Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Mark Pattison

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

A former wide receiver in the NFL, he has a goal to climb all “Seven Summits” of the world, a renowned podcaster in his own right, Mark Pattison joins the Huddle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dave, this is going to be a fun one interesting story. Here it is. Dave. What what is the highest summit you've ever climbed? Well, Gus, I don't from start to five. I've been on some high summits out West. I've been above tree line walking with my family. I wouldn't sit. It's a little different than what this guy does, but I've been on some. Well, it's the scariest hike you've ever been on. That would have happened this spring. The spring. Yeah, I mean we took a trip and then you go to Vegas with the Vegas but we kind of took like an unconventional tour of Vegas that included going to I think it was called like the Devil's Throat Canyon or something like that. It was it was something like where you nervous? When Kelly said, hey, dave, we're going to go hike Devil's Throat Canyon, I was not nervous, even though it's a it sounded like it was. I should be nervous. I wasn't nervous. She was. You read on trip advisors few so our guest talks about how when he goes to a mountain and he sees them on, he gets butterflies. Did you? Were you the same way when you got out of the van and you went to Devil's Throat Canyon and you saw it? You got a little nervous Um. Still not nervous because it was, I would actually going downhill. So you're like, Oh, this is going to be easy. I thought it was going to be easy and I was really wrong. We didn't read them. There was there's lots of warnings that we read afterwards that we put if we would. He did those warnings. I don't think that was so. What part of the hike were you like the most nervous? Like, when did you realize, like, this has gone a suck? Well, one of the parts was when I was like face down in the dirt, unable to have the strength to do a push up and stand on my feet and other hikers who I hadn't met up to that point, had to carry me. That made me a little uneasy. What do you think our guests would say if he saw you in that? What do you what do you think he would I mean he's very positive, very about picking yourself up. I mean he had to do it to himself and I think this would even is him seeing me trying to scale down these I don't know if you call them cliffs or whatever was we were doing. I think that would even test his positivity where he might have even given up on me. Thank God does. I would still be there, ever, wasn't for a couple of those guys that I didn't know until he carried me. Yeah, it didn't. Somebody help you up with that. was also carrying a baby. There was a there's a family with a baby and they he may have stepped over me as I was laying there, but there was a couple kids, couple teenage girls. I think they were trying to revive me and splash water on my face and stuff. So Dave, our guests, I don't know if he's ever been that down, but he's been down in his life and he found a way. He said, I don't know how I got here, and he basically he said, okay, I'm going to change that thinking and now what am I going to do about it? And that's pretty powerful thinking and not a lot of people can pull themselves out of that. No, and he took he channeled his energies into something like totally different than what he was doing before the hard times and is become great at doing what he's transformed into. Right, because he always felt, I think he was a good athlete growing up in Washington and then, you know, going to school at I think he went to universe, he was a Husky and he was a Husky and then he went in and played in the NFL for quite a few years with the raiders, you know, in just some of those prolific teams, and then get done with that, gets married, trying to figure out life and we all make that transition as former athletes. That's so hard to figure out what our next step in life is and he's no different. But he took that and changed it and turned it around and he's not just casually hiking up hills around his house. He's going to extreme levels of climbing. Right. Well, he is planning on being the first NFL player to climb the seven summits, next maze, Doing Everest Right, which is insane. It's crazy. Well, his story when he was when he climbed Kilimanjar Oh, his tent meet actually died on everst. I...

...thought was on Kilimanjaro. No, no, his tentmate that he was with and they climbed Kilimanjar together, went and climbed Everest, but he's still on every so I'm sorry. Yes, wow, but why? You know to hear why he died. So why people can only climb that mountain twice a year is because the wind at the top of that mountain and Mount Everest is so bad it raises above the peak twice a year. And to all those people thought I was going to raise up and it didn't. Yeah, it was just a small window. Otherwise it's a death drop. Yeah, and the trap it is, because that guy is still up there. But incredible stories. Now he's also develop a consulting company, mad for consulting, and part of another company where they just bought sports illustrated and he's a fellow podcaster and Philip Podcaster, which I think I'm going to be on the show pretty soon. So welcome into the huddle. Great guests. Former NFL player and hopefully the only player ever to successfully climb all seven summits, Mark Pattison. Oh, Dave is my co host and Dave we have mark passing on, former seventh round draft pick, just like myself. Yeah, other side of the United States. So he came from the West Coast, but he's also he's an entrepreneur, has been involved in many companies and he's also something I've never done. I can barely climb my driveway, but he's climbing the seven summits. And you know, mark, it's just an honor to have you in the huddle with us today and we can't wait to hear your story. Yeah, I know. Thank you so much, guys, for having me on the show. You know, I've not been in a huddle and it awful long time and I love being, you know, back with the quarterback. As you know, US receivers love to always know, buddy up with QB's just to get on that same page and really establish that rapport like I did with many great quarterbacks that went on into the NFL, as well as the guys that I did play in the NFL with. But now the seven summits are a been an amazing journey, the seven summits of the highest peaks on each continent and surprisingly I've been at this now for eight years. I thought when I started this that, you know, seven summits would mean seven years doing one mountain per year, and I forget to factor in Mother Nature, and so that's come into play a couple different times. One on Tenali in two thousand and seventeen, eighty degrees at the top and sleeping that mine is forty at fourteen thousand feet. So we decided to make the right decision turn around go back home. But I do have one more mountain now, Mount Everest, coming up next April, and I'll be the first NFL guy to do that and there's not too many first out there today, so it's going to be a pretty cool thing that hopefully I can accomplish. Now. That's an amazing thing. But where we really want to start was when your kid. Yeah, we really how did you get a love of sports when you were kid? What started that? Was In your parents? Was it your siblings? Was it a coach? How that passion come about for you? Yeah, I know that's a great question, Guss and you know, and it's one of those things where, you know, I've I can't say I've studied it, but I've paid attention to it just in terms of really that that whole thing around why and passion, and I didn't, I don't think, realize it when I was growing up, but I'm sure, like you, Total Jim rat, always out bouncing a ball, throwing a ball through a window. You know, where there's football, basketball, baseball, and those were back in the days when truly you did have your main three sports. It wasn't so one sided with club sports today, where it's kind of a year around whether you pick soccer or a football or baseball or one of these other sports, like my kids went through, but now growing went up in Seattle, Washington, very mountainous community. I spent a lot of time outdoor, probably like you did on these coasts, raining all the time out there in a t shirt. Didn't pay attention to it, didn't know any better. I didn't get on an airplane until my first recruiting trip to the University of Hawaii as the first time I was on airplane, and so didn't really see the country, but had a great upbringing. Spend a lot of times in the mountains. I'm sure you played up in Seattle. Mount Rainair is right up there in the cascades and the Olympics, so really surrounded by a lot of mountains, a lot of streams and lakes and so wonderful place to be. But you know, really at the end of the day. I don't know why. You know, I didn't have necessarily a role model that it was looking at. It was just something that was in me that I was wanted to be out and be a gym ret. Some guys either, I think, habit or they don't. Did you play all those sports that you went over in high school? Basketball, baseball, football? Yeah, and you know, looking back, you know, you try to look back with no regrets and and I did make some stupid decisions. You know, I was in eighth grade and I made a a varsity baseball team and they're going to travel to Europe and play. My Dad, being a...

