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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 month ago

Marjorie Lewis

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to the huddle with 15-year NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte! In the huddle today, Gus spends some real quality time with Marjorie Herrera Lewis, one of the most talented sports reporters and authors of our time. Gus and Marjorie discuss her passion for sports reporting and how from the early stages of her career, she knew that she loved writing and sports and to combine those together formed the perfect vocation. Her hard work and dedication paid off bigtime when she became the beat writer for The Dallas Cowboys for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Throughout her career, Marjorie covered college and professional sports, including the Texas Rangers and Dallas Mavericks, as well as tennis and golf. She also covered the Super Bowl, Wimbledon, the NCAA men's basketball tournament, and several college bowl games. As an author of numerous books, Gus and Marjorie discuss her inspirations and how she can interpret them into huge-selling books. These and so many other topics are discussed on today’s Huddle Up with Gus!

Hey everyone. Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with Gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital newsdot com. Huddle up with Gusts is brought to you by Vegas sportsadvantage, clients of Vegas. Sports advantage are winning big in 2021 youcan be a part of the winning two. As of june 1st $100. Bettors are up $3700 500dollars. Bettors are up $18,500 and $1000. Bettors are up $37,000 and $5000.Bettors are up $185,000 become inclined today by clicking the link in thedescription below and use promo code, huddle up To take 25% off your packagetoday. Thanks to our partnership. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans. Whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say welcome to this week's huddle up withgusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gust knows who the players are and how the gamesare. One. Uh It's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up.Okay sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios it'skick off time so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left. Everyone welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host. Gus for about 15 year NFLquarterback And I want to thank all of our friends and sponsors. I want tothank 16 31 digital news for always being supportive. I want to thank ourteam brian and terry who do all the work and I just sit here and talk and Iwant to thank you. Sounder FM. Sounder FM has done a great job with theirpodcasts and helping other podcasters uh promote their shows. Put them outthere so Sounder FM Thank you so much and uh Vegas sports advantage. Thankyou uh go there and if you want to, you know, try and win some money tonightwith Tampa Bay in Dallas. I think they're going to give you the rightpick so use my code huddle up H. U. D. D. L. E. U. P. And save some money andwin some cash. Alright so everyone we got another show. We got our co hostback marty marty. How are you doing today? I'm doing great. Thanks gus I'mhaving a good time. I'm in Tampa bay florida and uh apparently there's afootball game this evening. So that is very exciting. So marty's back andshe's got a new book and it's about Tampa. So tell us a little bit aboutyour book and what you're doing down in Tampa. Well, uh my new book is footballFreddie and fumbled the dog game day and Tampa Bay. So I'm very excitedbecause we get to travel through the great city of Tampa Bay where thechamps are and also touch on bradenton and Clearwater and ST pete and get tosee some really fun places around there and uh wind up at the stadium to cheeron the hometown heroes. So that's lots of fun. So when you open the last pageof your book does the Cannon go off like the like in the ship at thestadium? Uh That would be very high production value so or potentiallydangerous for young Children. So. No, but uh that's a good idea. In theanimated version. It will we will make...

...sure that happens. And uh that'ssomething lots of fun. I mean I remember being down in Tampa Bay is ayoung girl when my grandfather on the eagles. And the colours of Tampa Baywere that creamsicle color which was such a fun color to to see on the field.Now it's a little more um their colors are a little more dangerous now I wouldsay. But uh that's definitely what they're going for. Yes, but there's alot of color. Yeah, that color didn't really put fear into anybody's heartswhen you stepped on the field, right? Creamsicle. It's hard to, you know,it's hard to feel really kind of, you know, like a tough guy in a creamsiclejersey. Uh but it was a good color, definitely. Yeah, certainly lots ofcowboy fans here, lots of people cowboys, they travel well speaking ofcowboy fan, we have our guests today I think is a is a big cowboy fan and hasalso written about the cowboys has been one of the beat writers for the cowboy,She is first of many and so joining us today, marty is your friend and she wasnice enough to send me her book uh Marjorie Herrera Lewis right, and she'swritten a book when the men were gone. So I can't wait to talk about it. Butmarty, why don't you tell us a little bit about marjorie in your relationshipwith her? So marjorie uh is an amazing writer, an amazing lady, an amazingadvocate for women in sports, really truly and a friend of mine that's amutual friend of ours had said, you know marjorie wrote this book calledwhen the men were gone and I think it's something that you would really enjoy.So I ordered the book and I read it in one day, because it was so good, and itreally it was such an amazing book and I mean, truthfully, I mean, I had notread a book, like, I mean, like a real book and a very like that that quicklyin a very long time, but this book was so amazing that I really couldn't putit down. So I then begged my friend who had connected us to please, I was like,can you please just tell her that I'm a fan and I wanted to talk to her becauseI I really so obsessed with this book, and then she was so gracious andextended an opportunity for us to communicate. And uh then I was really Ifangirl doubt on her, and I'm so glad that I did, because then I got to knowa little bit about marjorie and why this book when the men were gone is sospecial and so amazing. It's really because Marjorie tells the story andobviously she wrote the book, although I really wish I had written the bookbecause I love it so much about you know, these amazing people that were ina time and place, and I'm gonna let marjorie share all her that reallyovercame obstacles. And that's like, one of the things I love about footballis that like really anybody if you have some passion and drive and grit, youcan play, you can coach, you can be involved in football and that's whatthese amazing people in Brownwood texas did way, way, way back. So yeah, soMarjorie, how are you, the author that Marnie spoke so highly of, How are youdoing today? And thank you for coming on how to up with guests? Well, it'sgreat to be here. Thank you for the invitation and marty. I'm very humbledby your words, thank you. You're way too kind. But I'm doing great. I'm outin santa fe new Mexico for a few days and so I'm out of the Dallas fort worthheat for a little while. But uh I'm doing doing well and really enjoyingwhere this life experience this journey has been taking me ever since the bookcame out? Well, I think your journey has been incredible ever since you'vebeen in high school, you know, just just in what you've done and everythingI've read about you, you've you've been a first in so many categories and andyou've just been an I think the best thing I read that I love the most iswhen you talk about your mom and how she really pushed you guys to um be thefirst in so many things and I think...

