Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 3 years ago

Larry Richert

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

One of Pittsburgh's most recognizable figures, Larry Richert joins the huddle. Larry talks; narrating the Steelers' highlight films, working with the legend Bill Hillgrove, and the day Bruno Mars met Bruno Sammartino. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I am former NFL quarterback, gusts frau. I played quarterback fifteen years in the NFL. This is my show called huddle up with gusts. Each week I team up with my longtime friend Dave Hagar, and we talked with guests about how sports shape their lives. Pro Athletes, business executives, community leaders, everyone has a story to tell about sports. We invite you to huddle up with gusts this week in the huddle. Joining us in the huddle this week is a Pittsburgh icon, growing up in Millville and graduating from north allegheny high school and Clearing University. Chances Are you've heard him on Kitty K bring us the morning news, or as the voice of countless commercials. He has served as a master of ceremonies for over a hundred charities, graced us with his skills as a PA announcer at hindesfield and has been the voice of the steelers for NFL films during the past seven years. This lifelong resident of the Burg is also a writer and producer of films and documentaries and close friend of the late Bruno Sam Martino. Dan Marino's lucky to call him his brother in law. Please welcome into the huddle, Larry Richard. Thanks for coming back on the huddle with us. Huddle up with Guss. We got another special guests, Longtime Pittsburgh personality. Everyone knows them. He's more famous than I think anybody has ever grew up in Pittsburgh. But welcome to the show today, Larry. Thanks for joining us into huddle. How are you doing? Mostly heard and not see. No, I don't know. I don't know. Know that I you know what I get. I did ten years of TV weather, so that was Katie Kay TV in the evening. So sometimes I was maybe the last thing people saw before they went to bed. But it's not glamorous to be on TV when you're the weather going because nobody's happy, right if family's not happy. One time this little woman in the mall says you ruin them. My thought as a wedding and I said what happened? She said at the rain. I said when was that? She said last Saturday. I said, well, that's what we said was going to get you. Yeah, but you'll never right. You're right, you wrong. So right. But I thought that was a good thing about being a weather man like you. Didn't have to be right. The upside is you can only be half right and stay employed. Right too many job you can't be a CPA right. Can't work in a bank or Corporate America. So, although I think my completion percentage is around fifty percent, but I played for fifteen years. Man, it was fun. It was fun to watch you play and we always root for the hometown guys. I mean it's not easy to be in the League and play at that level, with that position for as long as you play now. It was a lot of fun and coming from a little town for city and you know the famous people from that area. Yeah, there's a quite a few. You know we've had a quite a few water up there. What is I don't know. I think it's just the water in Pittsburgh. You know, whether it's the alleghany or the man, I don't know. That's I mean there's a whole book Britten not I think, but all the quarterbacks western Pennsylvania. You know we're kind of rich with that. But people will recogniz Nice me because it's been a while since I've been on TV every night, so they're not sure if it's me or John Burnette, who just retire right, or John M way, you know people or they just think I'm familiar in a lot of times people will say you'll look like somebody. Right, well, that's everybody Pittsburgh says that. Yeah, but if they hear me, they probably have heard maybe in past, with my voice. You are one of the most recognizable people in Pittsburgh. I mean I just googling you. I mean there's a ton of picture pictures come up because you do so much charity work. I mean, I think what it's? How many did you do last year? Probably Sixty seven. Yeah, whether you're the keynote or you're the you know, all those chair or whatever it is. When I was the weather guy, people would invite you because you're on TV. They want you to bring the camera to cover their event, which I yeah, right, we get right. So it wasn't even necessarily they think you're so special, but if you bring the camera you give them some notoriety. We did these things called a little hometown salute. So we do the weather. I remember those. Yeah, and we go to, you know, the Ford City Fire Hall. Right, that's a salute. Yeah, city, and people seem to like that. But, as you know, this is a small town, big city in the sense that all the charity and you move through those circles you end up mean a lot of great people whose heart on the right place. They're trying to do good things, and so over time you just network and then you know the price is right because it's charity. I do it gratis because I think I should. And so people say, Hey, if you go to one, then there's another. Well, it's it's also Katie K page. You really well, they do a good quarterback story for you. So Joe Nameth? Yeah, so one time I got to play golf with Joe and Florida. Didn't know he was going to be there. Got There and Joe drove the cart. Oh, and I I sit in the car.

I'm like this is pretty cool. So name with right and as we're taken off of the first hole he goes. So, Larry, see it work for living? Are you just rich? I go till I work in Pittsburgh at Katie K goes. An answer supposed the Good Joe Davis Story. I also golf with Johnny and IAS. I did this because a charity. So we did this Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Event and they had brought in Johnny and Idas and Johnny and Ias was going to be the Keyno and I did a live shot for TV where he threw me a pass. Right, I got a pass from Johnny and I is. I'm sure many right asked you to do the same thing over the years. So I didn't know who I was golfing with. That I didn't care, right, and then I look I see Johnny and ice golf bag on a golf cart and then I see mine next to it. I'm like Nah, Somebody's messing with me, right, and then, sure enough, I got to play around a Gulf with Johnny and iis and hear these great stories. Oh Yeah, about Don Shula and because he was the bald worm, right, you know colts, he was there coach, and so it was fascinating to hear you know, John Yeah, talk about that in the steelers and how that's yeah, those are times. They you can never get an interview. You know, he would never tell you that stuff if you interviewed them on there and anything. But in that play, the more you were lax. Yeah, and it had a few drinks, but afterwards. So they had also invited Greg Lloyd. Oh really, steelers famed linebacker. Yeah, certainly disposition and he was still playing. And we were at the table at the dinner afterwards and it got a little hated because they were arguing about the modern defense against you know, Oh yeah, school offense, and well, our guys, you know, they it was fun. They were going back and forth. Fly On, just just listen to that. I didn't want to be in the Middle Right, let's keep me on the side. But you know, you have an amazing story. I mean you were born in Millville right, you know, and which is a little little town right next to Pittsburgh on the allegheny river. And so I say I'm a river rat. Yeah, from the north side. He's from the north side. And where did you after mill you didn't live live there, though. You know, you grew up in I grew up in mccandlestown right, which is in the footprint of North allegheny, which wasn't as big as it is today. You know, they called right North alleghanny. But my dad got a job selling chevies at Beryl Chevrolet on the flats and Wexbury, Oh wow, which back then was like the Northwest Territories, moving my mom these, the city girl yeah, where you could walk to the butcher's shop when the yeah, to the edge of North Park, which literally lose nothing there, then probably. Yeah, and she didn't drive. She didn't. So I actually remember. I have three brothers, number three of five children, my sisters the youngest. I remember my dad with three of us in the backseat, no seat belts, in a bench seat, bouncing off the walls, my mother driving and him trying to teach it. Terrifying Times. So, so you had quite a bit you had, but for siblings. Ere One of five. Right. So how big a part of your life of sports when you were growing up? Every day, I mean we played UN organized sports in the backyard, whiffleball, football, basketball, not so much me basketball for obvious reasons. I was no spud web right, but the whole neighborhood looks so. My Dad worked Saturdays at the dealership. So every Saturday morning, especially in the spring and summer. Yeah, my mom was so aggravated at the breakfast table. She tell us to get out, don't come back to, don't come back to your dad gets home and you hear the whistle in the porch. Yeah, so we'd be in the neighborhood and you know how you play with the older kids are younger kids. You all kind of worked it out. Yeah, it was always wrapped around sports. It was always and I played little league baseball and then I played ice hockey. I did play two years of Grade School football at sat pursula. I was a viking really, and I like to tell the story that I took the angle of pursuit to avoid contact problems. I was on defense. Yeah, I didn't like so as running backs running. You're trying to catch him, but your angle wasn't quite quite right. We had this old school military guys, a coach who didn't have a kid in the program. Weren't they all old school military guys back there minute yell and I got I was I was intimidated by that and I didn't like getting hit. You did that all those years because everyone did. Meets you in a football fields trying to take her yeah, you know, and we don't get to hit anyone right, just terrible, right. You know, a lot...