...school teacher, said you're not going, you're only in eighth grade, and I was like Piss and so I quit. Baseball is probably my best sport, you know, as receiver, I could run down pretty much any ball in the outfield and I hit well, but it was just more of a selfish thing. And then on the basketball front, I only played for two years and actually I was I was a decent basketball player, not so much of a great shooter, but just being really active on the on the court, and I quit after my sophomore year because the guy put me on the bench and I was that guy that was, you know, the twelve guy with two minutes ago scrub time. If they put me in only for a by thirty and it was stupid. I hated it. So I quit. I just played club ball and I love basketball, but really focused on football and that's kind of where, you know, my star rows. So that's kind of the way I played out. Did you when you were a kid growing up? Were you in a neighborhood where you we you guys live out in the country, because a lot of times a lot of our guests talk about how you should just go out and play their buddies and that's really how they learned to play a lot of sports. Yeah, I know, that's exactly what happened. I know I grew up right and kind of the hub of Seattle. There I actually end up going to a high school that was about two miles away from where I grew up, right in the city, and then the university Washington, where I ended up getting a scholarship to, was about another two miles. So it was real like a six Mile Circle. I could actually see the stadium out my parents window, so that was pretty cool. But I mean you nailed it. I mean literally year round and the snow and the sleet and the rain and the sun, myself and these other buddies would meet up at this park view which playfield, and we just go at it. And you know, I think that's this word I'll started, and everybody had the same kind a passion be up there every day at at four o'clock after school and just go at whatever sport that was. Mostly was football, but you know, a little bit, a little bit of basketball. Were, you know, doorsmen at all. Any fishing a little bit, you know, with my dad, you know that I've got a kind of a background in in Montana. Actually built a ranch out there and that kind of started with going to Montana as a younger kid and then built this amazing place. I sold a couple of years ago. I moved to some Valley Idaho where I'm at now, but right on a stream, literally river runs through it. I had one side of the fence and Ted Turner had the other side of the fence and there's about ten miles of fresh water in between. So it was pretty cool and some good fishing right there. That everything. Yeah, how's House Ted Turner as a neighbor. Well, he was great because he was never there. He had all his work hands and with a Ted I think might be I'm not sure if it's still current bad. I'm sure he's right up there, if not the one, but the biggest private landowner and the US yonones ten or twelve giganto ranches and even within Montana and in the outside of Boseman he had a much larger ranch than the fourteen thousand nager one that he had next to me she's in. I'm sure it was pristine. Yeah, I know it was pretty cool and a lot of it that especially in town more towards Boseman. He ran a ton of buffalo and then he started a a a restaurant chain called Ted's go figure in that was pretty much, you know, focusing on Bison and more that lean mate that was out there. So you know, there's kind of a whole ecosystem for him of bringing people out and you could you could pay a bunch of money to go hunt on his property and again he ran buffalo and all kinds of other things out there. So pretty cool. And when you say threeteenzero acres, fourteenzero small ranch and probably sixty eight thousand on the bigger ranch. And Yeah, you can do a lot of hunting out there and yeah, you know there's a lot, yeah, a lot of critters running around out there, a lot of country. Any gene fond of sightings? I never saw Jane. I would have liked to see in Jane or in her in their prime. But now we went down towards towards his place. It means just an awesome drive to go down in there and and and I was told, I don't know if this is rumor or a fact, that that slice of heaven was for favorite of all the ranches that he had around the country. That would be pretty amazing to see and to be being able to go there every day. I'm sure you had a beautiful stream going right through. Well, I built two cabins and you know, the interesting thing was, coming from a city slicker kid, I had to create my own grid, drill my own water, create my own law cabins and everything and in so just going from absolutely knowing nothing. I don't know if you've ever seen that movie called Jeremiah Johnson, but it's the kind of the tale that the you know, the guy that goes up in the mountains and finds himself and he comes out a couple years later with a beard and a season veteran, you know, almost like an NFL player after playing a few years to kind of get to understand. But this guy had been a you know, attacked by Indians and grizzly bears and everything else. And and although I wasn't attacked by anybody, certainly encountered. We had snake attacks and bear sidings...

...all the time and you know, it's just an amazing learning journey. I could imagine. I could imagine. So to get to where you are now, you had to go through so much. You know, you get in your high school career you played multiple sports. I saw you also played quarterback one year's at right. Yeah, it was. There's a guy guess you made no, Hu milain. He was a fellow quarterback. Played Ten years in the NFL a bunch of different team, but he was our quarterback of the university Washington. But he was my backup in high school and he's a guy that his feet and the the the how fast he grew. He literally could not take a five step drop. You know, of course I was at receiver and things have gone well for me my sophomore and junior or you're you could not take a five step drop, which is about a twelve yard route, as you know right without being sacked. And so finally they said Mark, come on in here, and then I end up being recruited at quarterback. You know that my senior year. So I had some choices. Oregon schools, other places to go play quarterback, or go to the university Washington and other schools like that and play wide receiver. So your heart was kind of always said on Washington, even though you looked everywhere else. Yeah, no, I think, I think that was it. You know, it's hard not to grow up and and kind of you know, I am my grandfather's a big Husky Alam and I sat through a lot of games and those the stands watching the kind of the former Husky greats, and then I got that opportunity and I look back on it now, it's just I don't think I really understood the value of being able to be in that position, considering there's so many guys that go through there or want to go through their walk onto just never attain that level and just very grateful for that opportunity and then you know, once you go to school then anything can happen. People can break their legs, they flunk out of school, they get messed up and drugs or something else. You've seen that all and just having figured out navigating my way through and it took me probably a good three years before I had kind of grown into my body and built up the confidence to play in those days the PAC ten to make that happen, but it all did and very grateful for that opportunity. We had a very successful run under the Don James Era as well. Well, you've also played in one of the most scenic stadiums in the country. It's a gorgeous setting. Yeah, you know, again it was interesting because, I mean I used to go down there's a kid and break in the stadium, climb over the fences and do all that stuff and for me it was that was just my backyard. I didn't I didn't understand in this last six years, net to neck, not the last two years in a row, but I served in a mentorship program with Ucla just because I'd gone to college. I gone you know, I've been through the path and then on a the NFL and my best friends Jim Mora Juniors, who is the head coach of the team, and so I went on all the Road Games for eight years and obviously at the Rose Bowl at their home. But the cool thing about that is not only did I get to go to a really cool spots around the country that had been to Texas, am Virginia, those types of schools, but I got to go and they every single stadium had been redone to where they are today based on all the advertising money in the TV revenue that's coming in. Plus we added two teams into the PAC ten Colorado and Utah, so I got to see those. So it was just cool to go back and just experience those new stadiums. So what was your experience like going to the University of Arizona? Well, it was great. We never lost Arizona Day, Dave's, not until ninety one when you guys are number one and knock you off. But yeah, well, there's a big Arizona Guy. Yeah, I know, I watched that game and Gosh, he had some great players on the team as well. But Desert Storm, or whatever you called, you get so warm. Yeah, it's warm. Yeah, my daughter, my younger daughter, goes the U of a so there you go. Do Yeah, yeah, my other one went to USC so I got packed twelve, you know in the family. But you know Arizona. All the Arizona teams were tough back in those days and we always beat them, thankfully, because we were a little bit better. But they always brought it and they are always tight and it always got damned the last, you know, a second or minute the game to decide how, the saying was going to play out. But always lack they always lacked a quarterback. They still have not had all pack ten but pack twelve quarterback yet, which is unbelievable in I mean it just seems like a place where he as a quarterback, he very conducive to the weather and everything to throw. But well, seems like you guys, you kind of have one and then all of a sudden something happens to him, they get injured ors, you know, they kind of go off the deep end and then they're gone and then the backup comes in and then it back up comes in and that is a position you guys have struggled with over the years. Recruiting is always disappointed. I would say grown Kowski was a big recruit. He went there for the girls, as he said. I thought more would follow, but apparently we still struggle oll target. Rich Environment for sure, but you know, look at I've been down there, I've been in these other places. I mean pullman, not a fan of Oregon State,...