...that was great. Can you tell us alittle bit about your childhood and how you fell in love with sports. Both myparents are, were sports fanatics and they passed that on to me. I'm one ofthe second of five Children that it all resonated with me the most even more sothan my brother who is the youngest, Although he had the opportunity to playmore sports at the varsity level than I did because it didn't really exist muchat that when I was in high school. But if you were to look at pictures of myparents when they were dating in the early 50s, almost every picture is in agym or on a tennis court or at a baseball field. So my father went on toplay baseball at ST. Mary's College of California. And uh, and my mother, youknow, she living in santa fe new Mexico, she could have given you the startinglineup for the University of Rhode island. I mean she just knew everythingabout sports. And so it was something we shared. My father taught me how tocatch his curveball and his fastball when I was about nine or 10 years oldand my mother taught me how to throw a spiral. You know, she she's the onethat kind of connected with me to football. My dad was more baseball andbasketball and then a little football. So it just is in my blood. I knew thatif I couldn't be a college or NFL quarterback, I was going to be at leastsomehow involved with the game and that's how I became a sportswriter knowthat. I think that's that's incredible. And so tell us a little bit about, Imean you said you didn't really play many sports, but when I was readingyour bio, it said you played a lot of sports. I mean, uh, so, uh, what wasyour experience like and how did your, your high school sports experience pushyou to the next level and help you in your writing? Okay. I did, I played alot of sports, but they didn't offer varsities except for like in volleyballat the time. It was called G. A. The girls Athletic association. But I wentto a school in high school catholic school, ST Michael's high school thatup until just a few years had been an all boys school and when the all girlsschool and the all boys called merge together, The christian brothers thatran the school, they didn't have any experience with girls. They didn't knowhow to deal with girls. So whenever we told him we wanted something there,like, okay, uh, so we say we want that basketball, okay, we want volleyball,we want tennis, we want flag football. They never turned us down for anything.And so as a result, even though I got to play in a lot of different sportsthat, that weren't sanctioned by the state yet as varsity. Um, I don't thinkI was ever turned down. You know, I played on the bowling club, I played onthe, I was on the ski team, the downhill ski team. The brothers justnever said no. So the girls, it was great. So, so I got that experience.Basketball was always my favorite and I have to say, Um one of my biggestregrets uh, is when I went to Arizona state, my freshman year, I was offeredto walk on on the girls basketball team and I'm five ft 2 and uh, and I didn'tdo it and I think that's my biggest regret. I think the reason I didn't isI wanted to play intramural so that I could play everything. So I played flagfootball, basketball, softball, you know, everything, even water poll. Um,so I just didn't want to commit to one sport. But anyway, after college I became asportswriter for a phoenix magazine. And uh, and then off off I went, I went,moved to Dallas and, and uh, why did you pick Arizona state? It was it justuh, it was it, was that the close factor, Was it both the close and uh,you know, or was it the party school at the time? No, no. Actually my familywent through Arizona in the summer on our way to California and our car brokedown outside of Yuma and I had never been so hot and miserable in my life.So when it picking a college, my parents said you could go anywhere inthe country and people would ask me and...

I'd say I'm going anywhere but Arizonaand then all of a sudden I had this realization, wait a minute. I'm gonnabe there during the school year and they'll have basketball courts outsideduring the winter. So I could play the whole nine months, eight months I'm atschool and I picked Arizona state because I could play basketball outsidein the winter. Isn't that just the high level of thinking for general? That'sexactly how my kids pick school to. Yeah, no regrets. So I studiedjournalism, especially broadcast journalism at the time. And then uh,when I moved to Dallas, I went to S. M. U. For a while and studied printjournalism because I decided uh that's really where my interest was and uh,and then eventually worked my way up to the fort worth star telegram and thenlater the Dallas morning news. So I couldn't be more thrilled with how thatall worked out. Yeah, no, I think it's that's great and,and uh, you know, just being in sports and having that a part of your life, Ithink that it brings, it adds so much to our character and who we are and itit makes us, you know, be with other, you know, people and trust them andhave to do all those things. So tell me a little bit about how, when youstarted working in the industry and you know, a lot of times you were the firstfemale and how did that like those sports and that competitiveness helpyou in those situations? Well, because I never got a chance to really competein a high, high level in athletics, um I used the newspaper competition as my,this is, I'm gonna win. And what was so wonderful was when I was covering thecowboys, the Dallas Area Dallas Fort Worth Area had three big newspapers,you know, I was with the star telegram when I first started covering thecowboys, then there's the Dallas Morning News and then the old Dallastimes herald and competition was fierce and so this was my playing field andall I ever wanted to do was break the story, you know, win the competitionand so um that's sort of how I got my my experience, so to speak on the fieldand and yes, being the first woman to cover the cowboys, uh I have storiesthat could go on for, you know, for days. Um but the bottom line really was99 they've been selling them here, marjorie, pardon me said they've beentelling them here, but also the time it was very positive, the guys did respectthe work I did and we developed very good professional relationships. Infact, to this day, I still hear from timmy knew Susan and Jim jeffcoat andyou know, I run into Danny White, herschel walker toner said we havegreat, we built great mutual respect and so it was a good experience ifyou're ready for an an it don't let me know, I'll throw a couple out there.But well, you know, you said you were 52 and I know some football players aremassive, right? There's, there's guys that have been 68, especially on thecowboys. And so tell me about the first experience you had when you had tointerview somebody who was, you know, say a foot and a half taller than you.And what was that experience? Oh, that would be pretty, you know, to see thosekind of contrasts are pretty funny. Yes. So one of the best was when I wasinterviewing too tall jones and I went up and started talking to him and I'mlooking like this. And he looked at me and he said, would you like me to sitdown? I said, no, that's okay, we're good. But then he said, but you're justtoo small and that's stuck. So every time he saw me for years I was toosmall. Hey, there's too small. In fact, even after I stopped covering the teamand I was at a charity event that he happened to be at, He was in this roomsworn by people and of course he was...

