Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Mario Andretti

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Mario Gabriele Andretti is a former racing driver and one of the most successful Americans in the history of the sport. His name is synonymous with Auto racing.  Along with Dan Gurney, he is one of only two drivers to have won races in Formula One, IndyCar, World Sportscar Championship, and NASCAR. He also won races in midget cars and sprint cars. During his career, Andretti won the 1978 Formula One World Championship, four IndyCar titles, and IROC VI. To date, he remains the only driver ever to win the Indianapolis 500, Daytona 500, and the Formula One World Championship, and, along with Juan Pablo Montoya, the only driver to have won a race in the NASCAR Cup Series, Formula One, and an Indianapolis 500. No American has won a Formula One race since Andretti's victory at the 1978 Dutch Grand Prix. Andretti had 109 career wins on major circuits. Andretti had a long career in racing. He was the only person to be named United States Driver of the Year in three decades (1967, 1978, and 1984). He was also one of only three drivers to have won major races on road courses, paved ovals, and dirt tracks in one season, a feat that he accomplished four times. With his final IndyCar win in April 1993, Andretti became the first driver to have won IndyCar races in four different decades and the first to win automobile races of any kind in five. In American popular culture, his name has become synonymous with speed, as with Barney Oldfield in the early twentieth century and Stirling Moss in the United Kingdom. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with Guss, where we talked to our guests about how sports shape their life. I'm your host, Gust Farat, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my all time friend and cohost, Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top on sports circus with south a ring master, on amp TV, AA, MP tvcom, and you can also find us on RADIOCOM or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Welcome back everyone to another episode of huddle up with Gus. I'm here at my co host, Dave. I guess how you doing today? Dave? Ready for some speed? We're going to fill this is going to be a good show. And now we have to talk really fast in this episode. I yes, agree. Yeah, to keep up, because this person we're going to be interviewing today is anonymous. His name is synonymous with speed. Only the greatest driver to ever drive. No, down any realm, in any realm, every realm, because he's one and every yeah, anytime he's gotten behind the whist. It's like proofing. Yeah, not even an opinion. Yeah. So we're excited to have fellow Pennsylvanian because we're in Pittsburgh joining us today a Mario on dretty. Good morning us and they morning, Mario. Mario, we are so excited to have you. It is a real honor to be able to sit here and talk with you and be able to, you know, have you tell us your life story. So we're really excited about that. Very kind. Thank you. So one of the things we always talked about is how sports to shaped your life. I mean sports is synonymous race car sports and driving is anonymous with your name. So go back to the beginning, if you could for us and tell us about the first memory where you fell in love with sports. Wow, that's going back to just really my first when I became a teenager, really basically still living in Italy. I don't know why. I have a twin brother, although, and both of us just became fascinated when motor racing for I don't know, for whatever reason, I don't know. I guess it came from above, because there was no family background, you know, that there would take us in that direction. Or family didn't even have a car actually at the time. And but anyway, but Italy was very prominent in Formula One, especially. We're talking about the mid S and and, of course, for our a Maseratia, for a male being protagonists in Formula One. So a big deal in Italy and in my idol just became a Bert La Scotti, who was world champion fifty three fifty four when it was, you know, thirteen and fourteen years right of age, one thousand nine hundred and fifty four, although and I were some friends took us to the Italian Grand Prix in Monza, first time we ever saw, you know, a race of their magnitude, and I think the mold was cast at that point. You know, I said that all God, you know, if I can never ask for anything and nothing else in my life, give me the opportunity to become a race driver. And and again the passion just really started. Then, just to go back, our life was a little bit of a turmoil because of, you know, basically we were a product of World War II. Where I was born is then far northeast part of Italy. It's a region called East O, the peninsula of Eastria, which right after the war, actually Italy lost the war. Who We all know right that they lost that territory. So that became occupied by Yugoslavia under our communism and as soon as the borders bore obviously changed. We were trapped inside, you know, coming this country, and there was a choice that everyone could make to either remain, succumb to that or or leave. And US, like probably ninety percent of the population of that region, we left became refugees in our own country, and so from forty eight to fifty five we moved to Luca and...

Tuscany. For eight to fifty five we were in a refuge camp. So basically that's why. From there then, you know, there was an opportunity to come to America and we had some relatives on my mother's side who had been here for many, many years, and so that's how really this my, you know, teenage years. That's what that's why I was a bit confusing. But Anyway, we came to America one Thousan nine hundred and fifty five, and and here again, we had no idea what America would have for us in a way of how to pursue the sport. We thought Italy was a place to do it, even though that would have been totally the impossible dream when we arrived there. We arrived there on a Thursday and on a Sunday we were at their Monko's house and just lounging around and and we see some lights in the background, you know, which was at the fair grounds, and all of a sudden it was a big explosion of vengeance, right honey, and they're so there was. There was a stock car race. It modify stock cars at the local fair grounds and we had no idea what the hell that was, you know. So ather and I we just looked at each other. We booked, you know, we we went for for the lights and check it out. This is check it out, and we looked in there and so, oh my goodness, you know, this brute looking things by this, you know, the sound good and all that, and two years later we started building one with a couple other buddies, and two years after that my career began. My career began in one thousand nine hundred and fifty nine and and my very last competitive race was in two thousand. So I was very blessed and very lucky. So when you went to your first Italian Grand Prix when you were a teenager, what do you remember about that day? Do you remember the smell, the noise, the people? What was it that really that like if you if you know, like sometimes you remember a smell, like if you get in a car or something. What what was that at like for you? Do you use you that memory come back to you often? Unbelievable. Yeah, I mean there was such a defining moment, even at that young age of fourteen, where, again, you know, I says, my God, that's all I want to be. I want to be like a bet the Scotty, you know, for our even though you finished third that day, but he fought so hard that the Mercedes cars finished ahead of him. But nevertheless, as I said, I've been back obviously since and and it's fate. Would have a can you imagine? That's where I clinch the world championship and Moansa you know, right, you know, but I want Mons. I on the sports car race. Seventy three would offer a male and a thousand kilometers and I want the Grand Prix. One thousand nine hundred and seventy seven, seventy eight. So again, you know, can you imagine, from personal satisfaction standpoint, a lot of people ask me, give me your favorite race of your career. You know, I have been named eight hundred and seventy nine races sectional racism my career plus so like another forty more on sanctioned. What's your favorite race? It's so easy to say moans. I you know when I want the Grand Prix there because of what happened at the early eight, you know, at the early age. You know, in my career, you went from the you went from the kid watching now to the kid on the track driving around. I couldn't imagine what that was like for you. Yes, the that's that's it's. Who did you when you went back over there? Do you still have a lot of family over in Italy? Yeah, yeah, yes, of course we for many years. Of course, you know the stage of my life, you know we're losing them, you know. Yeah, I still have close relatives, first cousins there in Florence and but I had gone back almost every year, visiting and and again. That's still my my native land and Holst half the stadium. Passport does not change the blood. It right. So half the stadium was, you know, your relatives. The first race you went back probably well, you know. Actually, you know, it's amazing when I go back even one thousand nine hundred and eighty two was the last time that I drove a Monza and substituted one of the drivers that was killed. That was a team driver for Ferrari, and I was asked a substitute and I went there and I set...

