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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Mark Pattison

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

A former wide receiver in the NFL, he has a goal to climb all “Seven Summits” of the world, a renowned podcaster in his own right, Mark Pattison joins the Huddle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hello Dave: This is going to be a funone, interesting story here. It is Dave what what is the highest summit you've everclimbed? Well, Gus, I don't from start Tofi. I've beenon some high summits out west, been above tree line. Walking with myfamily. I wouldn't sit it's little differentthan what this guy does, but I've been on some wwhat's, the scariest hikeyou've ever been on. That would have happened this springthe spring yeah me. We took a trip and didn you go to. Vegas went to Vegas,but we kind of took like an unconventional tour of Vegas that included going to. Ithink it was called like the Devil's Throat Canyon or something like that.It was. It was something like. Were you nervous when Kelly said, hey dave,we're going to go hike, Devil's throat cand? I was not nervous, even thoughthet sound it sounded like it was. I should be nervous. I wasn't nervous shewas. She read on trip, Advisors, Yeu, so our guest talks about how, when hegoes to a mountain- and he sees them on, he getsbutterflies, did ye you the same way when you got out of the van and youwent to the devils, Throk Canyon, and you saw it, you got a little nervous, I still not nervous because it was wereactually going downhill, so you're like Oh, this is Goin to be easy. I thoughtit was going to be easy and I was really wrong. We didn't read the therewas there's lots of warnings that we read afterwards that we, if we wouldhave heated those warnings, I don't think that so what part of the hikewhere you like, the most nervous like when did you realize like this- is GonTa Suck? Well, one of the parts was when I was linkface down in the dirt, Unable Tho have the strength to do a pushup andstand on my feet and other hikers who I hadn't met up to.That point had to carry me that made me a little uneasy. What doyou think our guests would say if he saw you inthat? What do ou? What do you think he would? I mean he's very positive, veryabout picking yourself up. I mean he had to do it to himself, and I thinkthis would even is him seeing me trying to scale down these. I don't know if you call them cliffs orwhatever was we were doing. I think that would even test his positivity,where he might have even given up on me. Thank God does I would still be there For wasn't for a couple of those guys that I didn't know until he carried meout, yeah didn't somebody help you up with that. It was also carrying a baby.There was a there was a family with a baby and they he may have stepped overme as I was laying there, but there was a couple kids couple teenage girls at.I think they were trying to revive me and splash water on my face and stuff,so dave our guest. I don't know if he's ever been thatdown buthe's been down in his life and hefound a way. He said, I don't know how I got here and he basically he said.Okay, I'm going to change that thinking and now. What am I going to do about itand that's pretty powerful thinking? ND, not a lot of people can pull themselvesout of that no and he took he channeled hisenergies into something like totally different than what he was doing before the hard times and has becomegreat doing what he's transformed into right,because he always felt. I think he was a grood athlete growing up inWashington and then you know going to school. A I think hewent to univers e was a musquite. He was a Hosky ye h and then he went in and played in the NFL for quitea few years with the raiders. You know an in just some of thosepolific teams and then get done with that gets married, trying to figure outlife and we all make that transition as former athletes. That's so hard to figure out what our next step inlife is and he's no different, but he took that and changed it and turnedit around and he's not just casually hiking up hills around hishouse he's going to extreme levels of climbing right. Well, he is planning onbeing the first NFL player to climb the seven summits. Next Maze Doing Everest Right, which is insane it's crazy. Well,the story when he was when he climbed Killmanjaro his tent met actually diedon everst.

I thought it was Onkillmajoro, no, no,his tenmate that he was with and hey climbed, killma jar together, went andclimbed everast, but he's still on ever. Oh I'm sorry, yes, wow, but why youknow to hear why he died so why people can only climb that mountain twice ayear is because the wind at the top of thatmountain and Mont Everis is so bad. It raises above the peak twice a year, andso all those people thought it was going to raise up and it didn't yeahyou as just some small window. Otherwise it's a death drop yeah andthe trap. It is because that guy is still up there, but incredible storiesnow he's also develop a consulting company,Maverick consolting and part of another company where they just bought sports,illustrated and he's a fellow podcaster and fellpodcaster, which I think I'm going to be on a show pretty soon so welcomeinto the hotdle great gas, former NFL player, and hopefully the only player ever tosuccessfully climb all seven summits Mark Patdison, Oh Dave is my cohost andDave. We have mark passin on former seventh round draftic, just like myself,yeah other side of t, the United States, though he came from the West Coast, but he's also he's an entrepreneur andbeen involved in many companies and het's, also something I've never done. I counbarely CIMB my driveway, but he's climbing the seven summits, and youknow mark it's just an honor to have you in the hoddle with us today, and wecan't wait to hear your story yeah know. Thank you so much guys for having me onthe show. You know I've not been in a huddle INI awful on time, and I lovebeing you know back with a quarterback Aus. You know US receivers, love toalways. You know, buddy up with Q, Bes just to get on that same page andreally extablish. That rupport, like I deal with many great quarterbacks thatwent on into the NFL as well as the guys hat did play an NFL with, but nothe seven summits are have been an amazing journey, the seven summits ofthe highest peaks on each continent, and surprisingly, I've been at this nowfor eight years. I thought when I started this, that you know sevensummits would mean seven years doing one mountain per year and I forget tofactor in Mother Nature, and so that's coming to play a coupledifferent times, one on Tenell in two thousand and seventeen minus eightydegrees. At the top and sleeping that mine is forty at fourteen thousand feet.So we decided to make the right decision turn around D go back home,but I do have one more mountain now, Moun Evers, coming up next April andI'll be the first NFL got to do that and there's not too many first outthere today. So it's going to be a pretty cool thing that hopefully I canaccomplish now that's an amazing thing, but wherewe really want to start was when your kid really? How did you get a love ofsports when you were a kid? What started that wasn't your parents was inyour siblings? Was it a coach? How did that passion come about for you yeah?Now, that's a great question Guss and you know, and it's one of those thingswhere you know I've. I can't say I've studied it, but I v paid attention toit. Just in terms of really that that whole thing around, why and passion-and I didn't- I don't think- realize it when I was growing up, but I'm sure,like you, toal Jim rat, always out bouncing a ball, throwing a ballthrough a window. You know wher ther is footballbasketball, baseball and those were back in the days when truly you didhave your main three sports. It wasn't so one sided with club sports today,where it's kind of a year round, whether you pick soccer or football orbaseball, or one of these other sports, like my kids, went through, but nogrowing up in Seale Washington, very mountainous community. I spent a lot oftime out door, probably like you did on the east coast, raining all the timeout there in a tshirt didn't pay attention to it didn't know any better.I didn't get on on an airplane until my first recruiting trip to the Universityof Hawaii as the first time I was on n airplane and so didn't really see thecountry, but had a great upbringing spent a lot of times in the mountains.I'm sure you played up in Seattle Mount Reneris right up there in the cascadesand he Olympics so really surrounded by a lot of mountains, a lot of streamsand lakes and so wonderful place to be. But you know really at the end of theday, I don't know why you know I didn't have necessarily arole model that it was looking at. It was just something that was in me thatalways wanted to be out and be a gym rat some guys either. I think, have itor they don't. Did you play all those sports that youwent over in high school basketball, baseball football yeah and you knowlooking back, you know you try to look back with no regrets nd and I did makesome stupid decisions. You know I was in eighth grade and I made a a varcity baseball team and they 'eregoing to travel to Europe and play my...

