Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Kurt Warner

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Joining us in the Huddle is Hall of Famer and SuperBowl Champion Kurt Warner. he has been through all of the ups and downs life can throw at you and his strong faith and love from his family has pushed him to the top of the NFL. He continues his journey by coaching and studio work. You can check out his charity, First Things First on his website... http://www.kurtwarner.org/about.html   I found this great story about Kurt online by Mike Moraitis. I thought you might like to read it. Next time you go to the supermarket and you have someone bagging your groceries, take a good look at that person and try to figure out if you could peg them as a professional athlete or Hall of Famer. Believe it or not, Kurt Warner could’ve been that guy bagging your groceries. Yes, that’s right, I’m talking about the same guy who is a former NFL MVP quarterback and holds numerous records as one of the greatest playoff performers in NFL history. Warner worked the $5.50 per hour job back in 1994 after being cut as the Green Bay Packers’ fourth-string quarterback. It looked hopeless for the struggling signal-caller, and it seemed impossible that he would one day lead “The Greatest Show on Turf.” But it didn’t end in that grocery store in Iowa. Instead, Warner kept working to achieve his ultimate goal of being a starting NFL quarterback. There were two things Warner never gave up on: his faith and his skills. Warner moved on to play in the Arena Football League, where he began to flourish and then stepped up to more talented competition in NFL Europe. It was there that Warner caught the eye of NFL scouts and finally landed a job with the St. Louis Rams and their bright yellow jerseys. He quickly made the often-maligned jerseys respectable, and after an injury sent starter Trent Green to the bench, Warner proved he belonged in the NFL with MVP-caliber play. That season, Warner was second in the NFL in passing yards with 4,353 and led the league with 41 touchdowns and an incredible 65.1 percent completion percentage. Ultimately, Warner went on to win the MVP that season and lead the Rams to their first of two Super Bowls (won in 2000, lost in 2002). But St. Louis began to decline as a franchise after its second trip to the Super Bowl, and so did Warner himself. Constant interceptions and fumbling made Warner look washed-up just a few years after being one of the best quarterbacks in the NFL. Everyone gave up on him, the Rams included, and Warner’s success was pegged as the result of the elite talent around him and not Warner himself. Warner went on to sign with the New York Giants and continued to struggle, eventually getting pulled for the Giants' quarterback of the future, Eli Manning. I’d say it was the right move for the G-Men, but it left Warner without a job once again. It wasn’t until the Arizona Cardinals took a chance on him that Warner showed he still had something left. Given his chance to start, Warner had one of his best seasons in 2008. He was second in the NFL with 4,583 yards, which happened to be the second-best yardage output of his entire career in a single season. He was also tied for third with 30 touchdowns and was second with a 67.1 percent completion percentage. That percentage was also the second-best of Warner’s career. Much like he did with the Rams, Warner took the Cardinals to the Super Bowl in 2008 and lifted them out of the hole they had been in for the entirety of their existence. In that Super Bowl, Warner left the field with his team in a position to win only to have it squandered by the Pittsburgh Steelers last-minute drive to win the game. The huge numbers he put up in Arizona erased any lingering thoughts about Warner falling off. He single-handedly took the franchise to a level it had never been. In all, Warner owns or shares multiple records, including several important ones in the postseason.  Not bad at all for a guy who used to bag groceries for minimum wage.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hey everyone, we appreciate you joining us in the huddle. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback Guss Rod, alongside my longtime friend and Co host Dave Hagar, where we talked to guests about how sports shape their life. Be sure to check us out on our website, how do up with Gusscom, where you can listen to more episodes just like this. Now let's join the huddle. Everyone. welcolcome toother episode of Huddle up with guess. I'm your host guests for out, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I want to introduce a great guy that's coming on today. But before I do that, you know I want you also to be able to go to my podcasts. That's on RADIOCOM, houddle up with guests, or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. You can join me on my website, Hoddo up with guestscom. You can find us on the sports circus or newly added is we're going to be on thirty one digital out of Washington DC also. So our reach is growing, our membership is growing and it's all because of people that are joining me like today. So today we have a former super bowl champion a hall of Famer, somebody that came like most of us in this country that had to build their their brand up from nothing. They had to work hard and it never stops and this gentleman right here never stops and I can tell you he's busier than anybody out there and he's come a long way in his life from Burlington, Iowa. So joining me today in the huddle none other than Kurt Warner. Kurt, thanks for joining me in huddle up with gusts today. He got a man great too. Great to see a great to talk to you, I hope. I hope you are well. We're trying to hold it down out here in Arizona, where things are a little bit crazy, but but good to be able to to catch out. Yeah, I mean you say crazy. You have what seven kids? How many kids? You have? Seven? I do. I have seven kids. I have two grandkids now. So so life is good. It's a good crazy. I've got kids all over. I got one plan at the University of Nebraska, another one that is going to be headed to USC whenever they decide to go back on campus, and then I've got a few that are still in high school, including one that's that's playing high schoolball. So yeah, I got all kinds of different things going on. But but life is fun and I always kind of feel this is what retirement should be like, right is should be active and busy doing things that you enjoy, but y'all should have their freedom to be around your kids and your grandkids and be able to enjoy that. And so I feel like I get the best of both worlds. Yeah, you know, my wife and I are going through that. Are All our kids are. Well, my daughters in vet school at pain and and my son, gunner, just graduated from William and Mary and he's trying to figure out as next step. He wanted to be a coach and he was going to go do cane and and coach there for a year and they canceled their season. So it's like all the stuffs up in the air. It's really insane. But that you actually have grandkids is amazing. I mean they just dropping them off of your house now and say Hey, dad, we're going to go out and hang out for a little bit there watch the kids. You know, every once in a while, for sure. You know, I understand what that's like. We remember those days when you got three year old and a two year old and they're running around, especially during the pandemic and everything that's going on, where your quarantine more and you're stuck in your house. Yeah, my daughter and son in law, there's Times I can tell that they're a little bit frazzled and it's like hey, can you just take them where them out, or we're having to spend the night, and we are more than happy to do that. And everybody talks about the blessing of grandkids and you don't really understand it until you have them, and it has been a complete joy for me and my wife. We love every minute of it and so we welcome the opportunities when my daughter will just drop by and drop the kids off with a few hours. Yeah, so you know covid with this whole virus going on. You know, we as bad as it is, we also were able to be together as a...