...of pain up aggression. There is, there is. I feel bad for my wife all those years. But you know, when you talk about old school military, like my wife's father, Harry, was my high school football coach and Harry was like that, right, because his coach was like that. And then there came to a point to where all that kind of changed and it's crazy, crazy, you know, be and and, but all the sports, like all the things you just talked about, I've grown up going in the backyard all the picking up football games or basketball, whiffleball. My Dad used to bring home felt and we make felt balls and he's a broomstick and play whatever it was. Kids can't laugh because it sounds so aniquated now because they're all playing electronics, three dimension so much. You know. Yeah, I know, I've, I feel like, but you can't get them to experience what you did. You can't take them back, so you kind of have to work with where they are now. And now in sports it's a lot different. But I used to be more of the announcer. Right, we play, but now that right. You know what was really cool? You can always had that in a way, yeah, without even realizing it. And I had bill Mazeroski's number on because he was still playing then. Yeah, and he was kind of like childhood baseball hero, Him and Roberto Clemente. Yeah, I know you're involved in you know, our twenty one, which is very cool. And so I was living in that era and I remember to This Day my dad taking me and my brothers to Forbes field as little kids and see that field for the first time with the lights and smell the popcorn and the hot yeah, you know, just a whole atmosphere. Was Absolute Magic to be there at that game. And then my dad sometimes in the summer nights he'd set the back porch. Yeah, had a pony bottle of irons city. Yeah, and the pirate came on. Yew. So even to this day I'll listen because I get up so early for my right. Yeah, for your show. I still think baseball and the radio has a place because you make it all up in your own mind. What's going on? Yeah, those guys. Yeah, use your imagination. Broadcast team here so good and you just kind of drift off on a summer night. So you'll lay back and hear that here's the pitch. That that's a great story. So did you carry on like so? You were like me. Were replayed all kind of sports as youth and some of them were organized, most of them weren't, you know. I mean I can remember going up to the lettup elementary high school or the elementary school, and they had the eight foot hoops. I guess. Tell you many guys showed up and played basketball. They're just for fun. We get all done. Imagine that. Yeah, planning for fun. Yeah, but and so then you go on too high school. You play sports and high played high school hockey. I was a goalie for most of my career. You were goalie. Yeah, and for someone who did like to get hit playing football, somehow it felt right to play goalie, which is interesting. I used to play up at Kittanning, the Belmont, yea, Bel Monerna. Yeah, yeah, so there. I still know Larry Oh. Really played against some of the guys up there and they were good team then. So who was your idol when you were in Icelake? You, I mean, if you're playing goalie, had to have a favorite, you know, as far as the goalies go. But wasn't so much the goalies, but I really like bobby you or the Boston ruin. As far as the penguins, Pierre Larouche. Yeah, you know, he was a rookie. He was young, flashy. All the ladies Love Them. Scored like fifty goals a hundred points. Yeah, everybody wanted to be like Pierre and then the old school guys were like John Prone, of though, great players, and the penguins had some decent teams then. Yeah, so you went to North Allegheny, north aalley plade hawk. It's a big how big was the school then? And it's I think I graduated with eight hundred sixty kids in my graduating class, so that's a big school. And then I went to Clarion. I didn't pursue sports, I pursued the radio and TV side. So that's how I treated. You do some of that in high school. When I was a senior, we were only the second year in North Alley any high school. They had put it color television studio in but they didn't know exactly what they were going to do with it right. So they had twelve kids in a pilot program to go through the process of learning the ropes and making a little TV production. So they made little three to five minute pieces and you were a different crew member on everybody else's project. So you would write and then you would be the camera person, audio and so on, and then I did one. Back then they had a smoking lounge in high school and high school. High School for two years, which seems absolutely my wattling a bunker. So I did kind of min little sixty minutes piece. Was Smoking...