...tall, high above the cluster and helooked off to a distance, he saw me walking in and this was like 10 yearsafter I covered the team and he yells out, there's two small, did you yellback, there's two times. That was your thing. That's awesome. Yeah, I meanI've done that, I'm 64 and I've looked up, the guys have been like this, howdoes somebody create this guy? Like he's massive. How does this happen?Hopefully is on offense, not defense because he was really like when, um,when Leon Lett was running after me and hit me a few times, you know those bigguys, that doesn't feel great. No, it doesn't matter at all. So I ended uphaving to have next surgery and it was probably because I was always having toworkers comp for your next surgery for, for looking up so much. But yeah, so itsounds like you just had such a good report with all the players. What wasyour last year that you cover Dallas? It was the first year of jimmy johnsoncoming in and taking over the team after that. I covered the teamsporadically, but I didn't, I wasn't on a beat at that time anymore. So, so Iexperienced a transition. I had just had my first child and I was onmaternity leave and the team was sold and I was so mad that I couldn't breakthat story. Yeah, that would be a big story to break. I mean there was a lotgoing on with the cowboys back then. I think What the 80s were like and thenwhen the 90s happened and they start winning all the super bowls and I meanI was at uh, in Washington at that time. And uh, I had to play against all ofthat. So they were pretty good. They were. And even though I wasn't coveringthe team anymore during those nineties, uh, seasons where they were winningsuper bowls, I was doing a lot of feature stories. So, so, you know, I doa day in the life of Troy, Aikman, a day in the life of, of Michael Irvin.You know, I got to know those guys pretty well too. That's amazing marjorie. I mean, soalso you were able to really track something like the eighties withouttechnology and then going into, I mean, so that's another whole thing, is thatall the resources that writers have available now, how did you do yourhomework? I mean, how did you get prepared for the games to actually thengo and then write a really comprehensive story about that. Youtalked to a lot of people, a lot of people and you had to have respectwithin the organization if they were going to tell you things, you know? Andso, um, so that I was very fortunate to have a lot of people within theorganization who trusted me enough to talk to me a lot. And, and so that'sreally what it was. It's just, you know, the cowboys in those days, tex Schrammthe minute you became a beat writer, he would give you a list of all thecoaches, administration people, the football players, their phone numbers,their home address, we have total access to everybody at any time, isn'tthat I know it's really amazing. It was so different. I know my grandfather wasa big fan of tax and the merchants ends, but you know that is uh, you know, sodifferent now when you think, when you think about how different now. Yes, buttext really believed in in the, the idea of getting the names out, gettingthe coverage, getting, he wanted to make it is easy for us to uh interviewand get information now. Did he always like it? Sometimes he'd call me andcussed me out, you know, so that was okay too because usually when he wasmad about something that you broke it because he knew you were right and hejust didn't like out there yet. But, but that was it. I talked to a lot ofpeople um I had really good working relationships with the uh, the playersand the coaches and um and it really worked in my favor. I was very gratefulfor that. I have to say. At one point...

...when I was first hired at the startelegram as a sportswriter, not necessarily a cowboys writer. My sportseditor. The first day that I got to work, he asked me if you're ever put onthe cowboys beat, how would you handle it? And I told him, you know, I'd neverforget that the athletes were people, I would be fair. I would, I would alwaystry to get different sides to a situation. And I said, you know, that'swhat I've done with college and high school athletes. You know, I don't lookat them as a commodity or a news story that they're people. And he looked atme and he said, you'll never make it in this business. And I was like, whoa. Sotwo years later, a new sports editor puts me on the beat. And what happensbe in the middle of my first season covering the cowboys. I get a call fromNFL Gameday magazine. They want me to write the lead story for the magazinethat would be placed in all stadiums across the country. I couldn't do itbecause of conflict of interest, but I asked him why are you asking me? Andthey said to me, because we think you're the best NFL writer in thecountry. This was 1986. So something I did worked, even though my boss told me,I would never make it, wow, that's amazing. And and also heard the storyof of your first press box experience. Can you tell us a little bit about that?Because I understand like, you know, there's a mutual respect between youand the players and coaches, that's kind of how we're all brought up andtaught, right, but you're competing against all these other guys in thepress box and, and you walk in and tell us a little bit about that, thatdynamic was probably a little bit different. That was something I reallydidn't even expect. Um but what happened is I walk into the press boxfor the first game, which was going to be an exhibition game. Andtraditionally, like in every NFL press box, um you have, the front row isreserved for beat riders and maybe a columnist. So we have traditionally tobeat writers, each of the papers had to beat writers and a columnist. So thereare three seats in the front row. So I walk in and I go to, it didn't have ournames on it just said beat writer. And I went, my set at a beat roger spot inthe front row, and I'm sitting there unpacking my computer, my bag, gettingready for uh, for the game, and my telephone rings and I pick it up andit's my sports editor, and he says, the guy's just called me, they're they'rereally upset, what's going on out there? And I'm like, well, what are youtalking about? Apparently somebody's in the front row that's not supposed to bethere. And I'm thinking nobody else had sat down. So of course I knew who hewas talking about, and I said, well, who do you think it is? And he said,well, is it? And he starts throwing out all these names of people that we'regonna be there too, right, um some some features or something else, and andfinally, after he'd gone through this list of men, he says you and I said yes,it's me. And you know what his response was? He said, get back there, and I'mlike, get back there. And I just said to him, you know what, I'm a beatwriter and the beat writers sit in the front row and I am not moving unlessyou take me off the beaten, now then I'll move. But otherwise, if I'm stillin the beef, I'm sitting here and I'm not moving. And so he said, ok, youhandle the guys, And I said I have no problem, okay. And then not one of themapproached me and I sat there for years right now, That's awesome. And that'skind of what you have to do, it's not in a when you stand up for yourself,you're not necessarily standing up in a mean way or anything, you're justyou're just who you are and people respect that and I think that'sprobably what it sounds like what happened to me. Yeah, I mean, I wasjust doing my job. I mean, the only thing that was different with me andany other beat writer was that I was female, and if the seats were for thebeat writers and that's where I was going to sit, right mm, that's a that'samazing marjorie, but I definitely think, you know, which is the wholetheme of, you know, gus show about...