...family for four months, you know, where my daughter was home from school, my son was home from school, and we got a lot closer because there are a lot older now and we got to really dig into things where they weren't just home for Christmas. So I don't know how that was for you, but was everybody home for you for the most part. Yeah, until my my son went back to Nebraska as they were kind of getting ready and trying to figure things out. We had the whole crewier and it's been good. You know. I mean obviously there's been times I think we've all driven each other crazy. We're all going a little stir crazy and we've had enough of each other, so we got to separate at times. But I agree it's been a lot of great quality time and I think, you know, it really helps you to take a step back. We get so busy in life sometimes and things come at you and you just take on one thing after another after another and you don't realize how busy you are or how little time, little quality time, you really get with your family. And I think this is shown me. You know, some of that like, okay, let's let's make some changes when life goes back to quote unquote, normal, whatever that's going to look like. But when we get back to more normal lives, let's make sure that we carve out some time to be together more and to focus on each other more, because I think that's something that's easily, easily neglected. But we've been kind of forced to go back to that and and I'm with you. I've appreciated that part of it and growing closer to my family in a lot of ways because of it. Yeah, I've really enjoyed it. So let's go back to your family. When you were growing up in Iowa. You know, what was that first memory that you have of grown up where you fell in love with sports? Well, I mean, you know, I didn't have a whole lot when I was growing up. We lived in a small little house with a small little front yard and the front yard was connected to a really busy street. But I think my first recollection was just my brother and I out there in that little front yard with a million people going by, playing one on one football and, you know, creating rules as we go. They throw the ball up in the air and you can't tackle them until they catch the ball, and I mean just creating corny little rules because there was just the two of us in a small little area. But that was really how I fell in love with sports. Is You don't have a lot, it's easy to get a ball of some sort. You know whether it's he's ball and I pitched nine innings against a wall, or whether it was. Basketball is just a hooping a basket, and I'd spend hours out in the cold with gloves on shooting baskets or were, as I said, playing one on one football with my with my brother. So all those little things, I think is was really, we're really a huge part of my upbringing and what brought us closer together as a family, brought me closer with together with my brother, and those are really the earliest memories that I have of what life was like first, but also how I fell in love with with the different games or sports in general. Yeah, I'm with you. I grew up the same way, you know, a little house, we didn't have much and and whatever balls you had, you know, if you had a baseball, that was a baseball you had for the whole year you were there was no dick sporting goods around the corner where you can go and get a dozen of baseballs, right. So my dad was a factory guy and, you know, we would just have pickup games. I had an old wooden bat that was handed down through I don't know how many people, and you know, and you'd go get a bunch of guys, you go to a close field and we all just played. There was no lumps, there were no refs, are no parents, and you figured out, you made rules yourself, and I think we learned a lot by doing that and we learned how to play the game in a in a way that you just got through it. I don't, I think kids really misset today for some reason. I do do. I mean I think everything is so technical and you know, it's like we're building robots sometimes with our kids, specially when it comes to sports, because all they want to do is pick one sport and they want to go to a trainer and they want to, you know, do the same thing over and...

...over and over again. And and I'm with you. I feel like I've learned how to throw a football by being chased around by my brother in the front yard and happy to figure out how to throw it to a guy when I'm running to the left and he's going to the right, or when everybody's getting played man to man coverage and you got to realize, okay, do I have to throw it over the defender or do I have to drive it on them? And write so little you know nowadays, when you go to these trainers, do you get opportunity to just kind of freelance and play the game and learn how to use your body to throw. You know, I've got a son that plays quarterback in high school and that's one of the hardest things for me to teach him is, you know, he wants to drop back and when you drop back and you're doing all this technical stuff, there's so many things that can come into play when you're running around it and you've got to figure out, okay, how do I throw it to that guy that's thirty yards away from me when I'm running to my right? And you know, I see a lot of these guys in the NFL now and it's amazing that Patrick Mahomes and Kyler Murray and Russell Wilson are all baseball players right right and that's a big thing for me too, is that played every sport, because in baseball, how often do you get to get a ground ball and set up and step to the first base or wherever and throw it? You know, not very often. You're moving and you're grabbing it and you're twisting and and that was kind of how we played in the backyard and I think that is a lost art now with a lot of these kids is that in a perfect world they can pray play really well, but you know, when things start to break down and their technique gets away from them, can they still be successful? And you know a lot of these guys can't because they just haven't been out in the backyard. I mean, I try to encourage my son all the time. Just invite seven buddies over and go play thing. I know you're a quarterback, go play defensive back right. Yeah, you know, different aspects of being an athlete and controlling your body, but it is it's become so specialized that I've I'm kind of like you. I feel like we've lost a lot in terms of what an athlete is, what an athlete looks like. It's not just running a forty, it's the ability to control your body and manage different things that come your direction. And you know, a lot of these kids are getting away from it because it's all about training for one specific thing. Well, you know, and you're right, like I thought Patrick Mahomes was a breath of fresh air for that, watching him and saying hey, I'm just going to go out and have fun. I mean when he's throwing no look passes in an NFL game. I'm like what what? You know what I mean, like North Turner would have pulled yeah so quick if I would ever thought of doing something like that. But you know, that's the I think that's the great thing about when you see people that have played multiple sports, that have had success in all of them. You know he can go and do that. And you know it's really interesting that that we align like that, because I feel the same way a man these kids. I even in high school. These kids are saying, no, I just want to play defense, right, that's all I want. No, play offense. Let's do it all right, get everybody involved. Now some teams are bigger. There's ninety kids, so you gotta play everybody somehow, some way. But I agree with you. You got you got to play multiple sports. So you talked about that. When when you go to school, in high school, you're playing multiple sports. So you go from doing all these things as a young kid and you're playing in your arm with your brother. Now you're on real team's real organizations. For me that was a lot. That was a big change, you know, from going playing backyard stuff to really organize and coaches hammering on you all the time. What was that like for you? Yeah, I mean I you know, I think there was always pluses and mines. You know, times that you're just like, man, I just want to be out here. You know. It's what I realize now when I coach High School Football, is that you realize you might have a squad of forty five kids and all of them are there for different reasons. Right. Some of them just want to be out there running around with their buddies and they want to wear a Jersey on Friday night and they don't if they play or they've been move on or whatever, and so I think that's sometimes the hardest part when you get into organized sports, is that you know you want to play and you want to be competitive, but what level do you want to play at? It can be different for a lot of different people and it can obviously be different for coaches. Right, sometimes you have coaches that don't understand that.