...dad being a school teacher said you'renot going you're only in eighth grade and I was like Pissd, and so I quitbaseball. It's probably my best sport, you know is receiver. I could run downpretty much iny ball in the outfield and I hit well, but het was just moreof a selfish thing and then on the basketball front, I only played for twoyears, and actually I was, I was a decent basketball player and not somuch of a great shooter but just being really active on the on the court,and I quit after my sophomore year, because the guy put meon the bench- and I was that guy. That was, you know the twelft guy were twominutes ago. scrubtime. If they put me in only I for up by thirty and it wasstupid- I hated it. So I quit. I just played club ball and I love basketball,but really focused on on football and that's kind of where you know my starrose. So that's kind of the way I played out. Did you when you were a kidgrowing up? Were you in a neighborhood where you you guys live out in thecountry, because a lot of times a lot of our guests talk about how he ued tojust go out and play with their buddies? And that's really how they learned toplay law sports yeah. I know that's exactly what happened I you know. Igrew up right kind of the hub of Seattle. There I actually end up goingto a high school. That was about two miles away from where I grew up rightin the city and then the University of Washington, where I ended up getting ascholarship to was about another two miles, so it was like a six Mile Circle.I could actually see the stadium ot my parents window, so that was pretty cool,but I mean you nailed it. I mean literally your round and the snow andthe sleed and the rain and the Sun Myself, and these other buddies wouldmeet up at this park. Few ridce playfield and we just go at it, and youknow I think, that's jhis where it allstarted, and everybody have the same kind of passion, be up there every dayat at four o'clock after school and just go aut. Whatever sport that wasmostly t was football, but you know a little bit little bit of basketball.Were you now doorsmen at all? Any fishing a little bit, you know with mydad. You know I've got a kind of a background in in Montana, actuallybuilt a ranch out there and that kind of started with going to Montana as ayounger kid and then built this amazing place. I saw it acouple years ago and moved to some valley, Idaho, where I'm at now, but right on on a stream literallyriver runs through it. I had one side of the the fence and Ted Turner had theother side of the fence and there's about ten miles of fresh water inbetween so itwas pretty cool hand, some good fishing right there. I S TAT,Ryeah how's Ha House, tent Turner as a neighbor. Well, he was great because hewas never there. He had all his workhands and with Ted, I think, mightbe I'm not sure if it's still current bit, I'm sure he's right up there, ifnot the one but the biggest private landowner in the US ones, ten o twelvegiganto ranches and even within Montana n in the outside of Bosman, he had amuch larger ranch than the fourteen thousand acre. One that he had next tome he's Ai, I'm sure it was cristine yeah. I know I s, it was pretty cooland a lot of it that you know, especially in town moretowards Bosman. He ran a ton of buffalo and then he started. A A a restaurantchain called Tad go figure, and that was pretty much. You know focusing onByson and more that lean mate. That was out there. So you know there's kind ofa HOICO system for him of bringing people out and you could. You could paya bunch of money to go, hunt on his property and again he ran buffalo and all kindsof other things out there. So pretty cool it woult. You say: Thirteen Zandacres, fourteen thousand on small ranch and obys sixty eight housand, ow n, thebigger ranch and yeah t. You can do a lot of hunting out there, an e!! sothere's a lot yeah a lot of critters runnin around out there, a lot ofcountry any GN, fonde sightings I never saw Jane. I would have liked toseen janeor inner in their prime, but no we went down towards towards hisplace. I s just an awesome drive to go down in there, and- and I was told I don't know if this isrumor or a fact that that slice of heaven was her favorite of all theranches that he had around the country. Well, atthat that'd be pretty amazingto see to be ben able to go there every day, anm sure you had a beautifulstream going right through. Why built two cabins, and you know theinteresting thing was coming from a city slicker kid I had to create. Myown grid draw my own water trade, my own law cabins and everything,and and so just going from absolutely knowing nothing. I don't know if you'veever seen that movie called Jeremi Johnson Y, but it's e kind of thetailor that you know the guy that goes up in the mountains and finds himself,and he comes out a couple years later, with a beard and a season veteran, youknow almost like an NFL player after playing a few years. You kind of getton understand, but this guy had been a you know, attacked by Indians andcrizzy bears and everything else and an, although I wasn't attacked by anybody,certainly encountered. We had snake attacks and Barisidings all the time,and you know it's just amazing learning...

...journey. Oh, I could imagine I couldimagine so to get to where you are now you had to go through so much. You know you get in your high schoolcareer. You play multiple sports. I saw you also played quarterback one yearsat right. Yeah I was there's a Guy Guss, you mad knowhumelon. He was a fellow quarterback played ten years in the NFL, a bunch ofdifferent team, but he was a quarterback o the universial Washington,but he was my backup in high school and he's a guy that his feet and th the howfast he grew. He literally could not take a fivestep drop. You know, ofcourse I was at receiver and things Hav gone well for men, my sophomore andjunior year. You cannot take a five step drop, which is about a twelve yardrout, as you know, right and without being sacked, and so finally, they saidMark Come on in here and then I end up being recruited at quarterback. Youknow that my senior year so had some choices. Oregan schools other places togo, play quarterback or go to the universial Washton other schools likethat and play wide receiver. So your heart was kind of always sed onWashington, even though you looked everywhere else yeah. No, I think Ithink that was it. You know it's hard not to grow up. A and kind of you knowmy grandfather's Big Husky alarm and I sat through a lot of games and thos.The stands watching the kind of the former Husky grades, and then I gotthat opportunity and I look back on it now. It's just. I don't think I reallyunderstood the value of being able to be in that position. Consideringthere's so many guys that go through there or want to go through he, thewalkons. It just never attained that level and just very grateful for thatopportunity. And then you know once you go to school, then anything can happen.People can break their leg, they flunk out of school, they get messed up indrugs or something else you've seen that all and just having figured outnavigating my way through- and it took me probably a good three years before Ihad kind of grown into my body and built up the confidence to play inthose days to pack ten to make that happen, but it all did and verygrateful for that opportunity and we had a very successful run under the DonJames Era as well. Well, you've also played in one of the Mose scenicstadiums in the country. It's a gorgeous setting yeah, you know again.It was interesting because I mean I used to go down there as a kid andbreakin the stadium climb over the fences and do all that stuff, and forme it was that was just my backyard. I didn't I didn't understand in this lastsix years, nat to Nig, not the last two years in a row, but I served in amentorship program with Ucli just because I'd gone to college igone. Youknow I've been through the Patham on a the NFL and my best friends, Jim Morajunors who's, the head coach of the team, and so I went on all the RoadGames for eight years and obviously at the Rost Boll at their home. But thecool thing about that is not only did I get to go to really cool spots aroundthe country that hadn't been to Texas Ain, then Virginia those types ofschools, but I got to go and they every single stadium had been redone to wherethey are today, based on all the advertising money and the TV revenuethat's coming in plus we added to teams into the Packtan, Colorado and Utah. SoI got to see those so it was just cool to go back and just experience thosenew stadiums. So what was your experience like going to University of Arizona? Well, it was great. We never lost toArizona Day davs, not not until ninety one whenyou guys were number one and we knocked you off, but yeah. Well, there's a bigarizonaagain yeah. I know I watch that game and Gosh. She had some great players on theteam as well, but Desert Storm or whatever you called you Gan a yeah.It's warm yeah, my daughter, my younger daughter, goes to Ufa. So there you godod yeah yeah, my other one ween to USC, so I got pack twelve. You know in thefamily, but you know Arizona, all the Arizona teams were tough back in thosedays and we always beat them, thankfully, because we're a little bitbetter, but they always brought it and they're always tight and it always gotdamn o the last. You know second or men at the game to decide how the sing wasgoing to ply out but always lack they always licked a quarterback. They stillhave not had a all packd him, but pack twelve quarterback in which isunbelievable. It I mean it just seems like a place where you as a quarterback,he very conducive with the weather and everything to throw. But wellt seemslike you guys, you kind of have one and then all of a sudden something happensto them. They get injured ors. You know they kind of go off the deep end andthen they're gone, and then the backup comes in and then infact up comes in,and that is a position that you guys have struggled with over the years.Recruiting is always disappointing, I would say: Gren Kowsky was a bigrecruit. He went there for the girls, as he said. I thought more would follow,but we still struggle well target richenvironment for sure. But you know: Look at I've been down there. I've beento these other places. I mean pullman, not a fan of...