Corvallis, you know. I mean Arizona has a lot of things going forward. I actually like the camp as personally better than I do Asu up and Tempi there outside of Phoenix. I just yeah, I just think they've got a lot of great things going on there and it's just for some reason they just haven't quite got over the Hump to see that it doesn't doesn't matter who the coaches. It's the recruiting is all we're always like recruiting. It's like Santa's a state and stuff, and I just don't understand how they can. You guys do have the best softball, best all excellent softball, good basketball, but here there it's on the brink right now. Out We're still waiting for the penalties to come down, but we'll see if that guy keeps a job now. You played under yeah, right now you played a speak of coach as you played under Don James, which is one of the legends of College Football? What was your what was the recruiting process with jeames? Like, I know you were in his backyard, but that hadn't been pretty cool and coming into your living room and yeah, bitch, yeah, I know that was great, but I think guy said it perfectly. You know, it was just kind of like I was ready to be kind of swept up into that, you know, ease iveen drink in the Kou laid for so many years before. Yeah, but I'll tell you one thing. You know, the one thing that was great about coach James is that he was very hard lined. There was no great area with him. Either were in or your out. And we got into a city and and and at the time we were just starting to Cress Warren Moon and taking this to the to the Rose Bowl. This is two or three years, three or three or four years actually before I got there. But the team hadn't kind of quite got the level of consistency where you could say this is one of the college great coaches. You know that's out there. But what he taught me probably more than anything was John Wooden's pyramid of success. And one of the things that I didn't do, and of course, today it's a lot different with club teams and starting kids early, with with lifting weights and everything. But you know, I came in there at six foot two, hundred and eighty one pounds. Couldn't that bench my weight, and I could. I knew on the first day of camp that was in completely over my head and it took me, like I said before, you know, two or three years to to make a decision, a hard line decision that, you know, what do I want my life to be like, and really take a right hand turn and rather just then just show up like I'd always done and be better than everybody. I actually had to work, because all those other guys have been high school, all Americans who had developed their bodies. There were now twenty two, twenty one, twenty two years old, confident, gunned up and ready to play ball, and just didn't understand, you know what that meant. And so that the wooden's Pyramid of the success is essentially this. Twenty five different building blocks of individual team goals. The Very Pinnacle is competitive greatness. And when he peeled that all back, and guess you went through all this stuff, it's, you know, developing your your body, your mind, your soul, and then that has to bleed into with the team concept of everybody else a playing their role, and that competitive greatness to me is really peeling back the onion and the layers of that are really loving the process, loving to work out, loving to run the stairs, going out with guys like us every day, throwing the ball when it's not asked of you. And I ultimately got there, but I think that was a very defining moment in my life and I know we shaped many other people and because he had this system in place, you know, he slowly got better and better recruits and then we started to reload, not rebuild, and that's really what his secret of success, I think, ultimately was. It is a very difficult thing because I I love playing the game so much that all that stuff didn't bother me, like the lifting, the running, the extra meetings, all that I loved at all. But for my son, gunner, who only played two years in college, it was it was a burden to him, you know, because he's like, I got to go school dad, and then we have so many meetings and I'm lifting all the time, when we're running and we're never and I said it's your life. You have to decide what's important to you. And you know it took you three years. Gunner said this isn't for me, but now he's coaching on the team, which is good because he still has a high passion for football. And so there's so many things that you can get from a good coach in what you learned and what coach, your coach taught you and all your other players is invaluable, and that's what the crux of sports is, is that when you have a good coach and when you learn those things when you're young, they carry with you through the rest of your life. So that one of our points of our show is that we all have transitions, good and bad. We lose a job or something happens and you got to go and move on and those people that have come into our lives teach us so much, and I'm sure that's how you feel about your coach. Big Time, and you know I mean boy. I have a podcast, as you know, call funny or someone, all about people have becoming a versity in front of your way. So somewhat of a similar thing and and and and and you know there's plenty of people out there with those types of stories, but I start with myself in terms of, you know, like you guys were,...

...people may look at our lives and say, well, you know, college things went well and some businesses we've gone well and now I'm climbing these mountains. But I mean I've had as many valleys. Are More Valleys where falling flat on my face, where I was cut, I was traded, I didn't make it, I had a business fail, you know, all kinds of different things where you know it wasn't that better roses. And so I think it's those principles again, when you draw back to what coach James and others in the NFL coaches, coach floors and coach more tammy about being disciplined, committed taking, metaphorically speaking, one step after the other. Is You're climbing this mountain and don't don't focus necessarily on the end goal and loving the process and good things can happen, but it does take that mentality to get through. There's there's there's no doubt about that. And so you're in college, you're going through your college career. When did you first have an inkling, as you were in college at that the NFL may be something that you're going to aspire to. One of the great things about what coach James had to establish at the university Washington is we were going to rose bowls every year. I mean my freshman stop me here went to the Rose Bowl my third and I was there five years. My third and fourth year we lost to Washington Day on the last game, but we were in position to go to the Rose Bowl game. We ended up in Hawaii, played some good teams over there, Penn state in Maryland, and then my last year we end up in the Orange Bowl and we played Oklahoma. ended up number two. Should have been number one, but that the point of all that is that really exposed to a lot of guys you especially when I was younger, that were going off into the NFL draft. They are playing at the NFL level and these guys were players that that was scrimmaging against every single day. And then as I got older and start playing, now I'm playing against Stanford USC you know, played against Elway, I think three times, for example. He's obviously on my set, same side of the ball, but you know, other guys that were defensive backs had some success against and I was just like, you know, wait a minute. I think I might be a little too to have an opportunity to play and in guest as you know, you there's a process. You don't just show up. Some people have asked me. I Oh, can. I'm I think I'm going to go try to NFL team. I'm like, it didn't work that way, right, they asked you and there's a combine and there's some other things and some of the indicators whether or not you're going to make it up far. And so some things like that started to happen. But I think it was really those, those guys that I played with and against, that really started giving some confidence that, you know, there could be life after college football for me. Mark, you mentioned Washington State. I think the Apple Cup might be one of the most underrated rivalries and college football to the rest, to the mass maybe us on the East Coast. What are your feelings on the Apple Cup? Like that's a that's a I know, being a pack well fan, it's a big deal. But yeah, you know, it was interesting because back in our day, you know, for them, if they went, you know, one and ten but beat the Huskies, it was a successful season and we just didn't see it that way. You know, we were more like our big rivals and people that we were gunning for is USC or Ucla, and then at the very end there's this little, you know, pested on the side that we had to go deal with and play and they did bring it and that was the one thing. I mean they you can just grandpa used to say this perfectly. You can just take those records and throw them out the door because they didn't matter because people just brought that extra emotional element to the game, which I mean I probably was never hit as hard as I was against those and they had some big time. I mean guys, you probably know Mark Rippin. You know, he was one of the quarterbacks over there that we played against, and I mean he brought it and through for a zillion yards and we had to play catch up all game. And you know, I think I was there. Well, I was there five years. We beat him three times and they beat his two times. So that's the definition of a great revelry. Yeah, know that. That is an incredible rivalry and I actually I played the Blue Gray game, which is a college allstar game. I don't even know if they have it anymore, but the coach that was at Washington state when it was that went that your mic was ninety right, a prance. Right. Yeah, he was my head coach and we just had the best time. Like he was just happy go lucky. I think his son was a quarterback on a team that year from Watchington state and I got to know a lot of those guys. But yeah, you know, that's a great Riv we I've known a lot of the players from both sides of that Apple Cup and I got to play with a lot of them and just some tremendous athletes come out from from those two schools. Mike Brace was the sorry, sorry, Mark my price was the coach for Alabama for about two weeks, if you remember. Yeah, I know, I don't remember all that happened there, but it's so short that I don't think we have to talk about that, right. Yeah, yeah, I talked about adversary, overcoming adversity and finding as well. I'm sure he did. He brought his back, I think you did. Yeah, he did bounce back. So you get drafted. What was...