...the car on pole and so forth and and again. I can't even pay tolls on the outer stratas you know what I mean. The way, even when I go back, it's just such a wonderful feeling. The fans are so unbelievable there. Their emotions are just something that's to be even hard to explain. So it's always it's a wonderful feeling to always go back there. On Morio, tell us about going back to when you first arrived in the United States. What was your first impression? What was that like when you when you finally came over? Well, as you can imagine that we didn't know what to expect, you know, and so we arrived in New York. From that there was a ship that con't to be Oncmano, and we had our cousin John, the men you who picked us up, and on our way back we stopped for lunch. You know, New York is about almost eighty miles away from where I live now, and, as R so we stopped for lunch. It was one of those the call the bullet diners. You know that he's Ye and so and I remember that they order some hamburgers, you know, from my God. We didn't know how to order, you know, no language. And and and my dad thought that the hamburger tasted like cardboard, you know, because my dad had it. Hasn't gotten much better. E. I mean when you talk about Food Ian my mom was a supreme ship and everything. So there was a little bit getting used to, you know, but the only thing that I remembered clearly is what I want is kids, what we love. We got a milkshake, chocolate little shakers. Oh Man, at least that, you know, it's very same. Taste it. Well, you know what was some getting used to and everything, but we had an open mind, you know, I've my our older sister was was one of those, you know. She was, I I've said, very positive in our thinking and she was all excited. And when we when we navigated, when we arrived at the Port New York, was a zero in the morning, a beautiful day in June, and was her twenty twenty one birthday. Oh and you know, and here we got, you know, the skyline of New York and everything. It was a, you know, very positive feeling, you know, but that of curiosity. You know what we're about to see? What's life going to be like? Because, you know, when we left, my dad says, okay, we're going to America. You know, I took three years to give visas. When you apply Visus, one thousand nine hundred and fifty two, he almost forgot about it. In fifty five they were approved and that we had to go through physicals and everything, you know. But anyway, so when he broke the news that we're going to America, I says we're going to America for like five years and then come back. You know, that's the thing. So we had no idea they were coming to America and it's going to be the rest of our lives, you know. So again it was a lot of curiosity and and actually positive vibes really, to be honest with you. So when you got here, did you guys go to school or where? Did you go to school in either Nazareth, yeah, and Asareth, yea. Yeah, we we arrived in June, so obviously went to school, but the good thing is that we alther and I had three years of English when we were in Lucca in school there, and schooling there was much more sophisticated than here. I give you, for instance, our classes were eight hours a day. It was eight thirty to twelve thirty and and then we had a break two to six and Friday was two to twenty five and Saturday eight thirty, two twelve thirty. So you go figure, right. And if when we went to school already, you know, we should have been we I was fifteen years old, so it should have been like ten grade, right. And and obviously they put us in seventh grade because of the language barrier. And the first class we arrived there, it was one hour home room. You know, I never heard of that, you know, because every hour was a class. Right. So if like it was wasting time, there was a sus, a man, I like America, just said I love this, you know. So, but yeah, it but it worked out really well because, you know, the teachers, they understood a situation and and, like I said, from...

June to you know, September, when when we went to school, we were pretty good, we were communicating pretty well in English because of, like I said, having some schooling before that. So the language Barry was not a big deal, quite honest enough, for us. More wasn't hurting for your parents? Yeah, much harder. Yeah, my mom really grasped it, you know, she got on with it a lot easier than my dad. My Dad actually took a long time. I don't think you ever really had a command of it. But in and now explain it to you, because that work in our favorite some degree. Oh Really? Well, yeah, when we started racing, because there's no way that he would have approved that, because we were so called on the rage. Oh yeah, and and and if he would have known that we were racing with a squashed it. But that and we were Outdan I. Actually we were winning locally and we both we want our very first race that we entered here in Nazareth. That's a matter of record. And so at work and my dad didn't know. And at work they was a Gig man, your kids are really doing well. And he had no idea what the other we're talking about. So he thought that he was getting praises for his own work, you know. So he's yeah, and so, but that was the language barrier for him. Was Our defense. So what would you and your brother tell him that you were doing when he would ask. And what have you guys been up to today? Well, you know, you figured we we used to hang out my I used to call him uncle. He married my second cousin, and he had a gas station, Sonoko gas station, at the end of town, and and that was very useful for us because we could go Mingo. You know, a lot of people we still hang there. I'll do and I in fact that after school we would alternate. We would work there for you know, in the evening and he would work one day and I would work the next day. And you know, we used to actually earned some money. We start aren't forty five bucks a week there, you know, which was pretty good. They're good. Yeah, pretty good. Is that where you built your first car? I think it was what, a forty eight Hudson? Forty eight Hudson Horn A. Yeah, we we assemble for other buddies, you know, and always say there's among them. There was a geek, you know, the guy, and those everything which really we depend banded on and he steered us in the right direction and and actually we did a better job than than we could have hoped for because, I mean we delved into the real thing, you know, with as far as we bought information about set up to the car, how to do it right and all that, and and and it worked out. And actually the the idea that we got from Charlie, Mitch was the guy. This is it. If you're going to raise locally, you got to do something different. You can just try to build something exactly what they have and think you're going to do better. So in Nascar and those days the Hudson Hornet, they were winning, really dominating the short tracks right, dirt tracks especially, and so I said we got to build a Hudson, got to build a Hudson Horne. And that's what we did. And when we arrived there and look, oh, you know, something different, and we blew their doors off, you know, and I couldn't believe it even we had one car to drivers, you know, other and I both driving and we toss the coin, you know, who's going to drive first. And and we had a the promoter track, Jerry free, used to hang you know, used to be a customer at the gas they should I knew we were building this thing, and so he let us test one day at the track. So at least we you know, we had some ideas. What would right do? And and so I was glad that I'll the one to toss. And they started lasting the heat. He won the heat, and and then last in the feature, and they started, I because of the fact that we were unknown. So they they, you know, they that's that's the way that they treated it. And and they won the feature. So that and we were a thousand bucks in a hole. You know that we actually borrow from a local bank, and it's a long story, you know, right.