...in school. Is that a solved problem now? That right. So I narrated it. So they showed these to the school board, kind of here's what we're doing with this money. You spent three and they played my tape and someone said, well, I thought this was for the kids, and someone said it is for the kids. He goes, well, who's that guy narrate, which that little bit of encouragement gave me enough of an incentive to where I thought, well, maybe I should pursue that. Right, you never know where it's coming from. Well, what did your parents and your family think like today? They kind of push you that direction because, you know, my dad was big on he never got to he went to do cane for a semester but then you know, right, he's didn't have the money of the time to go through college. He was big on telling us you got to get an education. Might have same way options. You just going to give yourself more options. So he said follow your passion. If you're passionate about something, you're going to put the effort in. If you're putting the effort in, you're going to have some degree of success. Don't worry about the money, don't, because even if you don't make a lot of money, you'll be doing something you love. Right. So that was kind of the incentive for me to, you know, pursue that, because I got some positive feedback, yes, that that would be great to be in radio and TV, and on our mirror he was always very positive and he put those Dinah labeler, little stickers. It was yeah, positive attitude, enthusiasm, SELFDISC wow, set your goals, which everybody laughed at. But you know, here I am, how many years later, I can tell exactly what they said. So some of it stuck. Yeah, and then I did love radio and TV, and so I'm I didn't think I'd be able to make a living at it. And you you chose Claire Because I had a program in that my buddy who was in that same program in high school, who's a football player and a he he went to clarion a year ahead of me because I stayed home to work. I write as a partsman in a foreign car place to make money to go to school. Okay, I had to buy a little extreme. You took a year off. Yeah, he went up, he goes this radio stuff is great, you know. So I didn't do a fraternity or any of that. Was My fits, right. So we hung out at the radio station and then got into t TV. Did you do? Were you like the DJ and everything? Like a lot of times when your in terms of radio stations in college, you got to do all the when you start. Yeah, you kind of do everything. But here's the first thing. You always here a young DJ say hello everybody. Hello, everybody, man, that's funny. So who know how many people are listening to Clarion? No, yeah, I don't even think there were any. Even if people that were in the station, we weren't listening at speakers in kind of the conference room area. We had speakers out the window of the student you right, but I don't know how many people were. What Year were you at Clarion? Yes, I was. Yeah, well, seven and eighty one. Yeah, so my brother was there from seventy nine to eighty three. Yeah, he went to clarion and that's so crazy. Yeah, that's so Pittsburgh. Driving back from Clarion is actually how I found out I was kind of blind because there was like when you would come down through new Bethlem right there was across the there was a big sign up on the hill. I can't remember what it said and my mom said something and I said mom, what's that side to say? She because it's as big as that building. You can't read it. I think I can't see it. Next Day I'm at the eye doctor getting getting a big coke bottles. Yeah, out of just that's where I figured out contacts, quarterback, and then I had laces. That the TLC. Dr Witten, I'm sure you've done a commercial for them. T'll see you. Yeah, actually, my son did it. Yeah, he's a player to Kane and played in Germany and was coaching at Carnegie Mellon. Yeah, I went. Yeah, I went through high school contacts, college contacts, losing them, put them in getting right and then after my rookie year I just said I can't, I got it. I got to fix this is just miserable and it's an uncle thing. So it's it's unbelievable. So I I said, well, who do you get? You got to get somebody that's good. So, Woods Guy, that's exactly. And then actually I did some commercials for him and they did like five people, my whole family and I did. They ran some commercials in here and Washington DC. So it was kind of Nice and and it's amazing. You wake up the next morning you see the alarm clock. I can't imagine. Yeah, really would like that. It's phenomenal and it's way less expensive than it used to be, but it is. It is a miracle. Is Quick. Yeah,...

I really don't understand why it's not covered by insurance, because it's like something that can it's not like I'm getting a facelift or something, but it's actually can be a safety right, right, I would think that, yes, it should help your health. See, yes, so I don't know. It's crazy. So you go on a clarion. You're there for years, yes, doing the DJ the radio station the count did you call any games there? Did you go for the years of football and basketball, which on Caliperry was? Yeah, which one did you like better? Football? Basketball? I like to do football better because I had a better or understanding in the game basketball. I was fun too, because back then clarion was in the Naia and they were very good. Yeah, coach Joe Di Gregorio. Yeah, took us to temper arena in Kansas City for their tournament. Yeah, so it's it was their version of March madness for that level of play, and John Keliperry was there. Yeah. So, I mean, well, good things came out of that program yeah, and then football. I just I just always wanted to do that, you know, to sit there and cover football play byplay. Yeah, and it wasn't like and I took it like, okay, I'm not a player. I exclude that. The two years I played great school football doesn't qualify me to be. But I found out you don't have to be that guy for you to play by play guy. Right, the color analyst is almost always an ex player so that you can talk about, well, what they were trying to do on this play or this yeah, what develops. My job is to follow the action and set it up and I really love doing that. Well, most of the football players aren't going to be able to remember all the guys numbers and names and everything else. We just want to watch the game and talk about it, right, but that's why we're all color because we can't remember. You know, they give you the sheet, you got to study it. And listen, you know, and you would be really good at it. If anyone thinks it's easy, though, I have the greatest respect for Bill Hilgrow. No, he just completed his fifty at ear of pit football or basketball. Forty Five Year of pit football. It's amazing if you're of steelers football. And I worked with him in the mid S for four years when ironhead hayward right. I was the producer of the broadcast, so I travel with the team. I was the guy behind bill giving him the queue cards to go to the commercial breaks and did the timing of the show right then. You know, eight years ago I got a call asked to be part of the broadcast. So I'm thinking, wow, after all these years, Bill still there and do build does it at a high level. It's amazing and you know I've done it a couple times. I did three pit games played right when bills schedule didn't permit. And it's not easy. No, it makes there's no way it's easy. He makes it so effortless and smooth and his voice is so iconic. But my job now is for two hours prior to kickoff I anchor the pregame with Pat Bostick. And you know, yeah, former pit quarterback. He's the x's and knows guy. He's a pit Sabon because he's there, who works there in the bailment apartment. He loves the game still, so he provides that insight. My job is to get between segments, one place to the other and kind of build the kickoff. Then I go down to the sidelines. I'm on the field and I do the postgame interview with coach and some players, and PAT and bill participate in that. So it's kind of the perfect Combo for me because I still get to do and be a part of something I really enjoyed. I don't do it for any other reason than I love it. Right. So I'm not there, which is great, more money. I'm not there to try to use this to go somewhere else. I told coach Pat or Dousiast and I'm here strictly because I love it, and he got away. I guess you would be yeah, well, you know, it's so different than being a coach. Like if you're a coach or GM or somebody else, the Times that you get to spend in the same place are very few, you know. But doing what you do and being here as long. Yeah, you've been with Katik for how many years now? Thirty one, thirty one and then. But you can branch out two different areas around here. You've worked with Pitt, you've worked with the steelers in one thousand nine hundred and eighty five. So I believe John Facenda died in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. He's that great voice right that everybody still hears occasionally. Yeah, from all that time ago. There are twenty seven teams in Bro Right Guss for roight. He dies. So my ring Colt, the great color analyst and talk show host and writer, had Steve Saberlan from NFL films. He goes, AH, right, what are you going to do? Steve said, wow, you can't re replace John Pacnda, but we have to...