But Hey, I'm just out here to have fun with my buddies and they think everything is about winning and getting to the next level. And so yeah, I think there's challenges, but I think there's also benefits of you know, the discipline that comes with that and, you know, being able to perfect your craft and, you know, be accountable to a team in situations that you know actually have, you know, matter or have some bearing on them. You know I mean I loved Competitive Sports, I love the Organized Sports, I love being out there with my buddy. So just kind of depending on what the situation was, that there were times that I love just to compete and I wanted to compete to be the best, and there were other times there was fine with me like hey, we got a ball and there's none of my buddies, let's let's go do something right. I recently had herblang on. They call him flight time. He's a he was a hard on Globetrotter for eighteen years and we were having a discussion. He grew up in Arkansas and he played football and basketball, and we having a discussion about what was better, coming out with your basketball team with the music playing and you got your new shoes on and you got your you know, your ripoff sweats getting ready to play, or Friday Night Lights, and I think we both came to the conclusion of there's just something special about Friday night lights and everybody getting there and you're getting ready for game and it goes from being light to dark and the lights come on. It was just I don't know, I mean I for me it's always been like there's just no feeling you get from that. I mean I you know, I think the other thing that's always special about football to is that, you know, seasons are always shorter and there's only so many games. You know that you play, doesn't matter what level you're at. You know, you compare high school football to every other sport or pro football to every other sport. You only get so many opportunities to do it and to me that's what makes it so unique and so special. If I'm playing a hundred sixty two baseball games, you know, everyone's not going to have that same feel. Okay, Playing Sixteen Football Games, and that's all I did and that's you know, those sixteen games matter. Every one of them matters. You know. I think that's where it gets that feel and it becomes so special because it is so unique. And that goes all the way down to the high school level, when you're playing what nine or ten games? Then you only got so many shots at this thing. And everybody comes out for football. It's obviously, you know, so popular and in our country and so it is. It's a unique beast and it's so much fun to do. But I just think, you know, when you put that much on each and every game, it just heightened the experience for, you know, everybody, whether it's a fan, whether it's a coach or obviously if you're a player. So, yeah, you're a high school coach. Now you've done some coaching. Do you go back and think about a coach that really influenced you in high school and like some of those things that he said to you your team and then you use those as well? No doubt about it. No doubt that there were certain people growing up, a certain coaches that I really gravitated to and that really taught me. You know, you know, sports teaches them more about life than it's that it does about sports. You know, lessons that you learned and ways to carry yourself and how to, you know, create character and value in different things. But I did have some some great coaches when I was growing up, specifically a basketball coach in high school that was also an assistant football coach, but just a good man and a good man of character and he pushed me hard and he saw potential but he was right there to support me no matter what happened. And so, yeah, I think about that all the time and you know, and I try to take that into consideration when I coaching, is what kind of coach do I want to be and how can I help all these different kids? And you know, big part of that is is trying to recognize what they want to get out of their experience and then trying to give them that as a coach. Some kids want to move on and they want to play at the highest level. So...

...can you push them and can you teach them to the point where they've got that opportunity? As I mentioned before, other kids just want to be out there wearing a Jersey and having a good time. I want to be able to connect with those kids too and have a good time with those kids and give them that experience without trying to push them to a level that they don't want to go and so that's to me. That, to me, is what coaching is all about. It's being able to recognize what you can do and what you can bring to the table to make someone's experience better, whatever experience it is that they want to have. Yeah, I used to I coach in St Louis. Said John Borough School, for my kids went to high school and I coached football team there for four years and when we started the season I would go up to every kid. I mean we only had twenty eight kids, so when that hard, but I would go up to every kid and say, do you want to play football at the next level, and if they said yes or no, that would give me an idea. You know, then you go off their talent. You say, okay, you want to play at the next level. You know, there's a lots of places that are out there, from division three whole way up to, you know, the top of the top. And I coach kids that went to every level and by them letting me know what they're kind of ambitions were, let me know how they you know, how to have fun with them, how to push them, how to do different things with them. I was lucky enough to coach Zeko Elliott in high school, so we were usually ahead in games and I pull Zeke out and then everybody else could go and have fun. So it was really easy being a high school coach with him. But you know, I think that what you're doing is is great. You're carrying on that tradition. So when you were in high school, were you highly recruited coming out of high school? Now, not, not at all. You know, obviously was an all state player, so I was very successful in high school, but I only got one scholarship off for coming out of high school. You know, little entry was to hear the interest there, but only one scholarship offer as I was coming out little smaller school, university northern Iwa at the time was a one double a school. Now it's, I don't know, Football Championship series, FCS. I think it's an ass. There's so many new things. Yeah, well, one of those things. But no, I wasn't highly recruited at all and you know, it one of those things that at time, at the time was really frustrating, you know, trying to figure out that process, you know, but but again, I think all of those things shape us, shape who we are, shape how we we chase after, you know, what our dreams are and without a question. You know that did that for me is that couldn't figure it out. Didn't know why, you know, but but I think it pushed me to want to whether it be prove other everybody wrong or prove that I belonged and could play at a high level. Whatever it was, I think it helped to shape me that I wasn't how they recruit. Did you we recruited in any other sports? Yeah, I was probably more recruited in basketball than I was in football, and so that was one of the things that I kind of juggled because I love basketball. You know, basketball is just one of those sports that it's very easy to practice. Right it's fun to practice basketball or football, especially if your quarterback. There's only so many things that that you really enjoy when you could get seven on seven or eleven on eleven and really compete. So yeah, I wrestled back in and forth with not a lot of football scholarships that I want to go somewhere and play basketball because I love basketball. But you know, ultimately the end of the day, I felt like I wanted to try to play, you know, professionally, and just felt like football was going to be my best option to do that because some of the challenges that I faced as a basketball player. So so that was the reason that I chose football. Loved both sports. Love Different aspects of both of them, but but you know, wanted to see if I could continue my career beyond be on college,...