Well, you had to get the money to buy the party guy. Yeah, yeah, Jim to Beani, just you know, you have to pay it for us to ding the bay, a fee to get in the race. We first race. We are an hundred fifty bucks. Twenty five for the feature, twenty five for the for the heat. All right, no worry. What about like sponsorships, because you're starting to get become successful. was there sponsorships for cars then or how did that work? Well, on the side of the car we put the name of the Jim Tabani had a block plant, and so use the one to guarantee the loan with the bank. Okay, and that's so we put his name on the side, and so that's I started. And the interesting part is that this was the we were nineteen years old. This in one thousand nine hundred and fifty nine, and legally had to be twenty one to race legally because of the insurance. That's the way was the time. So Reyes race professionally, I should say. So we had a we befriended this local editor of the Nazareth key less young and we said, lest we need to have our birthday, you know, kind of change a little bit on our license, the driver changeable. It did a pretty good job. Yeah, you know, always saying, you know, no computers in those days. You know, get a way to sell. And actually, other than I we show up with proper racing suits. We sent for our the salad sport racing suit in Italy, I said, with all the zippers and everything and right and locally, you know, there's nobody had proper races suits. You know, there were a tshirts or whatever and yeah, Jee. And so we showed up and they said, and you know, we said we were, you know, line a little bit, you know, and we're said, we used to I se in Italy. You know. So this how they're going to argue, you know, and actually that stay with us for a long time and I tried to dispel that story. But because, I said the man we used to race formula. It was a formula junior in Italy, and I first race was an uncle on. I don't know how that we come up with that much death and they had no way of knowing. So by as well. Yeah, but that story went along and then, or an IT least, I remember seeing the you know, formula junior racing UN Colna, you know. So you know it's time went on and I had tried to dispel this story, but this story stayed with me for a time. Valet, stay and play in your next getaway to Los Angeles. The Western Bonaventure Hotel suites offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation or call one two hundred and three, six to four, one thou and asked for Promo Code PSF Oh, I can imagine. I could imagine. Well, I mean once you guys became successful, you know, the everybody, the word of mouth, just keeps going out and telling that story over and over. Yeah, I can imagine. So story stick. Did you and your brother play any other sports? Like, did you guys play soccer? Were you into any other sports or a fan of any other sports? Oh, the fans. Yes, we play soccer. When we were in Italy. You know that. The obviously that would say that's, you know, sport. There's almost a natural they're like, you know, baseball and right, but yeah, that's a real football. Right. Yeah, but you know, again, didn't do that in school because, you know, it didn't really we were just busy doing our own thing, you know, and and even you know our physical size. Didn't you know I was not going to do so, certainly not to bad basketball, you know. So right, but and really no desire to pursue other sports. You know my mind. I mean there was only had one thing, in my mind, you know, just, no matter what, you know, to pursue my dream. And a lot of things were just coming together a lot better than I ever thought, and that kept us busy enough. But honestly, you know, are we, as you said, fans of football and and, you know other sports? Yes, you know for sure. And you know, life goes on. You get to meet a lot of a lot of people involved in sports and then you have a certain appreciation, you know, for all of that.

Yeah, right, Um Maria. What was the next big step in your career? You had local success in that, in that region. Then what was like the next step to where you started to really become very successful? Yeah, it's like all sports, you know. I mean you have, you know, basically the grass roots where you start with and and the sport does have sort of a process where you just, you know, progress. I my objective was to to get involved into open wheel, single seater and more sophisticate or race cars, and but we had a start somewhere and the fact that, you know, we were winning, you know, didn't hurt, obviously, and you know. So I felt that I needed to race for two years in the stock cars because, you know, once you got into, you know, the more sophisticated side, obviously you know the age factor. You know, all of a sudden could have been found. I know that. You know. But we race for three years and I must say that my brother, although his career, basically it was almost determined at the end of that first season. We were at the I got to tell you, an invitational because even though I, he and I only alternated, you know, one week, and you know, because we only had, you know, one car, right, we still were and in the top three and points at one of the tracks that we race within a hundred fifty mile radius. We race like in three different tracks and and so because of that we qualify for it was a season ending race, which was in invitational at Hatfield, Pennsylvania, right, and and so and and that's and I was there. I was driving for somebody else. I got a ride. So he was dribbing our car and the heat race he had this big accident. You know, we're you know, he was giving his last rights. Actually that and the wow. Yeah, and and that's how my dad found out that we were racing. By a way. Yeah, you get an are full. Well, other was in a coma for a long time and then when we finally, when he finally came true, came through, the first thing that he said is that I'm glad you had to be the one to face the old man, you know. So you know, we got, we got, we had him back, you know, but you know, so it was. It was tough. You know, it was tough to deal with. That is you can imagine a twin. But he he recovered, you know, from that he raced for another ten he had a sabbatical the following year, but then he raced for another ten years and he had another accident in the Moin I win one thousand nine hundred and sixty nine, where it's determine his career, what type of car to retire. The will had an act in the sprint card. Money went. Yeah, but but myself again, I went from steppingstone to steppingstone from there, you know, into midgets and then sprint cars, and it's all a matter of just progressing, like you go to school, right. You know you don't want to repeat the grade. Yeah, you don't want to repeat seven seven SEC. Yeah, you want to keep making that nixt. Want to keep going and every time, every season, I sort of look back. Going on is throughout my career. Look and my better off this year than I was last year. Did that progress and things like that. And and once you reach the top level, then you said now I got to be able to stay there and sustain the performance, obviously to be able to turn my way there. So again, things were happening, you know, and and you can design it all you want, make all the plans in the world, but somehow, you know, there's so many things. I look back and and and what if this would have happened? What if that would have happened? It's all about being able to take advantage of the opportunities that come a all because, yes, you're all gun holt. You know to do everything is best way that you can and all that. But you know, in any sport you know where there's a potential, you know danger of injuries and whatever, and you just don't know what's going to happen next. By you just really go for it. And quite honestly, a lot of some of my brakes came, you know, through the misfortune of others, you know,...