...get another narrator. So they had an open audition. So I sent a tape in. Now WTAE. I work there six years before Katiek, right in the radio side. We supply we had the rights that WTA. We had two rights to the steelers and pit at that time. Yeah, so I would feed NFL films clips, highlight radio clips of pit games or steelers Gameer. Yeahler's games yeah, in that case. And the guy there's always a Pittsburgh connection. It's names Bob Angelo. He was originally from Neville Island. He worked for NFL films. He's the guy that wrote there are two seventeen. Really, yes, and he said, why don't you send an audition? And so he said that they had a room where nobody's name was announced. They just would play a little clip of everybody who sent a tape in and you were a number and then they had their staff kind of a right when. Well, apparently I was in the top twelve he set and he goes, man, they're only taken to but you kind of got close. He says maybe you could do the steeler highlight film. I'm think I got so excited I'm like maybe. So it took couple seasons and then eventually I got to narrate the steelers highlight one thousand nine hundred and eighty five. I was just see young guy. And you talk about an out of body experience being a Pittsburgher, three river stadium in the film room where they showed the highlight film to the local media and sponsor. Yes, standing there's Art Rooney, the chief. Yeah, you know and you got to perform in front of him. I am introduced to him as this is the young man that's narrating our film, and he goes, you know, he had this yeah coake bottle lenses on and it goes, where are you from kids? Yeah, that's cigar, and I said, well, my dad's from the north side. Well, that's why you had it. You knew what to say. Yeah, and Chuck Nor was there and you know, they had just really wasn't that many years away from the four super bowls, right. So this was a out a body experience and my dad had left work to come down and watch it. You know, it's kind of ye around moment, I'm sure, when your family watched you play significant games in your life and Oh, yeah, that's it is proudly. Thing is it's big faith family football, right. You know we were kind of cut from that. Yeah, we all cut, you know, I mean it's a that's my family. We were all about football. I mean my cousin Mitch played, yeah, for many years in the NFL. I played my you know, I've had uncle's that played at Virginia and one in North Carolina. So football's been in our blood for a long time, but it is. And then, you know, had to be an alder boy, had to go to church twice a week, you know, all that stuff. So paid off. You're right, right. And family was big. My Dad with one of fifteen kids. So when you talk about family, all my big yeah, he had a big family. You know, Bruno Sam Martino. I love when you say his name. Met. Well, I love when Arnold Schwartzen because I interviewed Arnold about Bruno. Did you really Bruno Sam Martino? So thirty years ago I had a TV show in the morning on Katie K of a producer says we have Bruno Sat Martino coming on tomorrow, like Brusapartino. Me and my brother's we broke some furniture right, right, recreating something living room. My mom would come out in the back porch. It's almost on, you know, studio wrestling. Yeah, yeah, before you get Dvre, stop playing, watch it in the moment. We had to watch it and we'd run in. We get a bag of chips, French onion dip in a little seven ounce coke bottle. Yeah, that was like that was the best. So I'm like, Bruno, this is so cool. I told my fatherin law, the late Damn Marino senior. Yeah, he said, Oh, Bruno was my classmate at Shenley when he moved here from Italy. I'm like what? Turns out there from the same little town in Italy on the top of the appending mountains called Pizza Bada. Mr Marino's dad and family came from the same place, same place as Bruno. Yes, well, so he gave me all these pictures and when I told Bruno, my father in law says Hello, Oh's your father in laws said they were you no seeing. Here he goes, I went to school with him, you know. Yeah, families from the same place. So this created this thirty year relationship that I had with Bruno. We're about to release a documentary about Bruno's life, focused more on when he was eight years old, the Nazi ss came to their village and kill the third of the men, women and children and they had to run and hide even deeper into the mountains and they're already in the middle of nowhere. He survives all this, this incredible...

...story. So how does a seventy five pound, thirteen year old immigrant who can't speak the language become the strongest man in the world. Well, so we interview Arnold Schwartzenenger, because Arnold said Bruno was one of his inspirations. Wow, Bruno used to judge some of the competition. Yeah, when Arnold was coming up and he said WHO is this? Bruno Sammontino? I saw this guy keeps asking me to do this again because so they said, you've got to see him. So we go to Madison Square, God, and it's packed to the raft is in I said, Bruno Zambadino's lifting these guys three four hundred pounds overs. How is this possible? He is the star of all stars. And he said this is one of the greatest immigration stories of all time. Bruno Zambadino. That's pretty good. We went to Italy with Bruno twice, two thousand and ten to take him back to where they hit from the Nazis. Yeah, she said he would never go as very emotional, and that had to be. But it was fun because when he got out of the car and his hometown, Moses wouldn't have got a better reception. Really, it was so cool to see and people just loved him. Some people name their kids after well, so a woman comes up, but know them that they know she's grabbed him by the cheeks. You know, I made I said with it. Would she say? Oh, she said she named her son after man like Bruno. That's okay, that's amazing. And then everywhere we went, you would here, but all knows that at then, but don't know. Oh my God, he's very humble too. I mean, yeah, he just passed away last day and the outpour him and love. It's my social media. We got a picture of the Marquis and Maison Square Garden. Bruno sold out Madison Square Garden as the headliner a hundred and eighty eight times. Nobody's close building. George's had a hundred last Jesus and they put up on the Marquis Madison Square Garden. Bruno said this is the greatest arena in the world and it's it had a tribute to Bruno. So I took that picture, which we got from the WWE's t h right, and because he was a big fan to and he helped broker the piece between them and bence and got him into the hall of fame in two thousand and thirty. Yeah, which you should have been, and definitely I got sixty five thousand likes on one picture. Wow, Bruno Mars is named after Bruno Sound Really? I didn't know that. Two years ago he was here, Kevin Culbert, the steelers, Jim, Jimmy Saco, who runs the stadium facility. Yeah, you know Jimmy's connected to the music business, right, a concerts. Yeah, and so he says we should get them together. Bruno Mars is in town. Well, we did and I was with him and we went in half hour before showtime. We go into Bruno Mars dressing room and I don't know how it's going to be. Is this right get up? Yeah, you know, superstar, yeah, Ego, but no, he couldn't have been more gracious. He said he was smart. He goes, Mr Sam Martino, it's an honor to meet you. Of course. That's set the tone. Yeah, and then at one point in his career he said, I'm named after some old fat wrestler. So Bruno said, I just want you to know I'm pretty good shape. I am metiately that Bruno knew that too. was like I didn't realize. And he said when I told my dad I was going to meet you, he was over the moon and he ran and got his phone and he said. He texted me tell Bruno he's the Muhammad Ali of wrestling, Bruno. So well, that's so nice. And Bruno asked me should I bring him something? I said yeah, he probably like that for his dad. He pulled out exact replica of this championship belt to give to his dad. And this kid is rich enough to buy anything, right right. He was like his static. So we get this picture. Now the publicists wouldn't let us take two pictures, right. I think they play with this, right, but they posted on their social media. So Bruno Mars real name isn't Bruno. That was the nickname his dad game when he was in diapers, because you're my Bruno. So he chose Bruno has his stage name. And I say, well, why Mars? He goes because women think I'm out of this world. So the next day to picture and I'm texting Kevin Culbert and Jimmy sackle. I go do you see what's happening? It trended because it was Bruno Mars Globally Billboard magazine. Now Bruno's getting calls Bruno Sam Martia from the newspapers and wow, it goes around the world. It's the number one trending picture in the world. That's amazing. Bruno Meets Bruno. So I said to Bruno. Sam Martine said, champ, you're back on top of this. What do you mean? I said you're trending around the world, is what's that mean? Yeah, you had no idea. I don't think...