...that? What was that experience like for you, because you know you're all of a sudden you're in your hometown for most of your life playing football and now you're going to go somewhere new. Was that like for you? Well, you know, look, you've been through this. The Fun thing about is that there's thirty two different teams which represent thirty two different cities, and there's some teams as a receiver that I would rather not be in to catch a ball, like buffalo right. And so I was sitting in my living room with again, Hugh Millen and Jim more of my two roommates, and, you know, just waiting for the phone. I think I had a little bit different mentality than some that you see on draft day and they bring them into make a big deal about it now, especially for the top guys, which was I was. My mentality was really just being grateful if I was drafted, and, as you know, they give you kind of a drafts at us, and I was anywhere between five and seven, and I just like, even if I'm twelve, I'm a happy guy and versus some other people get so disappointed because somebody said there were, you know, between one and three or three and five or whatever number, and then they go a lot further down the down the chart and then they become very you know, I have a chip on my shoulder because they didn't pick me high enough and all the stuff, and that just wasn't my thing. But I listen. I got picked by the Eli Raiders and for me Eveough to go to all the different teams and end up two years before they've been played this Washington redskins and been in the Super Bowl. I think was one thousand nine hundred and eighty three, and then I came in the nine hundred and eighty five draft, and I mean I got down there and you know, I'm playing against with all these legends of the game. I was just at a raider reunion two weeks ago, but Jim plunket was the quarterback. Clip branch, who just passed away this last week, was the other wide receiver. Room in this huddle, Marcus Ellens the running back, Talk Christensen's the tied in and then we break the huddle and then go lena scrimmage. Lester Hayes is out there stock in me. My canes is on the other side. How we long Rod Martin Lyles a too. I mean all these guys were just rock stars to me and I would just remember, as plunk it's calling out, that the signals in my head. I'm just thinking if I ever died, this is exactly what heaven would look like. And I was in I was in Manhattan Beach California with all these dudes and you know, we're going out. They had this whole camaraderie thing and having drinks and having a great time and just they played a different brand of football than what I was used to. Have more of a discipline style. At the university Washington, enter Don James. He marked Lester. He's where the Stickham even in practice. Hey, Dad, I saw him and we had a launch at about that two weeks ago and he looks great, by the way. And but you know, he was a linebacker at Texas and he was a big guy, so you know when he lined up. I mean guess you can appreciate this as a cornerback, you know, good six to two hundred and twenty six. You know, he was more like a strong safety or again, I mean I guess a smaller outside back or something. But I mean he could run, but he just got down so far in his stands with the kind of that wide open no legs and either side and just towel hanging down below with all the stick hum everywhere. I mean I just loved going against him and all the battles that we had and and you know, he brought it each and every single day and he's a amazing player. Amazing player. Do you think that he how do you guess? Let me refrain to how do you think he would have played at corner today with all the different rule changes? I think would be tough, you know. I mean he and Mike Canes was a little bit more smooth because Mike was Taller and he had a greater reach and so he eat his arms out there, even if it's just a step behind. I'm Lester was super physical and so you just can't do some of those things that he was doing. You know today, I mean it was a literally a battle getting off the light of scrimmage. Yeah, you know, when I went to the Redskins I felt the same way. You know, I go to the Redskins and drafted there. There's all these just one of the super bowls and there's some real legends, the hogs, and Daryl Green's there and you arn't monk and those guys just left, but Daryl Green, when you meet him, you're saying, okay, this is the fastest guy in the NFL. But you and you see him, he's tiny. I mean they called him peanut, you know, because he was so little. But then he's going against our big receivers. He's just locking them down. It was amazing and I'm like well, you know, I'm just going to throw it up because you know, our guys way bigger than it. He's like, Nope, not happening today. But you understand why he's a hall of Famer even at that size. He would love to get in and just get in your business. Yeah, yeah, I mean guys like that have just our instinctual and can run like that. They can play catch up, and so you can do all the shake and big stuff you want, but you know, they're just some of another just right on you, and those are the greats of the game. Yeah, so what was it like? So I never really got the May have watched him, Plunkett...

...throw. What kind of pastor was he was in a was it a very softball? Was it a you know, I threw like a hard ball. You know, as receivers say, there's difference in between all kind of quarterbacks. What was he like? Yeah, I know it's a good question. Then it was interesting because at that time we get another guy that I don't think one the Heisman, but he was right up there. But plunket, by the way, as one the big three. So He's won the heisman trophy. He was rookie of the year and he was a super bowl MVP. So you know, Elie Company right there, right, yeah, and on the team to we had mark Wilson and right mark is. You know, he looked prototypically a ead like a better athlete. He was taller, he was lank year he had more of a whip on his arm. But those two guys could through the exact same ball and mark would get his ball interception intercepted and plunks would go for a touchdown. It was a weird deal. Plunkett probably more than anything, even though he's not a super charismatic guy, had just tremendace leadership abilities and just kind of a bottomline guy and I don't know, he just he was kind of in between a hard ball, but it was very tight. Spiral always came in and he seemed to put the ball on the right spot and that the end of the day, that's the only thing that matters. And also catching a ball you know in La you know in that environment. Obviously you're not always playing in Los Angeles sports warm, but you know, certainly that helps the ball. Seems like it makes things a little bit softer to get versus rock hard down in Green Bay or someplace. Elsdud did, I'll Davens have much contact with the players all the time. He was like a head coach. He was on the field every single day that any of the players were on field. He was really the guy in charge and micromanage for sure. I mean all the way down to things that were going on on in the marketing department. But you know, I think he was a help as much of as he was a nuisance, you know, to the organization. He didn't let coaches go do their thing necessarily. He had such a tight rain. It's interesting because back in that day Mark Davis, who was around, he was really he was just a towboy and he is now the owner in right inherited the team and it's just weird, you know, to be around him, and I'm proud of him too, because he's gone through a lot of growth. Out was such a dominating personality that it is f this, F that, and you know it's my way of the highway, and he gotten a beef with it seemed like everybody, Steve Berlin and Marcus Allen and countless others, and mark is it's not that way, but to be kind of dominated throughout his whole entire life and now give them the keys to the car. You know, he's done a really great job, I think, of empowering others to make this thing go and and, like I said, I spent, you know, probably thirty, forty minutes alone with him and he's really gotten it together. So, you know, congrats to him. So you play four seasons in the NFL. Was it three or four different teams? Well, there was like a game in there for the rams, but it is really it was. I played a couple of years for the raiders and then my of my third year, two days before the first game, I get traded to New Orleans, and that was a shock. That would be. Yeah, and that was a big shock. And, as you know, it's new teammates, new system, knew everything, babble. Bobby are bear was the quarterback and it's his best calvs ever. Hey, like literally I call all play in the hot Lango. Okay, wait a minute. What, what did you just say? Yeah, that's cage. I could not an. Yeah, yeah, he his cage and accident is beautiful. Yeah, he's a great guy. I was down there for a couple of years and then my fifth year was the first year of free agency and and so Tom Floors had take them the they had this the GM job at the seahawks and he and Chuck nold did not see how to die. He brought in a guys. I was one of eight and all eight guys got blown out. And so at that point I was just frustrated with football. been doing it for a long time and I was just like, you know what, I think it's my time to move on. So what did you graduate? What was your study at Washington? Would you graduate it with your well right political signs, but really, you know, as a football major, and that was really my hundred percent focus. You know what? I just was so key ton on. That's what I want to do, that's what I was going to do that I made it through fine, but, you know, didn't really have any interest of being a lawyer or going into politics or anything. So sorry, Dude. So you then all of a sudden you're going to say I'm done with football. What's that transition like? What are you thinking at that point? Well, I'm yeah, I you know. I guess I was thinking that it would all work out on my phone and start reign with lots of offers to come to do this or that, and none of that happened. And Guess, as you know, it could be a really tough transition for a lot of guys and you know I was. I was in that group and I was probably probably in a bad spot for two years.