...the right drivers being hurt or worse. And then you get to try, you know, to get the opportunity to try that, you know that category and and and you go forward. Then you somehow you're lucky enough to impress, right, and you go on. So again, when I look back, there's so many moments like that that if this would have happened, that would have happened. I wonder, you know, what it would have been. You know. So it's a game of chance in so many different yeah, you know, it's just like driving in the street. It's not always not you that make you know has the accident. It's somebody else right stake. They run into you or they crash and then you can't help but miss them or whatever it is. Yeah, certain things you can control. Yeah, for sure. Right. So I always wanted this. So in football, you know we're going to play on a Sunday and and you got to prepare all week and you got to get mentally ready and then the Game Day comes and you play at one o'clock and then you wake up at seven in the morning and you're thinking about everything you have to do. What is that Game Day like for you? Like when you get up and you know that I'm going to go two hundred over, two hundred miles in his car today for you know, five hundred miles, and and you know, how do you prepare yourself? Is, do you have you have some superstitions or was it always the same? Well, it's it's probably the same as all the other sports. I mean it's all about the better you prepared, the more confid in your feel and then the more at ease, if you know what I mean. Rank all about practice, practice, practice, right, and one of the things that think really work for me and things that I will forever be thankful for is the opportunity that I had earlier on, when I found it, when I reached the top of level, I ended up with one of the top teams in Indy, cars, U sack, and that's at a time where there was the very famous tire war, tire war between two giant firestone and good year, and the team that I joined was one of the firestone teams, and so there was a lot of pract I mean there's a lot of testing being done and I was getting a lot of seat time. It's like like practicing every day type of right, and I was able to really work and develop, you know, my skills by having that opportunity. So again, it's all about just getting the most out of what you know you need to do as far as the strategy you know in in the sport, motor racing. There are so many things that you can help yourself with. But understanding all of the dynamics of a race car, I mean it's all about now. It's air dynamics, it's chassis dynamics. Understand you know engine performance, how to deal with it. So and the more you do, the more obviously you know. You know and and then when it comes to, I said, to to the race weekend and so forth, you feel you're pretty prepared. I mean there's so many factors against you. Obviously can't control right people, situation, but and also you know the reliability of the car. You know, and those days you know the because the rules we used to take a hundred one percent out of the engine. Now the way they're, the rules are, you know that you have so much better chance of finishing the races because the way it's control. But in the state wasn't. So you know, if you're pushing a hundred percent out of your you know your engine and hope it last. And I got it to beat you, I got to take a hundred one percent. I hope that's going to asses. So, yeah, and everything else, but nevertheless you know, it's just it's still about preparation, preparation, preparation is, you know, you know yourself the more the better you understood your opponent, the better of you know, like a plan you had. Okay, what if I'm dealing with this dude, you know all day. You know where, what are his weaknesses and all that, and it's all about, like I said, it it parallels other sports. Oh, Maria, when your I was that was my question was about the other drivers, like how much preparation you put in studying their tendencies and that kind of stuff. Is that based on your experience racing with them previously? Do you actually watch film of a race to see maybe how they pass or or tell us about that preparation? I mean, as far as be able to know and how to deal with other drivers, it's all about what you I've experienced in the past. You know, even by watching film, you don't learn anything like that...

...because there's no specific camera that's on that car. Okay, now we know exactly or the moves were. You had to be there physically, be racing with that individual, and it's usually who you're going to read deal with. You know, there's only a couple of guys that you have to deal with every single weekend. You know, it's not everybody. Yeah, they're you know that. Let's face it. You know, in our sport it's the usual. You know, I always say they use those suspects are up front, right, and and, and that's what's have to deal with primarily. So so you learn, your learn and you don't always know it, as always the unknown. You know, I feel well, but you have pretty good idea. You know how to deal with it. And and that's part of the game. You know, it's part of the game. And we're all good buddies. You know what I mean, that we're all good. We all have a beer, you know, to get and everything else, and the next time race we tried to kill each other. You know it is, yeah, same way in football. Yes, wait, some way in insurance. Right. I want to thank all of our fans for joining us here on huddle up with gusts. We have a great Mario and Dretti, you can they can hear us under the big top, Dave on the sports circus and amp TV. So, Mario, I think one of the best things that I took from all this is that you have driven almost every type of car now we see people that only drive one type of race car. You have you, I mean you've gone through the gamut and am one in every type of a champion and every level and every level, and I think that is the most impressive thing, because I don't think a lot of people do that or could do that. What do you think? Well, because it's all about, you know, the passion and the desire, you know, I I would just not satisfied, you know, and just doing and specializing in just one area, if you will, and even though I'd say my specialty was single seaters, open wheel cars, you know, which to me are the real thing. You know, they probably the truest form of the sport, right, you know, sports cars or something that. You know, it's a derivative of sports car on the road, and stock cars are derivative again. You know, the family cartage you drive, you right, it's car, but it's different. And but I wanted to and each one is it's got its own idiosyncrasies. You know. It's not that okay, because you mastered this, you're going to be really good at that. It's not that at all. And so the curiosity factor and the challenge is what drives you and and I just love to be able to just go to another discipline and not just race, but to see if I could win there, which you know, I was lucky enough to do, being with the top teams. You pitch again, you need the equipment. You can't do it alone. You know so. And but I derived so much satisfaction out of that, quite honestly, and just give you for instance. There's nothing more specialized than stock car racing and to be able to go and they're sandbars and win at their own game. You know, it's something that stays with you, you know, forever. It stays with them too. Yeah, I mean it. Yeah, it's not receive very well. You know, you look around, if one of them would have come to Indianapolis, you know I need that, you know, tough stuff that I won. They're over over us. You know, we would I like that either. You know so. But again, going back to the personal satisfaction that I had arrived. Yeah, that was really worth while, the effort on my side and looking back, as you said, did I have to do that? Well, probably not. Do I look back and say, you know, I'm sure glad that I did. Yes, yes, and the other thing is you know, it's all about a personal but you know, personally you want to do. I hear so many stories about, you know, some drivers, top drivers, are asked why don't you, you know, venture into this and that and and you know, many said. Well, you know, some said I don't need to do that. Others, you know, which is perfectly okay. Other said, well, you know, in my contract, you know, would not allow me to do that. Well, none of my contracts allowed me to do that. You know, I had, you know, specific contract like you know, whether it was in Formula One, even, for instance, Formula One when I had my contract. You know, contract said I cannot drive anywhhere else. Well, I did while I was in form how I drove indie cars in between and...