...organ State Corvalis. You know I meanAvrizona has a lot of things going forward. I actually like the campuspersonally better than I do Asu up in tempy there outside of Phoenix. I justyeah. I just think they've got a lot of great things going on there and it'sjust for some reason. They just haven't quite got over. The Hum. Just doesn'tdoesn't matter where the coaches, it's the recruiting, Iswe're, always likerecruiting it's like Sanase, state and stuff, and I just don't understand howthat you guys do have the best softball. That's O excellent softball g basketball, but here O ther it's onthe brink right now we're still waiting for the penalties to come down, butwe'll see if that guy keeps a job. Now you played under yeah right now youplayed at speakin coaches. You played under Don Jans, which is one of thelegends of College Football. What was your? What was the recruiting processwith James, like I know, youwere in his backyard, but that had have been prettycool him coming into your living room and yeah te Fitch, yeah yeah. I knowthat was great, but I think I said it perfectly. You know it was just kind oflike I was ready to be kind of swept up into that. You know because I've beendrinking the Culeid for so many years before yeah, but I'll tell you onething: you know the one thing that was great about coash James is that he wasvery hard lined. There was no great area with him either in or your out,and we got into a S T and at the time we were just startingto cress Warren Moon and taken this to the to the rose bawl. This is two orthree years, three or three or four years actually before I got there, butthe team hadn't kind of quite got the level of consistency where you couldsay this is one of the college. Great coaches, you know that's out there, butwhat he taught me, probably more than anything, was John Woodens Pyramid ofsuccess and one of the things that I didn't do and,of course today it's a lot different with club teams and starting kids earlywith with looking weights and everything. But you know I came inthere at six foot, two hundred and eighty one pounds could that bench myweight and I could I knew on the first day of camped that was in completelyover my head and it took me like I said before you know two or three years toto make a decision, a hardline decision that you know what do I want my life tobe like and really take a right hand turn, and rather just then just show uplike I'd, always done and be better than everybody. I actually had to work,because all those other guys had been high school. All Americans who haddeveloped their bodies ther, were now twenty two tenty one twenty two yearsold, confident gunned up and ready to play ball. I just didn't understand.You know what that meant and so tha the woodens Peramin of success isessentially this. Twenty five different building blocks of individual teamgoals, the very pinnacle is competitive greatness and when you peeled that allback and Guss you went through all this stuff, yet you know developing yourbody, your mind, your soul, and then that has to bleed into with the teamconcept and if everybody else, a playin their role and that competitivegreatness to me is really peeling back to the onion and the layers of that arereally loving. The process loving to work out loving, to run the stairsgoing out with guys, like gus every day, throwing the ball when it's not asked ayou and I ultimately got there, but I think that was a very defining momentin my life, and I know we shaped many other people and because he had thissystem in place, you know he slowly got better and better recruits, and then westarted to reload not rebuild, and that's really what his secret ofsuccessive think ultimately was it. It is a very difficult thing because I love playing the game. So much thatall that stuff didn't bother me like the liftings running to extra meetings,all that I loved it all, but for my son gunner, who only played two years incollege, it was, it was a burden to him. You know because he's like I got a goschooldad and then we have so many meetings and I'm lifting all the timewhenwe're running and we're never. And I said it's your life. You have todecide what's important to you and you know it took you three years. Gon Ersaid this isn't for me, but now he's coaching on the team, which is goodbecause he still has a high passion for football, and so there's so many thingsthat you can get from a good coach in what you learned and what coach yourcoach taught you and all your other players is invaluable and that's whatthe cructal sports is is that when you have a good coach and when you learnthose things when you're young, they carry with you through the rest of yourlife, so that one of our points of our shel is it. We all have transitions.Good and bad, we lose a job or something happens and you got to go andmove on and those people that have come into our lives teachus. So much and I'msure that's how you feel about your coach big time- and you know I mean boy, I have a podcast, as youknow, call funny or Somon all about people ov becoming aversity and fundingyour way. So somewhat of a similar theme, a D and- and you know, there's plenty of peopleout there with those types of stories. But I start with myself in terms of youknow like you guys, were people may...

...look at our lives and say: Well, youknow, college things were well and some businesses weve gone well and now I'mclimbing his mountains, but I mean I've had as many valleys are more valliys,where falling flat on my face were I was cut, I was traded, I didn't make it.I had a business fail. You know all kinds of different things where youknow it wasn't that bet of roses, and so I think it's those principles again.When you draw back to what coach, James and others in the NFL coaches, coachfloors and Coachmora Taut me about being disciplined committed, takingmetaphorically speaking, one step after the other is you're climbing thismountain and don't don't focus necessarily on the engoal and lovingthe process and good things can happen, but it does take that mentality to getthrough there'stheres. There's, no doubt aboutthat, and so you're in college you're, going through your college career. When did you first have an inkling, asyou were in college, t that the NFL may be something that you're going toaspire to? One of the great things about whatcoash James had extablished at the universiay o Washington is. We weregoing to rosbowls every year I mean my freshman thought me or win to the RolsBowl. My third and I was there five years, my third and fourth year. Welost to Washington stay in the last game, but we were in position to go tothe rollesbowl game. We ended up in Hawaii played some good teams overthere penn state in Maryland, and then my last year we end up in the OrangeBowl and we played Oklahoma ended up. Number two should have been number onebut h the point of all that is that reallyexposed to a lot of guys Yo, especially when I was younger that were going offinto the NFL draft. They ere playing at the NFL level, and these guys wereplayers Af that Wase scrimmaging against every single day and then, as Igot older and started playing now, I'm playing against Stanford USC. You know played against Lway. I thinkthree times, for example, he'sobviously on my set same shide of the ball, butyou know other guys that were defensive backs ad some success against. I wasjust like you know, wait a minute. I think I might be able to to have an opportunity to play a in casses.You know you there's a process, you don't just show up. Some people haveasked me: I Ocan, I'm. I think I'm going to go. TRY TO MFLTIM like itdidn't work that way right. They ask you and there's a combine and there'ssome other things and some of the indicators, whether or not you're goingto make it up at foragnd. So some things like that started to happen, butI think it was really those those guys that I played with and against thatreally started, giveme. Some confidence that you know there could be life aftercollege football. For me, Mark, U Mentione Washington State. I think theApple Cup might be one of the most underrated rivalries and collegefootball to the Resttu to math, maybe us on the east coast. What are yourfeeling is in the Apple Cup? Like that's a that's a, I know, being a packwell fan it's a big deal but yeah. You know it was interesting because back inour day you know for them. If they went, you know one and ten but beat theHUSKIES. It was a successful season and we just didn't see it. That way. Youknow we were more like our pig rivals and people that we were gunning for isUSC or UCLA and then at the very end there was this little. You know pest onthe side that we had to go deal with and play and they did bring it, andthat was the one thing I mean they. You can just my grandfa used to say thisperfectly. You can just take those records and throw them out the doorbecause they didn't matter because people just brought that extraemotional element to the game, which I mean Iprobably was never hit as hard as I was against those and they had some bigtime. I mean Gosh Shou, probably know mark rippin. You know he was one f, thequarterbacks over there that we played against, and I mean he brought it andthrough frazilian yards and we had o play catchup all game, and you know Ithink I was there. While I was there five years, we beat him three times andthey beat this two times. So that's the definition of a great ravery yeah. Now that that is an incrediblerivary and I actally. Actually I played n the Blue Gray game, which isa college all star game. I don't even know if toy have it anymore, but the coach that was at Washington Statewhen I was thit Wen that year Mike Ninety griht a prigce I right yeah. Hewas my head coach and we just had the best time like he was just tappy golucky. I think his son was a quarterback on a team that year fromWashington state, and I got to know a lot of those guys but yeah you knowthat's a great rivalwy. I've known a lot of the players from both sides ofthat Apple Cup and I got Tho value with a lot of them and just some tremendousathletes come out from from those two schools. Mike Price was the my sortsorry mark. My crice was the cooch for Alabama for about two weeks. If youremember yeah, I now T I don't remember all that happened there, but it's soshort that I don't. I don't think we have to talk about that right. Ayeahtalk about Avers, overcoming aversity and finding as Whay I'm sure he did hebos back. I think he did EA. He did Boukay. So you get drafted. What wasthat? What what was that experience...