Now it's financially secure and stuff, and I wasn't doing anything destructive, but just in terms of I knew I was bound to do something great. At least that's what I thought my mind, but I just couldn't figure out what that was going to be because I didn't really have the skill set to really understand business and what the different things were. I think today, you know, with the trust and the NFL and all the different programs they've done at one hundred and eighty, of really educating guys and giving them a path out, and back those days, as you know, it was just like you're out and you're out and that's it, so good luck. What was your like? What was your big spark post nfl like that really got you going? Because you've had your been a very successful businessperson. What was that first big break you got that kind of launched you into the business rule? Well, you know, I think one of the things I wanted to do my grandfather was very successful in Ceel. He was a restaurant guy and he was a hotel guy on some race horses, and so I wanted not necessarily follow that exact path, but the entrepreneurial side of it, and so after a couple of years I was exposed to a guy who said Hey, I think you'd be great in this business and was doing a lot of corporate marketing. And so just again circumstance happening growing up in Seattle, where Microsoft was founded, Amazon was founded, starbucks was founded, you know, number of these different companies, I was able to get in. It wasn't like a smaller, you know market where none of these things were happening. Very entrepreneurial as well. Probably fourteen years, and this was like a miracle that I even landed this, but I got into the manufacturing business for quite a long time at operation going over an Asia manufacturing in China, routing back through Hong Kong and then shipping back through through the states to the East and west coast. And I locked in with starbucks and I was the sole supplier of their outdoor market green umbrellas for fourteen years so and if that was going through, their huge growth spike too. So I mean I was packing a lot of those. I didn't even know what the hell outdoor market umbrella was. I told the person who was in charge for sure I could do it and had no clue and then I figured it out. Took me two and a half years to get that account, but it turned into be a very lucrative, you know, company to work with. Like what kind of volume are you talking about? Umbrella wives for that don't order for starbucks? Thousands, thousands and thousands and thousands. I mean they grew to I don't know, five twenty thousand stores, you know, from kind of ground zero back in the day. That was one, and then number two was every store had three or four and then they have to replenish every year. So it just it got into a you know, big time volume. That's good recurring revenue right. There is great recurring revenue. You know. I'll tell you though, that one of the things. I had multiple accounts, but it was way too top heavy with starbucks. And then I you know, I'd Microsoft and I do some some jobs and things like that for but one of my great mistakes in life was it just became so routine. I mean it was fourteen years right, and I didn't develop other business streams outside of that. And then just through attrition, nothing anything I did. But ultimately there was kind of a new regime that came in. They want to transition out and so they decided to go with this new vendor and that's just again, that's his business and I hadn't I hadn't prepared for that, and so that big income stream just kind of went run off the cliff, kind of like the NFL. And so it's just another lesson in in just, you know, preach to revenue streams, create multiple one so that you're not reliant just on one thing and then it falls off. So what was next? What was the next venture? Well, I started a somewhere in there, I started a eventure or back gaming company out of sea La. I ran into a guy who hadn't since seen since high school. was very creative and I kind of brought the business and the investor group to the table, and so we ultimately raised about eleven million dollars. We were in seven hundred different retail locationscom's magazines and seven countries and then sold that company to a New York based company and it was a wild experience, you know, but it was really fun. It was a you know, business one hundred and one. Getting my MBA on how to deal with venture capital people and with their true interst are and and so, you know, each one of these things were a little building blocks on just life lessons and what to do, what not to do and engaging with people, how to close deals and understand, you know, what needs to be be done in sales process and all those sayings. So but you...

...know, those things. When and then after that I was I started consulting business and then went well, and then that I this is now leads me up to about eight, nine years ago. And then I there was an opportunity to buy SCOUTCOM, which is high school and college recruiting and right and news right. So there's an opportunity to partner with a group to buy that back from Fox sports and then pair that company together with a hundred million dollar company out of Minnesota. And so we did that and and that way it's just a whole new experience because now it is really working in a much larger organization. And that went on and then about two and a half years ago, that's founding group. There's fifteen of us, mostly engineers, the CEO, CEO, myself, we left and we started this this this new company called Maven and you know, I didn't think this thing was going to make it that far, but we've now become about the sixth largest website on the Internet. Not We, and that would not be necessarily mayvencom, but we were technology company and then we house other we house other companies to sit on our infrastructure. So we have the history channel, the biography channel, Max and magazine backpacker, and we just quired the rights for the next Hundred Years to sports of traded. So I pretty much run all the content that's going to be coming through sports illustrated from from here on out. And then we just bought the street last week as well, which is Jim Kramer, that's stands up and yells at you about buying stocks and everything. Wow, you know how up with guests would be great a sports ill street. Let's do it. You can just talk us in there. No one would even know, right, because I'm the game of the gatekeeper, right. We just it's been great because, you know, for about three years I've been doing a little business stuff with a company. We developed an APP that measures of monitors your brain performance. Stave and I are both involved in a little bit. It's called Roberto. It's been fun. It's been great going through that process with them as a startup and and trying to go out and attack verticals and trying to figure out what what cells and what really people want out of your product. It's been very interesting and I understand where you're going. It's been a little slower and the VC part, the raising capital part, has been the hardest. And to go into somebody and say, you know what, well, you to give me your money. It's been that's been the hardest for me, and I don't you know, it's been interesting because I can go in and talk football and all those things, which is great, and get in the door, but it didn't bring home, you know, because I didn't have that background in business, so I had to learn a lot of that. I still don't know at all it's been. That's been a very tough transition. Well, you know, one of the things I've found is a lot of the guys that I surround myself are all very high business acumen and Iq and I think that's been one of the things I've tried to do is just sit back and really learn, kind of like a day with my coaches, like learn from the game, learned from those guys what they're doing, how they do it, and seek advice on things that I don't know, and I don't know a lot, but it's I mean, I would have never thought I'd be in this position today and it was really just a kind of a stroke of luck and being in the right place at the right time. But I think that also goes back to anything that you do, which is preparation meets opportunity and then if you're not ready for those moments in time, which we were in football days, I put myself in that position several times on the football field and now with business, to put ourselves in a position where, you know, we've got, you know, over a hundred million people looking at our different sites every month, but you know, every day chipping way chipping away, chipping away, and then next thing you know you pop pipe your head up and you're standing on top of the mountain. It mark. What's Jim creamer like when it when the cameras not on? I have not met him because we we had a different group. The the CEO and some of the investors were meeting with him back in New York and that's a whole nother story. I've got kind of the you know, play byplay, but that's not I really handled more the sports, vertical sports illustrated, building a network and and that's under the finance division. So it seems like you're extremely busy and you've been busy for a while and you've been in several companies that you just explained to us. So really, what started your passion for climbing the tallest peaks on every cop? Well, let's go back to kind of the theme of your show and you know there's some people, you know, you fall into valleys and have to overcome those different things and really like, how do you dig out and move forward? And then again, this goes back to I think my story on things aren't always as rosy as it might appear and I'm very authentic and truthful about that.

