Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Julia Landauer

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Julia Landauer is a NASCAR driver and 2-time champion from New York City. Since making history as the first and youngest female champion in the Skip Barber Racing Series at age 14, Julia has amassed dozens of wins in many different racing series. After becoming the first woman to win a NASCAR Track Championship at Motor Mile Speedway in her division in 2015, Julia graduated to the televised NASCAR K&N Pro Series West in 2016. She became the first woman to lead a lap in the Canadian NASCAR Pinty’s Series, and currently races in the NASCAR Euro Series. In 2017, Julia was selected as an honoree for the Forbes 30 Under 30 list in the sports category. Julia was also the only female member of the highly selective NASCAR Next class of 2016-2017. She is also part of the Global Shapers community, born out of the World Economic Forum. Julia graduated from Stanford University in 2014, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Science, Technology, and Society. Julia has since purposefully built her brand where technology, community and racing intersect and fuse. During college Julia was a contestant on season 26 of CBS’ reality TV show SURVIVOR. It was also in college that Julia started her motivational speaking career with a TEDx talk and she is now a sought-after speaker for corporations, universities, and conferences, including Fortune’s Most Powerful Women. Julia also served as an external advisor to Hyundai Motor Corporation’s Center for Robotic-Augmented Design in Living Experience. As she climbs the NASCAR ladder Julia uses her racing platform to continue advocating for STEM education and women’s empowerment. She supports The One Love Foundation, which educates about healthy vs. unhealthy relationships, as well as The TechForce Foundation, which helps students find technical vocations. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome to our PODCAST, huddle upwith gusts, where we talked to guests about how sports helped shape their life. I'm your host, former NFL quarterback, gusts fraud, and I'm joined bymy longtime friend and coach, Dave Hagar. We are a RADIOCOM originalpodcast and you can find us on the new RADIOCOM APP or anywhere you listento your favorite podcast. Now let's get in the huddle. All right,thank you everyone for joining us huddle up with guests, where we talked toour guests about how sports shaped their life, and I'm here with my cohost,Dave Woa and you know, Dave, we got another great guests on today, so why don't we bring Jolie in right now and we can talkto a little bit about how sports has influenced her life. So it's Julia. Thanks for joining us in the huddle on huddle up with gusts and weappreciate you coming on. Oh, thank you for having me. I'm happyto be here. So where we always start and what we want to askyou is, what was that moment in your life for Sport, your sportthat you love, came into play? What was that first time that youfell in love with it. Yeah, so I'm a race car driver,but I started in go karts and it was originally an activity that my parentswanted us to do as a family, for me and my sister and brother, and I loved it right away. But the moment where I realize Iwanted to pursue it full time was sometime around age like eleven or twelve,when I was in middle school, which is a really miserable time for alot of people, and I just realized that I was always most proud ofmyself at the racetrack, like, even though we had to wake up earlyand it was really hard work and a lot of times the racing didn't gothe way we wanted it too, I was always happier to be there.I wanted to be there instead of school, and when I realize that that wasjust where I felt the most accomplished and most proud, I learned thatthat's what I really wanted to pursue. How does that work now in thatlike go kart racing at that age, because, like, we're used tolike, you know, little league or soccer and stuff like that. Sotell us, like how that how that came about, like what it typicallike race day was like when you're ten years old. Yeah, so withgo cart racing, it's not quite like what you see at the rental cartplaces around the country, but these are very much performance built racing go carts. There are different manufacturers or specific engine builders and you you know, youyour family. They purchase all the equipment. My parents and one external mechanic coachworked on the go karts and it's really you know, arrived on Saturdayor Sunday, depending on when the racing is, and this was at aracetrack in somewhere upstate New York. It's the same go cart track that MarcoAndretti raced at from the famous on Dretti family, and we would go thereand we have practice for several sessions and it's like five to ten minutes whereyou go out practice, you make some changes to the go cart, wego qualify, which is where you go as fast as you can for afew laps to set the starting order for a race, and then we haveour races and they probably were about ten or fifteen minute races, but wejust did that every weekend and there was one year where I think we racetwenty seven weekends out of the year as a family. So is a lotof similar things of the whole family schleps to wherever the races are. Andit was local go cart racing and the National Races, where there were fivea year and we traveled to Wisconsin, Indiana, Texas, Florida, allover to go racing. So did you grow up in Manhattan? Is thatwhere you grew up? So, you get up in Manhattan got into gocart racing. That's it's pretty bat right if we're the heck. Did youput the go carts? Yeah, you can store the go carts at therace track. But then my parents have a place in the woods of NewJersey on my dad's always worked in New Jersey, so we kind of splitsome time between New York and between the woods and but yeah, we commuted. It was a good you know, two hours outside of the city toget to the race track and it was really special though. was really coolto be able to get out and and just dedicate so much time and effortto something that involves so many people. Is Very communal sport. So whatdid your friends say when you would go back home and all your girlfriends orand friends when you tell them that I'm racing go karts, because that's probablysomething that you know, maybe as they go to the Jersey shore they're goingto see go kart racing down there, like the ones you read, youknow. But what was that like? How did they take that and whatdid you explain to them how what you were doing? Yeah, so Iremember when I started. I think I started racing when I was in thirdor fourth grade, and you know, it was very weird, like theyhad no idea what it was as and everyone's so young and just like okay, cool, go do that. And as I got older there was definitelythe interesting balance of missing some of my friends things or birthdays or, youknow, parties that they had or in balancing that was racing. But Ithink they always got it. They just accepted that this was something that Idid and some people understood racing. Some people like watching things like Formula Oneor even Nascar. There a lot of NASCAR FANS in New York, I'velearned. They're just more closetive maybe, but but you know, I thinkpeople thought it was cool and it's very different. So I think a lotof people also just had a hard time understanding exactly what goes into it.But they knew that I exercised every day...