...like for you, because you know you allof a sudden you're in your hometown, for most of your life playing footballand now you're going to go somewhere new? What was that like for you? Well, you know, look you've beenthrough this. The Fun thing about it is that there's thirty, two differentteams which represent thirty two different cities and there's some teamsas a receiver, that that would rather not be in to catch a ball like buffaloright, and so I was sitting in my living room withagain humilon and Jimora Matu Roommates, and you know just waiting for the phone.I think I had a little bit different mentality than some that you see ondraft day and they bring them in to make a big deal about it now,especially for the top guides, which was I was. My mentality was really justbeing grateful. If I was drafted and as you know, they give you kind of a draftstatus and I was anywhere between five and seven and I just like, even if I'mtwelve, I'm a happy guy and versus some other people get so disappointedbecause somebody said ther were you know between one and three or three andfive or whatever number, and then they go a lot further down the down thechart and then they become very. You know. I have a chip on my shoulderbecause they didn't pick me high enough and all the stuff, and that just wasn'tmy my thing, but I listen. I got picked by the Elle raidors and for me vot togo to all the different teams and end up two years before they'de been playedthis Washington redskins and been in the Super Bow Hinh, onethousand nine hundred and eighty three and then I came o Ne Thousand Ninehundred nd Ighty five draft, and I mean I got down there and you know I'mplaying against with all these legends of the game. I was just started to Rada reunion two weeks ago, but Jim plunker was the quarterback CLICP branch who just passed away. Thislast week was the other wide receiver room in this huble Marces Saands, therunning back, Tok Christenson's, the tied in and then we break the hoddleand then go to Lena scrammanes. LESSTER HAZ is out there stocking me. My caseis on the other side, how we long Rod Martin Lile Zado. I mean all these guyswere just rock stars to me, and I would just remember as punkets, calling outthat the signals in my head, I'm just thinking if I everdied. This is exactly what heaven would look like and I was in. I was in Manhattan Beach,California, with all these dudes, and you know we're going out and they havethis whole camaraderie thing and having drinks and having a great time and justthey played a different brand of football than what I was used to moreof a discipline style at the University of Washington. Under don jams, hey markdid Lester Hayes, wear the stick em, even in practice, Hey dad. I saw him.We had a long chat about that two weeks ago and he looks great by the way and but you know he was a linebacker atTexas and he was a big guy, so you know when he lined up, I mean Guss. You canappreciate this as a corner back. You know good six, Two t twenty six. Youknow he was more like a strong safety or again I mean I guess, a smalleroutside back or something, but I mean he could run, but he just got down sofar in his stance with the kind of that wide open, no legs on either side andjust towel hanging down below with all the stick Om everywhere I mean I justloved, going against him and all the battles that we had and you know he brought it each and everysingle Dan he's he amazing player raising player. Do you think that he?How do you guess? Let me refrain t o? How do you think he would have playedat corner today with all the different rule, changesIUD, think it would be tough. You know I mean He. He and my canes was a little bit more smoothbecause Mike was Taller and he had a greater reach, and so he gat his armsout there, even if it was jus a step behind Lester was super physical, andso you just can't do some of those things that he was doing you know.Today I mean it was a literally a battle getting off the LENNA scrimmageyeah. You know when I went to the Redskins, I felt the same way. You knowI go to the Redskins and drafted there. There's all these theyve, just wone, Othe Super Bowls and there's some real legends: The hogs and Darrel Greensthere and aret moncanose guys just left, but Darrel Green when you meet them,you're, saying: okay, this is the fastest guy in the NFL, but you whenyou see him he's Hity, I mean they call him Ptat. You know it's because he wasso little, but then he's going against our big receivers, he's just lockingthem down. It was amazing and I'm like wow. You know I'm just goingno throw itof because you know our guys way bigger than I me he's like no not happen today,but you understand why he's a hall of favor Yo, even at that size he wouldlove to get in and just get in yewr business, yeah yeah. I mean guys likethat, have just or instinctual and can run like that they can play catchup,and so you can do all the Shak and big stuff you want, but you know they're,just someone another just right on you and thoase are the greats of the gameyeah. So what was it like? So I never...

...really got a man. I've watched Jimplunket throw what kind of passer was he was it a? Was it a very softball?Was it a you know? I threw like a hard ball. You know, as receivers say,there's a difference in between all kind of quarterbacks. What was he likeyeah? Now? It's a good question and it was interesting because at the time wehad another guy that I don't think one the higsman,but he was right up there. But plunket by the way is one the big three so he'sone, the hisband trophy. He was rookie of the year W and he was a super bowlinvp. So you know elite company right there right yeah and on the team too,we had mark Wilson and mark, as you know, he looke prototypically a like abetter athlete. He was taller. He was lankier. He had more of a whip on hisarm, but those two guys get through theexact same ball and mark would get his ball. Intercepton, intercepted andplunkins would go for a touchdown. It was a weird deal, plunket, probablymore than anything. Even though he's not a supercharosmatic guy head just tremendous leadership, abilities and just kind ofa bottom on guy- and I don't know he just- he was kind of inbetween a hard ball, but it was very tight spiral, alwayscame in and he seemed to put the ball on the right spot and that the end ofthe day. That's the only thing that matters and also catchg the ball. Youknow in La you know in that environment, obviously you're not always playing inLos Angeles, where it's warm, but you know certainly that helps. The ballseems like it makes things a little bit softer to Katt versus you know, rockcard down in Green Bay or some place, Thatright dide M did Al Davis have muchcontact with the players all the time he was like a head coach. He was on thefield every single day that any of the players were on field. He was reallythe guy in charge and micromanage for sure I mean all the way down to thingsthat were going on on in the marketing department, but you know I think he was a help. As muchof as as he was a nuisance, you know to the organization he didn't, let coachesgo do their thing. Necessarily he had such a tight ran. It's interestingbecause, back in that day, Mark Davis who was around, he was really he wasjust a tallboy and he is now the owner. Ou rigt inherited the team, and it'sjust weird. You know to be around him and I'm proud of him too, because he'sgone through a lot of growth. Alb was such a dominating personality that itwas Fthis andef that, and you know it's my way of the highway and he got intobeef with it. SEEME, like everybody, Steve, Berlin and Marcus Allen, a D andcountless others and mark is, is not that way, but to be kind of dominatedthroughout his whole entire life and now give him the keys to the car. Youknow he's done a really great job, I think of empowering others to make this thing go and- and like I said,I spent you know- probably thirty- forty minutes alone with hem and he'sreally gotten it together. So you know congressed to him. So you play four seasons in the NFL. Was it three O four different teams? Well, there was like a game in therefor the rams, but it was is really it was. I played a couple years for theraiders and then M my third year, two days before the first game I get tradedto New Orleans. That was a shock. Tha would baand. That was a big chock and,as you know, it's new teammates new system, new everything beb but bobby abar was the quarterback and it's his best cabs. Ever heiklike literally, youcall t I play in the had INEGO. Okay wait a minute. What what did you justsay EAS Eah this cans? I could not atow Yeah Yeah E, his Cagan accent isbeautiful, yeah he's a great guy. It was down there for a couple years andthen my fifth year was the first year of free agency and, and so Tom Flor ishad taken, the the head, this th GM job, it the seahawks and he and Chucknol didnot see how to die. He brought in e guys. I was one of eight and all ouguys got blown out, and so at that point I was just frustrated withfootball been doing it for a long time D I was just like you know what I thinkit's my time to move on. So what did you Grada? What was your study? Washington wouln? You graduated withyour wellpolitical signce, but really you know as a football major, and thatwas really my hundred percent focus. You know what I I just was so keyed inon that's what I want to do. That's what I was going to do that I made it through fine, but you know:Didn't really have any interest of being a lawyer or going into politicsor anything. So sorry do so. You then all of a sudden, you're goingto say I'mdone with football lhet's. That transition like what are you thinkingat that point? Well, I'm yeah! You know I guess I was thinking that itwould all work out on my phone and start ringing with lots of offers ocome do this or that and none of that happened and Guss. As you know, it could be a reallytough transition for a lot of guys, and...