...sports, kind of bringing everybodytogether and really educating us on the playing field, so you're playing fieldwas, you know, being a beat writer and that was it. You were suited up to playand you wanted that job and you were going to do everything you could toprotect that job and you did not Samantha's and the relationshipschanged over, over a very short period of time. Um, the, my colleagues andcompetitors really warm, you know, they brought me into the, uh, into the club,so to speak and we had great relationships, in fact it was randyGalloway, you've probably heard of him if you're familiar with the Fort Wortharea, Fort Worth Dallas uh, uh, newspaper industry, but he's the onethat brought me over to the Dallas morning news, we were competitors andhe said, we're tired of you kicking us in the fanny come over and work with usand I did. Do you think that was the moment that you realized that? I mean,was there one moment where you're like, ok, wait a minute. I got this. Wasthere a moment that you realized that? Or was that it or how did that? I thinkthe moment was the way I started getting treated in the press box,everybody, I felt like everybody had warmed up to me, I think at first whenI showed up, they were just, it was just new and different and they didn'tknow how to respond, but it didn't take long for them to see that I was astudent of the game, I knew what I was writing about, what I was talking aboutand we ended up on road trips and everything all going out to dinnertogether and, and we play on softball teams together. And when the cowboysplayed the Bears in London, I was part of the Dallas fort Worth Media softballteam and we played against the Chicago softball team there in Hyde Park and uhit was all, it was all fine. It was a great experience. So when you werefinished with the cowboys, you know, and you were not the beat writer forthem anymore. You stayed with the Dallas morning star, Is that right? Atthe Dallas Morning News Morning News? Right. And then you just kind of, youalso wrote about the Mavericks, uh you know, a lot of other sports going on indoubt. I mean it's a big city, so tell us about that like that. You know, youkeep transitioning and where did you really want to go next? Did you have anidea or you just kinda, I'm going to go wherever this takes me. I knew where Iwanted to go. I, I really, to be honest, I, I, I always felt in control of mycareer and I remember I was at Super Bowl 22 a lot of the reporters that Icame up with at the same time. I don't know if you remember mitch album orLesley Visser uh Melissa isaacson john Feinstein, you know a bunch of us, weall kind of came in together And we were on on the bus on our way to go tocover the Super Bowl 22. We've already been in town for a good while in in sanDiego. And everybody was talking about where they wanted to go with theircareer and you know Leslie's, I want to go on tv and she did and and mitch isyou know, I want to write books and do all they say everybody did what theywanted to do. And what they asked me was I said, I love the game of football.I am not wrapped up in the in the glamour or anything about coveringcowboys are covering the NFL. And what I want to do is I want to cover D threefootball one day. And they were like what you're at the Super Bowl and youwant to cover D three football. And I said, I know, I know that soundsstrange but that's what I want to do. And so I stayed with the morning newsfor about 14 more years after I quit covering the NFL And I covered D threeand D two football. And by then I had two daughters and they would go with me,my husband and the and the girls would go to the games and while I was writingmy stories I would look out on the...

...field and I'd see my two daughtersdoing cart wheels on a football field waiting for mommy to finish her stories.And then we'd go out as a family and we'd go out to eat and we talkedfootball, we talked about the game and my girls grew up loving football,loving sports and thinking of it as you know, our weekend adventure in the fall.And so and then I also wanted to write books and so that's why I wrote thisbook when the men were gone and covered a lot of amazing athletes who went onto be doctors and lawyers and teachers, professors. I loved it. I loved it.Yeah, d. three seems to be like the guys who really want to keepplaying, you know what I mean? Like there's just a love of football, right?It's not gonna be like your Alabama's where it's all the spectacular stuffbut it's just guys uh and people who want to just go out and continue toplay. Yes. And you know what's funny is my first D. Three game after seeing anNFL game, my brain was so wired for the speed of the NFL that when I saw myfirst D. Three game I could have sworn they were running backward. I mean itwas so slow that it took a while for my brain to adjust. Yeah, I can see thatdefinitely happened happening. Yeah, I mean marty so you probably can relateto marjorie and her girls being out in the field and you know when you youprobably ran around the stadium in philadelphia all the time. I did well,you know, and when you talk about pace of play of the professional footballgame, often my grandfather would take me on the field during the game and itwould really upset my mother because she was like, but dad, you don't, youknow, she's a little person and like the pace of play, like balls go flyingeverywhere, you know, you don't know in an NFL game where they're going to windup, but I love the excitement of it just being on the field, there'snothing more exciting than being on a football field, whatever it is, whetherit's A D three field or professional football field, there's something aboutjust running around and seeing what's going on and being in the middle of theaction is so great and I love that, you know, you taught your daughter'sobviously the same love and passion that you have for football that that Iyou know, I have to and it really is something that I think is great foryoung women to speak football and then you become marjorie, like people know,oh she's the football lady like people actually, which is kind of a little bitand I want you to share this story about how you ended up learning aboutyou know how when the men were gone, how that came into action becausereally because everyone knows you're the football lady. Yeah, yeah. So Ifound out about kyleen Wilson when I went to get allergy shots and I waswearing a t shirt that had the University of Tulsa football and I getmy and the allergist this nurse, jean van Waters, she sees me and she says,oh a woman who loves football. I due to all the women in my family lovedfootball because my great aunt was a football coach and I was like your what?And I and she says my great aunt and and I was trying not to hyperventilatethat I'm hearing a story like this. And I asked her, I said where was this? Andshe says Brownwood texas now if you know, high school football in texas.Brownwood is one of the more iconic cities, a little towns. They had justhad a famous football coach? Gordon would their stadiums named after him?He had won seven state championships at Brownwood. And and I was just like ohmy gosh! And I said when was it? And she said during World War Two? And myfather was a World War Two veterans. So I've always been fascinated by thatpart of history. So I started asking her all kinds of questions and by thetime I left my appointment she I asked her she would let me write to heraunt's biography and she said that would be wonderful. Unfortunately heraunt's story, much of it was lost to time. So I wrote a novel based aroundeverything that I knew to be true. And...