...and so football was that best option. Yeah, I felt the same way. I was kind of recruited in baseball and then I had two choices to make. You know, do I want to go baseball route? I want to go football route? My Body's telling me right now probably should have done the baseball route, but did the football route. So you're right. You get to northern Iowa. You know, you're a lot of people when they go to college. I mean I had a lot of friends that when I was a freshman that they just left. They were nervous, they were scared, whatever it was. What was your experience like when you had to make that transition from high school to College? Yeah, I mean, I think the transition anywhere, you know, whether it's on the field or off, whether it's high school, the college, College of Pro Yeah, there's always a transition and you know, I always tell people that, you know, I believe you know, the biggest challenge from going from one level to the next is proving to yourself that you belong right. I mean it's so easy for all of us, as athletes and with our Egos and whatever, to you know, to go out there in social media or stand out there in Friday nights and beat our Chatz and let everybody know Howt Grey we are. But you know, there's always a proving ground that we have to make when we go from one step to the next to prove to ourselves that we can play. And you know, that was definitely, you know, definitely something that I dealt with and I, like you said, I think a lot of people walk away because it's that fear of man, I don't know if I belong, I don't know if I fit in, I don't know if I could do this and instead of kind of waiting it out and challenging yourself through it, a lot of people, I think we'll turn the other direction and and run going man, I just don't feel comfortable in this. But we've all been there, you know. We've all been in those situations that are really uncomfortable and it takes time and it takes, you know, work to be able to prove the ay I belong at this next level. And that was tough for me in college because you talked about college and up sitting on the bench for four years in college, right. So I had to wrestle with that a lot. Like there's times I thought I was good enough and then, well, why can't I get on the football field? And then you don't get a lot of opportunities to actually play when you're the backup, so you can you start wondering do I belong? Am I good enough? And so I wrestled with that, with that a lot through my career in college, trying to figure out where I fit in, how good I was, you know, where to gain, you know, kind of my confidence or my self esteem, you know what kind of player I was. And so it was. It was definitely a struggle and I had times where I even thought about and is it the time for me to move on and do something else or walk away from this? And obviously I'm glad that that I didn't do that and I didn't you added the easy way out that it's ultimately worked out for me. But you know, I understand some of those same reservations and questions that we have about ourselves when we have to take jumps from one level to another. Well, you know, and I could imagine that it would be pretty difficult for you, because my son went through a little bit of that at William and Mary, where he went down there to play and he didn't get to play like he wanted. He only played two years an he went right into coaching with the team and so he got to stay in the game. And for you, you know where you were there for four years without even playing, and we know that college football is a job, we know it is difficult, you know, going to class meetings, lifting, doing all the things you have to do, and for your perseverance. Yeah, I commend you for that, because a lot of people want to stay that long to say my fifth year, I'm going to get the shot right and that's what I'm going to do that. So that's amazing that you did that. So now tell me about your senior you finally get the shot. You're excited. Now you get to go out in the field as the starter and leading the team. What was that senior year like for you? Well, I mean there was obviously a great experience, you know, because again, as as athletes, we just kind of think we can overcome everything. So, even though I sat on a bench for four years that was confident that I was going to take that one year and parlay that into a career in the NFL. Don't know why I felt that that...

...that's just kind of the confidence by which we we do things, you know, but it was a great experience just to be back on the field again. You know, I think that's the biggest thing, is that, of course, we all dream of accomplishing certain things and getting to certain levels, but ultimately, at the end of the day, and I was reminded it numerous times throughout my career, that at the end of the day, we love the game for a bigger reason. We you know, we love it for a bigger purpose, the reason we fell in love with you know, the Games that we play are the things that we want to do, have nothing to do with, you know, reaching the highest level or, you know, reaching a level of fame or making a certain amount of money. That has to do with, you know, different aspects of the game, and that's what I so enjoyed that senior year that, you know, you forgot a little bit of that because I wasn't playing and you know, my mindset was, Gosh, how am I going to make it at the next level? I can't even get on the field here. And then you finally get on the field after four years on the bench and you just kind of like all right, now I remember why I played this game. You know, I loved leading my guys, I loved competing in those moments, as I talked about before. I love the fact that you got ten games. So every moment mattered, every game mattered, and so true, you know. So I just I so enjoyed that senior year because it just got me back to the roots of why I love the game and I didn't know what was going to happen moving forward, but I was able to get that out there and compete and know that if that was going to be it for me, at least I got that one opportunity at the college level to to show that I belonged and to enjoy the game. And if that would have been it, I could have walked away and been happy because my final experience was a good one. Yeah, you know, and it's amazing to hear your story because you have this great senior year. I think you were the player of the year in your league, and you do all these incredible things and now you're back on a high. Right. You've gone through a whole college career. You've had highs and lows and one or today am I going to make it. Now you're on a high again. Now you go try out for an NFL team with the packers and you're up there with far and I forget I mark Brannell, I think, was there with you, and and you're up there and you're working out with these guys and you're seeing what it takes to be at the top. But then you don't make the the roster and then you have to go back down again and humble yourself by getting, you know, as we say in the NFL, normal job right, some that that millions of Americans go out and do every day, you know, and then to come back from that, like to just have that drive. So I mean it's just amazing what you've done. So tell me about the highs and lows of your life that you've gone through. I mean, I've been through them all as well, and it's just how do you come back from those highs and lows? You know, I've always believed that the most important thing is to always have a firm grip on who you are as an individual. And you know that extends farther who you are as a player, because what we realize in life is that circumstances are going to be thrown at us that are going to try to tell us that were something different or that we're not worthy or you're only as good as this circumstance that you're in. And so I think one of the things that helped me kind of manage the highs and lows of my career was to always try to keep a firm grasp on who I was and why was the way that I am and that no matter what the success level or no matter, you know, how bad the moment was that I was in or how tough the situation was, then it didn't define who I was as a person and I think that that's easily lost in you know, in life, and specially with athletes, that we get so caught up with what's happening on the field that that is our whole identity and if what's happening on the field doesn't Mesh with who we want it to be, want to be or what we want it to be on the field, it usually kind of makes us, you know, spiral out of control...