...and then I went running every dayor every other day and traveled quite a bit, so they knew it wasintensive, but I think some people definitely had a hard time really grasping whatall it was. Did you have the driver that you particularly followed at ayoung age? Yeah, so I grew up watching Formula One and so Iwas a big Michael Schumacher Fan, but then kind of when I was fifteensixteen, we started switching over to more oval racing style and when I startedwatching more NASCAR, I became a big Mark Martin Fan, a big CarlEdwards Fan, and I've actually been able to speak with him on the phone, which has been so cool to be able to talk with one of yourheroes and he's just like how you see them on TV. So yeah,there's definitely some some heroes in the sport. So when you start out and gokart racing, you tend to fifteen minute races. What are you thelength of your races now? Oh, yeah, now the races are liketwo hours. This year I was racing part time in the CANADIAN NASCAR seriesand they're a lot. It's a especially in the heat of the summer.Like a lot of people don't realize, it can be a hundred thirty degreesin the car because a closed cockpit and the motors right up front and itjust gets really hot and you're in full fire resisting gear, helmet everything.So I think when I try to explain what it's like, it's like rapbeing at a hundred percent physical and mental capacity for hours on end in asauna with people who want to pass you and are trying and move you outof the way. And maybe your car is not perfect so you have toadjust your driving to figure out how to make it better. And it's notat all like driving on the highway, and I think that's something that makesracing a little bit tough for some people to really appreciate, because most peoplegrow up playing basketball or baseball. I have some idea of the sports they'rewatching, but not everyone goes racing right and so the closest thing you canequate it to is your every day driving and it's just so different than that, obviously. But yeah, it's really tough. It's physically exhausting. Soit seems like from what I know and friends that I've had that love thesupport when you're young, your parents have to do a lot of work foryou. Yes, you know, because they're trout. You've, like yousaid, you're traveling, they're hauling maybe your vehicle around for you, they'redoing a lot of work repairs. So talk a little bit about your parentsinvolvement in your life. Yeah, and there's the whole financial component to racingas a place board. It's very expensive and I don't I don't think Iwould have been able to do it without my family, and partially because itwas my parents I did. It gets into gocarting, so I was verylucky that this thing I loved and was good at kind of fell in mylap. But they're involved. I mean they would always try to figure out, no, mechanically on the group go cards, what needed to happen,and then also from a mental point, they had to be our coaches andfigure out, okay, if we're putting around not doing well one race weekend, why is that? How do we prevent that? And I now tella lot of these stories through motivational talks that I give because my parents hada fairly aggressive, involved parenting sid really appreciate now is a little rough inthe moment, but no, I mean they they were dedicating all of theirweekends, so much time, energy and money to helping us go fast andto do the things that that we loved, and it's incredible commitment. So I'mkind of mixed us to whether or not I want to get my futurekids injuries just so intensive, but I mean I'm very grateful. So didyou have like a headset on when you were even young and your dad wasin there like Hey, put the pedal the metal, let's go. Luckilyit was only after the fact I got it just be in the zone andI was in go carts, but once I started in cars, yeah,we had radio communications and so getting feedback was a huge help for a lotof as my dad only gets on the radio ever so often, and what'sinteresting is that now he doesn't like to get on the radio, like nowwhen he comes to my races and takes more he my mom take more ofa, you know, kind of spectator angle to the sport now, butthey don't like getting on the radio, which I find fascinating because they wereso involved for so long and now they just want to see me drive.They don't really want to hear the behind the scenes stuff. So what's sotransition? You must have been a successful go cart racer at a, youknow, early teens. What's the next step like? How did you moveinto the kind of what were you're getting to now? Yeah, so thereare a lot of different steps you can take and really my dad and Iwould read racing magazines and we saw that a guy who now is a friendof mine who races in sports cars, he got into something called the skipbarber racing series, which is arrived and drive, more gentlemanly racing, likethe the series provides the cars, but he got into that series when hewas twelve, and so we're reading this and it's like, oh well,this is fun, let's go car racing. So when I was thirteen we madethe jump into cars and I ended up winning that championship at age fourteenand then just kept climbing the ranks and there was a bit of an agerestriction, so that was limited in which series I could go into. Andthen when I was sixteen I started transitioning more to oval racing and the NASCARstyle racing. And it was really because...

...someone I had raced go karts againstall of a sudden was kicking my ass in the road course racing in thoseskip barber cars and we were always pretty equal. So I was like,why is he suddenly so much better than me? And he had started doingsome oval racing and it really helped his car control, his ability to beright on that ragged edge without going too far. And so originally I thought, okay, let me just improve my skills and let me just go practicethat and bring it back to road course racing. But after I did afew races, I loved the racing on ovols. It was so much fun. Your side by side for laps on end. It was a really differenttype of racing, different style, the way you pass is really different andI decided that I had a lot of fun with that and I want topursue that. So just still a lot of homework, figured out which teamswe had to try to talk with, and then went fast and turn left. Well, Daves, your girls are at the point you're your one daughterjust got a license yes and now live will be getting her license soon.She was driving a car and like it's bride had a weight like she.She's like, okay, I got to get my license out. It's it'sprobably was so boring her. So many kids are probably so excited. Wereyou excited? I was that process for you? I still I was stillexcited because when I was super nervous, like because in racing I don't haveto park, I don't have to back up, like I have a spotterwho tells me where to go and everything. I don't take responsibility for that,but I was really excited to get my license. I had my racinglicense at thirteen and in New York City you can't get your license you're eighteen. Let's driver said and stuff, which I just really didn't want to do. And so I was very excited. But then there was all this pressurefrom my friends like, oh, are you going to fail, Your FailYour Road Tests? Happy and there was a lot of pressure. I didn'tfail. I got it on the first try, but I don't know,K turns are interesting, you know, right, you just used to justgo straight and then the circle and then all sudden you got to back upand parallel park. The parallel parking was the biggest obstacle that we phase.I was I I was her teacher, but then we ended up going toa school too, because I'm a terrible she actually is better than me.I'll parallel parking. She's just owned you out when you were trying to teacher. Yeah, is is typically she would. I didn't do anything with my kids. I said here, go to school because I knew I was likemy dad, like one wrong move and I'm all over them and they wouldjust give the first so it parallel parking New York probably was pretty it ispretty difficult. Sorry. What parallel parking in New York is