I found that in my research she and Ihad a lot of similarities and so I think my life experiences, I bring thatinto the story. I don't think I could have written her story with such alevel of authenticity had I not had the experiences I had as a as a sportseditor, a sportswriter. So so it was just like landed on my lap and and hastotally changed my life. Yeah, no, that's that's wonderful. So heyeveryone, we're gonna take a little quick break here and we'll be rightback. We're talking with marjorie Herrera, Lewis and her book. When themen were gone, we'll take a quick break, we'll be right back. Yeah. Hey, heading up with us listenersManscaped. Well they sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch of tools andformulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh so you know, I want toshow you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got aperfect package but they sent me the perfect package three point okay and Iwant to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box.Uh, you know it and you can see what it says. They will thank you because theysent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us, uh, you know, stuff that makes yousmell better. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this great uh boxers, whatyou get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this coolsack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it'sbeen great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, you know, and you know,you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, you can go to Manscaped dot comand put in the code. Uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G U S F R E R O T T E G get 20%off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit, you canget individual items like, um, this way cool rumor that has a little led light,um, ceramic. Uh, these things come apart, they're waterproof, you can do alot with them. So, you know, man scape is great. You know, it's funny game. Iremember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going tomention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team.And uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, you'll know exactly what I'mtalking about. But uh, he brought his own clippers in one time and he used totrim his beard up his goatee and everything and he had him there forabout two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in andthere's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beardtrimmer. So you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the sametrimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out a littlebit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said,well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since.So you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things outand probably if it would have just said manscaped on it, but we wouldn't havehad that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh taking care of yourball stories I've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL,so, uh, it's a great story. Um, but you know, I always said There was no way toknow, there's no name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy wasusing, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So one of the bestI've ever heard my 15 years playing in the league. Um, but you know, there'sso many great things about manscaped...

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...herschel walker Supplanted Tourney doorset uh in the starting lineup there was a home game where Dorset didn't play atall. And now you picture this guy who's Heisman trophy winner. He's he's afirst round draft pick, he's a star for the cowboys for so many years. And nowhe's sitting an entire game and so when the game was over we left we went tothe interview room where the players we had access to interviewing and Tonyleft, he didn't want to talk to the media. So I called my sports editorbecause he really wanted me to talk to Tony. I said well he's gone. So youknow, he didn't stay for the interviews and my sports editor said, well thenyou got to go to his house. Now remember I had that list of numbers,addresses, everything. I'm like, oh please, you know, I don't want to bethose people that chase after and everything and he's no, you got to. SoI get in my car and I drove over to Tony's house. He lived in a cul de sacin north Dallas. There are a lot of cars parked in front of his house. So Ifigured all his friends would come over and they were kind of talking about howmad they were that he hadn't played. And I'm thinking, okay, here we go. Iknock on the door, Tony opens up the door and he sees me and he goes, oh no,I didn't want to talk to the press. You know, like just what you wanted, thegreeting you want when you open the door. Oh no. I said Tony, I don't wantto be here either. This is the last place I want to be. But I have a job todo. So can we talk just for a few minutes, just a few minutes. And hesaid, well we can't come in here. The whole house is full. There is no placeto talk. So he said, okay. And we sat on the curb. Now here's a star NFLathlete and we're sitting like two kids in the front of the house, on the curbof the sideway of the sidewalk and we talked and talked and talked and heopened up and he told me everything about how he felt about sitting andwhat he might do next. Of course, we all know, he ended up with the broncos.Um, and I was the only one who had the story the next day. Nobody else did.And, and we just had a great conversation. It just turned into agreat conversation that never even felt like an interview. Yeah, I will say that the bestconversations I've had are people that are just honest and real with you andin all the years I've played Um 15 that, you know, you knew kind of the media,people that were honest and wrote the truth. You know, not necessarily, umnot the truth. Like stats and all that, that's easy to find out, but it's justabout who you were. Yeah, I had a bad game or I had a great game, but I'm agood person. I have a, you know, three kids, I have a loving wife and it'sjust a great family. Like to me, when those, when it felt like that wasn'tbeing said about me, that made it, you know, harder to, to talk to that person.I totally get it. I totally get. In fact, one time john Dutton was having,he, he decided he didn't like the way the reporters were covering how he wasdoing at that time and he didn't want to talk to the media anymore. At onepoint I really wanted to talk to him and I said john can I just ask youthree questions? I'm not talking to the media. No. I said please just threequestions. Finally he said okay after he talked and talked, after I finishedthe third question, he answered it and then he stood there waiting for thenext question and I looked and I said I could ask you at least three more butthat was three and that's what you agreed to. And so he was shockedbecause I stopped and from then on Any time I needed to talk to him aboutanything he knew that I didn't I wasn't going to be dishonest and keep askingquestions just because he had lost track of that was three and there arethings like that that I think really made an impression, you know, on on theguy's definitely definitely so marty, how's it going down in Tampa are youexcited for tonight? Yeah, well the weather's clearing up a little bit. Itwas a little rainy because that's what happens, but it looks like it'sclearing up. People are starting to...

