speeches in my day and every audience is completely different and I'm reading the audience constantly. It's like a barometer. When I go out and play with pink, you come out to an audience it's screaming and adoring. I mean just because there are fiftyzero sets of eyes and not one set of eyes is on me because they're all on her. They should right. But when I go out and I'm the one that's leading the pack and I come out to a corporate audience that's just dry and sitting like this. Well, yeah, you whatever I can do, because I know you're at a disadvantage, right, because that audience doesn't get to have a few drinks before they go see the concert. I was something that do. But my point is, I never I don't make the audience responsible. I'm not there to be loved by the audience. I am there to love the audience, right, one of my attitudes before I go on stage. So I'm not there to be judgmental. I am there to present what I call a rock show disguise, is a keynote. And well, you do it. You do an incredible job at it. Oh thanks, man. I've had had people, I've had some of the most conservative audiences and I had people come up to me the end in tears. Lee last thing I expectedly going to changed my life. And you, as I tell, certain...

...stories that are very powerful, and so I realize that I am just there to do what I do and it doesn't matter how the audience responds, because corporate audiences respond very differently, and that's okay. That is okay, that is okay, and so you know, I think one of the things before we go here is is is been really enjoyable and I hope all of our fans on RADIOCOM and and under the big top of salve, the ring master is he makes me call them marks all, the ring master. Yeah, I am TV and I hope they enjoyed this podcast. One of the last things we love to do is we go into what we call our no huddle, and so we love to fire a lot of questions at you and then just have you get some really good responses. And so day've only starts this off today. Won't you go ahead, aren't mark? Who is on your Mount Rushmore of drummers, there are two people. One is the late great buddy rich, and for living drummers, my favorite living drummer is also a gentleman that I'm friendly with, Danny Kali Judah. All right, so what is your biggest pet peeve? My biggest pet peeve is people that don't communicate back. Oh, that it. I hate that also. That's the worst. I go. Just give me a response, right, that's all. That's all you're wanting. Okay, mark, if you could trade places with anyone in history for one day, who would that be? Oh my gosh, what a great question. It might be fun to be Elon Musk for a day. Freddy Fun, a lot of options. It was fun until he brought that truck out in the correct window. Yeah, no, I know, but I mean just just being someone who is in charge of and somebody who has manifest one of the biggest enterprises possible. Yeah, just the vision, like the the yeah, this will work, it will happen. But how many times did he fell in at and he talks about that sometimes. Yes, it's pretty amazing. It's been their planned. Plenty of other people in history, I'm sure, would have been glorious to be Michael Angelo, just a just a just a savanted and at so many things, just, you know, a brilliant scientist, a brilliant painter, having that balance of all those things that that is. That's a good one too. All right. So if we're looking through mark showman's phone and we said, okay, who's the most famous non musician in Mark's phone, who would that be? A most famous norm music, she will Tony Shay's pretty famous. This I mean the CEO for Zappos. He's just a big time guy who I have enormous respect for it because he's a man of heart and a man of philanthropy. I think your picture was with him on your website. Yeah, I think there's a photo of me. Would Tony. He's a good man and go in, Tony for now. All right, that's all a good one. Um. All right, mark, if you could go back in time and give a young mark showman a bit of advice, what would that be? Well, when I was very when I was younger, in my teenage years, I was very pompous and I was very I didn't like to listen. Now I listen to everybody and everything. I've become car kind of just the opposite. So the young mark s woman, I would have said just really be willing to listen and absorb whatever works for you. I'm not saying listen and take everybody's advice, but when I tell my students is when you have a teacher or you have a mentor, listen to everything they say, try and everything they say and do and see what works for you and if something doesn't work for you, you disregard it. Right you can,...

...you can. You could congratulate the young March woman, though I'm putting down the violin and picking up the drumsticks at Shelo. Well, hello, his dude brother, Randy, played the violin right brother Eddy's an excellent and violent is still and playing cello gave me an amazing sense of pitch because I'm a studio owner and a producer and I played cello on the pink tour, on the Fun House tour, wow, the second tour. See, you never know when. You never know when these skills that you've had in your life. I would never I don't dare call myself a cellist owner, respected cello players because they are really brilliant and I don't practice, but you never know, like my mother would say, you never know when it's gonna come in Handy, right, right, all right. So what is the your the most favorite concert you ever attended where you didn't playing but you attended you wanted to go to? Well, I'm just the biggest McCartney Fan and I just just melt when it comes to McCartney. I mean I had a chance to chat with him for about ten minutes once and it was better than any dream I had ever had. I was so overwhelmed that I went in my dressing room and started bawling. We were doing a show with him. So every time I see McCartney. Everybody, the audience is just in tears. There's just an emotionality attached to all those songs. Wow, I'd be that's something. All right, this is another amount or for more class to forgive me for that, but this is your mount rushmore of bands with females as the front one that's front women. Well, look, I gotta Tell You, dude, I play with the greatest female artist ever. I'm sorry, I mean nobody surpasses pink, and it's not just because I play with her, but when you get to know her and you get to know who she is and what she's capable of and what she's willing to do and what she's willing to give out, she's absolutely magnificent. But then again, there are different female artist that are absolutely brilliant and I've left in history, like Joanie Mitchell. Yeah, so that's a hard question because I I don't tend to be an either or guy. I tell be like, wow, I'm in this food. I'm going to put on miles, you know, kind of miles Davis, kind of blue. I'm going to put on like I'm on this, you know, panic and the disco phase, because I think the Brendon your is one of the greatest vocalists. or I'll put on like an old and I'm a big, huge Beatles Fan. You know, I love Cheryl Crow. I got to play with Steve Nickson Sheryl Crow ryl's an amazing, amazing artist, singer, songwriter, prolific. So sorry, I kind of blew your route. A lot of different face when the ray it's solid. Yeah, so, Dave. Two more so I have one that I usually ask everyone. So it's usually related sports. We're going to relate this one to music. What is your favorite kind of movie that's kind of includes music, you know, like the one that just came out about Queen Prop Oh wow, that's an interesting one. Well, I was a huge fan of Tommy when I was a kid, but that wasn't the WHO's version. I really like the WHO's version to you know, speaking to the Queen Movie, that is one of the best because they actually incorporated all of Queens Music and elite actor, I forget his name, but he was to Pennis. Everybody was stupendous and I think that that was a brilliant, brilliant representation. I mean it was it was over dramatized and there was, you know, there was, there was some there stretched the truth a little bit. Yeah, but don't you think it was like that at Wembley State Stadium when they played the big concert for Africa? It went live a I'm sure that live aid...