pretty pretty.I mean, I've never really driven a whole lot in New York's I gotmy license at eighteen and then I left and I went foreignia and I movedto North Carolina, so I really haven't done a ton of driving in NewYork, but parallel parking's hard. The other thing is, because I didn'tgrow up in the suburbs, like parking lots, like at grocery stores andlike in malls. We're stressful for me at first because, like, there'sa lot of people driving. Not everyone's paying attention to where they're going andthey got to practice and then you get more comfortable with it. I hatepeople to drive fast and parking lots. It's the one the guy that likecuts like I don't go down the normal roads. If there's no cars,I go through all the spots. Just want to go and pray. Wouldhate that. I'm not a fan of that. So I so you goto tell us about the high school you go too, because I think it'sa college prep school and I'm not quite sure it's Stoy ves as. Howyou say it? Stivenson Stevenson? Okay, so don't worry. It's a toughone. Yeah, so it was. I went to I went to aprivate school through eighth grade and then I switched over to the public schoolsystem and New York City has a handful of specialized public high school so it'syou have to test to get into them, but they are fully three fully public, and mine had a math and science focus and for me it wasreally cool because it really opened up my world and I had eight hundred kidsin my grade and it was extremely diverse, you know, racially, socioeconomically,just background wise, interest wise. So I got used to working reallyhard. I missed some a hundred and twenty days of high school and gotto be really good friends with the principle and everyone, because to explain likeHey, I'm going to maintain my grades, don't worry, but I am goingto miss a lot of school. This is why I'm going to missit, and they were very accommodating. It was really I loved high school. I thought it was really cool and it was fun because, because therewas that math and science focus, there were a lot of people who wereengineering enthusiasts and people who loved like racing, and they understood the physics of it, and so people I probably wouldn't relate to in other ways we gotto bond over racing and they thought it was really cool. So it wasfun. It was a lot of fun and you probably didn't have the opportunityto play other sports my school stuff, because you're on the road and thenyou're trying to make up for classes and stuff like that. There's not alot of time to do be on a basketball team, for example. No, no, I'm what. I don't really think I'm built for many othersports. Some, I'll be honest, and maybe running, and I loverunning, and so I always did that. You know, several times a weekafter school, but I really didn't...

...start doing more focus training until Igot into college when I had access to a gym. It was like,Oh wow, I can do a lot more and if I do more pushupsand if I do more strength training, it helps in the car as well, and so it's been interesting and I've now work with a trainer. It'stray Shan and with podium performance fitness, and we do very specific racing trainingand neck training. And you know, as they are talking about concussions andfootball, they're also talking about that and racing, because even though we havethe helmets, like if we knock into a wall, we hit our seatrests and then that's still has the potential to lead to a concussion. Sobuilding up next strength, really building up core strength to be able to holdourselves in the car, because as soon as we start to physically fatigue,then all we focus on is just trying to stay upright and trying to getthe car around the track instead of more proactively how are we racing, howwe're going to get by these people? So it's really important to have thatphysical fitness and we do a lot of visual training, like really cool stufflike, you know, peddling on a stationary bike to maintain motor skills andthen having strobe boggles on that flash and then my training will throw tennis ballsat me and I have to catch them. So it's just doing all this stuffto try to train the visual the reaction times, the sensory input,just because all that is relevant to racing, which I think is so much funand really cool to fine tune. Right, Dave and I are partof a company here in Tis Work Code or street twenty one X, andwhat the company does a measures and monitors your brain performance, but by playinggames on your phone, and it's old neuro psych tests that we really targetdifferent areas of your brain. And so over the years that I've been doingthis, I met a company out of Canada. They what you were talkingabout, the tennis balls. They do it on a computer screen. Theyshow you three tennis balls in the beginning and then you have to follow themthrough the process and it starts real slow, then it gets faster and faster andit's working on what you're talking about. Like can you keep up? Canyou find these tennis balls, because you're trying to increase the performance ofyour brain as you go and our test is basically given you that score everytime. Right. Is what I am doing working, and I know partof what you're doing also is you start your day sunny side up at theWeston Bonaventure Hotel and suites and enjoy breakfast or two on us. No matterhow you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day witha hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US eachday you stay for reservations. Be sure that Promo Code S for Bappears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Mariottcom. BACKSLASH LAXBW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninetyand ask for a promotional code s four B. and now it's I gota great appreciation for it because I started the Pepsi five hundred one year andI was down to Daytona and it's the day before the big race and I'min a Pontiac Vaudeville. We're doing a hundred and twenty in a Pontiac Vaudeville. I'm holding on to the side because we're going around because it's so Steephn, and I couldn't believe that the guys behind us where they're just like giveus a were cruising. They're doing their little thing, you know, they'regetting ready to start the race and I'm hanging on in this car is screamingdown the down the track and I'm like, this is crazy. It was alot of fun, though. I really enjoyed my time there. I'mso glad you got to do that. Yeah, I mean it's super differentand even just to see a race, I can see how banks some ofthem are. It's like it's hard to walk up. And then you thinkof they're these like rocket ships on wheels. There's somehow staying on that and thenracing against each other and there's there's a lot going on. So whenyou talk about the heat in a car, how much weight do you lose onone of your races now, because I know that that sweat and thescience behind that, and how do you keep from sweating so much, allthose kind of things, because if you lose so much salt and sweat inyour body, it's got a be a detriment to your brain and everything you'retalking about. Yeah, so I've never measured myself, partially because, like, my care gets really wet and that and adds weight. So I thinkit's wouldn't be super scientific on me, but the average guy, so Iwant to say like five hundred and ten, one hundred and fifty, one sixtyish can lose five to ten pounds of water weight during a several hourrace. And so it's a lot. And so much of the preparation forracing starts several days ahead of time with hydration and, you know, cuttingout alcohol and eating really clean foods. And for hydration on race day it'sa fine balance because you want to hydrate enough that you're you know that you'resufficiently hydrated, but not over hydrating so that you flush out all the importantminerals and vitamins that are in your system. And what I found was that whatwe do have water bottles in the car that we can drink whenever,but what I found is that having electrolyte filled water or even just salt waterwas so much better than just having plain water because it really replenishes and getsthe sugars in the salts up. And...