...definitely get uh you know, you canfeel this is what the great thing is and I know both of you can understandand relate just that that feeling of excitement before a game, whatever itis and really obviously this is a big game because it's the opening of theseason, but before any game, whether you're watching D. Three, you know,those guys playing whether you're at the University of Tulsa or Penn Stateor a professional football game. So it's definitely, I can hear, you know,you can hear Miley, Cyrus singing and the band not herself, but once theystart playing Miley, you know, they're getting ready for some for some wildwild activities down here. For sure. Yeah, it's usually what's his name,hank what he was, Yeah, hank Williams, he's playing somewhere right now,getting ready for football. So uh yeah, I mean it's always exciting the firstgame of the year and the NFL does such a good job, I talked about this today,they do such a good job with the fan engagement and promoting the game andand how connected everybody gets to the game. So, and so the NFL ever come toyou marjorie and say like, you need to make sure that you're connecting orthey just let you write whatever you don't like what you just wrote,whatever that's awesome. You know, big companies sometimes want to want tomake sure everybody knows what they what they want them to you. Yeah, no, Ithink part of the problem was and and Texan tom Landry, they knew um theyknew that they weren't going to be able to dictate uh you know, any of thestories or any of the direction of the stories. Well, they know if too smallis in there, we weren't going to be able to tell her anything or guilt andit was quite the character. Right. Right. So, okay, so you get donewriting and I'm excited to hear about your next chapter because you know, youwent to texas Wesleyan, I've been there before and uh tell me a little bitabout your experience there because you were a coach, You were an assistant,you helped the coaches, you were in the press box giving them information. Sohow did that come about? Where you, you got to be a coach? Well, I just nevereven thought about coaching. It came about because I was working on my noveland, and I'm finding out about Thylacine Wilson and all of hercoaching and all of a sudden I just got like, I want to get on the field. Sowhen uh when texas wesleyan brought its football program back for the firsttime in 2017, it had disbanded in 1942 shortly after uh Pearl harbor happened.And and the football team, I just want to share the conference championship,but they all decided to go serve the country and the team disbanded. So, Sonow they're coming back for the first time in 2017 and the school didn't havemuch of a budget. So a lot of their coaches had to be volunteers. And so Iwent in and I met with the head coach and uh, I told him I wanted to be oneof the volunteers. He asked me, what position do you want to volunteer? AndI said I would like to work with wide receivers and he said, okay. And theassignment defensive acts and linebackers. Uh, and so I just, youknow, started scouting. I did scouting reports and I worked with the playerson the field. We had practices at uh 5 45 6 46 o'clock in the morning becausethere was no home field. So we had to use a local high school and we wouldshow up and it was dark and the lights were on and we could hear the roostersin the, in the neighborhood and we practiced until the sun came up. And uh,it was very surreal. But, but yeah, during games I was with the headset andI'll have to say one thing whenever I'm watching football and I see the headcoach chewing them into the headset, I still cringe because we're alllistening to the chomping um, up in the, up in the press box. Uh, but uh, I hada great working relationship with the...

...athletes. I discovered just like tilingdid during her journey that if these young men know you have some sort ofknowledge or something that you can bring to them, that will make thembetter. That then it doesn't matter that you didn't play it or that youwere not, you know, a man, so it worked out very nicely, so marty, have youever wanted to coach football? Well, you know what, I feel like having twoboys at a played football while I'm not the official, while, I have not been onthe field, coaching, being a mom and an advocate of teenagers playing sports, Ithink that I've done a little bit of uh behind the scenes coaching, but sure, Ithink marjorie and I need to uh talk about, you know picking up and anddoing some coaching together, so I mean coaching is really about being elite,you know, cause you know, you coach, I mean coaching a lot of it's aboutstrategy and so forth, but about being a leader both on and off the field andthat to me, you know, it's interesting, it's like I look back at some of thesegreat coaches and the players that played for them, the ones that seem tobe really successful have had great coaches that have really taught themleadership skills, like coach from so many people that played under coach formeal have gone on to have tremendous success after the football, you know,and so I think that being a great coaches about really being a greatleader and then also having a great football mind what you know is I don'tknow if I have a good football, I don't know if I have a good football mind,but I don't know if I have a football mind as you know, some of these guysare so good these guys and gals. Well I think too that coaching you're nottaught that right? I wasn't I coached high school football coach EzekielElliott Marjorie, I don't know if you knew that in in high school. Yeah, soum and you know, and you go in from the NFL and you're saying, Okay, I know alot about football. I have my PhD in football, right? I've been doing thisfor 25 years. I should be able to coach. But there's so many other aspects tocoaching that you don't know about, right? That you aren't taught likeBecause you I've dealt with NFL coaches for 15 years and they're dealing withother men all of a sudden you're dealing with these kids in high schooland there are so many things that I had to learn and so many things that Iscrewed up and I have to apologize for and and you know, make sure the kidsknew that I was for them and not against them and it's just and changedthe whole way I talk because people without that knowledge, you know, youhave to treat them like they don't know all the time and they don't write mythat's true. My my father in law, my wife's dad who coached football for 42years, who was telling you about the went to new Mexico State, He tells agreat story. He said, look I went out and coached a kid, I told him to get ina three point stance, he put three fingers down and bend over and put hishand down. He said okay what's this guy doing? He said getting a two pointstance, he put two fingers down and you know I got in the stance and he saidall right getting the four point stance, he put four fingers down. He said thatjust made me realize that you know you can't assume as a coach that anybodyknows what they're talking about, you really have to teach and coach and be aleader like you said, oh the very very basics, very basics that you can'tassume and that is so true and and even beyond that they've got so many thingsgoing on in their lives and they need somebody that they can talk to as well.And then they also, you know one of the things that really bothered me whenwhen I first started coaching at texas wesleyan as the practices were so quietand I just felt like nobody knows each other, they don't know each other, theydon't know how to, to to pull for each other, they weren't connected yet, youknow, I mean I just feel like quiet practice is not a good practice and umand so there's just so many things that you don't even think about that all ofa sudden present themselves. Yeah, yeah,...