...and you know, you see a lot of players struggle after they get done playing because they no longer have you know, that to hang onto or people telling them you know, they're great or whatever it might be. So our identities get so caught up with that. And and I really feel like, you know, during that period of time when I was going through some of the struggles, I was really able to figure out who I am and who I wanted to be. You know, my faith became more important to me, so I was able to kind of ground myself in my circumstances. You know, we're never going to tell the whole story right and you know, it was all of those things that I think, you know, kept me focused on what I wanted to accomplish but also, you know, realistic to the standpoint that if it didn't happen, that didn't mean that I was a failure or that was an awful person or an awful player, that there's just sometimes circumstances that come into play that we have to deal with. And but I was never going to let those things define me. And you know, we kind of at saying in our family. My wife's been through a lot of ups and downs or rocky road as well. It's just that, you know, our circumstances will never define us. You know, we're not going to allow what we're dealing with to be the catalyst to determine who we were going to be. And you know, I think it's a great message for this time to write. Or circumstances stank and you got kids that you know, don't get to graduate from high school and go through graduation. And now you've got kids that are juniors and seniors wanting to play college football and they don't get a high school season. And you know all of us, you know from a from a workstandpoint. You know a lot of people out there and know struggling from a workstandpoint. You know that it's easy to kind of allow that to take over and be the defining factor in our lives and I think we have to fight through that and wrestle through that oftentimes in life to make sure that we we hold on to what we really are and in holding on to that person and that character, we're able to work our way through a lot of things that at the moment don't seem easier to work through. Not at all, not at all. Hey, we're going to take a little break. Will be right back. We're joined by hall of Famer Kurt Warner. We're going to find out a little bit about our better halves when we come right back on huddle up with guests. Hey listeners, thanks for joining David I in the huddle. We invite you to join our excusive huddle through Patreon, where you can get access to content made just for VIPs like yourself. Head to our website, huddle up with Gustscom and hit support our podcast on the pop up ad once again. That's huddle up with gustscom. Now let's get back in the huddle. Welcome everyone back to huddle up with gusts where you can find us on RADIOCOM wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts, also on the sports circus and now at one thousand six hundred and thirty one digital so we're joined by Kurt Warner. Hall of Famers, Super Bowl champion, Kurt. You know, one other thing, I think that you and I have in common is that we have a great support system at home that we've had with us. I mean I married my wife and we've been married almost twenty six years now, and you know, I couldn't have done anything in the NFL without her being there and being my sounding board. And I played for seven teams. I've been through a lot in the NFL a lot of adversity, just like you have, and those people keep us going. So tell us a little bit about your relationship with your wife, Brenda, and and how you guys have solidified this through your whole career. Yeah, I mean, I think you know, as you said, one of the coolest things about my journey is that, you know, I met my wife in college and so we've been together through the entirety of the journey, through the ups and downs, the highs and lows, that it's been kind of a group effort and that, to me, has been the greatest blessing.

That to me, you know, ups and downs and specifically, and even the best moments in life and don't mean nearly as much if you don't have people to share them with and if you don't have people that have enjoyed and endured the Jurney, the journey with you. And that is one thing that I've loved about, you know, my journey is that I truly feel like my wife has come along on the journey with me. You know, unlike a lot of you know husbands and wives that that are in pro sports, you know, oftentimes you just see whoever's playing you know one thing about you know, our journey was my wife was in the spotlight a lot as well, and so we got a chance to really kind of experience it all together, and that's that's been really cool and you know, we look back on, you know where we started and where we finished and where we're at now and you know just it's just so awesome to know that from the beginning to be end, we've been together. She was there when I needed a shoulder to cry out. She was there when I needed somebody to I would. We want the Super Bowl, and that, to me, is what life is all about. Is You know, how many people can I get close to like that that can share, you know, all the unbelievable memories that were able to create over the years, right and you know, for me it's like you have a lot of friends. You create so many friends in this game. You know, and you love to keep the locker room going on for the rest of your life, but you know that's not going to happen. And when you have those down times, you know some some friends you have aren't going to be there for you. You know, and but your wife and that person that you love, I'm with you. I've been with Annie since, you know, my before my junior year in college, and we've been together ever since and we've been through therapy, we've been we've struggled with being with each other all the time and learned how to deal with each other. And and her father was my high school football coach, and we've had to deal with all those things and we've been through the high and lows and like hey, honey man, I really don't know if I can play anymore. Well, why not, you know. You know, I'm in my twelve year, you know. And do we want to travel to a new city? Do we want to go somewhere else? And she goes yes, this is what you're meant to do, you know. So those types of things really keep you going. And I'm sure through your a renal league experience and then going overseas and playing, you know, and all of that. I mean, I can't imagine that journey that you two had together. Yeah, now, I mean you're right. I mean it just, you know, so many unbelievable memories and you know, well, I think we both remember the moments when we sat back and go mad, how did we get here and how are we going to get out of this and then we remember the moment, you know, when we kind of looked at each other and go, do you believe that that we're here? Do you believe that? You know we've got to these places in our lives? And so, yeah, I mean it's just there's just nothing better that to wake up next to your best friend every day, to have experienced the majority of the journey together, to remember those highs and lows and to appreciate the life that you have now together. I'm just I'm grateful, just like you are, that I had a strong person that was willing, you know, to kind of chase my dream, you know, because that's a huge sacrifice for someone that, you know, even though we know that we were meant to play football, that doesn't necessarily mean that that our wives were meant to follow us around. Why we lay great so I'm extremely grateful, you know, that my wife, you know, made those sacrifices to put whatever she wanted to do on hold at times or to pick up and move the family when I bounced around from one place to another. I'm just grateful that, you know, that I do have that support system and I do have, you know, someone that that was willing to make those sacrifices for me. So one thing I always wanted to ask you because I played with Trent. We played at the redskins together, and then you know he comes he's at the rams, quarterback, your second string now. I mean there's been a lot...

...of journey you've already been through in your life and then you know Trent has the terrible knee injury. You come in. I know Dick for mill said some wonderful things that they're just going to these going to the whole team's going to wrap their arms around you. We're going to support Kurt Warner right, but with the coach saying that is huge. But also when you get in that huddle with those guys for that first time and now you're the leader of that team, who were the guys or what? Who did you really lean on in that time to say, okay, we're going to get this done, man. You know, I mean I lean known all the guys. You know what I realized early on that it's very easy to put a lot of pressure on yourself and, you know, to try to see expectations and chase expectations. You know, at that particular time I was just trying to prove to people that I belonged. You know, I mean my aspirations. Of course I wanted to win super bowls, but when I became a starter, that wasn't what was all the forefront of my God was, Hey, I got I got to prove that I can play this week, because goes from meal can say whatever he wants. If I stick it up week one, I'm probably because nobody knows this guy and nobody knows if he can play. So I'm going to have a very short leave. So I was more worried about me. And you know, we were fortunate because, you know, we had Isaac Bruce and we had Marshall Falk and we had or land a pace and we had in these great leaders and these great pros. You know that, and I didn't have to worry about them, and that was probably the greatest blessing and allowed me to have, you know, great success early was I didn't feel like I had to carry anybody. I felt like I just just do your job. You know, if you do your job, the guys around you are good enough to be able to carry or lead or pick up the slack for you. You mentioned Trent. I mean Trent was unbelievable to me in terms of, you know, helping me out and giving me all his knowledge because he had been in the offense and you know, I asked him a million questions that I know he was tired of me asking him questions like, Dude, shut up, get out of my not but ever once did he say that. He graciously answered those questions, you know, and even you know the hall of fame speech, you know, there's only one teammate that I really think. I mean, I think them all in general, but the one that I think was Trent because, you know, I found myself in that situation numerous times later in my career where I was the guy that was sitting on the bench and the young guy was in front of me and the young guy might have been having success and you have to wrestle with okay, how do you deal with this situation? And I only had to go back to Trent and he was a great guide for me to say, Hey, I'm a part of this team and whatever I can do to help the guy that's playing or the guy that's in front of me or whatever that might be, that's my role and he accepted that role and I do believe a lot of my success, and I can look at over all success because again, had I not succeeded early, I don't think I would had an opportunity to sixty late. So his helping me early on to allow me to have a early success in that system was so valuable and, you know, the way that he treated me and the way that he shared those experience in that knowledge with me. You know, I'll never forget that and you know, I try to do my best to emulate that as I found myself in those situations later. All. Yeah, you know, I went through a lot in Washington DC, you know, from battling with he Schuler and and the adversity of head button a wall and deal. You know, I had so many things and NORV and I fell apart. It was just a lot, you know, and you go through all these adversities and I end up playing a long time after that, but you have all these things happened to you and you can either say I'm just going to be out for me or I'm going to try and help everyone I can. And when I would go to other teams, I it doesn't matter if it was a starter or the guys behind me. It was like we're all in this together, and I really despised people when I would go to a place and they didn't want to share their knowledge, you know, like because we were competing at the same position, which I understood, but I'm also like,...