Yeah, you sweat a ton,so you have to really balance that and take into consideration the foods that youeat leading up to the race. Juliet, tell us, though, so you'reat Stanford and but you're still pursuing your dream of being a race cardriver, like how do you balance that? You're on the other side of thecountry now, like what take us through that? They got race tracksout there. So, yeah, I throughout my college years I only racepart time and it was only during the summer's after my freshman year I actuallyinterned at a NASCAR team just to be able to be in North Carolina andthen I raced a handful of weekends during the summer and then, but itwas my junior year in college where I did more consistent racing throughout spring quarterand the summer. And you know, I raced there something called legends cars. They look like s cars but at like hap scale and they just goon a lot of shorter race tracks like third mile up to half mile inCalifornia. So I would just pack up on a Friday morning and drive overa few hours to a race track. Found a great team out there.We raced on Sonoma and these little cars which you know, they have anIndie car race they have a NASCAR race. It's in wine country, which isSuper Nice, and I had friends that came out to some of theraces and it was really cool for them to see. But, as Imentioned earlier, like I started really taking my strength training a little more seriouslyand really utilizing the tools of the gym had to offer, and it wastough. But I like doing a lot of stuff. I think there's alot of cool stuff in the world that's worth trying out. So that beingbeing busy but productive was always something that I really enjoyed and I think ingeneral my life is fairly fast paced. So for me that balance was totallydoable. Definitely a challenge and I found as long as I got adequate amountsof sleep, I was I was good to go well with him all that. Julia then Auditions for survivor. Survivor, I don't think it's that. Theman a layer, is it? How do you say the name ofthe where you went? Karamo, Oka, Karamo and island. Yeah, Isix it was fans versus favorites, but I will never be better aboutbecause it's half people who played before a people who haven't. So inherently unfair, but yes, I did. What's the audition process like for that?Yeah, I mean you have to send in an audition video and you haveto say why you're going to be good on the show, and I wasreally pulling in my school experience and how my racing in my school experience weregoing to make me really great. You know, the final result I've beena little different. I ended up getting the really boring edit. But Iwill say you know, for me it was a really big lesson in authenticitybecause I decided not to tell people I went to Stanford because you're playing fora million bucks, and so I thought, okay, well, if I playas well as a single mom or someone who worked a minimum wage job, you know, why would they give me the million dollar prize? SoI concealed that whole part of who I was. And then when you spenddays on an island where you don't have much going on, there's a lotof talking and I would realize I go to tell story and then realize,Oh, that would blow my cover and the last thing you want to dois let people know that you were deceiving them. So I just end upbeing kind of quiet. In addition to, you know, being thrown into thistotally unfamiliar environment. Your body's dealing with so much stress. I meanthere's so much going on. It's very authentic. But I learned that itwas just better to own who I was and just play into all the differentparts about me, because I know authenticity is a buzzword that we hear alot, but it's it's way better to own who you are than to concealbig parts of it, because then you just don't shine as much. Yeah, it feels it's probably stressful, like you're always concentrating on what not tosay. Yeah, yeah, and then you become quiet, and then noone like some quiet on reality TV. So you just don't thrive. Butthe challenges were so much fun. I mean, talk about those physical challenges, like you're totally depleted, totally Mountain Urish, you know, dehydrated,and with people that you may or may not like very much, and thenyou have to make it work, have to bring the team together, youhave to allocate jobs and allocate parts of the challenges to different people's strengths,and we lost a lot. It was a huge test and perseverance, butthey were so much fun, like the challenge is like jumping off of aplatform and hitting a plaque and then falling into the ocean. Is Very exciting. Probably those exciting is going two hundred miles round the track. But nowdifferent water can be scary, though, so it adds a whole new likerisk factor to it. There are sharks in there, a lot of stuff. Um. When. So, when you get eliminated? How soon afterthat moment do you return back home? You out there. I think theshow does a really good job because they don't want people knowing the finishing order. So we're out there. Yeah, so you just stay out there,you just stay at here. How long did it take, Fak, andI guess how long it take start to finish for you. I think itwas six weeks from when I left to...

