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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Jimmy Lynn

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Co-Founder of Kiswe Mobile and former AOL executive Jimmy Lynn joins the huddle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I am former NFL quarterback Guspera. Iplayed quarterback fifteen years in the NFL. This is my show called huddle upwith Gus each week I team up with my longtime friend Dave Hager, and wetalked with guests about how sports shape their live. Pro Athletes,business executives, community leaders, everyone has a story to tell aboutsport. We invite you to huddle up with gus this week in the huddle he is Seidto Ham, one of the biggest role Hof dexes in Washington DC he's a pioneerin the digital sports sector is regarded as a leading broker, thesports management industry and, as a founder of AOL Sports, he developsstrategic partnerships with such organizations as the NFL WWF, MLB NBA,Nascar, Nhl, N PGA he's a professor, a philanthropist and an entrepreneur.Please welcome into the Huddle Jimmy Lynne: okay, hello, everyone! Today we have aspecial gas from Washington DC Jimmy Lynne he's going to get in the huddlewith US Jimmy. We appreciate you coming on and I think it's so powerful what you do from where you started where you camefrom and how suports shaped your life and how you are helping othersunderstand how supports can shape their lives right. So, let's get going andsome of the questions we want to start with was about when you're young rightand and where was that first influence for you. There really took you down thepath that I love sports and I want to play it all the time right. Well. Well,thank you very much gos for having music, guest and reat to reconnect.We've been friends for a long time, so I'm actually a half American halfJapanese mother from Tokyo, Fathers From Oklahoma. My Dad was a usarmyofficer, so I my first eight years were growing up on military base in Japanand I think it was around five years old that I really start got in lovewith teble and it's been a lifelong love for the sport of baseball, but itreally started with tball and you think about back in the S. Japan wasdominating the little legue world series back then, and so it is actuallyreally fun playing on an American team on the US base and we would practiceand play against the Japnese Littl League teams, and you saw a marketdifference on how the teams were played, manage practice. Japnese teams willpractice eight hours a day, they'd run off the field, take their hats offtheyve food cuts, a Bott of the managers versus American way, which ismuch different, and I think I start to learn about discipline and how to playthe game the right way and how practice s so important at a young age yeah. I know that's great and one ofthe things that Dav- and I were talking about is- is you know you being a amilitary child and probably being on a base, your whole childhood growing up?We were kind of wondering what is that like for to be in a military when youstart playing sports? Is it like? Are you going out? Are you on the base, ordo you go out and join other leagues? We don't understand that area of Allatall great question for the Little League you actually play on themilitary basis, so I grew up on a army based in Japan, so we play the Leagueteam from Navy bases, army basis and and those you have littleaguetournamental eleague games. But as you get older, when you play in high school,you play not only the teams, R, mother military bases. You play the schools ofthe private schools in Japan and Tokyo, who are the children of diplomats and business executives andgovernment officials hat live in Tokyo. No as far as like the coaches, and that you had as on your baseball team, was it militaryofficers? Was it dad's was like who really kind ofinfluence you as as a cood yeah a great question day, so when your littleleague, I it's primarily dad so military, it could be the officers orenlisted men. So it's usually the Dad's Av a coaching, but when you get to thehigh school level, Stachly High School Teachers Visit Teachers that areteaching you, but I think what I learned so much was observing thecoaches of the Japanese little league teams, because they just ran such adiscipline and regimented system and it...