...look, if something does happen to you and I have to go in, I'm not going to know. You know you want to talk to me and I you know, I don't have the ten of the knowledge of what you have, and so if we you can share that, we're all going to be to be better together, and I've always done that and that was why I kind of like coaching to write. Is that I get to share that knowledge with everyone and I and that sounds like that. You really have up kind of felt that way throughout your career, you know, when you go to New York, then you go to Arizona. I feel like you just grew so much through all that and you want to really share with everybody your knowledge and it made everybody around you a lot better. Yeah, yeah, and I think it was twofold. You know that. I always took the approach that when I signed on the dotted line with whatever organization. It was. You know, there was no fine print that said, hey, you have to be a good teammate and leader only when you're starting and then write whatever else when you're not in the role that you want. Yeah, that's never in the fine print. The fine print says, Hey, you sign on the dotted line, you're a part of this team and your job is to be the best teammate you can be, whatever that means, and there's going to be different times that it looks different. But you know, for me, a lot of the time it was me as a backup and what was my role to be the best teammate that I could be to help that team be as successful as possible at that particular time. And then the other side of that was, you know, we grow up as competitors and as a competitor I always said to myself, man, I don't want to win a job because I know more than the guy in front of me, I want to win a job because I'm better than the guy in front me. And so I also took the approach like here, what do you need for me? Here's all the knowledge I can give you. Take it all and I'm still going to beat you. Out anyways. That is my approach every time I did it. So I wasn't afraid to pass out that knowledge because I wanted to beat them out when they had that knowledge. You know, I didn't want something to look at all. He's a rookie and so he doesn't know anything or whatever. You know, the reason is I wanted to be able to say, Hey, these guys are on equal footing. Kurts doing everything he can to help that other guy. Now let's put it to a competition and let the best guy play, because to me that's the joy of sports. It's about competition. And if I wasn't the best guy, I walk over and I do what I can from the bench because I realized the best guys playing. But if I was the best guy, then I don't like I've belonged out there and there was no reasons or no questions on why. You know why I was the guy in the field. Yeah, you know. And the other thing I take away from flipball. I don't know how you feel about this, but I mean you said all kind of records, you have an amazing career, but when you went from St Louis and then you end up in Arizona. You know you've played with some amazing players and we get to Arizona. You guys didn't start off like where you wanted, but then you get to the top right, you get to be really, really good, and so I'm sure that Larry and Edgran James and all the guys that you played with her really did they come up to you and ask you those questions, like you know about Marshall Falk and how did you guys deal in these situations and and did you take a lot of pride and kind of giving that knowledge out to them? Yeah, I mean I think you know, anytime you've been to the top and you've competed at a high level and then you come across guys that want to do those same things in a compasso same things, they're going to ask a lot of questions and and you know you're going to try to give him as much knowledge as you can to help them and shed light on, you know, what you can you know, but you also know guess that you know I can go through certain things and there's just certain things that I just I can't. There's no way to share it. You've just got to learn by experience and you just got to grow through experience. But but yeah, that was always a part of my role. I felt when I got here to Arizona there was a losing mentality, there was a losing culture. Nobody had any expectation, right. I mean in most places I had been at least we had expectations,...

...whether we were good or not, we effected to win, you know, we went into training Cambin Ay, we're going to win the Super Bowl, like everyone else. But I went to Arizona there seemed to be none of that and I was just kind of like, man, I don't know if I've ever been in a place like this. It felt so desolate and felt like, you know, everybody was kind of just out like well, I'll try to have a good season, but I have no expectation that we're going to have a good season, you know, and do really no possibility of US winning. And so that became one of the big challenges for me when I got to Arizona. was and I want to change the perspective that everybody in this organization has and everybody outside this organization has about the cardinals. I want to change their perception of what they can be. Want them to you know, give them hope, that that there's possibilities beyond what the last fifty years have shown them, and so that's kind of how I approach that situation there and it was a tremendous channel. But it was also extremely fun to be able to take guys and mold them and shape them and watch them carry that torch. You know, Larry Fitzgerald was a young guy when I got there and you know, him asking me a lot of questions. We became really good friends, and then for us to kind of succeed at that level together and then to see him kind of take that torch and he's been the ultimate leader for that organization and really represented a competitiveness, you know, and a level of expectation that they never had before. And he's been able to carry that on year in and year out, you know, since I left. And so you know and he's done a great job. So who's he going to pass that on to? WHO's the ranks guy? But that becomes part of the fun is that, you know, you take ownership in these organizations that you're a part of and you feel like you did a little something to get them where they're at and you want to see, you know, that torch continue to be passed and you want to continue to see those expectations, you know, set every year within those organizations so that you know they're striving for something, they're driving may be better than they've ever been before, and so it was a big challenge in Arizona, but it was also one of the things that I'm most proud of was being a part of changing that perception in that culture within the organization. Yeah, that's amazing. Once the only thing I ever really got to change was when I played in the Minnesota Vikings. I started the Donut Club on Saturday mornings and they still do it to this day. So I did that note three hundred four when Patt and Kevin Williams would say bring me the biggest donut, I'm like whatever, you guys won to hold them on fourth down. That's all the matters, example. But so you've had amazing career. Talk to me a little bit about the kind of role that faith has played in your career. Well, I mean the faith has been a huge, you know, huge factor in really everything. You know, the success is the down moments that we talked about being able to navigate my way through that, you know, in the ironic thing was that my faith, where it's at now, you know, wasn't the same when I was kind of going through a big part of the journey. And you know, I came to to build a relationship with Jesus and to make faith a priority, you know, when I was sitting on the bench and when I was working in a grocery store and when I was trying to find my way back to the NFL. And so, you know, I count that is kind of my training ground, not just my training ground to become a better football player, but my training ground to figure out who I was and what I wanted to be about and what I wanted to accomplish in life. You know, what the true mean of my life was. And so was very fortunate that when I finally got to the NFL, I was very focused on what I believed in and who I wanted to be in the values that I wanted to to possess and kind of, you know, share with with everybody. And so as top of some of that training ground was, I really felt like, both football wise and off the field,...