...when I got back. The gameis thirty nine days and there's like kind of a pre prep and the poststuff. and was it like physically taxing? Oh my gosh, I think Ilost twelve pounds at the time. I was like five five, maybeone fifteen, and I got extremely skinny, which you know. I made itabout halfway and so I kind of look back and I think what wouldhave happened, how I made it the full leg because there was a lotof weight to lose. Again, your body is so stressed and reacts verydifferently and and I got really badly sunburned and know it was. It wasvery taxing and you don't sleep very well, so you're just yours miserable all thetime. And Yeah, do you think that somehow that helped you inpreparation for the amount of time you have to spend in a car racing andhow physically taxing and mentally taxing that is on your body? Yeah, that'sthat's a really interesting perspective. I am it definitely gave me a sense ofit, but at the same time I think races last a lot longer.We have to stay physically focus while being depleted, and I never as depletedin the race car as I was on the show. So they're definitely parallels. But I think some of the bigger lessons for me we're not so muchon the physical side, but I shall take that back. I'll get tothat in a second, but the kind of understanding how I am con portrayingmyself or conveying myself to an audience. I think that was a really biglesson. But another big thing was that team work component and the leadership.And you know, when you join a racing team, basically it's a rentalprogram. You know, we, as a driver, either ourselves or withour partners, pay a team to rent out the car, use the crew, and so we always, always have control over who we're working with andwho our mechanics are and who the crew chief is. And so in thosemoments, regardless of whether or not you get along, you have to figureout how to make it work. And I had a much worse experience onsurvivor. Like I've been pretty good with my teams, but it did.It was a really good lesson in how do you encourage all these people tobe their absolute best during the challenges that you don't have to go back totribal council and put someone off the island? Right, I'm stand it didn't work. We lost everything, but it was interesting to kind of see howdifferent people react to pressure and stress and being tired and then learning how toaccommodate different people's needs. Yeah, I would say that's kind of like thebusiness world. When I first started, I mean I played the NFL offifteen years going. It was a coach. And then all some in the businessworld don't know anything about that. Right. And one of the besttips I ever got from somebody who was a CEO. He said, look, when you go in and you're trying to pitch or sell, you're doinga presentation, you got to find out who that person is in that roomthat wants to be your enemy, that doesn't like what you're selling, andthen you convince them that what you're doing is great, because the people thatyou have to convince to be on your side are the ones that don't wantto be on your side. Right. And then that goes any kind ofteam. Right. If I had a player who had an issue with acoach, that did me no good on the field. If he's out therecomplaining about everything, we were going to win a game. And so youhave to get him on your side. Say don't worry about that, let'sjust go do your job, let's play. You know, same thing in thebusiness, same thing for a probably what you're doing, whether it's onsurvivor or trying to manage a team, that maybe some people you don't reallyknow and they don't really want to work on your card, and you gotto get them to do the right thing, because you know how important that isa hundred percent and I think that that ability to be a leader,no matter what situation you're in, is really important. And there's a quotefrom Bill Bradley that says leadership is unlocking people's potential to be better, tobecome better, and I just think that's really cool because it kind of putsthe responsibility in every individuals hands to make everyone else on their team better,and if you can do that you're a really valuable asset and I think that'sso true, like no matter what you do in life. So can youtell us a little bit about, I'm thinking, all the stages you've gonethrough in in racing. It's kind of like the minor leagues up to MajorLeagues of Baseball. How can you explain a little bit of that to us? Yeah, so I'm basically NASCAR specifically has three professional levels. The Cupseries, which is where you saw jeff board and you see Jimmy Johnson,would Dannika Patrick just retired from they have the NASCAR exfinity series, which ishere too, and the NASCAR truck series, which is the first professional level.My manager equates it to AAA baseball, and then below that you have moreof the regional touring series, which I guess would be the minor leagues, and I they have several different series. I raced in a West Coast Nascarseries for two years. This year and last year I race part timein the Canadian Nascar series, which it's Canada's premier stock car series. ButI would still call a kind of the...

...minor leagues compared to the states andthere are a lot of different racing series and you know, as you climbthe ranks, the races get longer, the cars get a little faster moreadvanced, the tracks get bigger, you get more TV exposure. So itreally is an interesting system. But I think those that kind of AAA MinorLeague is where where I'm playing right now. Right. So when you graduate fromStanford, like what's where do you go? Like it's in terms ofyou you're going to be a driver, right, I was pretty much decided. So, like what we're what of those levels did you start at?Yeah, so I graduated, I moved to North Carolina and that was intwo thousand and fourteen and then in two thousand and fifteen I raced in anascar sanctioned weekly racing series. So it was a championship ship at one specificrace track. So I went to that same race track all season. Onehalf the race of them won the championship there, so that was really cool. So that's kind of like the very beginning of the NASCAR ladder, andthen from there you go into more touring series, so you could do thesame type of car but add a bunch of different race tracks. And thenI jumped up to a series that had fourteen races a year. It isit was televised, the Nascar Canon Crow series, televised on tape, delayed, but still get to see it. And then, you know, itkind of depends what the goal is and it tends how much funding you have, for it does get extremely more extensive with each level you climb. Butnow we're trying to break into that first professional series in the NASCAR truck seriesand also doing other types of racing on the more minor leagues just to getthe good seat time. So does a car change as you go up,like because you own your own care? No. So this is where again, like you rent it from the team. So like in two thousand and fifteenwhen I won the championship, the car that I drove was three hundredand fifty horsepower thing and then the next year I jumped up to one thatwas six hundred and fifty. And the tires are different, the specks ofhow the car is built is a little different, the suspension is different.So and this year in the Canadian series they use different shocks. And sobasically, when you hit the brakes, and you know when your car thefront of the car kind of goes down a little bit when you hit yourbrakes. Basically, the way my car this year reacted is different than howit did several years ago in a different car. And the horse powers alittle different. And the break of pads are different. They have more robustbreak pads in some series and less robust break pads. So you have tobe gentle and maintain your equipment. So lots of different technical components. Soin Canada, do they have to put those little spikes on your tire soyou get around the tracks and all the ice like, but season goes fromMay to September because of weather? Oh Yeah, I'm sure those like Marchto November. Tell us Ali sponsorship works. Do you have an agent? Doyou solicit sponsors or did they come to you? How do how doesthat work? Yeah, so it's buried in something that's shifted, I think, over the last ten years within NASCAR. Think since the recession, the kindof landscape of the sport has changed a little bit and it is paytoplay and it's a mix of self funding through family or family businesses that yousee a lot of younger people coming up the ranks and unfortunately, sponsorship isjust hard to come by for anyone and the support is so expensive. Butfor me personally, I do work with a manager and we combination. It'sa doll of the above. Right we pitch. We're in a couple ofdiscussions right now which are really exciting, and then we have people coming tous for different partnerships and it varies in price. Like to run a fullseason of the NASCAR truck series is like two or three million dollars for theseason and the Cup series, after the best teams, is like twenty milliondollars. So you're talking big dollar amounts to go race thing. And sofor me it's about being creative and figuring out, you know, where Ican get little chunks of that and build that up. And so combination ofpartnerships like this. Yere I worked with Shell turrow and a wine company,which was really cool. Brought in a little bit. I've also self fundedthrough speaking engagements. But to move up we really need those more robust partnerships, and so is a mix of seeking them out and having people come tous and just finding out where I can provide value, not just from annon tract marketing but from a more holistic three hundred sixty review of how itcan help a company and their initiatives, whether they're at the track or wayfrom the track. Right. So you can say, Hey, I wantyou to sponsor my car, but then I'll come and speak for if youhave an engagement. I love to come talk to your employees. You're talkedif you're you know whatever that is, and we try to do that alittle bit here. On the total up with was sponsorship as well. Sowe had drive. If we try, we're working on it. We're workingon well, one likes the part with money very quickly. So but yeah, it's exactly to that point. It's about, you know, understanding wherecompanies needs and a lot of it for me. You know, women insports right now is really big and women's empowerment and being able to authentically carrythat mission and carry that messaging and to create content. Maybe it's a youknow, video content that a company is...