...you know I was I was in that group andI was probably probably in a bad spot for two years now: IAS financally,secure and stuff- and I wasn't doing anything destructive, but just in termsof I knew I was bound to do something great. At least that's whyt. I thoughtmy mind, but I just couldn't figure out what that was going to be, because Ididn't really have the skill set to really understand business and what thedifferent things were. I think today you know with the trust and the NFL andall the different programs they've done at one hundred and eighty of reallyeducating guys and giving them a path out and back those days. As you know,it was just like you're out and you'R out and that's it. So good luck. Whatwas your like? What was your big spark post NFL like that? Really got yougoing because you'V got you've been a very successful business person. Whatwas that first big break at you got that kind of launched you into thebusiness world. Well, you know, I think one of the things I wanted to domygrandfather was very successful. In sel he was a restaurant guy and he was ahotel guy on some race horses, and so I wanted not necessarly fall of thatexact path, but the entrepreneurial side of it, and so after a couple of years I was exposedto a guy who said Hey, I think you'd be great in this business and was doing alot of corporate marketing and so just again circumstance happening growing upin seatle where Microsoft was founded, Amazon was founded, starbucks wasfounded. You know number of these different companies. I was able to get in at wasn't like asmaller. You know market where none of these things were happening veryentrepreneurial as well, probably fourteen years- and this waslike a miracle that I even landed this, but I got into manufacturing businessfor quite a long time at operation going over in Asia, manufacturing inChina, routing back through Hong Kong and then shipping back through throughthe states to the East and west coast, and I locked in with starbucks- and Iwas the sole supplier of their outdoor market green umbrellos for fourteenyears so and if that was going through their huge growth spike. To so I mean Iwas packing a lot of those. I didn't even know what the hell outdoor marketumbrella was, and I told the person who was in charge. I for sure I could do itand I had no clue and then I figured it out, took me two and a half years toget that account. But it turned in to be a very lucrative. You know, companyto work with like what kind of volume were you talking about umbrella? Whyit's for that it'll order for star bunks, thousands, thousands andthousands and thousands. I mean they grew to, I don't know: Fifteen twentythousand stores. You know from kind of a ground zero back in the day. That was one and then number two was every store had three or four and thenthey'd have to replenishhever year. So it just it got into a you know, bigtime volume, that's good, recurring revenue right. There is gray re, curring revenue. You knowI'll tell you, though, that one of the things I had multiple accounts, but it was way too top heavy with starbucks.And then I you know I' Microsoft. A do some some jobs and things like that forbut one of my great mistakes in life was it just became so routine. I meanit was fourteen years right and I didn't develop other business streams outside of that and then justthrough attrition, nothing anything I did, but ultimately there was kind of anew regime that came in. They want to transition out, and so they decided togo with this new vendor and that's just again, that's hisbusiness and I hadn't I hamn't prepared for that, and so that big income stramjust kind of went right off the cliff kind of like the NFL. And so it's justanother lesson, and and just you know, preatour revenund trams create multipleones, so that you're not reliant just on one thing, and then it falls off. Sowhat was next? What was the next venture? Well, I started a somewhere in there. Istarted a adventure- Bat Gaming Company oousy. II ran into a guy who hadn't since seen since high school was very creative andI kind of brought the business and the investor grew to the table, and so weultimately raised about leven million dollars. We were in seven hundreddifferent retail locationscoms magazines and seven countries and thenSol thet companyd to Newyork base company, and it was a wild experience.You know, but it was really fun. It was a you know: Business Oneand, onegetting my MBA on how to deal with venture capital people and with Thei,true interstar, and- and so you know, each one of these things were littlebilling blocks on just life lessons and what to do, what not to do and engagingwith people how to close deals and understand. You know what needs to bedone in sales process and all those...

...things so, but you know those things when and then.After that I was, I started consulting business and that went well and thenthat this is now leads me up to about eight nine years ago, and then I therewas an opportunity to buy Scoutcom, which is high school and college, recruiting andright, an news right. So there's an opportunity to partner witha group to buy that back from Fox ports and thenand pair that company, together with a hundred milliondollar company out ofMinnesota, and so we did that and and that way it's just a whole newexperience because now is really working in to much larger organization and that went on and then about two and ahalf years ago. That's founding group there's fifteen of US mostly engineers,the CAOCO myself. We left- and we started this this. This new companycalled Mavin and you know I didn't think this thing was going to make itthat far. But we've now become about these six largest website on the Internet, not we and that wouldnot be necessarily Maven TCOLM, but we're a technology company and then w.We House other, we house other companies to sit on ourinfrastructure. So we have the history, channel, Lebargraphy, Chal, Maximmagazine backpacker and we just quired the rights for the next hundred yearsto sports eltrated. So I pretty much run all the content. That's going to becoming through sports, illustrated from from here ond out, and then we justbought the street last week as well, which is Jim Cramer. This stands up andyells at you about buying stocks and everything wow. You know how op a guswould be great is for chillstraigt. Let's do it, you could just talk us inthere. No one would even know ut right, btthe, gatkeeper right. We just it'sbeen great, because you know for about three years: I'vebeen doing a little business elf. With a company we developed an APP thatmeasures and Montors your braine performance stave, and I are bothinvolved in a little bit s Coll Borberto, it's been fun, it's beengreat, going through that process with him as a startup and and trying to goout and attack, verticles and Tryin to figure out what what sells and whatreally people want out of your product. And so it's been very interesting, andI understand where you're going an it's been a little slower and the VC part.The raising capital part has been the hardest yeah and to go into somebodyand say you know what want you to give me your money. It's been, that's beenthe hardest for me and I don't you know it's been interesting because I an goin and talk football and all those things which is great and you get in hedoor, but it didn't bring home. You know, because I didn't have thatbackground in business, so I had to learn a lot of that. I still don't knowit all. It's and that's been a very tough transition. Well, you know one ofthe things I've found is a lot of the guys that I surround myself are allvery high business acument in Iq, and I think that's been one of the thingsI've tried to do is just sit back and really learn. Kindo, like I dea with mycoaches, like learn from the game, learn from those guys what they'redoing how they do it and seek advice on things that I don't know, and I I don'tknow a lot, but it's I mean I would have neverthought iwould be in this position today and it was really just a kind ofa stroke of luck and being in the right place at the right time. But I thinkthat also goes back to anything that you do, which is preparation, mutesopportunity and, if you're not ready for those moments in time which we werein football days. I put myself in that position several times on the footballfield and now with business, to put ourselves in a position where you knowwe've got. You know over a hundred million people looking at or differentsites every month, but you know every day chipping way,chipping away, thipping away, and then next thing you know you pop pop yourhead up and you're standing on top of the Mon Ey mark. What's Jim Kreamerlike when the Camerais not on, I have not met him because we we had a different group H. The CEO andsome of the investors were meeting with him back in New York and that's a whole nother story. I'vegot kind of the you know playby play, but that's not. I really handle more. Thesports vertical sports illustrated building a network and and that's underthe finance division, so it seems like you're, extremely busyand you've been busy for a while and you've been in several companies thatyou just explain to us. So really what started your passion for climbing thetallest peaks on every contnent? Well, let's go back to kind of the theme ofyour show and you know there's some people. You know you fall into valleysand have to overcome those different things and really like how do you digout and move forward and then again, this goes back to. I think my story onthings aren't always as rosy as that...