And about eight years ago, my well, this goes back probably eight ten years ago, my the Gal that I had met in College, married for twenty four years to two kids, two girls, didn't want to be married anymore, and that was a very tough place for me to being because I was committed to the very end. And Yeah, you know I'm very driven, but she just wanted something more and it's just it's just like there's a certain things where built a certain way. And then at the same time my dad died of a massive stroke, and so I was just at a like a like an emotional pit right. I was always very tough. Yeah, and I was. I'd moved from Seattle down to Santa Monica because you wanted to resume her acting career and all the stuff, and so I had no friends and you know, is very literally place for me to be. And for two years I kept walking around our big ass block and I kept asking myself. I was with my chocolate lab. We kept at saying like how did I get in this place? This is impossible, this is impossible for me, this to happen to me. And here I am and you know, somehow another. It has, and this one on for quite some time, probably a couple of years, and in the worst place of all, that is, when you're in this this zone where you're just treading water and you're not really paddling and going in some direction, right or wrong. And after a couple of years, you know, I just said to myself, you know what, what am I going to do about it, because I'm sick and tired of being in this place. And so at that it was almost like this mental shift. I don't know, it's the stars that split to this. You know there's a shooting star. What happened on that moment? But it just seemed like it lifted the weight off my shoulders, like I was ready to move forward. And with that came clarity, and with that clarity was possibility, and within that possibility it was like I want to do something athletically great. I kept myself in decent shape over these years and obviously can't go back and play the NFL, although I think I still have three downs. I think I'm very quick out, a quick end, and maybe I said go and I'll pull my hands right right, but but I said going up again in Seattle I said you know, I love mountain climbing and I know a from there's a lot of kind of famous mountaineers from the northwest and I said, you know what, I had to go do some research and see if any NFL guys ever climb the seven summons and if not, I'm going to try to be to come that guy. And so I did. There was no guy that done it, and so I started off on this journey and it really sucked the light back into me, gave me a goal, you know, the big ass school gave me a path and there's a lot of logistical things and things I've had to learn along the way, but you know, off I went. First Mountain was down in Africa, Tantonia, Clem Kilman Jerod, nineteen thousand three and thirty three feet, you know, just to see if I could actually handle that. And then since I've gone all over the globe climbing these. I do one a year. I've been invited with Chris Long. His Foundation, as part of the founding class, raised a bunch of money over Fiftyzero to build a water well for the people in Massai tribe, organization called water boys that he started, and so it's just like the associations that have come my way through this climbing venture, the adventure of being around the globe, being and Antarctica, being in Russia, being in Australia, being in Argentina, Chili, all these other destinations have really been a gift, you know, coming back to me. Yeah, we had Chris on and what he does in the players that he brings on with him and the people that he takes up to climb the mountain and for what he's doing is great at water boys on organ and we loved hearing his story and his passionate about that when he was on not too long ago. I've known Chris for a while. Great Guy, great family, but you know he's doing his passion, but your passionate trying to get to every continent, to climb every mountain. You have one, left, right, I do it's it's it's mountain everest and you can nervous. No, and the reason why I'm not nervous is because, again, preparation meets opportunity and I've been doing this now long enough and I've been on these other mountains and there's nobody that trains harder than me. I'm not seeing there's other guys on the mountain who aren't as fit, but I do two days I will wake up in the morning and do cross fit and then I moved to some valley so I'm at six thousand feet and then I run up and down the mountain every day in the afternoon and it's just what, you know, fuels me. But you know, they talked about three percent of everybody that goes to to Mount Everest, you know, does not make it, and so really what I'm focused on is the ninety seven percent of the people that do and what I can do to put myself in the best position. Now. I was in this last January. I was in in Arctica, so this would have been January two thousand and nineteen, and you know, just like going to the moon or some place, you have to charter in there and it's a very specialized trip. But I shared a tent with a guy who today sits on top of Mount Everest at twenty nine thousand and two...

...nine feet, because he didn't make it and he got to the very top, raises hand and fell over and died. And when I was down there in an Arctica, there are all kinds of signs that this guy should not be even on that mountain, which was sixteen thousand and change. He had frostbite six months before and den Aali and mountain I'd been on at the same time with him. He got flown off. He lost three of his fingers half of his nose. But it's guts. It's kind of like one of those guys on the football field, not so much in the NFL, but you look out there and use like this guy's got no business being out here. Yeah, not prepared. And the big difference, of course, is that you talk in Cavasses, you talk in severe cold. You're talking about having the things to really self manage yourself, feel yourself in the right way, where the right kind of gear, not dropping things all over the place and being responsible and a good teammate. And while he was a great family man, in a good guy, he just was not a guy that should have been in the mountains. And again, I've been around and I've had enough of these experiences of people phone and CARASS. I had a gun in Russia on Mount Mountain calm, Mount Elpres, got an awful storm. He was hit by lightning and died, and it's just like what can you do again to put yourself in the best position of success? And I know it's an apple and and orange, but gus, you know, you being the quarterback, calling the different signals, understanding the defense. You know what they're doing and how. What's the best strategy and what's the best way that you can put yourself in a position to beat that opponent? And when? What's like the highest? I guess, Windy, you encountered in some of your tracks and like wouldn't show wise, like give us the extremes. Yeah, so, I mean the highest I've been is twenty freezero feet. Pretty High, you know, I'm not sure what it is in Pennsylvania, you know, but not not even close. Maybe. Yeah, eat, yeah, yeah, and they know. Interesting fact on that is that was a mountain called a can cog way down in Argentina, and we got up there. We started with twelve people in the group. Only six mated, and so we were flying guys off and rescue helicopters and it can be deadly. You know, you have braining, you have swelling in your brain, swelling in your lungs, and very bad things can happen if you don't get people down. You know, soon enough, and so that was real test on whether you know how I would do, and I had no problems being up on that particular mountain at that height. I've been Ontanale, which is right in the middle of Alaska, the Alaska Mountain Range. The thing that's interesting about the Alaska Alaska National Park, Danelle National Park, is that it is it is bigger than the entire state of Massachusetts. Think about that. So it's just this massive crevast, you know, mountain top peaked, and then you have the bar in Sea that's coming. It sits in between Russia and the US and you have eleved that cold air that's coming up and over the top. And so again we were the two thousand and seventeen. It was awful, you know, we're getting in these awful blizzards and it was blown probably forty miles per hour, and it's mine is forty at night sleeping in the top. There's just lenticular cloud that was ad up there and we just kept waiting for the same to pass and it never did, and so finally we just packed it. Dinners like this isn't going to happen. So again, going back to self care, you got to have the right sleeping back. You got to be have the right gear, you got to have the right warm stuff so you can, you know, endure those severe conditions. When you get into sleeping bad do you just pass out pretty much. You know, it was kind of a challenge a little bit. Well, actually, so the same thing on Danelle, because you know you're going every you know, it's obviously when you talk about the globe, you talking about South America being the opposite seasons then North America, right, and in the case like a Vann Arctica, it the sun ever goes down during their summer, which is our winter, so it's done in January. So it's just it's hard at night when you're going to sleep, going to bed and it's like twelve o'clock in the afternoon on a sunny day, right. Yeah, I could imagine. What do you bring for food? Like is it how pouches of free stride stuff for like what's it's the typical. Yeah, and that's that's been a challenge for me. I mean I would say that's probably been the weakest part of my game. Like the physical part I've done well at, and the reason why is that you're not frying up cheese burgers or something at night, because it's you just you can't bring in things that are that you need to be refrigerated, even though that's you're in a cold area. You're packing these things up and so you have to be just really creative about what you can bring. There are freeze dry things, which I hate, but your own snacks. You know, my little secret. I'm not a big candy guy, but my secret on summer day is packful a bunch of those snicker bars and just having that sugar rush to go up in the in your drinks, having Nune tabs or other kind of like hydration type drinks that you...