...trying to support or put out.Maybe it's being able to engage employees and kind of give that motivation for theinternal corporate initiatives. So it really just it's there's no one size fit alland people, you know, there's no like one deck that I send outthat you know. It's just like what is this company's needs? is orthere an organic fit and is there the room to be created and how wehelp each other? Does your manager do a lot of that or do youdo a lot of that? Yep, he does a lot, I doa lot. It's a full fledged team effort right now and you know,he's got relationships that I don't have. But I also I firmly believe that, like, I am my best salesperson and I think most talent will beif they can articulate it will be their best sells person. So it's acollaborative effort. Yeah, I know this. That makes sense. That is toughin your own business right your you has. So when you go andrent a car from a racing team, you also are renting all their mechanicsand everything else. So do you just pay one fee for that? Yeah, basically, and you you discussed with the team owner kind of what thecost are, what they need to make from it, and and that coverseverything. So if you have a sponsor and that sponsor wants to put theirlogo on your car, the team's okay with you putting that on their carand all that. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I think at this pointin racing in general, people aren't going to likely send away sponsorship. Imean if there's a direct conflict of interest with a team sponsor, I don'tthink it would work as well, but that hasn't been the case so far. Great. So then if you're part of a you rent a car,you win a bunch of races, you're getting more more wellknown. Does thatteam that you read of that car from also Rosher back to you a littlebit or not also red share back with you? Like, is there areciprocal you know you're paying them, but I'm putting you out in front stagebecause I'm one of all these races. Yeah, no, I mean it'sI think it's just a little more cut and driving that you know you're,as you said, like we pay for and then you know, hopefully,the team's doing a good job and then you get to show off all thework that you've now paid for. And and the thing with racing that's interestingis that's so much is out of your control, right, and the factthat I love that it's a tech face for because it is so cool tohave that human machine interaction. But like machines fail and like the stuff thatgoes wrong that's no one's fault. You can get a flat tire. I'vehad an axle break, which is a freak accident, and you know,just stuff happens, and so it's you know, when I talk about winrates and you think of a traditional team, any given player in a basketball game, any given player has a fifty chance of winning. Right. Well, it's Jeff Gordon who's one of the most decorated races of all time.He had a fourteen point nine win percent to just like you, you're sounlikely to win. Like winning, having a win rate in the teams isa very high wind rate, and so I think could be a little bitcrazy to pursue this, but there's just so much it's out of your controland so much that has to go right to win, and so I thinkthat's what makes it so special when it does happens. Like you can haveall the add weekends in a row and you just have that one good weekendand you're like I'm good to go, let's go racing forever because this isnice, and then you lose a bunch and then it's just throw intoxicating whenit does go well, because it's all tattoo. It's like golf. It'sat one shot that keeps you coming back. Yeah, when you show to keepit coming Bat Yamble, like we're game more. Yeah, like youlose a bunch and then all sudden you put if you win once, Iput on red and you win on this wheel. Yeah, definitely. Yeah. How does how does surprise money work? I know, like if you comparedto like PGA, you know, the golfers, maybe the top twentyfive get paid. Like how does it work in your staff? It dependson the series and there you know, sometimes the team takes majority of itsenjority of teasing, majority of it. Sometimes it's split with the driver.It just depends what the overall deal looks like. But then as you getto the higher levels, most drivers are on a salary for the team.Like in the Cup level, a top level, most drivers are on asalary. You also get endorsement money and licensing, a little bit from licensing. And then, however, a lot of teams will have a teer systemfor prize money. So if you finish ten or below, you get expercentage. The driver is ex percentage and you're more incentivized as you wins.Maybe get a little bit more if you get a top five and maybe youget like twice if you get a win, but that's just a case by casebasis. Valet stay and play on your next get away to Los Angeles. The Western Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city ofangels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch or concert or sporting event. 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PSF. So you've been around carssince you've been ten go carts and everything else mechanically. What is your skilllevel? Right? Can't. Can you do everything on a car? OhNo, Oh yeah, so on go cards I did a lot of thework on go carts and with race cars, as once I switched to Nascar Ihad a lot more to learn. Just that the cars are show differentand I would say that I'm technically literate. I know why different changes make heavyeffects they have. You know, if, let's say, the cardoesn't turn in as quickly as I want it to and going into a corner, we have to break it down and say, okay, am I onthe brakes? On my off the brakes? You know, you have to takea whole lot of pieces into consideration and I can, I will knowlike what family of changes can be made, but sometimes the crew people just havea more precise, more knowledge idea of what specific change to make.A lot of teams don't like the driver's working on the cars just because youdon't want us to mess it up right. But from an understanding standpoint. I'mpretty good. I can always get better and something I'd try to keepdoing. I um but it's a it's very interactive and I but I willsay I cannot tear pardon engine and put that back together, like no chance, no chance. Those people a lot more topsed than I am in thatregards. What's your average top speed right now? So the top speed Ihave hit is a hundred and seventy four miles an hour. I'm a littlebumed it wasn't one hundred and seventy five because that's a nice round number.But it depends on the track size. You know, I race on sometracks that are only a half mile long and those maybe we'll hit like oneten, one hundred and twenty, but then as you get to the biggertracks, the mile, the mile and a half, you're hot in thathigher range. But I would say the average all of what I'm doing isin like the average feed around at track is like eighty ninety miles an hour. Have you ever wanted wanted to do Formula One or any of that typeof racing? I started in that style. It became very clear that was goingto be a rough thing to pursue financially. But then also the oldowner's view on women was very public and nothing to reflattering, right. Butthen also, I mean as I get older and I think about safety alittle bit more, Nascar. I believe it's one of the safest forms ofmotor racing and unfortunately you still see deaths in Formula One and Indie car andreally serious injuries. That I love racing and I hope to keep doing itfor a very long time. I don't really want to die doing it's I'mgoing to limit my chances. Having that half, I like having the