...it's always a learning experience andso tell me a little bit about how now that you've gone to coaching and youstart thinking about Thailand, I mean, and I can't imagine like you're goingto write this story about her and now you're coaching you and it just, to meit seems so surreal that that's the path you took and that's the story youwrote. Mhm. Yeah. Well, you know, I wanted her story to be so authenticbecause she's a real person, you know, even though it's a novel, I didn't justmake her up in my head and create a story, I had to be very true to herstory and to who she is and you know, I've always taught at the universitylevel, which has helped me in coaching because I've been around kids that age,but but I teach media ethics also at the University of north texas and Ifelt an ethical obligation to her legacy and and and so I had to do a lotof research to make it authentic and newspaper clippings where I could seedirect quotes and I would know how she spoke and and I had to get to know whoshe was because I wrote the book as you know in first person and so I becamethylacine essentially telling the readers which she would want us to knowAnd and I think having that experience on the field, like when I worked atwalked on the football field for the first time in a coach's role. I justcouldn't stop looking at my feet thinking on these are feet of afootball coach on a football field. It was it was really it was a prettyawesome moment. But so so yeah, I just really had to connect with her and andher story. And as a result they've got a room in the press box at the at thefootball high school football field called the Thylacine Wilson room. Theyget cut the rhythm for the exhibit at the, at for her exhibit at the ground,County Museum of History. And just today I got an email from somebody whowanted to ask who's asking me some information because they want to put ahistorical marker. And and so um so I I just felt like I owed it to her and herlife and her legacy to make it as authentic as I could. And and so livingthe role was part of it. It's really, yeah, it's reallyincredible. I mean certainly marjorie your body of work is really somethingthat I know Thailand would be very proud that you wrote her story becauseyou've really done it all, you uh between writing and being the firstwoman then, being that you were always, which I guess is something again aboutsports, like wanting to be the first in the room, the winner the first one todo it. That's something that competitive nature is what sportsdrives us. You know, you're like, well no one's done it, but why can't it beme? And that is something that I know that you probably have a lot of youngwomen and young men to wonder, you know, wanting to follow in your footsteps ofbeing the first and doing it and picking up where you kind of have havea left off, well, you haven't really left off, but we're appreciate way intothis transition like great athletes, You just kept transitioning because gusyou know, you've done things, you went from playing football, professionaleight and doing other things, having a great successful podcast, like you wantto keep improving as a professional athlete, your brain is wired with, likeI need to do more, I want to do more. Right. Exactly. And and I think that'sthat's part of it. As you just keep one of you want to keep growing. And I saythat I made that mistake in the NFL is that I didn't, I wanted to be a goodfather, I wanted to be a good husband and and then football was my other love.Right? And so I did those two things, but I didn't continue to grow ineducation and other things which I should have and and had theopportunities to in the off season. So that's probably one little regret Ihave is that I wish I would have went back maybe got my MBA or something likethat. And I always tell guys if you have an opportunity to make sure thatyou continue your education, because it's so important because the NFL willhelp, you will pay for it. That's true. Yes. And there are some that do and youknow, Emmett smith, he went back and yeah, there's a lot of guys that dothat and I think that's great and I...

...think that if you want to go intosomething else in life, you have to learn about, right? I went intocoaching and podcasting and it's just such a high learning curve foreverything that you try to do that sometimes just kind of go sit in class,learn a little bit before you dive into it might help. So, I wanna margin, Iwanted to ask you. Okay, so why the cover? Why did you pick this picture?Okay, well harpercollins out of new york, it's one of the biggestpublishing houses in the world. And so I had no say in the picture. And it wasfunny, what's interesting though, is that my editor, she sent me an emailand said I'm sending you a copy of the cover, if you have any suggestions orchanges, let me know, I'll pass them on to the art department, but I'll tellyou right now they don't care. So, you know, no matter what I said. So I Iactually did say, could you put print on the dress, Could you had treesbecause it's in the pecan valley. Could you add an airplane that looksauthentic? And they actually did all the things that I asked. My editor wasshocked. Um, but I loved the cover for 22 reasons. One, the woman that is themodel for the cover looks exactly like my mother looked like when she was thatage. Exactly like my mother. And so, um I couldn't believe it when I saw it.And then the second thing is, my husband came up with the title of thebook. So he loves it because you know, I right tens and tens and tens and tensof thousands of words. He writes five and he gets the cover gee. I wonder howmany times he tells you about that. Exactly. I know. I'd never let my wifeforget. He doesn't, Well marjorie tell us about what's happening now with whenthe men were gone. Well, just yesterday I got some pretty good news. Um uhwe're under contract with a couple of of uh film producers. And uh theyalready have a uh a studio that I can't give the name of yet because it's notannounced yet. But they're working with a a studio and that studio assigned ascreenwriter and I've seen the treatment for the draft. We zoom, wewent on zoom and uh went over what probably was necessary to be included.Um and now they're looking for attachments and we should know in thenext maybe uh 4 to 6 weeks who we might have directing the film and and uhmaybe even shortly after that who will be playing Kyleen. So I am just beyondthrilled. It's just, I still can't believe this is happening is awesome.Who would you like to see? Plate Eileen? Well, I don't know if they'll get madat me if I say anything. Um I know when I was still writing it, I was sort ofthinking of amy Adams, you know, I mean I wrote it with the picture of the realThailand next to my computer. So I was always thinking about her but there area lot of people that I think would be you know fantastic. I well she, what isis tiling like is she feisty? She fiery like you know what I mean? Like allthat plays into who or was she just kind of calm, cool and collective Wellshe was a combination of both. She kind of knew how to pick her spots and soshe wasn't like a comedian so she's not like hilarious, funny or anything likethat, but she was very driven, very determined and and uh she could go totoe to toe with anybody. So she was tough but she was also very warm, youknow, she was protecting the boys, you know, she didn't want them to go off towar until they were men, you know, finish your childhood and then go dowhat men do. Right, Right. Yeah. That's that's amazing. What a great story. Andso for both of you who are strong women, what would you say to our fans who arewomen and that are trying to make a...