...that prepared me for what was to come. And and I don't know where I would be without it. I don't know what kind of person I would be. I don't know what kind of player I would have been, I don't know how I would have handled. You know the success or, you know the numerous benchings that I went through right know, you know what life would have looked like had I not had my faith and been grounded in this is who you are, this is how you represent yourself and it's bigger than football. It's bigger than the accomplishments that you have. It's about the impact that you can have on other people and that can look a lot of different ways. But that really became my mindset when I got to the NFL. As much as I want to compete and be successful, not ever going to sit here and say that that wasn't still a part of what I was trying to do, but it was all within balance and focus of that's not the most important thing. Keep things in perspective and be able to use your high and low moments to impact the people around you. So I would just say that my faith was essential and who I was the player I was, but more importantly, that the career I had on and off the field was real, really always dictated and driven by my faith, by who I wanted to be and, most importantly, by who I was representing. Right now. That's awesome. So then you've you've gone through this journey of football. You retire. You know there's a next step in it, right, so you've done a lot after you got out of the game. You know charity and community is really drilled into us in the NFL. We want to give back, so you've done a lot of that. You want to also work and you know you have to earn a living for your family and you have seven kids. At cost a lot of money, right. So there's a lot of steps that you have to take in all that. You can have a lot of money, but if you're not making more than it becomes tough. So now you're in a different journey. You get into the hall of fame. Now that has catapulag you to another level that you know only so many NFL players know about, right, and it's an amazing you went in with my good friend Morton Anderson that year and I was at at the ceremony that when you were there, because I went to Morton's after party and he was just off the chain, but he was. He had a lot of fun that N I'll say that. But now you've done so much to tell us like really what you're proud of since you left the NFL. You know, man, you know I've really enjoyed my time since I retired and you know I'm proud of all of it. I mean, are you retired though? Well, yeah, I mean exactly. That's what my wife asked was ask me that again yesterday because, as you said, I think I'm busier Nath than I was before. But yeah, I still feel like I'm young. I still feel like I have freedom within what I do, but I still feel like I've got a lot I want to accomplish. Right, there's more to do than you know just the first forty years of your life. So I'm excited about that. But but I'm really proud of a lot of things. I mean, you know, proud of the different challenges that I've taken in retirement. You know, one of the big things. You know, we talked about proving yourself from one level to the next on the football field, but I think you know, probably the biggest challenge that I've faced in my adult life was when I retired. And you say well, I've spent whatever, thirty some years of my life focusing on one thing. I'm not sure I'm good at anything else. I'm not sure I can do anything else. So what am I going to do for the next forty years of my life if I've got no other skills? So the challenge of going, okay, what am I going to do next and how can I challenge myself and, you know, and feel good about whatever's next in life, even comparing it to, you know, the the last career that I had. And so I've really enjoyed kind of challenging myself in different ways. And not every challenge is worked out and not every challenge I've been good at whatever I've taken on. But but I've tried different things and I'm trying to figure that out.

And so I've loved the TV and and the NFL work that I've done, whether it's calling games or working for the NFL network. That's a unique challenge in itself, but I think it's it's fed some of the competitive juices that are inside of me still and that is inside of all of us as competitors, and so it feeds you to want to be good at something else continue to do a lot of charity work. My wife and I just about two years ago open to a community living facility for young adults with intellectual developmental disabilities, or oldest son, Zach, sever a traumatic brain injury when he was young, and so to kind of give a full life to, you know, some of those individuals that I think are forgotten part of our community. And so we're a couple of years into that and the place is almost full and it's thriving and it's doing braid and so I'm proud and excited to about that. You know, I've got another foundation that I'm you know that I've had some siety, you know, second or third year in the National Football League and which trying to give people that don't have the same blessings that I have some some opportunities that they might not other otherwise have. I'm proud of that. I'm proud of the opportunities to be a dad and, you know, to watch my kids and to make them a priority when I know for a long time, you know, work and football was a priority. You know, do the during this whole pandemic. You know, I think we were all kind of sitting around going okay, what am I supposed to do and what's next and what's life going to look like, you know, when we get through this, and what's normal going to be again? And so, you know, during this time I did a number of like zoom meetings with quarterback rooms and we did zoom meetings, you know, for high school team and you know it did consulting with a lot of coaches and so right now in the process of developing a coaching instruction platform called Qub confidential that I'm going to launch a little later this month, in which I feel like I can have of a further reach inside this game, you know, being able to teach, you know, all the field stuff and obviously the mental stuff that goes with it, but also being able to share my journey, very much like you're doing, share my journey and encourage and motivate guys as they find themselves in different places. But really just about hey, how can I have an impact, you know, with the things that I've done, the knowledge that I have and maybe the expertise that I have in football? How can I parlay that into a chance to truly impact people, advance a game that I love, give people new opportunities and, you know, maybe more importantly than anything, encourage people, no matter where they're they're at on their path, to keep pushing because you never know what the possibilities are. You know, over my shoulder here you got the hall of Fame Bust, and don't do that to let people know them in the hall of fame, but a lot of times it, you know, it reminds me of the journey that for so long, you know, people wanted to say you don't have a chance, you can't make it, you're sitting on the bench, you're working in the grocery store, and that's just a reminder to me. You know every day that you know those circumstances won't define me and you know that you continue to work, you continue to believe, you have faith. You never know what the possibilities are and and I think that's really what I want to do or the next forty years, is trying to present new possibilities and give people hope about new possibilities, whether it be you know that those that are suffering with disabilities in some fashion, those that maybe you know in situations where they're suffering financially or don't have some of the blessings that I have. Maybe that's in the game of football, where, you know, guys are getting opportunities by what you're able to teach them, you know, in that regard, or even character, you know, just working with high school kids. You know, maybe there's something that you teach them in a lesson that you teach them that that carries with them, like we talked about earlier, like the messages are coaches had for us, and that can be the driving force that takes them somewhere new and somewhere special in their life. So, you know, I love, again, I'll say retirement, semi retirement.