...might appear, and I'm very authenticand truthful about that and about eight years ago. My well. This goes back probably eight.Ten years ago, my the gall that I had met in college married for twenty fouryears to two kids, two girls didn't want to be married anymore, and thatwas a very tough place for me to be in because I was committed to the very end:Eah Yeah, you know I'm very driven, but she just wanted something more and it'sjust it's just like there's a certain things were built, built a Sertin wayright and then, at the same time my dad died of a massive stroke, and so I wasjust at a like a like enotional pit right. I was OWAS Oy tough yeah. I knowSi'd moved from seelldown to Santa Monica because she wanted to resume heracting career and all this stuff, and so had no friends- and you know Itasvery lite ony place for me to be, and for two years I kept walking around ourbig ass block and I kept asking myself. I was with my chocolate lab we kept outsaying like how did I get in this place? This is impossible. This is impossiblefor me this to happen to me, and here I am, and you know somehow or another ithas yeah. This went on for quite some time, probably a couple of years and in the worst place of all that is whenyou're in this this zone, where you're just treading water and you're, notreally paddling and going in some direction right or wrong, and after acouple years you know I just said to myself: You know what what am I goingto do about it, because I'm sick and tired of being in this place, and so atthat it was almost like this mental shift. O Don't know it's the stars thatsplid to this you know, there's a shooting store or what happened on thatmoment, but it just seemed like it lifted the weight off my shoulders likeI was ready to move forward and with that Kame claridy, and withthat clarity was possibility, and within that possibility it was like. Iwant to do something athletically great I've kept myself in decent shape overthese years and obviously can't go back and play NTME NFL. Although I think I still have three downs. I think I'm Rihto Qlickout quick in and maybe I sago no pull my hand strangh right, but but I saidgoing up again in Seattle, I said you know. I Love Mountain climbing and Iknow from there's lot of kind of famous mountaineers from the northwest, and Isaid you know what I'm going to go. Do some research and see if any NFL guyhas ever climbed Te, seven summons and if not, I'm going to b try to be tocome that guy, and so I did there was no god at had done it, and so I startedoff on this journey and it really sucked the life back into me game agoal. You know in the big as school, gimme a path and there's a lot oflogistical things and things I've had to learn along the way. But you knowoff. I went first. Mountain was down in Africa: TANTANNEA Clem, Kilman, Jerro,oand, nine TNEEN, housand, three Hundre andthirty three feet. You know just tosee if I could actually handle that and then sense, I've gone all over theglobe climbing these had du one. A Year I'vebeen invited with Chris Long. His Foundation as part of the foundingclass raised a bunch of money over fifty thosand dollars to build a awater well for the people in masside tribe organization called waterboysthat he started, and so it's just like the associations that have come my waythrough this climbing venture the adventure of being around the globingand in Orartica being in Russia being in Australia being in Argentina. Chile.All these other destinations have really been a gift. You knowcoming back to me, yeah we had Chris on and what he does and the players thathe brings on with him and the people that he takes up to climb. Thatmotainand, for what he's doing, is great and water boys out of Oregan, andwe loved hearing his story and his passion about that when, when he was onnot too long ago, I've known Chris for a while great guy great family, but you knowhe's doing his passion but you'R passiove, trying to get to everycontinent to climb every mountain. You have one left right. I do it's, it's mount evrest and be nervous. No, and the reason why I'mnot nervous is because again, preparation meets opportunity, and I'vebeen doing this now long enough and I've been on these other mountains andthere's nobody that trans harder than me. I'm not saying there's other guysin the mountain who aren't as fit, but I do to of Days II wake up in themorning and do crossfit, and then I moved to some valley, so I'm atsixosand feet and then I run up and down the mountain every day in theafternoon, and it's just what you know fueels me, but you know they talk aboutthree percent of everybody that goes to to mount everist. You know, does notmake it, and so really what I'm focused on is the ninety seven percent of thepeople that do and what I can do to put myself in the best position. Now I wasin this last January. I was in in Artica, so this woulde been January oftwo thousand and nineteen, and you know just like going to the moon orsomeplace. You have to Chart Er in there and it's a very specialized trip,but I shared a tent with a guy...

...who today sits on top of Mount Evers atTwenty Thouzand, O two nine feet because he didn't make it and he got tothe very top, raise his hand and fell over and died, and when I was down there in in Artica,there were all kinds of signs that this guy should not be. Even on thatmountain, which was sixteen housand and Change, he had frost Bie six monthsbefore and Denalia Mountain Iad been on. At the same time with him he got flownoff. He lost three of his fingers palf of his nose, but it's gos it's kind oflike one of those guys in the football field, not so much in the NFL, but youlook out there and use like this. Guy's got new business being out here. Yeahnot prepared, and the big difference, of course, is that you talkingcarvasses your talking severe cold you're. Talking about having the thingsto really self manage yourself feel yourself in the right way. Where arethe right kind of gear? Not Dropping things all over the place and beingresponsible and a good teammate, and while he was a great family man and agood guy, he just was not a guy that should have been in the mountains andagain I've been around and I've had enough of these experiences of peoplephallne in Cavas they had a gun in Russia and mo mountain com down Albrusgot in an awful storm. He was hit by lightning and died, and it's just like what can you doagain to put yourself in the best position of success? And I know it's anapple and and orange, but gus, you know you being the quarterback calling thedifferent signals, understanding the defense. You know what they're doingand how what's the best strategy and what's the best way that you can putyourself in a position to beat that upon it and when, what's like the highest, I guess when de you encountered in someof your tracks and like win, show wives likegive us the extremes. Yeah, so I mean the highest I've been. Is Twenty Twothousand feet pretty high? You know, I'm not sure what it is in Pennsylvania.I know, but not even clote, maybe ah eat yeah, yeah and know interestingfact on. That is that was a mountain called ACK, an cogway down in Orgentina,and we got up there. We started with twelve people in the group, only sixmate it, and so we ere flying guys off and rescue helicopters and it can bedeadly. You know Youhave braining, you have swelling in your brain wolling inyour lungs and very bad things can happen. If youdon't get people down, you know soon enough, and so that was real test onwhether know how I I would do, and I had no problems being up on thatparticular mountain. A At that height I've been on Undinelli, which is readin the middle of Alaska. The Alaska Mountain Range. The thingthat's interesting about that Alaskan Alaska National Park. Denelli NationalPark is that it is. It is bigger than the entire state of Massachusetts.Think about that. So it's just this massive cravast. You Know Mountain toppeaked and then you have the Baren Sea. That's comming! It sits in betweenRussia and the US, and you have elevat that cold ar that's coming up and overthe top, and so again we were the two thousand and seventeen. It was awful.You now we're getting hin these awful blizzards and it was blowing probablyforty miles per hour and is mine- is forty at night sleeping, an the topthere's this lenticular cloud that was minus ad up there and we just keptwaiting for the same to pass and it never did, and so finally, we justpacked it in was like this isn't going to happen so again, going back toSelfcare, you got to have the right Seecrin back you Gott, be have theright gear. You got to have the right warm stuff, so you can, you know,endure those severe conditions. So when you get intha sleep in bed, do you justpass out pretty much? You know it was kind of achallenge, a little bit well, actiouly. So the same thing on Denelli becauseyou know you're going every. You know it's. Obviously, when we talk about theglobe, you talking about South America being the opposite seasons, then NorthAmerica, right and in the case like a van Artica it the sun, never goes down duringtheir summer, which is our winter. So I was down there Ir January. So it's justit's hard a night when you're going to sleep going to bed and it's like twelveo'clock in the afternoon on a Sunday Day, right yeah, I could imagine whatdo you bring for food like? Is it hopouches of free stride stuff for likewe like what'? That's the typical yeah and that's that's been a challenge forme. I mean, I would say, that's probably been the weakest part of mygame, like the physical part, I've done well at and the reason. Why is thatyou're not frying up cheese, burgers or something at night, because it's just you can't bring in things that are that you need to be refrigerated, eventhough that you're in a cold area you're packing these things up, and soyou have to be just really creative about what you can bring. theire arefrees, dried things which I hate, but your own snacks. You know my littlesecret, I'm not a big candy guy, but my secret on Sumbor Day is Pakfull a bunchof those snicker bars and just having that sugarrush to go on in the in your drinhaving...