...he ever did a social media NITTI. I said your number one again. That was one of the cooler moments. That would be really cool. What I met him one time. The only time I got to meet him as when they had that special thing. I think you might have been there up in Mount Washington for Joe. Yeah, and he was there and talked about them, and that was the only time I've ever personally got to meet him and here him speak. It was only a few years ago. I think was like two years ago. Yeah, that was one of the last public things he did here. Yeah, and he never changed. He always looked the same to me. He so humble, so natural, so appreciative to the fans. You talked. We were talking before we came on about autographs different SOMEODI's handle it differently. He would stay until the end. If there were a thousand people, he would stay and he said to me. Why wouldn't I? He said, it's because of these people that I was able to do what I did all those years. I didn't want to disappoint anybody. Yeah, does that? Yeah, not many nowadays. And so how did he feel about I mean, you knew him pretty well, do you know? Our country's made of immigrants. My Dad's families, they're all. They were all in my mom's family, I mean her grandma and her grandma's sister were given as much money as our parents had and put on a boat and said we hope you make it to America, you know. And in that's the stories that you here all time, and his story of being an immigrant and reaching the pinnacle of what do you ask can give you? And and we see everything that's going on now. It's just it's just crazy. So many people out there with good stories. That can happen. The strength of our country is our diversity, right, the fact that we are country of immigrants. We got people here who were compelled to come and make a better life for their family right right from the get go. You know, it's not always smooth sale and Ivi asly by me. Yeah, and there are people who are so desperate to reach this country, and Bruno appreciated because it took him three years, he was so sick, before he could even yeah ship to get here. Yeah, and then his dad was caught working in the mill when the war broke out, so he couldn't even get homes as his wife and three children are stuck in he has no idea whether they lived, died or were killed in the war. And then when they reunited and came here, they made a home in Oakland and Bruno said, I you know, people ask me over the years, Bruno, you could have lived anywhere in the world. He was I would never live anywhere but Pittsburgh. I Love Pittsburgh, the people you know. Yeah, and he's a success story. He's one of those who made something of himself out of nothing and continue to give back to others. So he did. He appreciate it, he valued it. I think this documentary is going to be a story that resonates. It's not such a wrestling story, per say. The wwe is going to do that right at some point. Yeah, though, and they'll do a phenomenal job at right. This story is more about his mom in the mountain saving their lives. That's where he get his heart of a lion. How could you do what you do, Bruno? Because of my mother, I wanted to prove every day that her sacrifice was worth it. Yeah, she lived to be ninety seven. Wow, and she was this apparently. I didn't meet her, but she was a sweetheart and you can imagine. Yeah, he'd be they had a pool and they would have barbecues. We have the home footage. Yeah, and he would grab his mom around the neck and she would just you could see her beaming with pride love this. Oh, yeah, and you know, those are really happy moments. And he said, in the end, and in spite of all the suffering and all the obstacles that we had to overcome, we made it. We this country gave us a chance and you know, yeah, we reached a level of comfort and joy and family that we could have ever had if they didn't escape. You know, war torn Italy well, which is which is an amazing story. When, when does that documentary come out? I just talk to the wwe last week. We have the rights to the footage that we're utilizing. Wow, and just got the release and is a big moment because now I want to give the wwe some love for that. Yeah, because they don't let things go very often. Recognize this as a family passion project. It's a feature documentary. It's not really an interfere with anything they're doing. In fact, it'll be in. Ah, wonder WHO's going to narrate it? Some Guy, some guy that with the clarion. I did narrate it. Brutal asked me to. He says, you would be great. He said you wait, you did. You did. You impersonate him on it. Talked about haven't asked an Orna sports inting and I thought no, I don't want Arnold's so iconic. I don't want him to take away from yeah, the narration of part. So Bruno said, well,...