...can throw in with your water and, of course, your water we have to melt from the the snow that's up there. Well, that sounds like you have to have a lot of mental toughness right and in when we're playing football, people talk about that a lot. Right, you got to have mental toughness to play this game and and go through everything. But I got to feel like it's a little harder when you're up at twenty threezero feet than being on a football field and in La. So what do you think? You would go back and tell you know a mark pass and that's in high school, about mental toughness. Well, this is what I believe, and I have a I have a big time conviction about this, is that I don't think in this has happened to me. I was guiding a trip on Mount Raineer two weeks ago and it was a disaster because this guy that showed up on the recommendation of a navy seal showed up and all's he done his walk around the block and then did it. Had done a lot of reading about you know this with the navy seal has said you like right, more like a classroom type. Then I don't think it starts with being mentally straight. If you're mentally strong, then you can be physically strong. I think being pushed and pushed and pushed to the point of the brink where you don't think you can go anyway any longer makes you a mentally tough person. But you got to have the physical tools so your body doesn't breakdown in order to build up that that resistance. And so a lot of things that I try to do every day. I do things that I don't like doing and I do those because I know they're my weak points. But I look at Mount Mount Everest and I'm I know that there's going to be various points on that trip, in particular on the high camps at Twenty Sixzero feet, and you're making that truck all the way the twenty nine. You're in in it for fourteen hours and we saw a lot of what went down this year where are there's that big line that went to the top and all hell breaks loose, and how you going to deal with that? If you don't have your strong body to sustain you, then you're going to have a weak mind and that's going to break pretty quick like from Mount Everest. What's kind of I know you it's hard to be precise, but what's the from start you arrive at the base of Mount Everest to you get to the summit? Like now, how long is that projection in terms of getting to the top? Yeah, yeah, you guys are going to like say, wow, but two months. So what happens is I'll land there April two, but my ticket the other day, so I'm ready to go land on April two. I'm a Kaman do and then from there we make our way and there's a forty mile journey that we take. That goes from about eight thousand feet up to seventeen thousand feet, and so I'll be living at seventeen thousand feet for most of the two months. Something that's really interesting that happens on Mount Mountain that doesn't happen anywhere else, and this is one of the reasons why you saw which you saw this year with this big lung lineup, is at the jet stream sits on top of the top of that mountain at Twenty Ninezero feet, and for two weeks during October and two weeks during May, may fifteen exactly to the end of May, the jet stream rises above allowing you to have, relatively speaking, save passage to the tops, in other words, is not blown a hundred miles per hour. And so this year that jet stream, it never rose, and so on the one or two days, two days I think, to two days to be exact, when it did rise, everybody had summit fever and just booked to the top. And so you see, you've had these same types of numbers go, but it's been spread out over fifteen days or so, versus everybody just saying it's I've got my one window, I've been here for two months and I'm going and then you run into the mass like they rent into this last year. Wow. So do you think the people that live there, what are they called? The SHERPOS Serpos, if you think when they see all these people coming in? I mean it's it's probably brought them a lot of money into their little communities and all that. But you think they say, and these people are crazy, you know, they want to just come to do it for for for sport to say they've done it, but these people actually live there. Yeah, I mean it's interesting because it really it's probably a bitter sweet and I'll know I could probably answer that question a year from now if we want to do a follow up. But it's better sweet from the standpoint of they love to have normal jobs and not go off from their wives and their children and and put themselves in harms way of laying down the fixed lines and everything going up and living there for months on end. But it is what it is and that's a lot of what fuels our economy as people from around the world coming to climb many of these these these these tall peaks. They're and I know there's been a lot of pretty intense moments between the Serpa and between between these some of these American or nute American, big foreign I'll say, climbers that have come in and not really taking them seriously. And and so hopefully, you know, knock on wood, my experience is going to be a great one and I'm going to meet some amazing people and but it just seems like...

...more and more in this is part of part of the issue is that there's some low cost budget outfitters from Nepal that are offering a very cheap way, and then you have people who don't want to pay very much, but they had don't have much experience. Like this guy was talking about, who's my tentmate, who still up on top of evers right that was trying to get me to go with these guys and I was just like well, let's just way to you get back and we'll have that conversation. And you never came back and it's just like, you know, you get with what you pay for. What is what is the cost of, you know, going up and do it for two months to hike evers? That's a lot over five hundred or under five hundred thousand. They know it's way under that all right, so a hundred thousand somewhere around there. It's just a little under that, okay, so, but it is. It is a lot. What what's the toll on your body? I know it's going to vary, but like when you, let's say you climb average to come back or any of the other mountains to climb, when you have finally descend and come back home, what do you feel like? Well, I feel beat up and you know, could you're deprived in your body, especially when you get up there, once you get into the death zone, your body is actually dying, the cells on you because there's not enough oxygen. I've down a neck can caguaylast seventeen pounds. Actually I lost ten pounds, not can caguant in la I lost seventeen. So I'm anticipating probably losing around twenty five pounds and I'm already fairly lean. So hopefully I can keep up my nutrition. And that's the one thing that people don't understand is that when you climb, the higher you get, the more your appetite gets suppressed. But you're burning calories like crazy, you're carrying heavy packs and so it's just sitting down forcing yourself to have some water, forcing yourself dep some food so you can sustain the energy as you go up and down the mountain. What is the weight of your pack that you check up? Well, that's a good question. That's a great question. You know, this mountain was going to be a lot different than the other one. So, for example, on Danale, which obviously is an America and Alaska, we had to carry our own stuff. That was a three week expedit. I'd carry a hundred and forty pounds, if you can imagine that on your back going up to the like super steep, you know, traversing them and navigating your way around. So, like I said, you got to bring it. This one is a little bit different because a SHARPA. This is in part gust some of the cost to get into it. The sure PA are carrying a lot of the the weight. The going up and up and down the mountains. We carry we have the acts carried a lot of the gear just getting into base camp. So it's probably going to be a thirty pound pack. You know, on on I'll be wearing oxygen joll of tanks on my backpack. You know, as I'm going up the mountain, all of extra gloves next to this and that, just to make sure something happens right. Right. Wow, amazing story, Dave Mark. That's just amazing and we can't wait to hear how it all comes out. Next year we're going to have you back on and one of our last things we always like to do here on hottle up. We go through a two minute drow called no huddle here at the end and we blast a bunch of questions at you and, you know, just to shoot out the answers and and we you know, I think we get a lot of good things out of our know holiday. All right, let's far away. All right, mark, who would play you in a movie about yourself? Wow, who would play in a movie about my self? I think probably Liam Hands Worth. I'm probably saying that wrong, but that would be my answer. It's a good one. We'll have to we'll have to, you know, get that up and do side by side for a Promo Les. I would love to say Tom Crewis, but I don't think I'm that cool. Yeah, of course you are. Well, Tom Cruise made a climb a few mountains too. So yeah, but I think you got a couple more on them. Okay, mark. If you could treat places with one person in history for one day, who would that be? I think George Washington. Why would that be? Well, I mean he's a founding father, right. I mean just the creation of trying to put something together, entrepreneurial on that sense. Just so many different obstacles, but pulling everybody together at the last minute. I mean that might be an answer. That's that's probably the the DNSWER, coming from my my aspiring quarterback days. You know, as a senior in high school, I wouldn't be crazy about wouldn't teeth so so many one day, though. So yeah, so what is your biggest pet peeve? My biggest pet peeve is people not being prepared and bringing it because they may lose fingers, they may and nose and lives. Yeah, exactly. theresly Um, what do you think the most overhyped thing in sports has today? What's the most overhyped thing? I think everything is overhyped,...