...was all that and more. And it's hard to imagine. I mean I played with simple minds of the Glastonbury Festival for two hundred and twenty Fivezero people. I couldn't see the audience. It was Rolling Hills, with Peter Gabriel, one of my heroes, standing on the side of the stage watching. We had Robert Plan on the side of the stage watching us. So I can only imagine how that was and also the purpose and the passion and also that Freddie knew that he had aids and he was just he was so impassionate. It was so brilliant. That performance was just was like extraterrestrial. You know. Yeah, there's no way to explain it. Well, you know, it's all right, last one day, but you know, it's kind of cool, though, if you look at the the actual footage from live aid compared to the movie they duplicated on that Wembley scene, like even the level of Petsi in this cup and everything. I mean it was pretty cool the way they did that they did and going back that, I'd probably have to say that probably is the best movie music movie ever because their attention to detail and continuity was absolutely astounding. Yeah, when you saw it in the theater, you felt like you were there at the end. It was really nice. It was insane, it was astounding, it was it was brilliant. All right, we will send off with your least favorite household duty, my least favorite househole duty. We share the duties, especially this this time around. You know, I'm pretty willing to do just about all of them. I'm a pretty lousy cook, but that doesn't mean I'm it's my least favorite because my wife is such a great cook and now my ten year old daughter's learning at a cook and it's like magnificent. That each least favorite household duty. I was cleaning toilets the other day. You know, we don't have a don't have our are are made here. So yeah, wedding and and I like I didn't kind of remember. You know, it's been a while. I don't want to sound like a stupid, you know what entitled musician but I clean a toilet again, it put comment in and and know it's weird. Man. I really don't have the attitude of this is horrible. I really do assume this attitude like this is my place. I one of my attitude shifts is shifting half tous to get tubes and I actually just kind of look at look. I get to just feel with this light to take care of my space, not rely on somebody else and just get into it. So I put myself in this head space of shifting my attitude and I get to do it. So there isn't anything that has been that treacherous that I said. No, I mean I had like way back in my old life, we had dogs in our backyard, read a huge backyard. They were big killer dogs and skunks got in a couple of times and they just rip the skunks apart. So it was my job to go in and clean up the dead skunk carcasses. That was probably one of my least favorite thing. Yeah, I would that would be at least said. Probably didn't smell very good, but a while that was another life ago. So yeah, no, but hey, anytime you want me to come on and, you know, interview me you want to talk about it. Whatever. I appreciate you coming on with us and joining Dave and I in the huddle and I look forward to helping you out and whatever I can do to help you out for your book, that would be wonderful. All, let's Road Fun. You, guys, and again, Sal you're the man and that they've thank you so much for a man Gus. This is fantastic and and it's an honor to be here. It's an honor to also give the sports fans a different perspective about, you know, my lifestyle and hopefully give you some...

...usable information and opportunities to seek in these trying times right now. Yeah, so this is our first covid nineteen podcast. So thank you come up, for coming on and joining us, and stay healthy and happy and you know, I wish you all the continued success in the world. You, as well my brothers into everybody listening as well else, stay healthy, happy and find the opportunities and find the joy in the moment. You know, I came up with this years ago. I even told it to pink and she liked it. Life is a series of nows. So, even though we're having traumatic times, really embrace these nows and try to stay present and enjoy the moment, as many moments as you can. Just, you know, let everything go for a minute and celebrate, even though it's a challenging thing to do and with with with with survivals being challenged. Just take that time out to smell the flowers, so to speak. Really critical, definitely no down thank you for joining us in the huddle today. Right, pleasure, gentlemen. Thank you. It's an honor. All right, all right, thanks, Mark Sea tears. Take care. We want to thank everyone for listening. To huddle up with us, please go to our website, huddle up with gustcom and subscribe and leave us a message and let us know what you thought about the podcast or maybe future guests you would like to hear from. So thank you again for listening. To huddle up with US and find us on the new RADIOCOM APP or under the big top at the sports circus, posted by sal the ringmaster.

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