...showd you how important practices andhow important detail is and routine is to make you a better team. What would you say the biggestdifference between typical Japanese player in a typicalAmerican players at an early age? I think the respect to the coaches,there's a hundred percent dedication to the coaching staff and the Merican wayis similar to UPID, there's so kids that just don't really get and the system the coaches get onehundred percent respect always yeah. That's that is a big differenceright, an it's almost a societal thing: yeah it is, it really is, and you knowyou try to I coach High School Ball. I coach Literal League football with Gabe,and that is hard to get respect to the kids. Hey, let's work hard, let's getit done in an hour and a half I mean you're talking about their practionfreight Oraat right Ean, it's just. How do you focus that long whie? You know,I think the fact is. Land is limited in Tokyo right because thirty, eightmillion people living there so when the kids have a chance to practice on a USmiiitary base, and you have that whole field for the whole day they takecomplete advantage of doing that. tothey would just practice routinepractice scrimmage over and over and over. So where do you who, in yourfamily? Where do you get your athleticism from? I guess on my Dad's side? Am My dad.You Know Irish America and fift generation OOkahoma CIT, so he was one of five boys and they all grew up playing sports. Soitwas always sports, and you know my dad first taught me t love ofUniversity of Oklahoma football because all my cousins went to Ou. So you knowI got the love of sports from my father. You know that that theother importantthing I think I want to share- is when your military Brett you live on thatbase for usually three years or up to five years but you're. Actually, Ithink your Socia lations socialization skills are very good because you'retaught to me make new friends every few years. Unlike my friends, it grew uphere in the DC area, who might have gone to the same elementary junior,high and high school for eighteen years and had lived in the same neighborhood,your forers, to make new friends every three years, and I think it you thinkit sucks as a kid. But when you look back on it, it actually teaches you tobecome better at social skills. Well, in terms of adjusting and beingflexible ye meeting people situations, everything sure tat exactly my kids arethe same way. I wasn't in the Millethairas in the NFL we move. Iplayed for seven teams eight, because I played for the same team twice y andour kids lived. I took my family everywhere with me right right andwe're still connected that way and they had to learn day to do the same thingwhere they had to create new friends. We throw them into a new school when wego to a new town and you had to learn all that kind of stuff and I'm sure itwas all the same for you yeah Gust. Other analogy I think- and you canrelate to this- is your network of friends? is so muchbigger like for you and Annie, but l alsoso for your kids right, becauseyou're moving in all these different cities, and so because of social mediayou're able to reconnect and stay in contact with friends. You grew up with,and so I found that our high school from Japan has a reunion every twoyears and we've been doing it for thirty years, I' I'm going to Nashvillein mid July for a high school reunion with with students that went thogh overthree decades and and that Grewp, because social, social media wow thatth, that's pretty cool. So when you were in high school and you wereplaying sport, what sports did you play in high school? I played baseballbasket, AL football, three yeah and then so. who was the coach thatinfluenced you to you? The most there was a coach named Mir, Elliott insevth and eighth grade, so we had a junior high basketball team and I was alittle scrawny point guard. We had some really good athletes on the team, but he really taught us a lot about teamwork and discipline and eight grade. We won the championship in Japan, beatingsome of the bigger bigger schools that had more people. But to me a highlightwas the championship game that my...

Japanese mother brought my Japanesegrandmother and Great Aunt, who only wore Kamonos had never been to abasketball, a dame, and it was really cool. Like my African Mercan teammatesgoing Yo man, Jimmy's Japanese people are up in the stands and are watchingthis like we got ta win for them. That's a highlight that was forty yearsago. I'll, never forget that that was a highlight. So when you came back to thestates, you were sixteen right Yep. What? Where did you go to school? Whenyou came back to the states yeah, it was actually a difficult transition,because I came back to wt Witson high schooland fairfracks Virginia, which is three hzand people and most athletes only played onn sport andit was hard to breakfreak into the system. So I didn't play high schoolsports the last two years. I continue playing baseball in the summers, but Ididn't play because I wasn't in the system, and so you know th American way is youknow you start playing in junior high and you come up through junior high.Then you have Jav and you go to Barsity. I didn't I didn't have that opporopportunity, so that was something at that was a bommer not not playing inhigh school, the last two years, yeah that has to be a difficulttransition. What about like academically? Your schooling in Japanversus Fairfax, great question, you N, I didn't go to aJapanese high school. I went to American High School and on Army Bat,so the education was good, but it was better here in the US, because ThorpaxCounty is one of the top ten public high school systems in the country andWhitzon is regarded. I think Willangley is two of the best public high schools,and so an education here was excellent, butfor me it was trying to assimilate going from a small high school in Japan,where you play threesports and class Vice President Sophomore Year you knowpeople, and then you come to this big high school. Where you don't knowpeople, and it was hard. Fortunately, for me, my best friend from Japan hadmoved the year before he went stooantan Thattherehey one of the StateChampionship in seventy eight. Their right number one in the country, Ibecame