I drove, I even Iraq stock cars. And I remember we were at a test in and silverstone in England and we had no race following weekend and Formula One and and Colin Chapman says, what are you going to do this weekness? Well, I'm going to be racing in the states. I was riding for Roger Pensky and Indie cars, right, and it says, Mari, calm do that. I said, I know but I will. You know, we in the contracts specifically. You know, it was a breach of contract. So what the hell was it going to do? Just fire me, you know what I mean. So and I did it. And whenever we, you know, we did negotiated a contract, that clause was always there everywhere, wherever I had a contract. You can do and I never argued as I keep it in there. You know I'm going to do what I want anyway. So, okay, but you build up a little bit of leverage. Yeah, I think. Yeah, a little bit of you know, if you know you got a little okay, what are you going to fire me? You know? Yeah, what I mean. So you take advantage of the position that you're in, and so there you go. You know, that's the way I dealt with my situation and I don't know if anybody else you know, I'm sure others could do that if they really wanted to. That's what I'm saying. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston bottoventure hotel and sweets and enjoy breakfast for two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles started every day with a hearty meal to kickstart your morning enjoy breakfast for two on us for each day you stay for reservations. Be sure the Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservations at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LA xbw or call one eight hundred two to eight ninety two hundred and ninety and asked for Promotional Code S for B. What was the moment when you felt you know what, I think I've almost realized my dream here, that I've hit it big. Like when did you feel like you were the name in racing? Like, was there a particular race that occurred or a win that happened? Well, I don't think I ever felt that I was the men in racing, but I felt that I've belonged mainly. And when I think there was, it was a one race that I remember. I was in one thousand nine hundred and sixty three. There was a Labor Day where I want three features in one day. Was Two features. It was slater was supposed to was in a midget and was it with the top midget drivers of the Times here DC and it was a race. It in Flementon New Jersey, and one in hats field and to Venia afternoon and Mond in the evening. And I want a heat race at a match race and a feature a clean house and then that. Then there was a third feature after the the the Hatfield race, because it was a rain now feature from the weeks before. So I want that as well. And I remember on when I was on a cool down lap, the announcer, which was a gab a name of Christ econom acky. He was like the God in a sense of really, you only what it called a spaceport news, which was the Bible of our racing right, and you know, I few were recognized by him. You know, then somewhat, you know you must have done something. You do something, averaging part and and I remember forever, even through my helmet, I heard said we had a shrilling voice in this and Mario, you just want the ticket to the big time. You know, he just said something that you know, you know, that sounded really good to me. Yeah, I can imagine. That's really you know, moments like that's bigger. You know, I beat some pretty good dudes today, you know, and then maybe have belong here and right said, reinforcement that it gives you. You know, that like a confidence level type of thing and it's all about that when and when you win, you win how you win, you know. You know that if you beat one of the very top teams, you know darn well you had done something right. Yeah, I can imagine in the sport here again, almost every decade he's got that guy, that guy. That's the yard stick, right. And and you know when I broke into indy cars, you know, didn't run by the nineteen sixty five as a rookie. Who was the guy that was? Really was five years older than me. So established. Was AJFOID. So if you beat him...

...and he finished second, that was a good day. That was a really good day. I did that in Formula One. Three years later, when I did my very first Formula One was my debut at the US Grand Prix with Lotus, who was the guy to beat? Was Jackie Stewart. You know, it was gurn world champion, and he was really again, the yard stick. Who did I bet for pole? I was a first race. I was on Pole Jackie Stewart. When I want my very first Formula One race in South Africa for Ferri, nineteen seventy one. Who finished second to me? Jackie Stewart, those are the moments, you know, where you figure I belong here, you know right, and it gives you that feeling that is impossibly even to explain, if you know what I mean. They said God's been good to me, type of thing. That's what it is, right, and you set it before. You have to have a good team with you, like even though you do the work. You know, as we play football and you see the quarterback on the field, there's coaches, there's equipment managers, there's trainers, there's all this goes with you and I'm sure that you have always had a good team around you, because you could tell them something about that's going on with that car and they can instantly fix it. But team, team, you're you know, a lot of people don't realize how much of a team sport it is, because you're basically is a driver. You're the quarterback. But unless you got you know, you know good defense and good you know, guys that protect you when you're in a pocket and through all the right thing. You know that right, you can't perform. You know. So it's a team that gets it done. And and in our sport it's not just that drives our guys around you. But it's also how do they prepare that car right? And you know that car, the car is the way I looked at the race guys like like a beast that can actually hurt you, you know, and and you're basically the trainer to you know, you got to make that best that can kill you, to make a Perr right and get that beast to sort of a respond to your command. And it's all of those factors. And how do you derive that? By having an engineer the really understands your style, understands, you know, your input and and be able to because the race cars and machine of a thousand adjustments. Yeah, it's all about, you know, just everything to your style, get the balance of the car that actually compliment your style of driving. And it's it's very complicated, believe me. Sure again, it's just that's a labor of love, for one thing, but it's also do you have the right people around you, people that really understand what you need is a driver to be able to give it, to perform your best. So, and it's a constant. I mean you never arrived, you never really have all the answers, because technology is sort of it's a moving situation. You know, it's you always learned something new and and I've been going through it like the decades, you know, where so much development was happening in a car, which is fascinating, you know, when I look back, we know so much today, but you know, we didn't have computers until like the mid S, right. You know, we were the first indy car actually to be instrumented, you know, to give with a computer, to give, you know, back information. Oh yeah, that would be if we never knew before we had you know, I did the first test at the proving grounds are in Romeo mission with telemetry and it's all now I can just write but a number on it. This is what it felt like in this is why I felt the way it did, you know. Now everybody knows that. You know, and but it's, like I said, it's a fascinating process, you know, but you got to stay on top of it. I'll tell you what. You sleep too late, one day your one day behind. Right. When did? When did the headsets come in? That you know you would somebody would be telling you what's going on ahead. You could talk back to them. When did that all start for you? Well, it's all about all these things that could have happened before they they were not allowed. Okay's by rules, you know. It's I think in many ways has to be controlled by rules, because otherwise it would be so lopsided, because there's always somebody that's got, you know, the better idea. So there's a specific rule book that they used to be this thick. Na's that thick right, you know, to be able to control and give you a relativity level plane field, you know. And so we we were back in at late s already...