...why did you do it? He's so you do those steelers, and his wife said Yeah, you should do it, and the price was well, yeah, so far, yeah, so far. Well, it's kind to get even better once it comes out. I'm sure. I'm excited because Bruno saw this documentary before he passed. He approved it. My Mantra was let's tell the story that Bruno and his wife Carol want to tell. Yeah, and if we follow that instinct, it is what it is and I'll take my chances because he hasn't been wrong yet. No, I think it's going to resonate with the immigrants of all different yeah, backgrounds. Well, it's funny because I coached I had him on a few weeks ago for a LEUCON. He's a linebacker for the Falcons now, but his dad immigrated from Nigeria and I coached him in high school and you know, his dad worked his butt off to put him through this private school. Then I had him a full scholarship Tokahoma state and he said his dad said no, coach, he's going to Ivy League and we made his sons. You know, they were very smart and for you went to Yale. From Yale, I helped him get to work out and now he was drafted by the Falcons. He played linebacker form last year and just you know, we talked to foys America. Can write right, but you talked to his dad. His name's JEMMY BUT WE CALL HIM Steve and every every football game he'd bring this drum they had from his village and he'd be banging on the drum. They all for the team, but he I still text the emmy all the time, but there's just stories that this country can give people. And you know, and I think that Bruno is the epitome of all that he was so universally loved everywhere. We went, New York City, Madison Square Garden, two thousand and thirteen and ducted into the hall of fame. Arnold Schwarzenegger flew in from a movie set in California just to do that. Wow, and he said it's so good to be back in Madison Square Garden, filled to the rafts, which leaves me asked a question. Where were you? And My last movie came out. And then he says, speaking of movies, I told Bruno Samadino, I want to make a movie about you, Bruno, and I want to play you, and Bruno said to me, Arnold, shouldn't we get a real actor? Funny stuff, but then he got, you know, really serious and Ted ut Bruno and it was out of body experience to hear that crown channing Bruno after all these years, because I made so many nights special there, yeah, garden me for Oh, yeah, how many people went and watched him? How many things? He was like the number one ticket at one point around the globe. He wrestled in Japan. He was a superstar in Japan. Well, I wrestled in Australia. Europe, obviously Italy knows who he is. Canada because he was up there for a few years, Mexico, South America, he's been all over the world. So there are people that know him at some places, even far corners of the world. Now, you know, the older fans will know on the younger people might not, but some of what they're wrestling fans, they'll know him. Yeah, but what Arnold says about him. And then we saw John Cena in New York. Yeah, couldn't have given him more love and respect. Yeah, rock rocks got on a cheek, and so chant, we stand on your shoulders, you know, just now. To see that kind of respect. Was Fun to be a fly on the wall. How do you feel like you had a relationship with them for a long time? I mean that's just had to be an experienced because everywhere you went it was just like being you know, and I mean yeah, we've been around some really traumatic football players, you know, that get crowds, but this he was on a different level. Yeah, he was so much fun and I knew I didn't take it for granted. I tried to suck it all in right better. Where we went to see how other people treated him and how he treated them was really fun to watch because they were a lot of times surprised just how gracious and kind of is, you know, he you know, for being in a sport that was kind of build as aggressive and violent, you know what I mean, like all the stuff they had in physical yeah, right. And but just to see he was just humble, like you said, when you hear stories about them just meeting people, and there wasn't a lot of hate there. You know, he was a just so thankful for everything that he ever got. Yeah, and he credits his mom and, yeah, she probably put him in headlock a few times too long enough to enjoy all of that, which was amazing to see. And we have we bought the rights to George Romero, the Great George Romero, who did all that, yeah, night of living dead and right, other movies. He did a documentary, a series about champions in Pittsburgh and one of them was Bruno in the mid S. Wow. So we bought the rings...

...to that and then contained in that was, I think, the only video of his mom speaking and of course it's in Italian, right, and you know when he saw all this put together for him. Yeah, his story, it's probably pretty emotional. I sat in their home. They made me a little glass of wine and like a little cheese plate. Yeah, stuff. Yeah, it was just the three of US watching Carol Sa Martino and me sitting there. You know, I'm on edge because I want to make sure he's happening right. Yeah, and so they watched the whole thing and it was very emotional for them and great to see that he gave us the thumbs up. Yeah, you know, it's amazing your story because you've embrace Pittsburg. This is your towns is, you love it and you've gotten the meat almost everybody that's come through here. That has been some cool people that have been really cool people, whether their athletes or not. And but you know, just from all the experiences you've had in the transitions you've had to make, just say that. You know, what would you tell somebody that that's says, okay, I'm not sure if I can do this right or I lost my job, I got to go do something else. I mean, you're so positive and everything you do and and that's why I wanted to have you on your show to tell these people that, look, there doesn't matter where you come from, what you do. It's really simple. My Dad used to say a few things and then I had a program director in college and my dad had those sayings on the mirror. You know, set your goal, positive attitude, enthusiasm right, those kind of things as a basis, and I think you have to have a certain level of spirituality. You know, I don't tell other people with the thinker feel that's right. It's a personal thing and if people want to share that and not share it, I believe there's a greater force going here and and there are a lot of good people. There's more good than bad, but when it comes to you, you have the choice to choose happiness. Happiness is absolutely a choice, no matter what your circumstance. Right are you? You can have something happened to you in it. You can react say woe is me, everything's bad, this is so negative, nobody likes me. It's easy to talk yourself down that road. or You have a chance to react to adversity, which I've seen many times and other people and youth wonder what how do they do it? Because they chose not to let those things get down. Happiness is in a destination point. You're not going to get somewhere to be happy you're happy in the journey. If you choose to be right, no other's going to be obstacles and things to overcome. Embrace the challenge. My Dad used to say. Now, the program director that I had, his name's Day burner. He's now a prolific writer. He's a professor in Chicago and is on the radio still well himself. He said, do the things that you're afraid to do, not in a dumb or silly way, right, right when you were a teenager, but push yourself a little further than your comfort zone right and you may find that true. You're better able to handle things than you think, and don't be timid and don't worry so much about what other people think. Is How is your heart's in the right place as long as you're taking care of your family, you're trying to be a good person. You want to be a good husband, you want to be a good father, you want to be a good grandfather, you want to be a good friend, you want to be a good coworker. That's five things right there. You focus on that, you're never going to be far off the track and if you get too far, those right people you love are going to step your run. Yeah, come on back, come on back. Yeah, so you mean that's such good advice, you know, and I want to think that there's some part that there's a you know, we all say we have a better half. And I'm not sure when you met your wife, like we're how long were you at Katie k? Was it before that man or WTWTA? She was a intern and then she became associated producer of a talk show on TV and Devilin Pittsburgh's talk. I was in radio and she walked through the cafe t to Shiti's bright blue eyes and I was like, Oh, who is that? It's so took a while, but we eventually met and then I can't remember when she told me we were getting married. We've been married thirty years. Wow, it's great. And and I my children. Yea, I have three, one of each. They three, one to feed daughters, daughter, and then now I have three grandchildren, a grandson, wow, too little girls are two and a half weeks apart from my son's wife and am my youngest daughter Wow. Now they both just told me they're each even another one. Oh, wow, you spoil them absolutely, absolutely. And you know what I tell young people,...