...right. I mean I don't think there's any one single thing, but just I it one thing that I don't like. I'm not sure if this answers your question, but you know that the the showboating. I don't like when somebody catches a touchdown, they go in the end zone and and then or maybe it's a dunk. You know where they just ESPN highlights as is all they go on. There's so much more of the game than just those things. I know that's what brings in the ratings, but I just personally don't like that. I never did that stuff. I like when the guys canch a touch smelt but they give it to the Lineman and then the lime smash it and because they never get to do that. Yeah, it's cool. My My my coach, Gary Pinkel, who is ultimately he was. He was assistant coach at Washington, became the head coach at Missouri. Successful run there. He used always say to me, act like you've been there. Right exactly. What is your favorite sports movie? My favorite? My Favorite Sports Gosh, I've got a lot of them. I Like I love secretariat, I love Rudy. Love that show. I was never rudy, thank God, but identify wou allow. Those guys that right and tried hard. So did you, I'm sure. Gosh, there's a bunch of amount there, but those are probably my two favorites. How about this? If you could let me see we already went through this. Apologize. Okay, this is a little bit art explained. I heard this on another show. If you could trade places with a Sitcom carry character and live on that set for a week, what would who would that be and what show would that be? Well, I you like I used to think about that with Magnum Pi, because he seemed like he had a pretty good gig going in Hawaii, right, and pretty girls coming around and some, you know, fun guys to hang out with. So it seems like that would be a fun show to be on. I can see you with a good stash, like you'd have a good Magnapai, I must say. Yeah, he had it going all the way around. Yeah, I would be Dane Dave. You'd be Buddy Rick, right, and I'd be like TC. All right, yeah, you'd be a buddy rick. Yeah, awesome, it can would be higgins. He'd be our producer. Be Higgins. Yeah, that'd be He'd be higging. Actually, I'm out thinking like maybe threes company. That wll scenario. Would you like that either? Yeah, they would let you in there, though they wouldn't let me in, but the Regal Beagle look like would be kind of fine, right, all right. So if we are scrolling through your phone right now and we stopped, who would the most famous person in your phone be right now? Well, Gosh, I've got a lot of them. I mean the guy that I I hang out with every day is Jim Mora, you know, nfl coach and Ucla the last night. But you know, they've got Jim Plunkett's and muster hays and running lots and you know, mostly I don't have a lot of actors in there, but you know, more on the on the on the sports side and a lot of those types of players. Maybe a Ted Turner. Well, Ted Ted's name was not be his ranch hands in there, okay, and he's the one who said yes or now? Yeah, right, exactly. Um, if you could be commissioner for a day for any of the Leagus, yeah, what what rule would you institute? Besides no celebration? The rule that I'd institute is a better pension plan for all the retire guys, I guess. And I yeah, that would be nice. I would like that. And Yeah, life andsurance, like just just help us through, like our like our health insurance. Don't cut it off after five years when that's when we start getting all of our ailments, like, you know, I played for fifteen years. I got all these things going all of me. Now I'm like, thank God, my wife got a job. Get on our insurance. Well, see, I can do that for it, because I'm going to be the commissioner for one day. That's right. I like, please change that rule, commission yeah, yeah, how does life insurance work with your climbing activities? Like, is there there's special policies, because I be that some of that stuff would be excluded activities. I think, yeah, so I don't really look at it that way. I mean, I do have that allies in place, but I look at it more of you know, what do I need to do to make sure I get myself off the mountain? I don't go into it with a fatalistic, you know, idea. I have a Garmin device, which trap not only tracks. I have SOS device. Also get insurance that I can get emergency are backed out if worse comes to worst, because otherwise would be hundreds of thousands of dollars to have a helicopter flying from nowhere. Ye, have these different stations all over the US. When you activate these certain buttons, things can happen, and so that's what I have, those types of insurance to make those things happen. Have you been on many expeditions were some of your colleagues have had to call for help like that? It again, I kind of...

...a yes and a know that the the the people that got flowing off of back INCAGUA. We had a radio in and make that happen, but it wasn't. It wasn't necessarily that they'd fallen into a crevasse. They had just been in a situation where there their lungs, of their brain and filled up with with fluid. That's crazy. Well, we wish you all the best of luck and climbing on Everest and you know anything that you need us to talk about. You know your part of water boys and we'll definitely put that out there because we feel like that's that's a great organization and we really appreciate you coming on and really giving us your story of all those transitions you had in your life and where you are today. is going to be the first NFL player to ever climb the seven summits, which is an amazing thing. Thank you so much and guys, listen. I love the interview I love chatting back and forth and I always really appreciate not only coming on shows like this, but especially gusts in your case. You know, talking to another guy who's been through the war, you understand a lot of different things that we've had to go through and you know, look, life is a journey and I would have never imagined that I'd be in the position I am to day on so many different fronts. And so I made a foolish statement years ago when I was in Seattle. We'd bought this House and I thought that was my final destination. I said I'm never moving and since I made that stupid statement, I moved like seven times. Is Because of life circumstance, right. So, you know, be open to the way that life might, you know, take you and go after with Gusto, and that's what I try to do. I tell my kids every day it takes a little more to make a champion, and I think it really does. Well, I agree. What do you think, Dave? Absolutely, and also to tell us, if we want to listen to your podcast, finding your summit, what's the best way to go about that? Yeah, so you can to check out on my website. Mark Pattison nflcom. That's the same handle on my instagram, twitter other things like that. Mark Pattison nflcom. And then my name of my podcast is called finding your summit and it's all about people over becoming adversity and finding their way and I've all kinds of fascinating guests on there. I'm going to have guests on in a couple weeks. So look forward to hearing that that story. But no, I just again I really appreciate the love and you guys reach out and having this this talk. All right. Well, we appreciate you coming on and spend it some time with us and telling US your story. Absolutely, mark, have a great one and we'll talk to you soon. Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on how to up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shaped to life. As always, I'm joined by my great friend and Co host Dave Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at hottle up with gusts and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

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