...we had radio contact, like whenever I come in engineer with again, and we could talk properly. Otherwise, you know, through the helmet, communicate. But you we were not allowed to have communication while driving. So everything was on the board, you know, when you go by, you can only get information months a lap, which which was equal for everyone. And then, I think, for reasons of safety, then they thought, you know, that we should drivers should have communication because the least something happened in front that you know, you could immediately could get all warning, turn to or whatever, turn eight, whatever, you are right, incident, whatever. So it was because not because of performer, because of safety that was implemented and then of course. Now you know it's it's a normal thing. You know the proper communications, but you know the fact that everybody has a communication doesn't give you an advantage. What I'm saying right. So I was when there was no communication. Everybody was a you know, I had an equal right that US, and the same thing today. So, but it's all about again in the sport, as you regulated to make things controlled. So again you can do more with less, if you know what I mean. Even the engineers, they in so many ways that keep their hands tied, you know, because otherwise you could today, with the knowledge we have, you could have a car to Darnier, you know, all you have to do the steering, you know, and I feel anything. And so they're trying to keep everything as a sport, to keep it in the hands of the driver. So I give you, for instance, you know there's that to keep balance of the car. You know, you have adjustments from the front wings. We have wings and all that, and you could have all that, you know, on the steering wheel and everything. But now they're not allowed. You have to do have it. So the mechanics have to do it manually and I remember I used to get like emails and so forth. You know from the engineers this and Mario, you know, I know. I could have used to give me a wiring thing. You know this is that. You could do this, you know this and that as no, you can't do it and we're not allowed. I know what maybe, but we're not allowed. So there are many restrictions, which is good. Like any cars, Formula One, you know, you could have, you know, traction control for Asus. No, they're not allowed. You see what I mean. So that's the driver. figure out how to get the grip, you know, and you know, and and connect, you know, without will spend type of things. So that's the way the sport is regulating. Right. I'm thinking from the perspective of like a casual racing fan. Of many people don't appreciate the physical and mental and erction these guys go through. Like more, what's it like like the day after the Indi five hundred, like, how do you feel mentally, physically, assuming like there's no accident, just what's that? What's that like? Well, you know, each race almost is different because there are so many factors. It's even ambient temperature as a factor. You know, it could be a cool day you're much cooler, because the heat is a big enemy, you know, on a race car, whether the car is it's an open cockpit or closed cockpit, and and so that in itself is a factor. As far as you're fatigue, you know, throughout the race, there's some races, some road races, they are more physical than Indianapolis, even Theianapolis, you know, as a longer race for a hundred miles. So each track has its own you know, obviously called it qualities or right even the syncrasies and the competition of that day, the way you had to fight the car, for instance. You know, sometimes if your car, you know, is pretty well balanced the way you really want, you're much more relaxed. There are other times when the car means giving your fits and you're on top of that, you know, every second. There's so many factors that can determine you know what kind of day you're going to have. There's some days, some race, especially long this is races. I remember six, seven, we want that twelve hours the sea bring. I mean, I was as spent as I ever been in my life, you know, after that race. And because, why? Because it was really acceptionally hot day and and they because a lot of wind and with a lot of our air intakes got...

...plugged up, you know, but with debris and so forth on the track throughout the race and Bruce Mclaren and I were just done, done back. When I came home, my mother looked at me, she started crying because that's is we're in my head and like an inch. Yeah, just just one of those things. And you know, I'm not a big guy physically, but it's some you know, weekends, you know, throughout the week and I've lost as much as five six pounds of you know, when you're when you're sweat. Yeah, what are you know? You know. So, so it's that kind of well, it's interesting. I have a I have a friend in Washington, dcee, who does sweat testing and they did it on rally, Rally car drivers, and they had two brothers that were kind of, you know, same age, kind of like you and your brother would have been, and they both drove for twelve hours same car in a rally and the one brother got out and he couldn't even move. They had a carryamo out of the car and the other brother, after twelve hours, got on he could just walk right away. So they what they learned was they put all these patches all over in the one brother was sweating so much more than the other brother and it just fatigued right so that he does all this testing, because they work with the military for the pilots and everything like that, because that's the last place when you're flying and fone fighter or something and you know and you go down because you're dehydrated. Well, it's an individual thing, as you can imagine. Even again, how you prepare for a number one, but also what are you dealing with to write and how do you react to that? And it's all it's about, even wasted energy. At times, I found myself, you know, sometime I'm you know, I got a long way to go. Better start relaxing a little that you start, you know, and you be surprised, you know, how much you can, you know, recoup yourself out of potential disaster. You know, I just but that's, you know, okay, I'll be fine. You know this type of thing and their situation like that. Yes, mad many did you have like a pregame meal that you often had the same thing, like a ritual, or was that a random thing? Or, like I try to do a lot of the same things. Yes, you know, and I think it's very important to have your you know, your body train at the something that you know works. You know, a lot of people like to have a really heavy meal, and so I couldn't, couldn't deal with that because I think, you know, when your body is concentrate on the digestion and taking a lot of the energy out of your brain. And so far, so I was. I thought that I was put light. I mean that the night before and everything else, I have, you know, obviously good, you know, proper meal, but but like it before the race. So I had a fairly light meal, you know. So I felt probably at best myself. So it's a personal thing, right, right. So we want to make sure we thank all of our fans for joining us here on huddle up and and if they get a chance to go out to the La Bonaventure Hotel and and enjoy that. So, Dave, one day we're going to get to go to the La Bonaventure Weston Bonaventure. I can't we keep talking about it, but if we know yet, you gotta go. But yeah, but so, Mario, one of the things is to is that your family is all involved in raising your sons, your grandson. So tell us how that is. Like that that I know one of your sons had a crash. I think all three of you were in a race at the same time. You craft. Your Son Jeff was at the crash and Michael Almost won. So that, like you guys, have been through this as a whole family. Well, we have for sure, and here again always say I'll do an I started this mess, you know, is between here and I. We have, you know, basically four guys on each side, or dudes on his side, that pursue this and you know the would various degree of this success, if you will you know. But again, it's been sort of the family business, if you will, and something we certainly understand, you know, about each other. There's so much we we obviously are thankful for in many ways. And and again, I don't know if there's any more pride and that, as far as you know, if you're a parent and then you have your own kids, you know, pursue a career, something that that there's been your life. It's complemented itself. You know, it's something we understand. It's a double edge sword, as you can imagine. You know, because of the safety fact or something that, you know, I look back at. You know, how important to have the proper family life. You know what they would my wife, supportive as she was, and some of the...