...like if you're twenty five, I said, I was you yesterday. People used to tell you that when you were yeah, time goes. How is it possible I am not capable of being somebody's ground? Yeah, Oh, you're more than capable. When you're in the moment with them, there is a big difference than when you have your own kids, because you when you have your kids, you're in the midst of responsibility, you're working hard, you're trying to maintain right now it's but when you get to the next level it's like God's way of thanking you for dealing with the other ones, because when they're in the room you don't care about anything else and there's a magic, there's you know what it is. It's a love and it's unconditional. Right. So, I'm sure you had grandparents. Yeah, you just they just love you. Yeah, it didn't matter what happened. You want a game, lost the game, then in care they just love you. Are you okay? You know I love you, honey. You know there's that and you know it's real. Well, well, if for Annie and I were at that like. So we have our daughter's at vet school, at pen our sons are going to be a senior at William and Mary and other son possible, and our other sons going to be a junior delaware. So they're like right on the cusp of you know, it could we could be grandparents at anything. For you know, guys, it'll just be like magic and and it's going to be crazy and you'll love it. Well, everything I've ever done, I mean, I paid for all. You know. I've told him. I said it's about you, guys, and taking care of you, getting you through school and the things you want to do. At some point you're off and you got to go figure it out for yourself. But until you're ready to do that, where any and I are going to help you. So it's been an amazing journey to people I met in my life through my wife's family right because I'm what they caught a Meta gun, which is not a right. You know, it's all a from me, the family. You know, it's right, faith, family and our case football, so right. And you have football huge in your family. Yeah, football, and I also work with the steelers. So I appreciate that. And Yeah, don't take that lightly. Yeah, take it seriously. Game Day. Yeah, as a public address announcer at Hinsfield, nobody sees you and that's good, but they know your voice well when you're winning. And when we beat New England this year, yeah, notice I said we. When the steelers beat New England this year on a year they won the super right, that was one of the big moments of the season. Yeah, and you know, we had it all going in the scoreboard room. There's a game day producer and Chris Burns and these guys are just terrific. They're they're like another team. Yeah, fifty people doing everything that you you can't imagine what it takes to coordinate all that. We're a well oiled machine because of them. Right. So you're part of the experience for the fans and in some cases occasionally can influence the I'll come you maybe cause up. What's what side or something? What's the song they play? And renegade, renegrade. Yeah, they play renegade. The screen goes it just yeah, it's no, it's coming, and that's fun because it's showtime. It's live in the moment. It is, it's it's fun, it is and it gets rocking. It's a blast to be there and to be a part of that. It's like when I played it the chiefs. It was with the redskins. It was my first time I've ever playing in Kansas City and you're standing on a sideline's good, done with pregame warm up and saying the national anthem, singing it, and then right at the end, and it's the home of the in the whole place goes cheefs and it just rolls through your body right and then the stealth bomber flew over. It look like it just hit the top of the lights right and I look around and the whole team is like, you know, is going to be a long day. You Wind. No, we didn't win. It was a rough they had a really good team back then. That was when toy of couse, Derek was was playing the end, yes, and maybe you knew where he was all the time. Yeah, death, but it was it was ninety two. Slide, slide, go that way, you go that way. But Hey, we're going to break the huddle there and we'll be right back with Larry. All Right, till hey, we're back in our segment. Now in the huddle of Larry, we're going to do our no huddle segment. We're going to pepper some questions. You got two minutes to get down the field. You got to score touchdown. All right, let's go. I think you have a relative is pretty good at Um anyway. So what we want to do is actual quick questions here. So one mean I think I know what the answer this is, but who's your favorite former Pitchburgh athlete? Wow, living or dead? Or isn't that former? They're not playing, they're not current. Roberto Clemente. Why? Because there was something magic...

...about him and then when he was tragically taken from us, if elevated him to an unattainable level. But then when he went back and looked at how he played conducted himself. People don't know he was a United States marine. Yes, you know. Yeah, I know, you're very familiar with his story in the family and I just love the way he is energy and you know he overcame racism. He so much. He helped us in Pittsburgh because of people. He was a chiropractor and that's another people know that he used to take care of the guys in the lock, Roberto Clement A. Yeah, overall, if I had to just pick one, just because he was magic. Yeah, that was our first interview. The interviewed Roberto Comedi junior and we had to hear a lot of PSI. He's a great storyteller and he's no he I loved stories about his dad and Neil Walker, the Pittsburgh kids. Dad Tom played with him. Oh, really, I didn't know. Yeah, he was about to get on the plane. Oh, Neil Walker's dad was standing there here and was going to go on the flight. Roberto said it was New Year's Eve. He said no, you stay, I'll see at the party when we get back. It's all we heard it from. He still gets choked up about what we heard of Roberto tools about when you know, dad left that day. You know. So it was pretty emotional. It doesn't how much pain that just thought of, how tragic it was. But you know what, he died helping other people. Yeah, you know. And again he was a great baseball player, but he was even better human being and he helped this city overcome, you know, some barriers to Roberto Clemente. Right, they now betting right field number twenty one. Robert to opening with the cannon for an arm that was masket catch everything. What about current player? There's a wave with three amazing teams. Sydney crosby works hard. He's a superstar. Doesn't take it for granted. He's humble, treats people with a huge humility. That as a superstar, he could probably get away with being the prima done and no one would care. But he doesn't take what he does for granted. He's the first one on the ice the last one off the ice. There's a reason he's great, because he wants to great and he puts the effort into be great. Well, we'll say this view and Dave Hanson had the same answer. Oh, did that? Would Dave said? Yes, he said there's an old school presents about him. The plays a game because he loves it, not because he's making money. He's got all the money's knee. Yeah, he's it's a love of the game. You can't. You can't categorize it in that way at all. Yeah, and how lucky is Pittsburgh to have you fall? How do you follow up an ear like Pierre Laruche? Yeah, first French Canadian superstar here, then you got John Prone of all. And then there's this, the French connection of Pittsburgh. Right. Then you got Mary on them, you who saved hockey three times here, right. And then you get Sydney crosby. We get five Stanley Cups. Well, yeah, and and even look at the other guys. There's Yager was here, right, and then we got Malkin. Like we've had like some super superstars, and then we've had superstars and like it's just been incredible, blessed beyond rigination. We really need crosby. Right. Okay, now you've been up, you've been obviously Pittsburgh your whole life. You've been here, you've been on the radio, you probably eating it every restaurant. Tell me, give me, give me at least top three Pittsburgh restaurant. All right, top three is, if you like seafood, it's off the hook in Warrendale, which is right off of seventy nine. Really phenomenal fish. You know it's not the cheapest place, right, if you're going to pay, you might as well get the best as well, get the best great sea food. Tambolini's been there many times. He has. They're wonderful people, that Joe Wonderful and I love Italian food. And then, if I had to pick a third man of stuff, because I there's a place on south side. It's called STAGIONE's. Yeah, it's right on East Carson Street, not too far from the Birmingham Bridge. TAPPA size dishes. Yeah, absolutely delicious. You should try when I'm right. I haven't been. I'M gonna have to try for you. Yeah. Well, we live in Oakmont, so we rarely cross a bridge or a river to go come down to the south side. Sometimes. Yeah, yeah, definitely south side. All right. So this was one we always ask people if we were going through your phone and looking at all the people on your phone list, who's the most famous person you have in your phone right now? Well, that's a good one. I know you have a lot. Triple H wwe. I do have a...