...next step or a different transition inlife? What advice would you give them? So marty, tell me a little bit then,marjorie, I'll let you go. Okay, well, I think for me it was really, hey, I'mso grateful that there are so many amazing women out there, or men thatreally understand the value of what we are, what we can bring to the table. Sofor other women, other young women out there, just know your value and findthe people try to find the people that will be your cheerleaders, noteverybody's whatever you are. So find your cheerleaders, cheer for them, letthem cheer for you. And just remember that, you know, ultimately you're goingto get there. It's like football inch by inch. Every you know, just keepmoving the ball down the field and you will get there. But definitely try tofind your cheerleaders and there might just be one cheerleader. And that'sokay because all it takes is one cheerleader cheering for you and you'llyou'll get there awesome marjorie, What do you think advice you would givesomebody? Well, you know, I've had a lot of people ask me this themselves.They come up to me and they say I wanted to be a sportswriter too. But Igot a few nose and I just changed directions. And so, uh you know, theyregretted it. They were like, why didn't digest? You know, persist ifthat's what I wanted to do. So I would tell them, you know, they're going tobe doors that close. But if you keep going after it, they're gonna there'sgonna be a door that opens and and so don't give up, you know, just keepgoing, keep going. And it's like the advice my mom gave me when I was little,there was no such thing as Nike at the time. But when I would tell heranything that I wanted to do, she would just look at me and said, well thenjust do it. It was very simple, you know, to her, it was just do it, do it,don't talk about it, do it. And that's what all my sisters and my brother andI did. We just followed mom's advice and we never really thought of the ofof the the difficulties we may incur uh you might experience along the waybecause it was just not even a consideration. You just go do what youwant to do, right? Don't you wish your mom would have put a little tm by justdo it? You might be talking to us from Hawaii right now. No kidding. All right, so what's up next? Youtalked about? Are you doing any book tours or what can you tell us aboutyour book and how you're promoting it right now? Well, you know, the bookcame out in uh in October of 18, so we're getting close to three years andand the invitations have not stopped coming. I'm still out there uh meetingwith as their major speaker for a lot of organizations. I'm still signing alot of books doing A lot of a different kind of media interviews. It's amazingto me, it's slowed down during 20 because of the virus and everything.And then all of a sudden things started going to zoom and now all of a suddenI'm getting invitations all the time. And and it's interesting because mypublisher at Harper Collins told me when they published the book, they said,we we have a feeling this is going to have a long shelf life. And I washopeful, but I could not have seen this coming. And so uh I'm very grateful.Yeah, we're grateful you wrote it because these are the stories thateverybody needs to read and listen to and and understand what being firstmeans, right? And I think you explained it so well, when you did your ted talk.Oh, yeah, well, thank you. I appreciate that. Yes. You know, and there's stillso so much room for first and so I hope people don't hesitate just becausemaybe they don't have a role model or something like that. Just like my momwould say then become the role model. Just go for it, you know? Right, Right.That is awesome. So I appreciate both of you spending time with me today onthe huddle up with gusto marty, Give me your prediction for tonight's game. Ithink it's gonna, there's a bunch of cowboy people in front of me, but Ithink it's gonna be Tampa Bay, I'm gonna say Tampa Bay, I'm not quite sure.I'm not gonna give actually, let's just...

...say, I think tom brady is going tothrow a lot of touchdowns. I just want to act to stay healthy. That's why I dowant him to stay healthy. So I love healthy. I love it when players canstay healthy through the whole season. So Tampa Bay is going to win and Ithink it's gonna be a pretty high scoring game. Oh good. What do youthink marjorie? Oh, I agree with Marnie, it's going to be a high scoring game,but the cowboys are gonna win. I actually picked the cowboys too. So Isaid doc is going to have a breakout game, he's going to be healthy. He'sgot a lot of talent around him and I always think tom brady starts a littleslow in the season. I build this way up so you don't want to meet up with himin the last game of the season. Yeah. You definitely want to catch him in thefirst game. Yeah. No, I I appreciate both of you joining me and huddle upwith gusts and March. We'll definitely let you know when we put it all onsocial media. We wanna, we wanna thank you for joining us today, marty. Thankyou for being my co host again. Tell us about your book one last time. Alright,football. And that's why I'm here because I'm actually going to theRonald Mcdonald house after we do this before the game. So football Freddieand fumbled the dog game day in the USa and there's many different cities tochoose from. You can get them all philadelphia, the Carolinas, Atlanta.Let's see. Green bay Dallas fort worth Chicago and now Tampa bay. Wonderful.Send us some artwork so we can share it. We gotta put it on the media. Idefinitely do that. Yeah, this has been great. Thank you. Yeah, that would begreat. I appreciate both my dogs out there bark and he's like, dad, you'vebeen in there an hour now. So let's go saul, he's got to go out and go to thebathroom. I think so, I appreciate you both of you joining me and uh it's justbeen a wonderful talk marjorie and you know, everyone needs to go out and getthe book and read it. Well, thank you. Thank you. I've had a great time.Thanks for the for including me in this conversation. Mhm. And I swear I won'tsay too small on any of my social media. It's that's okay. It's pretty funny.Yeah, it's a good story. It's a great story. So that's our show, everyone.Thanks for joining us on the huddle up with Gus. Uh and I appreciate all ofour sponsors. Uh 16 31 Digital News, I appreciate sounder FM and I appreciate,you know, you got to go to Vegas sports advantage, you gotta put in my code,huddle up and save some, save some money. They're gonna help you pick theright teams and then they're gonna win you some cash. So go out, go there, goto Vegas sports advantage and listen them. I appreciate marty, I appreciatemargie terry brian, thank you all so much and go to wherever you listen toyour favorite podcast. Check out huddle up with Gus and we'll see you next time. And that's a wrap sportsman, Thanks forjoining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another action, huddle upwith Gus featuring 15 year NFL quarterback. Gus Ferrand, huddle upwith Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 Digital media and is available on applemusic.

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