fullfender car and the roll page around me. I like that my head is notexposed to things falling off of other cars. So I think I'll probablystick with closed cars. But, like, I've never done sports car racing andI think that would be a lot of fun. But different, differenttypes, right. Yeah, there are different types of racing. What's so? What's the next step? What are you looking for to achieve next inyour sports? Next step would be a try to break into racing in theNASCAR truck series at first professional level, and they're still purpose built race cars. They just look like trucks to kind of help out the manufacturers, becausethe original model for a nast bar was race on Sunday, sell on Monday, and the cars saw on the showroom floor were very similar to wase onracetrack. So they kind of continue that tradition and then, yeah, andso to keep doing that and to you know, we've had a lot ofbad luck this year, and so they get some better results and have morethings come together and to race just a little more consistently. With limited budget, we I did a lot of cart time racing over the last two yearsand you get a little rusty, just like any athlete that doesn't get todo their sport radio. So lots more seat time and try to break intothat first professional do you have a favorite make? What do you race?or You Ford Chevy too? Are you so? In Canada we still rundodges. So I had a dodge challenger this year, which but I sizethat I haven't had a strong, strong, you know, feeling for one ofthe other because then the day they all go fast. So right,what card you drive? Just done a day to day basis. I drivea Volkswagen G yeah, I stick shift and I love it. Don't wantit to die anytime soon, so keep keep on that for as long asI can. Yeah, those are nice little car. So you can getaround pretty good. Sporty, they're really great and traffic. They're way easierto park than bigger vehicles, so for those of us who are parallel parkingchallenged, yeah, it's a it's a nice little car. I think thatwhat you're doing is amazing because I know that I could never do that.Just driving like on the turnpike going to see I went to see my sonthis weekend of William and Mary and and you have to take the Turnpike thento get on ninety five from DC. It's just insane. But doing itat a hundred seventy four, one hundred seventy five miles an hour. Ithink she's actually safer than we are out. I'm I don't think so, becausethere's some crazy people out there's a lot more than I like being onthe road. True, store I don't really like driving on the road.Like backcountry road or through the mountains are one thing, but it's way moredangerous on the street. That ain't much...

...more defensive than if you at therace. Always say my pet peeve is that person in as Fassling, goingslow. I think that. Thank you. I think hate that. Like justmove over right, like get over, let's move about. Well, I'dlike to see like Julia, like in a road rate situation that's notnot dangerous, but where someone cut you off and then they don't realize whothey're cutting off. She just rides her bumper and then, like like ashe could completely make them look silly, you know, and they didn't.It's kind of like get going to a bar, like picking a fight witha guy, but you don't know he's a hockey player, because he mightnot do that, bitch, and then he just destroys you. Yeah,know, like so, yeah, we're to see the boards you go into. Well, this is many years ago and just I'm whatever heard, butyeah, yeah, yeah, yeahs. I definitely get angry on the roadlike they they just opened up some expressed whole lanes north of Charlotte on thehighway and regardless of what the traffic looks like, I take them just becauseof like the sanctity of mind. It's like they're fewer people there. It'sfive miles an hour faster than the regular layans. I'm like know it.I'm investing in my mental wellbeing right now and other drivers. So it's worthit because I have to take it to guess my trainer. So yeah,I tell my wife at all time you need to have a little more patiencewhen you're driving, because she's on the horn. She likes, you know, the flashing of the hand, if you know what I'm saying, andvery nice way. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, like she getsangry really easy at when she's driving, which I understand. I take itmore your way at I just just go and you know, I don't flashmy lights at anybody. I am I'm I aim for that. I don'treally achieve it, like I definitely do, but I don't want to take yearsoff my life because of driving. So so, are you a fanof any other sports? So I I've been dabbling more like I really enjoywatching basketball. I can't tell you very much about it, but like,in terms of watching a sport, are going to a game. I dolike basketball and I've been to a handful of worn it's games here in Charlotte. But no, I wouldn't say like I'm a big sports I love theOlympics and I really, I really love these sports that kind of are morethe individual performance of the gymnastics, the running. I think track is fascinatingjust because I think track athletes are totally superhuman. But like, I'm knowledgeableabout some right, well answered. Your question is not really. But thereare some sports and some athletes I really enjoy watching compete. That's awesome.So one of the think last things we do on the show here we havethis called or two minute drew, our no huddle. We're we fire abunch of questions at you. So Dave always starts. So, Dave,bunch of far away are Julie. If you could make a mount rushmore ofauto racing, who would those for people be? Okay, so Michael Schumacher, Mark Martin, Paul Newman and I have to take that back. Damn, there's only four, because then there's also lind Saint James and Janet Guthrieand Shirley Muldowney. There's a long would you do a men's and women's MountRushmore? There are enough women trailblazers and racing that. Yeah, there are. So what's your biggest pet? Peete slow drivers in left lane. Yeah, I like it. So they're always were a page dissipater saying if youcould fell a young if you could go back in time and tell a youngJulia some bit of a bit of advice, what would that be? There aretwo pieces. One is always keep moving, always keep trying new things, like like don't well, and the other thing is something my mom toldme, and she was thinking about finances and getting compensated financially, but shesaid, you know, you'll never get what you deserve, but you deservewhatever you can get. And I really like that because if you're creative enoughand you've got enough hussible to go get something, hopefully legally and like,you know, not hurting any but right. But if you can do that,you deserve it and I think that kind of helps combat the doubt thatso many of us feel. So, if you could be anyone else fora day, dead or alive, who would that be? Serena Williams.That's pretty good one. Yeah, yeah, I think she's just to be theCOT. I mean just everything and I love what she does. Youknow, from a sport perspective, from an empowerment perspective, from a businessperspective, she's just she is goals and as long as she's been doing itas well. I mean that high love what's pretty amazing, and the familycomponent. I mean I love that it's been a family affair for so long. Right, if you could be the commissioner of Nascar for a day,what rule would you change? I would probably make the races shorter and soit's more intent. I would hope that that would make it more intense racingfor a shorter period of time. What is your biggest fear? U Ifear my baby's fear would be kind of...