...lot of famous phone numbers. Rocky, Blyer. Yeah, Roxy, good, Hares, frock, I love it. Damn, Marina Dammer, you have to have dad. Mike calls them. He doesn't. Stars don't answer calls. The answer a text. Maybe I'll really text first. I like answering calls. Yeah, I texting is I don't know. I'm kind of over that. So those would be so we can talk picks this this this week on our show we were having we had Chris Long on, and so Chris I asked Chris this question and so he answers it. Well, you know a great drinking game I have to go with looking up names on your phone, and he went into a twenty minute drinking game called cell phone or let and some other time. I want to tell you about it, because but dry. And all I asked was who's the most famous person? Of course, up until recently, Bruno Sam Martino. Wow, you know, it's kind of fun because people would say, you know Bruno Sammartino, you might have arn't. You have Arnold. I don't have Arnold's cell phone. I got our own. It's guy. You Got Arnold's guy. That's that is not the same. All right. What's your biggest pet? Peeve people who think too much of themselves and treat other people in a way that's rude and inappropriate. Right, you know that. I've been around people that have taught me, you know, over the years, starting with my own parents. You know, they never used the F word, they never use the n word right. Always told us to respect people, you know, and so it started there. So I have a low tolerance for people who think a lot of themselves and treat other people that way. Right, I like that very good. Favorite song or band. I know you were Dj back on a day overall globally, and I don't listen to their stuff much anymore. Led Zeppelin. Oh yeah, I could be someone that way. Let's Zeplin, which. Well, what's all? Well, the presence album, I know, the old school stuff. First Rock Song I think I recall was black dog, one thousand nine hundred and sixty eight. I was only ten years old, and and from there, I mean, well, stairway to heaven. It's almost right. Want to say that because it's too right, but there's so many. I've kind of switched, he might. My wife favorite was always Tangerine, and so that's what we listen that's what we listened to all the times of kind of good, kind of gone that way. That's a good one. That's a good one. Okay, you've had so many and you may have already said it, but what is the greatest experience you've had in your life, besides your kids being born? Being married? Yes, meeting my wife. Yeah, greatest experience in terms of my professional life. I guess it would be being with Bruno Sam Martino in Madison Square Garden at his hall of fame induction. is to be a fly on the wall participate in that and to see people poor genuine love and appreciate you and him thank them back. Yeah, this has to be right up there. Has To be right up there. And I thought your number two might be when you got to sit down and interview Bill Mazarowski. Bill was yeah, that was up there. I mean that was an out of body experience and narrating the Stiller highlight phone. Yeah, I got to do two super bowls, right, you know. And what amazing? You know, nobody knows that you because you know nobody sees you, and that's cool and I like that too, but to be associated with did you make your kids listen to it? Yeah, I used to show them, hey to do, I got the the DVD first, you know, yeah, this is the here, we're gonna have it right in our house, and they were like okay, day. They liked it. But I'll tell you. Another person, though, was the late Ambassador Damn Rooney. Yeah, I love that man. He was like a almost like a father figure to me, because the way he treated people and his humility. Again, it's all gets back to these are people who could act big time and they get away. They could get away with it, but don't write. And that's who I gravitate to because I appreciate that in abassador runs just such a warm family man, classic Guy, and he was. He used to come to the scoreboard room before every game, right, and before his last playoff game was Miami two seasons ago. Yeah, and I said to him when he came to the door, I said, ambassador, I said I'm going to leave it out on the field today. He went, Oh, Larry, all right. So I got to ask you. What about my coast? and wasn't able to be here today. So was Dave Hagar a good or a great intern? You know, he was a game changer, Gus. You know,...

...there are certain individuals in life that are able to somehow, you know, take the next step and move everybody to a higher level. That was day. That was dave just took everybody. You know, it's been a few semesters, but they made his mark. We're still trying to clean it off, but Dave was it was great for him to come in and I knew his brother and grew up with his brother. And you know, Pittsburgh your APP person from everybody. Oh, yeah, you're very close to everyone. Yes, and always happens that way. It was always good man. Okay, last question. And you've had so many wonderful life experiences. You're on the radio every day you can, you get to meet amazing people. But what are your top three things that on your bucket list? Yet I want to go to Australia. As far as travel, travels one of the greatest things. Yeah, you can do. I was blessed to be able to go to Italy and have that experience. Did you meet the pope? No, he wasn't home. When I call you an even there, forget about I figured Bruno can get you in. Yeah, I always I never thought I'd get to Europe. Yeah, and then ends up that I've been to Europe six times. Wow, she's after I was, let's see, forty five years old. So yeah, you're thinking, Hey, travel so great. Yeah, no one can ever take it away from it. It's an experience. Even in your quiet moments, if you were by yourself, you could still imagine the things that you did and remember them. So I want to go to Australia if I can just once the other two bucket lists or that's a great question. I want to I want to get into better shape. I'm not quitting. You're in great shape. I'm not quitting yet. I could be somebody, I could be able to contender guy. Yeah, but no, no, skydiving coming out of a plane. Scuba diving, but sky diving. And then I thought better of it. I thought why would you get out of a perfectly good plane? Right? Had to right. Yeah, yeah, but I don't know, I've been so extraordinarily blessed. I feel like I got a lot of things I want to do. Just more grandkids. La's just keep coming. I think there's a biblical thing, whether there be more than the stars for coming out, but I just, you know, I just want to be somebody who tries to lift and help others. Too long away, and you know, I'm nothing special really, but I tried to reach out to other people where I can and I'd like to see us do a better job of taking care of the homeless people in this area. Veterans very close to right. Well, here at the E I see they've signed three veteran groups and folker out of Voodoo brewing. They're going to be making all the veterans will be helping make all the food for the restaurants and teaching them new career pass and all that. Here at the I see energy innovations. I see this is great. This is a little gem here I didn't know is. You're right under our nose. It is. It really, really really is, and I'm proud to be a part of it. But good for you. You know what, Hoddle up? Yeah, I know, yeah, but you are a role model and thank you so much for coming on and you definitely change people's lives. Number twelve guys for rot. Yeah, when you do my voice over, you just got to leave one little part out that everybody life to talk about, but we'll let that. Don't beat yourself phone. Yeah, I've already done that. You gotta you gotta move on. You can't rest. You hit the reset. But you done a lot of good things in nobody can take those away from you. Yeah, now yours in the NAFO. Are you kidding me? Yeah, order back. Been Married Twenty Five. That's right. There is one, two. Right, which one's first? First? Yeah, there you go. There you go, but thanks for coming on. Hudle up and we'll see you next week.

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