I've loved where I'm right now and being able to enjoy all these different things that I'm doing and I'm not looking to stop anytime soon. I'm looking to continue to have the impact, but I'm also continuing to look for the proper balance for my marriage, my kids, myself and also being able to use the blessings that I have in whatever way possible that to help others. Okay, one last question before we get in our two minute drill. I know you have a movie coming out about about your life. How do you feel about that? I mean that that's got to be something special for you. It is. You know, it's you know, it's amazing. You know, for so long in my journey, you know, we talked about faith earlier. You know, I hit my knees in prayer and I'd be asking God, you know, God, why me? You know, why can't you know? I'd be the number one draft Ping. Why do I have to sit on the bench? Why don't have to work to Grou and then, you know, once you look back on the journey and now I hit my knees and I go, guys, why did you choose me for this? You know, why did I get the blessing of walking this journey that no one else has, that no one else will ever have, a journey that, you know, gets a movie made about your life? You know that we've had some great players in this game that don't get movies made about them because it's you know, those movies are about bigger journeys than that. And so I'm you know, I'm just, I'm humbled and I'm honored that that I've been able to, you know, to take this journey, that God's chosen me for this journey and we're excited about the possibilities of the movie right. I mean it's really just to me. I want to get the essence of the story right and I want to inspire and motivate people through our journey. You know, kind of the same stuff we been talking about, the possibilities in life, you know, given people hope when it seems hopeless, you know, when their circumstances say there's no chance, there's no way that you're ever going to get to where you want to go. Our story, I think, shows, and it's not just my story, my life story as well, that a lot of people don't know as well. Into the stories are all about perseverance and it's about overcoming and it's about, you know, being able to work through circumstances that aren't where we want to be but continue to stay focused on a belief that we can, we can get somewhere that nobody expects us to get. And you know, that's really, I think, the message of the movie and we're excited about we're excited about that, you know, and hopefully, through all of this, you know, we can find a way to get that thing shot in they're looking at a release next December, some next Christmas, so we'll see. But but we are definitely, definitely excited about the posts. Now. That that is awesome. I you know, it's going to be exciting and if a country ever needs it more of a story and to understand what it takes for you to get through tough situations. You know, these kind of stories help people get through and that's what I want to deliver to my fans and the people right now. Is that saying that? Look, we all deal with this and we have our own way of dealing with it and you need a support system, you need friends around you and don't give up, don't quit. There's going to be something around a corner. You just got to believe in yourself and do the best that you can, that you can do it that day. So your faith, your family and football's really ingrained you into the hearts of America. Right now we're going to do a two minute drew. I don't know when the last two minute drill you ran, but we're going to go down the field here and we'll see how far you get. So are we ready, son? Are Their rights? Are they're right? Wrong answers? I mean like they might get gets okay, pretty easy. They're pretty easy. You're ready, son? Are here. We go. All right, all right, two minutes on o'clock. Gas or electric car, electric fly or drive like rowd camp about going fly. I'm a fly. All right, all right. What's your pet peeve? My pet peeve is when people leave the milk out, because I hate warm milk. Okay,...

...what is your Mount Rushmore of NFL players, players, not just quarterback, anybody. No, just quarterbacksh I'm going to say Walter Payton. I'm going to say Marshall Falk because he was the best player that I ever played with. Oh my gosh, probably, but Lawrence Taylor on there. And then I got to put a quarterback. I got to put Tom Rady on there, even though I could make up a whole mount rushmore with quarterbacks, but I'm going to put Brady on there as well. All right. Hot or cold? Oh, hot, definitely hot. Favorite sports movie hoosiers. WHO's is? All Right, what record recreational sport do you play now? Basketball is my is my first leaves long. I love it, all right. If you could change places with one person in history for a day, who would be? I would probably choose a president. I don't know which President, but I would probably choose a president and just I think we all should be in that role for one day just to understand work goes into what goes into that position. Right, all right. Now, who's your favorite QB? My favorite somebody, Eh man, I mean my favorite Crebat qb growing up was Roger Staubuck. I was a huge Che Cowboys Fan and our stories were somewhat similar. He's got great character to him. I still think Tom Brady is the best quarterback we've ever seen. Gosh, I mean you know again, when you appreciate the position like we do, I depict different guys for different aspects of the game. But but I'll leave it with those two. All right, I got two more for you. Okay. Would you text, call, email or written note? Which one would do you prefer? Well, I do like written notes, but in this day and age I'm going to choose probably text over anything because it's just easier. But I do like written notes to either receive them or send them. All right. And last one, which I think is kind of a proposed today and all the conversations going on Jordan, Kobe or Lebron Jordan, I mean they're all phenomenal, but I grew up in Iowa where we didn't have a pro sports team. I grew up when the Bulls were riding high and Michael Jordan was on my TV every day. So I'm going Jordan. What do you think your kids would say? I don't think my kids know enough about Jordan, but I agree they price a leable maybe because of the last dance they all watched it, maybe they have a greater appreciation. But man, it's hard to argue I wouldn't argue with any of them that. I think one might say Lebron. I think the other one might say Kobe, and so we'd have a pretty good debate in our household. All right, that would be good. Well, Kurt, you didn't get in the end zone, but you kick the field goal. We want to thank you for joining I want to thank you for joining me on huddle up with Gus. Please let our fans and everyone who listens to our show no where they can find you, where they can find go to your websites, maybe help you out, donate to your charities, whatever you want them to know. Give us one last shot at it. Well, I mean I think the best way is just on twitter at Kurt Thirteen Warner. I'm always posting stuff about our foundations. I'll be posting stuff about to be confidential. That'll be coming out at the end of the month. So that's probably the best way to get all the information about what I'm doing. So again, Kurt Thirteen on twitter and we can direct you see the different places if you want to find out more information about treasure house or first things first or whatever we're doing. Yeah, well, thank you. And you're going to be doing NFL network again this year? I will be. I don't know what capacity it's, what it's going to look like this year, but I'm definitely going to be back work. First you argue with Michael EARV and so well, hate Kurt, thanks again for joining me after thank you for joining David I in the huddle.

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