...things that she don't didn't always agree with, you know, but she knew that, you know, she could not contest our desires and so forth, and she went along with a lot of things that probably a lot of parents, you know, would say absolutely not, you know, but just because you knew, I'm important, there was to us, you know, she just she was there supporting it and and it meant so much, I mean, to the clarity of of our approach to things. And so there's so many other factors in a family that the play very positive way, you know, and us being able to do what we love, and we have our gals. You know, my daughter was obviously pursued what she wanted and you're a hundred percent behind her. So it's all about the family operating together, having the fundamental love. You know, that is very important and and again. But you know a fact that, as you said, is a family. I had the events where there were four of us for Andready's in Indianapolis, five hundred in ninety one and ninety two also competing, which it never happened. Never been four members of the same family before or since. You know. So it's a matter of pride. They've been full podium, you know, of and Reading Center right ninety one in the Milwaukee, you know, and Michael Finish First, my nephew John's second. I was third. I remember one thousand nine hundred and eighty six at the poking of five hundred. It was a supporting race. They're like the call they like the indie lights. And my younger son Jeff was in that race and Michael and I were in a five hundred and jeff was so pulled for the his race in one is race. Michael was on pull for the five hundred and I wonder five hundred between the three of us. We Clean House. Not that wow, you know. Do we celebrate that evening? Yes, you can imagine. Now you know that Michael and I were on podium in an indy car race fifteen times. Wow, and we were. We started first a second ten times or on the front row and we were one to five times. Wow, the second five times. Then it's amazing. If father and the son or is a family. You know, you can't plan it. You can't even plan that. It just either happens or a dozen. So when we look back as what the sport is done for us, we count our blessings every day. So how does that work? Because I'm a father, I have three kids in college. Dave's a father. So if you and your son are going one and two down, just stretched, you let up a little bit and you say, all right, I'm going to make you try and beat me. How does that work? I got I would know. I'm just having no mercy on my kids. It's like, okay, I'm going to win this, No mercy, I love it, I'm going to be for instance, it was any six in a Portland, Oregon wheren pret there and my son Michael was leading the race and it was I was his second. There's no way I could have caught him. And I was about three laps from the end. He started having some fuel pickup problems and my engineer screaming and my says Michael's Amas some few pickup problem. I could't even see him. It was that far in front of me right and we're coming down to the finish line, to the last of the dragged down the straight away. I beat him but like two inches. And I have a photos and and and my wife, you know, and obviously it was a very quiet on the way back. Yeah, play and my wife says, Mario, I mean he's your old son. Why didn't you? I say, you kidding? You know, I know that kind of a thing. Is that your that your screen favor on your phone so that when he calls it just comes up? Yeah, the other one was I remember the very first time that he made a competitive pass on me. There was it the meadowlands Grand Prix. You know, I was around the stame. Would like a road course, you know, very tight event. Was An indy car race and as a very first time that he made it competitive pass on me. And and Michael was just kind of nudging. mean, that's me. Funny went by me and if little as well. That's my boy, you know. I mean, yeah, to me this kind of almost pushed me out of the way. Yeah, and is disappair going to the sounds and well, that's my boy. Yeah, that's awesome. One of the things...

I read about was when you retired you had a lot of kind of issues with your health and one of the things that I thought was familiar, that he was making his transition from racing an adrenaline and fast and all of a sudden it's slowed way down. And one of the things I read was that you went to your doctor and you said, well, doc, here's what I was doing and now here's what I'm doing, and can you tell us a little bit what he what he said to you, like why were you were having them? Yeah, I was there in the interesting yeah, I was having some issues and and it came down to I was at the University of Pennsylvania and and there was, you know, the doctors just configure it out, you know it basically, you know, as we were talking, then finally, when he realized you know what you know, my job was to know what I was doing, he says, I see what's happening. He says your body thinks you're dead, you know, because you'd lived on land and all your adult life and now, you know, you just change your life so dramatically, so quickly that you know your body does is confused. They don't know what and he says it's probably going to take a couple of years, you know, for you to get back and you know and somewhere and something that understood. And and and what happened is after I retired officially and then I did three races at twenty four hours or Laman and so forth, and as soon as I got back in a race car, all of a sudden, man, I like I was reborn. Everything just amazing, amaze that sent man, this is my element, right, but I need and that all of a sudden we realize I'm okay, I'm not going to die after all. You know. And Yeah, it's amazing. It was. It really actually was. I was it was a tough where I was very, very concerned, you know, right, because I say you know, physically I was always on the shape. All of a sudden as some breeding problems, so on and so forth. I don't have asked my for right, but you know, my body just was trying to figure out, what the Hell is this guy doing now, you know. And so again, I don't know if it's going to be, you know, in a medical journal, but yeah, but it's amazing happened to me. We hear that a lot with coaches and people who've worked in the same job and position for a long time and then they retire and it's like they've lost themselves and you know, things happen that way then. So it's pretty interesting that when you got back in that car you just the adrenaline kick back in. You felt great. So one of the last things we like to do here is called the no huddle, where we ask you a bunch of questions and we fire match you and you can give us some great answers, which we would appreciate, and I do a little intro for that. So and then we'll be we'll be done with the show and we really appreciate you coming on. So they we're going to get into no huddle here. Thanks for all of our fans for joining us on hudle up with gusts. They can catch us on Radiocom or go to the sports circus and watch US under the big talk top with sow the ring master on amp TV. So we're going to get in the no huddle with Mario here, Dave, and I think this is going to be some interesting questions you have for him today. So won't you thank to me? Yeah, far away, okay, right, so neat for speed murb that. Okay, all right, Mario. What's your biggest pet peeve? From other drivers. And we can say if you're driving to the mall, not necessarily on the indy five hundred, but like anywhere you're driving. What's a big pet peeve? Big One is anywhere. Well, on, especially on that duel dual lane highway, you know, when people are just oblivious. So what's going on around him, and they're on the leg, on the left lane, and if forced, you know, faster traffic, you know, to my pass and do stupid things, you know, on the right, then you go buy him and then out there, you know, either on the phone or just stay not they dreaming and people don't realize that actually some of the people that are slower on the road are more dangerous than the ones that are a little bit faster, quite honestly, no doubt. And so that's a big pet peeve of mind. Yes, they don't realize Mario and dread, he's behind them either. Right, that's right. Yeah, like I would make seeming to really hot. I don't want to do I don't want to pass anybody on the right, I don't want to do anything. And what it doing right, you know, and there's some people, you know, they just feel that okay, I'm going to speed limit. Well, let the police worry about that. If that that is you know. But you know, if you're in Europe, you drive that this there's a whole different discipline, you know, and driving there when you know, if if you're not past you some months, stay on the right side. You know, I let people go buy you and and everything is so much safer. Well, Mare, I know you have your where you can take a fan with you. I think it's in your indie car or formula winter. Yes, yeah, so if you ever need an extra driver, I wrote home with my wife on the turnpike yesterday and...