really good friends with the number of the theanadel guys. So youwere so. I remember when I was a kid in highschool and I was going to watch all the Varsity Games. I was a fan of like theguys who were in my high school. So is that kind of how it happened for you. Iknow you said you didn't play your junor and senior year, but were youstill fan of all the sports and went to all the Games? A hundred percenthundred percent yeah? I came here. You know I went to Woodson Games, but Iwent to a lot of Anadel football games. Soa. My friend was a really goodreceiver and his father actually was a forstar general and John Al Gutre waslike my second father and he had a love of sports. That was crazy. I's, like Imean Gussyou'll, relate to this back in the seventies there was somethingcalled the the hoolaboll where the college all stars would go play inHawaii and then the year after they would play in the Japan. I mean a weeklater they plann the Japan Bull. So when the college allsars would come Oto Japan John Al Guthrid, because he was such an avid football fan. He'dhave the US team come door army based topractice, so we got to see Tony door sat and Ricky Bell and Tho selemonbrothers. All these great players like in the mid Seies, which is a real,really cool experience. The other thing Jen Ral, gotth did really well wasthere was an HBC? U Game between grambling and Morgan State Ind, seventyseven and low and behold your predecessor, Doug Williams, was thequarterback hethrow an ninety. Seven Yard Touch Don passin the pioneer BoLontoko in seventy seven e. You knew how how great dug Williamswas going to be BOFOR. Anybody else did yeah ive told him that a couple times likeyou were there a thiame. You remember that he got excited. That was fine tugs,a great guy. I've met him several times and I know he's working with redskinsnow, but he is an an outstanding guy and had tremendous talent, and you knowhe's one of the guys that broke the barriers, absolutely for a lot ofAfricanamerican quarterbacks today Super Bowl NVP ie. Yes, he wasdefinitely so Jimmy One last question before webreak the hoddle. I wanted to understand like how you picked whereyou're going to go to college. You know...

...you had all these influences in yourlife living in Japan, moving back over moving back and then coming to back toVirginia to go to high school. What really made you want to stay in DC area,great question. So it's funny because I'm a professor now and I you know, Imentor these young kids, I sort of say I know what you want to do so back whenI was a kid. I was obsessed with statistics and sports reading, the box,cors memorizing positions teams and my friends fothes used to always say thatI was going to go in to sports broadcasting. I'd go into sports and Ididn't I didn't really. I didn't know how they knew, but they sort ed yew. Iended up. I wanted to work in communications in Radio and TV, so Iwent to American University in DC, which has a really good school ofCommunications. I think recently was rike the number one schoolcommunications in the country and I wanted to stay in the DC area and Iwant to do communication. So I went to AU both M underga time, which realattingset the foundation for my career in the media, work, media, industry, greatdeath, that's kind of what we wanted to hearis like you know how people make these transitions inlife and why they do it, and it really starts from when they're young Yep, andyou just keep these memories in your head and that I want to do that like Iwas lucky enough to be able to to go on and play the game that I played mywhole life and loved in not a lot of people get to do that, but we all havea love for something, and you know we transition into our to our next phaseof life. Jimmy. You know you, you go through this whole transition in yourlife and now you're going to college for the first time, and you talked alittle bit about being. You know, biratial, where your part,Japanese, Youre, part American and you know, did you have any of thosestruggles in high school that kept you kept going on into college or a lot ofpeople? Let that go and college becomes a lot different for them now. Gos.That's we've never talked about this. You and I are Bein friends with w. Solong, that's a great question, so I didn't appreciate being by racial, or Ithink part of it is growing up. Playing sports kids can be very nasty what theysay so, whether a point card or short, stop or quarterback. I got called a lotof names by other players. You Know Chink, Jap, goop NIP and you know tomine game it, and so I think I pushed aside my Asien side and and reallybecame more Ino, my Caucasian my American side right, and so it wasn't. Until my junior year andcollege I was in the library I was taking a sociology class and fellowstudent, a man Deby Freedman from New York City, where in the library andshe's, like you, know, Jimmy you're really lucky. I said why she's like youcome from two backgrounds. You have an American background and you have aJapanese backrond she's like I'm Jewish. I only have one and something aboutthat. The Light Bulb went on at twenty one years old and from that point on, Iembraced being a part Asian and and until then I had not, I put it aside,and I think it was sports that had maybe push it aside, because kids canbe so mean and at nasty with their names. But that's where I realllyembraced being by racial. You know working in sports. I was onlyone of a handful of guys of Asian background working in sports and butI'm really been pushing students of Asian Descenti to go work in area thatyou're passionate about follow your dream. Just because you're Asian youhave Asian parents to say you got to be a doctor lawyer banker. You don't haveto do that. Go follow what your heart tells you to do and for me, that's beenreally cool to see the growth of that and I'm also telling the Byracial kids.You know by Racialis much more prevalent now, because a Democrat orshifting, whether it's President Obama or tiger woods or or Saka I mean reallyhuch of it, like you know, look at your daughters situation, ryjust the Byratio as much more common than it was twenty five. Thirty yearsago I mean we like to talk about. We have been about influences in yourlife and you're upposed to force star...