...nun, tabs or other kind of likehydration type drinks that you can throw in with your water and, of course,your water. We have to melt from th the snow, that's out there. Well, thatsounds like you have to have a lot of mental toughness right and n when we'replaying football people talk about that a lot right. You gotta have metaltoughness to play this game and and go through everything, but I got to feel like it's a little harderwhen you're up at twenty three thousand feet, then being on a football fill inin La so what do you think you would go back and tell you know a Mark Passon, that's in highschool of mental toughness h! Well! This is what I believe and I have 'T. Ihave a big time conviction about this. Is that I don't think- and this hashappened to me- I was guiding a trip on mountrener two weeks ago and it was adisaster because this guy that showed up on the recommendation of a navy sealshowed up and all hed done, is walk around the block and then did a haddone a lot of reading about. You know this with the navy seal and said youlike more like a classroom type. Then I don't think it starts with beingmentally strich. If you're mentally strong, then you can be physicallystrong, I think, being pushed and pushed and push to the point of thebrink, where you don't think you can go any any longer makes you a mentallytough person, but you got to have the physical tool, so your body doesn'tbreak down in order to build up that that resistance, and so a lot of thingsthat I try to do every day. I do things that I don't like doing and I do thosebecause I know they're my weak points, but I look at Mo Mount Everest and I'm.I know that there's going to be various points on that trip, in particular onthe high camps at Twenty ix thousand feet and you're, making that trek allthe way, the twenty nine you're n e in it for fourteen hours, and we saw a lotof what went down this year, where therewas, that big line that went tothe top and all hell breaks lose. And how are you going to deal with that? Ifyou don't have your strong body to sustain you, then you're going to havea weak mind and that's going to break pretty quick like for from MountEverist. What's kind of, I know it's hard to be precise, but what's fromstart, you arrive at the base of Mout everst till you get to the summit like.How long is that projection in terms of getting to the top yeah yeah, you guysare going to like say wow, but two months, so what happens is I'll landthere April second bought. My ticket the other day, so I'm ready to go ilandon April, second o' mccaman do and then from there. We make our way and there'sa forty mile journey that we take. That goes from about eight thousand feet upto seventeen thousand feet and so I'll be living at seventeen thousand feetfrom most of that two months. Something that's really interesting that happenson that mountain. That doesn't happen anywhere else, and this is one of thereasons why you saw what you saw this year with this big l lineup is that thejet stream sits on top of the top of that mountain at twenty nine thousandfeet and for two weeks during October and two weeks during may mayfifteen exactly to the eneme, the jet stream rises above, allowing you tohave relatively speaking, safe passage to the tops. In other words, it's notblown a hundred miles per hour, and so this year that jet stream it never rose,and so on the one or two days two days. Ithink two two days to be exact when it did rise. Everybody had someon feverand just booked to the top, and so you you've had these same types of numbersgo, but it's been spread out over fifteen days or so versus everybody.Just saying it's. I've got my one window. I've been there for two monthsand I'm going and then HEU run into the mass like they ren into this last year.Wow. So do you think the people that live there? What are they called h?SERPAS Shirpas. Do you think when they see all these people coming? In I meanI was, it's probably brought them a lot of money into their little communitiesand all that, but you think they say, and these people are crazy. You know they want to just come to it.For, for for sport to say, they've done it, but these people actually livethere yeah I mean it's interesting because it really it's probably abitter, sweet and I'll know. I could probably answer that question a yearfrom now. If we want to do a followup, but it's bitter sweet from the standpointof they love to have normal jobs, a d not go off from their wives and theichildren and and put themselves in harmess way of laying down the fixlines and everything going up and living there for months on end. But it is what it is and that's a lotof what feels your economy is people from around the world coming to climbmany of these. These hese these tall peaks there- and I know, there's been a lot ofpretty intense moments between the Sherpa and between these, some of theseAmerican or Nentus American, big foreign I'll, say climbers that havecome in and not really taking them seriously. And so hopefully you knowknock on wood. My experience is going to be a great one and I'm going to meetsome amazing people, and, but it just...

...seems like more and more- and this ispart of part of the issue- is that there's some low cost budget outfittersfrom Nepal that are offering a very cheap way. And then you have people whodon't want to pay very much, but they had don't have much experience likethis. Guy was talking about who's, my temptment, who still up on top of Beros.That was trying to get me to go with these guys, and I was just like well,let's just wait till you get back and we'll have that conversation and younever came back and it's just like you know you get with a what you pay forwhat is what is the cost of you know, going up and doing for two months tohike evers, that's a lot over five hundred or under five hundredhousand nowwas way under that Al Right, so a hundred thousand somewhere aroundthere. It's just a little end of that. Okay. So, but it is, it is a lot wea.What's the toll on your body, I know it's going to vary but like when youlet's say you climb average you come back or any of the other mountains thatDoclimb, when you have final descen and come back home. What do you feel like?Well, I feel beat up and you know, because you're deprived in your body,especially when you get up there once you get into the death sone, your bodyis actually dying. The cells on you, because there's not enough oxygen. I've down in that cincawe lassseventeen pounds. Actually I lost ten pounds ACCANCAGUAand to Nalei lost seventeen, so I'm anticipating, probably losing aroundtwenty five pounds and I'm already fairly lean. So hopefully I can keep upmy nutrition and that's he one thing that people don't understand is thatwhen you climb the higher you get the more your appetite gets suppressed, butyou're burning, calories, Ike, crazy, you're, carrying heavy packs, and soit's just sitting down forcing yourself to have some water, forcing yourselftohave, some food. So you can sustain the energy as you go up and down themountain. What is the weight of your pack that you tack up? Well, that's agood question. That's a great question! You know this mountain wis going to bea lot different than the other one, so, for example, on Denelle, whichobviously is in America and Alaska. We had to carry our own stuff, that was athree week e expedidn EO carry hundred and forty pounds. If you can imaginethat when you're back going up to the like Super Steeve, you know traversing,H and navigating your way around so like I said you got to bring it. This one is a little bit differentbecause a Shirpa. This is in part gus, some of the class that get into it. TheSHIRPA are carrying a lot of he the weight, the going up and up anddown the mountains we carry. We have yax carried a lot of the gear justgetting into base camp, so it's probably going to be a thirty poundpack. You know on I'll, be wearing oxrygen, soov tanks. On mybackpack, you know, as I'm, going up the mountain aw of exter, gloves andextra this and that just to make sure something happens, right right, wow, mabic story, Dave Mark, that's just amazing, and we can'twait to hear how it all comes out next year. We're going to have you back onand one of our last things we always like to do here on Ottawa. We gothrough a two minute role called no huddle here an and we blast a bunch ofquestions at you, and you know just to shoot out the answers and e. You know.I think we get a lot of good things out of our knohowday Allrigas, far away allright mark who would play you in a movie about yourself Ha wow who would play in a movie about myself, I think probably leam hands worth. I'mprobably saying that wrong, but that'd be my answer. It's a good one we'll have to have to you know, getthat up and do aside by side for a Promo Les. I would love to say TomCruise, but I don't think I'm that cool yeah oof course. You were well topcrews made CIMB a few mountains too, so yeah an. I think you got a couple moreon them, yeah, okay, mark, if you could trade places with one person in historyfor one day, who would that be? I think, George Washington. Why would that be? Well, I mean he's afounding father right. I mean just the creation of trying to put somethingtogether: Entrepreneurial in that sense, just so many different obstacles butpulling everybody together at the last minute. I mean that might be an answerthat that's probably the answer. Coming from my my aspiring quarterback days,you know as a senior in high school. I wouldn't be crazy about wooden tee,so thatoul be kind weird. So only one day, though so yeah. Sowhat is your biggest pet peeve my biggest PEP peeve? Is People notbeing prepared and bringing it because they may lose fingers they mayand nose and lines yeah exactly teriy? What do you think the most overhypedthing in sports is today?...