...looking back and having any regrets orthinking that I could have done something more, I could done something better or moreintentionally. That may help, may have helped me get to where Iwant to go. What about physical fear? I mean, you're racing star driverand you've been a survivor, so there's probably not many. But like, we're jump out of a airplane, like nothing about that sounds appealing andI have friends who do guy diving and oh it's so great, it's sofun, like absolutely not like that. I couldn't do it. I don'tthink I'm go space either. Yeah, that and Bungee jumping, like Idon't really want to like dive off a bridge with a thing strapped to myankles and hoping and sees attached? Yeah, that's does not seem fun to meat all. Now I agree with you. And jumping out of planes, I don't get that. I maybe there's a rush that they you know, they always talk about how it's just there's a lot to lose. Hope. That's Strang word. Yeah, risk benefit analysis. Right, it's there'sa sales or a little weird. So what frustrate you when you're racing aboutthe other drivers? What? What? What do they do to you thatreally frustrate you? It's very frustrating when drivers block you, and that's partof racing. But you know, sometimes on certain racetracks, like sometimes,you can't always race side by side because the asphalt a little different or justdoesn't have attraction. So there's like one line that works around the race trackand if someone's blocking that's tough. Um, I think I drivers who do morebone headed bonds I moves I don't like as much. I think mydriving style and the racing that I really appreciate is really good, hard,clean racing, and there's kind of two school the thoughts. I think thatyou know either you know do anything to get the win, even if youtake people out, versus like clean, hard racing, and you got toearn those the place that you got. I'm more on that side. Ijust don't like anyone can knock someone out of the way, but to executea pass properly, I think takes a lot more skill and I just appreciatethat and drivers more. If you could step into a time machine and goback in time to for a day, where would you go and what timeperiod would you be? I would I am really really obsessed with N SNew York. I love s kind of a cross the board. I justthink it's a fascinating time period. And Yeah, New York City, Ijust think to know it today versus where it was in the s would befascinating. Like it's just a period I love a lot. Yeah, thatwould be great because it's totally change like when you go to the plays orthe shows now New York, nobody dresses up, like I can remember afew years ago my wife and I were going would always I wear a suitand she'd wear a dress and then like we're like people weren't shirts it.Hear all the time he is so laid back at so different yeah, andeven communal aspect and like you know, you see photos of like the sidewalkand Lower Manhattan and just how bustling it was, but like everyone's more orless connected. I think. I think New York with that technology that wehave now, would be really interesting because it is a big community. Right. So, what is your favorite sports movie? Oh, that's a greatquestion. So I love a League of their own, but I haven't seenit in a while and I think like to two thousand and Nineteen Lens iskind of different than when you see it as a like dum stager and butI also like I don't know if the Samlot counts as a sports yeah,yeah, that's a great sports movie. Yeah, what was the movie withTom Cruise in it when he days a thunder? Asia, Thunder. Thatmean as another really good one. But I just love how they like tookthe cameras in there, right, so that you've remember how you were saying, how you you want to smell it, feel it, like it almost inthe movie. You kind of get that sense. Yep, and asa fan, when I watched some of the races, like I kind ofalmost want that, but so hard for a camera to be able to dothat. I know is but they now also have helmet cameras, so theyput them on the helmets and you can just see how much vibration there is, how much the drivers are moving around. They it's it's definitely getting better.They're experimenting as getting getting good. All Right, okay, last question. What's the best race you've ever been to as a spectator? Most memorable? So probably when I went to the Formula One race in Montreal. Iforget how old I was, I was probably still single digits, but it'sit's in Montreal and it's on an island basically, and like the whole citycomes out for and it's just this whole to do and so much energy insuch a small area and it was just totally electric and it was my firstconscious memory of going to I think it is the first big race I hadever gone to. Just like wow, there's so much here and it wasjust I was an all that got you, he got to me, it gotme. That's great. Well,...

I think you taught David I alot today about about racing and we can't wait to watch you. When doesthis when does this season start again? So my seasons done for two thousandand nineteen. So we'll start up again in two thousand and twenty and I'llbe announcing across my social media at Julia land our racing plans once they getssolidified. Wonderful, wonderful. Well, we can't wait to watch you.We appreciate you coming on our show and learning about a sport that we haven'tbeen able to talk about yet. I agree. I'm interested much more rightnow than I was, you know, and maybe once ago. Maybe we'llget you out in the car. Let's do it. To do that.It's good on the caroline. I will go get in the car, willdo a show while you're driving. I'll interview you. Sounds good, aslong as we don't get in fights hockey players. Yeah, exactly. Practicetalking while you're exercising. That's one thing I'll leave on. You know,the driver has to be able to communicate with the team while we're driving,and so I actually started practicing talking while I'm running to get used to clearlyarticulating while I'm stressed, and so I gave a tedex talk in May andthere's one run where I actually went through the entire twelve minute talk while Iwas running trying to annunciate and speak clearly to have better communication on the radio. So yeah, it has to be great. Pussy engines going and andthere's all your mind has to be your talking, but you're also seeing whateverybody else is doing. It's got to be crazy. Like Dave just ridesa bike and he can't call. Somebody has to text me. True,I can't. There's nothing I can say. So, but thank you so muchfor having all those thanks for coming on. It was great and we'lltalk soon. Okay, thanks, joy to earlier. Hi, we wantto thank you for listening to huddle up with gusts, a RADIOCOM original.You can find our show on RADIOCOM, the new RADIOCOM APP or anywhere youlisten to your favorite podcast. Please leave us a review or comment if youenjoyed the show. We are on facebook, twitter, instagram and Youtube at huddleup with gusts. You can also visit us on our website, huddleup with gustscom.

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