...general, the you know all those greatpeople in Japan and when you you were supposed to in high school, but reallythat conversation with debbi was a major point in your what yea success,probably right so, but I'm glad you reference Mightso. Let me go back toJohna got three so when so, my best friend's family moved from Hawaii toJapan and seventh grade, and he went from a two star to a three star CampZama and he told his son and his best friend. Everyone is treated equallyrake race rank ethnicity. You cannot cut the line because your dad's, thegeneral, the other thing he did really cool that I observed was he playedsoftball and he bowled within listened soldiers. A majority of that wereminority, a minority descent. Most generals did not interact with enlistedsoldiers back then they were like the commanding General John Al Gutthreysaid treat everyone equally well and that made such a deep impact on my life,but for the rest of my life. He I looked at him as my second father. Hespoke at my father, so we dont know way he passed away year later, but I alwaysseun carring on his legacy and treating everyone equally and that's something Ilearned at at. You know seventh and eight grade. Well, that's real leadership right and- and itdoesn't matter if it's in the military, if it's in the NFL, if it's in theworkplace, if it you know- and you hear this all the time because the last fewyears I've been in the business road a little bit and when you see people thatdon't interact with their employees, don't know them and some people come. Uand don't even know their names. Yep, it's the same thing yeah and, and youhave to understand your employees, you have to understand their profiles andbecause you want to make them want to work for you and I'm sure that you sawthat in the military as well. So Gus. Let me tell you a story that think yourlove, the General Guttry was a dihard Redskin San, so living in Japan. Wewere thirteen hours ahead and so the NFL Games would come on radio in Japana Monday morning that iybe tape, dely John L Gussy, would call the Pentagon early in the morning get the redskinscore and he give us a score. Then the the cool thing is his son. Kavin wenton to play football at Princeton. He was all time leading receiver untillast year, his senior in eighty four. He was number two in the country. OneOua catches per game number one with Jerry Rice from Missispie balley state,and there was Kevenant, so Kevin tried playing te NFL for two years. He didn'tmake it, but his agent was Marvin, demost, Oh wow and then yeah Tha Co. Myagent Marvin had the idea to create this quarterback challenge, so my bestfriend Kevin actually created the quarterback challenge and the battlethe Gridiron and ran that in Hawaii in the mid during probl week, and the coolthing was John, a Guttho was such an avid fan and Sunny Jerginson. was thereso Jono gottree in Sidy Jermanson would ride side by side the golf caurt asjudges for that for the quarterback challenge? It's so you know you gothrough your college career and you know what influenceit really like you know,because, like my kids, they don't know what they want to do like Abbey knewwhat you want to do from thirteen. But for me I didn't. I still don't knowwhat I want to do, I'm trying everything, and so so for you, you talked about analytics yeah and todabt really influence where you graduated from what you wanted to do incollege yeah. So my senior year at Americaan, my last semester, I took aconsumer behaveor class and and thet share the marking department. Dr Mazerwas teaching and he pulled me at the side. He said Jimmy. Have youconsidered Grad, school and marketing? I said no, I am not, and he said fortyfive students on four got Ayou you got, you got an a marketing is natural toyou. So yeah encouraged me to go, get my NBA and marketing, and I spoke to acouple of mentors at the time and they said you know one school. A thought isgo for your NB immediately, so you don't start working making money. Youdon't know what it's like. So I actually went straight and got my MBAand I got my NBA Marketing and I graduated at Twenty Six and althoughI've been enterning an radio and TV, I really wanted to work in sports and soAndy Arcatelsan who's, a general...