What's the most over hyped, then Ithink everything is over hyped right. I mean, I don't think there's any onesingle thing, but just it one thing that I don't like: I'm not sure if thisanswers are questioned, but you know h the show boating. I don't like when somebody catches atouchdown, they go in the unzone and and then or maybe it's a dunk. You knowwhere they just ESPN highlight says: is All they go on, there's so much more fthe game than just those things. I know that's what brings in the ratings, butI just personally don't like that. I never did that stuff I like, when theguys catch a touchnow, but they give it to the linemen and then the line smashit and it because I deer get to do that. Yeah is cool Y, my my coach Gary Pinkelwhois. Ultimately he was he was assistant. Coach, o Washington becamethe head coach of Missouri successful run there. He used to always say to me:Act Like you've, been there right exactly yeah. What is your favorite sports movie, My favorite, my favorite sport cosh. I've got a lotof them. I, like I love Secetarit. I love Rudy love that show. I was neverrudy, thank God, but identify with lot of those guys it Ri Trid hard. So didyou I'm sure Gosh, there's a bunch of m out there,but those are probably my two favorites how about this? If you could, let mesee we already went through this apalogize. Okay, this is little bit,Hardt explained. U, I heard this on another show. If you could trade placeswith a Sitcom, carry character and live on that set for a week W at would. Who would that be and whatshow would hat be? Well, you like I used to think about that with Megnam Pibecause he seemed like he had a pretty good gid going in Hawaii right andpretty girls coming around and some you know fun guys to hang out with. So itseems like that would be a fun show to be on. I can see you with a good stashlike you'd, have a good magnapatimo. He had it going all the way around yeah. Iwould be game Dave, you'd, bebuddy, Rick, right and I'd be like TC, aRightyeah Youd be a Budyyeahcan, would be higgins he'd, be our producer, beHiggin yeah that B actually as tinking, like maybe threes company ETAL scenariowo you like that either yeah. They would let you in there, though theywouldn't let me in but the Regal Begle was. I coul, be kind of RFIN right allright. So if we ere scrawled through your phoneright now and we stopped who Wus the most famous person in your phone beright now well, Gosh, I've got a lot of them. Imean the guy that I hang out with every day is Jim Mora. You know NFL coach and Ucla the lastsight, but you know they've got Jum plunkets and Mustar Hays and runninglots, and you know mostly, I don't have a lot of actors in there, but you knowmore on the on the on the sport side and a lot of those types of players.Maybe it tend Turner well, ted Te's name was not Bhis ranchance in there, okay and he's the one who said Yes for now yeah right exactlyif you could be commissioner for day for any of the Leagus yeah, what rulewould you institute? Besides no celebration, the rule thatI'd institute is a better pension plan for all the retire guys like us and Iyeah. That would be nice. I would like that life insurance lik just just helpus through, like our like our health and Surch, don't cut it off after fiveyears when that's when we start getting all of our ailments like I, you know Iplayed for fifteen years. I got all these things going on with me now andI'm like thank God, my wife got a job we get on her insurance. Well See. I can do that for it becauseI'm going to be the commissier for one day. That's right. I like yeah, pleasechange that rule commission, yeah yeah, I ow does life insurance work with yourclimbing activities like? Is there arethere special policies, because Imean that some of that of stuff would be excluded activities ev thing yeah, so I don't really look at it. That way I mean I do have that yeahahes in placs,but I look at it more of you know. What do I need to do to make sure I getmyself off the mountain. I don't go into it with a fatalistic. You knowidea. I have a a garment device which trap not only tracks iy have a SOSdevice. I also get insurance that I can get emergency airvackd out if worseCems to wors, because otherwise it'ud be hundreds of thousands of dollars tohave a helicopter flying from nowhere yogat these different stations, allover the ES. When you activate these certain buttons things can happen, andso that's what I have those types of insurance to make those things happen.Have you been on many expeditions where some of your colleagues have had tocall for healp like that...

...again, I kind of a yes and a Kno that the people that got flowing off of backIncagua. We had a radio in and make that happen, but it wasn't. It wasn'tnecessarily that they'd fallen into Cervass. They had just been in asituation where theyre their lungs of their brain and filled up wi wi fluidthat's crazy. Well, we wish you all the best of luck and Climbing Mon Evrise, and you know anything that you need us to talk about.You know your part of water boys and well definitely put that out there,because we feel like that. That's a great organization and we reallyappreciate you coming on and really Giveng US your story of all thosetransitions you had in your life and where you are today, is going to be thefirst NFL player to ever find the seven summits, which is an amazing thing.Thank you so much and guys listen. I love the interview. I love chattingback and forth and I always really appreciate not only coming on shows like this, butespecially guss. In your case, you know talking to another guy who's beenthrough the war. You understand a lot of different things that we've had togo through and you know look life is a journey and I would have never imaginedthat I'd be in the position. I am today on so many different fronts, and so I made a foolish statement years agowhen I was in Seattle. We' bought this house, and I thought that was my finaldestination. I said I'm never moving and since I made that stupid stave andI've moved like seven times is because of life circumstance right, so you knowbe open to do the way that life might, you know, take you and go after withGusto and that's what I try to do. I tell my kids every day it takes alittle more to make a champion, and I think it really does. I agree. What doyou think Dave absolutely and also to tell us if we want to listen to yourpodcast finding your summit? What's the best way to go about that yeah, so youcan ethe check out on y website Mark Patteson n flcom, that's the same,handle on my instagram twitter, other things like that mark, Patteson andFlcom, and then my name of my podcast is called funding your summit and tellabout people overcome n adversity and finding their Wayn an all kinds offascinating guest on there. I'm going to have gus on in a couple weeks, Soilook forward to hearing that that story, but no I just again. I reallyappreciate the love and you guys, reaching out and having this this Tokall right. Well, we appreciate you coming on and Spendin some time with usand telling US your story to mark, have a great one T and we'll talk to yousoon, Hey. We want to thank you for Joiing US Today on Hotdo up with Guss,where we talkd to a wide range of guests about how supports shape to life.As always, I'm joined by my great friend and Cohouse Dave Hager, and wewant you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at how to up withGus, and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listeningto our podcast.

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