I was saying a lot of prayers and watching her do pass the cars on the right side and and she's you know, she probably could fill in for you if you really needed an extra driver sometime. Okay, that's good. She's super fast. But if you had a look at racing today and all the different types of cars, would you prefer an American car or an Italian car? Well, that's a good question. There all depends really whether you're going going to be able to go out there and and going to back road and let your hair down a little bit. But you could still do it in a corvette or right, though you know it's it's just whatever language you speaking, quite honestly. Right, that's been both. I like both. Yeah, I hear. Ye, I'm sure you have both both of those cars ours as well. Right, Mario, who's your most respected foe? My respect of fellow? No foe like who went at all the mistrespectful. Quite quite honestly, I cannot give you just one because of my long career. You know, I've had several that sometimes even, you know, outside of the cockpit. We didn't really seeattle, I didn't get alone it kind of there was a rivalry that it was not the you know, with smiles and everything else, but later on, I think is life goes on. We became very good friends anyway. But I've had many and I don't want to mention because I'm afraid I'm going to leave out, you know, one or two. They're very important, so I'm going to leave it at that. All right. Well, I know you have a winery. Are you a Pino or cab guy? Basically cab. Yeah, I like cab. That's my favorite. You know the red wines, but you know it's a cab Marlowe sand of Aza that type of thing. So if day but and I are going to go to the the PA wine and liquor store, what on Dretti wine or we or should we look for and pick up cab? Cab. All right, Dave, we're start check it out. Sound as okay. Um, Mario, have you ever had a speeding ticket? I knew you were going to go there. You know. No, yes, no, it's been so long I can't even remember. You know, and quite honestly, I'm not saying, Mario, you know, but I've been fortunate. I've been stopped, you know, but because I don't drive recklessly, I've been let go and and you know police, usually they're good, they're good dudes, right and they understand. And if I would have been reckless, right and putting somebody in danger, that I would deserve, you know, a citation. But I haven't had a station since one thousand nine hundred and sixty eight, and even then I beat that one. Yeah, it wasn't right. Well, that's good. Okay. So if you had to go back and look at your whole career and you had to go back and tell young Mario and drenny when he was in Lucca, Italy, what would be the one thing you would go back and tell him? Well, number one, pursue, pursue your your your passion, I mean, and don't give up on your dreams. If you really really have that burning desire to accomplish something, don't give up. And it's always going to be some robe blocks and glitches here and there. I saidbody, if you really believe in what you're doing, pursue it. It's going to happen somehow and and I really am a great believer of that. It's happened to me and that's what I would advise. Awesome, Mario. Now there's a lot of people that would want to trade places with you for a day, but if you could trade places with anyone on earth any period of time, for one day, who would that be? Probably won't you guys, you know, would be pretty right. Yeah, yeah, if the dogs are earlier, that was pretty fun and it's change laundry. That was me. Yeah, all right. So we know your Italian, we know you love to cook and I've seen that you said that I would make you would probably make bill chops if you're making a special dinner. But what else? What would be Dave and I were coming over. What were what would be the menu for tonight? I don't know. I mean I my daughter does all of that cooking...

...and I'd go back and have some Yokei but then brown sauce and yo key. You know, it died. I don't hoe potatoes done properly, and that was a, you know, one of the delicacies, one of the meals that we enjoy so much, you know, and my daughter still has my mother's recipes and and that's what I would have for you guys. I couldn't, I couldn't imagine your parents going to Italian restaurant when you guys came over here and just being like, we can't ever go out to eat, we have to stay at home. Like if your dad didn't like the hamburgers, he wasn't going to like anything else. It is the case. That the case. Did you have a favorite racer today? Racer today? Now there're too many. I have many, too many disciplines and I follow all of them. You do maybe a lot of good answers, but that's a fact. You know, you're being very diplomatic. Yes, yeah, okay, so there's so there are so many different disciplines. Now, did you ever do a drag race? I did that one exhibition drag race in Hartford, Connecticut back in sixty eight and one three. I went three out of five against the national champion as far as exhibition did you like that? Well, I like that, but that was not my that was not really my cup of tea. Yeah, how did that go over you? You're racing the national champion, you've never done it before and you win three out of five. was a friendly over very well. Know Me, though. Yeah, well, he I think it went back to him saying he liked to go to other sports, you know, in the same field, and just say hey, I'm going to come and win that, I'm going to go and leave like your mind everywhere. Yes, yeah, so, Mario, we really appreciate you joining us in the huddle. It was an amazing, amazing journey through your life and thank you for sharing everything with us. Thank you for having your show. Thanks, guys. All right, thank you. Take Care of day. Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shaped to life. As always, I'm joined to find my great friend and Co host, Dave Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with us and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (166)