...manager of wmal, which is the redskinsmedia partner, introduced me to his best friend, Charlie Broughtman, whowas a top sports pr guy in towns. So, as I tell my students all the time, Ifollowed my passion, I'm fifty thouserd dollars in death of my NBA. Yet I wentto work for Charlie brottmemand. I got paid nothing during the day workingforty hours a week. I worked at a radio station at night. I was a screen callorfor can Beatrice Sports Tock show and then fo, the Tom Snyder show I wasproducing the board, making six bucks an hour and then on the on the weekendsI dj weddings and Barmentswas and parties, and that's how I made money.But my point is: I started at the very bottom after about two months. Charliethen offered me a hundred bucks a week and then six months later, we offeredme a starting salary. Fifteen grand I asked for twenty one. I started ateighteen. So when I tell my students I started at the bottom I did, but Ifollowed my passion. You've been through these lifeexperiences Yeph and you can give kids a lot of influence on what they want todo in their life. If you had one word to tell your students like this is theword that you got ta you got to live by. This is what you got to do. What's thatone word you tell them Gret Grit at just just having the bility tofocus, be disciplined and grind and grant, especially in your twenties whenyou're starting is grit. Grit to me is the keyword I'm going to have you talkto my son gave because he's in sportins management at Delaware, and he needs tolearn that word. I've been telling them that forever, but kids never listen totheir DADS right, but I wish you would have talked to me when I was twentyright, so you graduate from American University and you're in DC. Who is that team? Whowas that person? What was that like for you as a fan of sports? I know you lovesports at that point like who did you want to follow? Who did you want to goafter? Who did you want to watch? This is really interesting. You know Ido like the Red Scans and the called the bullet stand. The capitals wedidn't, have a baseball team, but this is actually ironic. I was a big fan ofGeorgetown basketball from, but I liked Marylan basketball and George TonBausel, but I love the the hoyers of the s. The big eastas great and themost ironic thing is: I'm now my thirteenth year teaching at Georgetown,I live three townhouses down from big John Thompson, the legend and thepropessor who meets with all the recruit. So yesterday I was meetingwith a recruit and in comes coach Ewing and he tells the family. Oh, your metin,with Jimmy he's our closer and it's like so fregging cool that here's, aguy that I loked up to. I mean Patt and IARE the same age. Right and you know,he's hugging, you shaking your hands. You know tell him that thos Guy! Thisis my boy Jimmy. You know what it just so cool. Like that's someone. I lookedup up to an I life, so I think it's really cool and you know I tell ther. Ialso just like I talked about John Guthree, I think ot. What coach Tomsadid was so powerful. You know recruiting the players he did, but thethink Kos Shamson did. So importantly, was he strets academics to the players?I mean, there's still a half to play the Baasketball in the basketballoffice saying you're here to play basketball, but really academics iswhat's most important a, and I think you see how articulate coach going ishow a lot of his players are, and I think that goes to coach Thomson andthe Academic Advisor Team. He built in the s which most coaches didn't do backthen you're doing the boardwork for theradio station you're doing all these things. So what's your next step inyour evolution, all right telllet me walk you to the next five years, soowhere my career took off. So I did. I did the the PR job, but then, less than a yearlater, I had an offer to go. Work become a PO promotion director for aCBS radio station, an the DC area and the key message is especially wit, theyounger people, how important internships are so I the job requirentwas five years a major market experience. I had no experience, but Ihad impressed the program diuctor at the previous radio stations, so hehired me. So I worked in radio for three and a half years. Then I wantedto to stretch myself. I went into TV,...

...so I went to home team sports, whichbecame comcast ports, not Washington. Now it's NBC sports Washington and Iwas there, but just like radio. I felt boxdon like this is the same way. Youmarket a radio station, a TV station and I had the opportunity to go to acable conference in ninety four New Orleans and I heard a guy on the stagetalking about Awell News, Interactive News, how you cannot only read thestory, but you can engage with a story. You can do polling. You can do Trivia,you can be chat, you can exchange pictures and that to me was my aloholmoment. I want to do that in sports. So hcs is one of twenty two regionalsports networks in the country. I wanted us to stand up from H, othersand I want on us to have an interactive presence. So I went to Awel justbecause they were in Texan's corner in ninety four and they said we don't dodeals or regional companies. We don't have a sports channel at this time. Thesix months player. They called me and said that we really like your ideas.Would you would you be intered coming here and help us launch the sportschannel and that's where my career really took off in in ninety five? Wewant to start now with AOL kind of right where we met each other yeah,okay, an and tell us a little bit about AOL and what your role was there and gothrough that timeline of a mean just the world was changing. At that pointit really was yeah. I really so. Ninety five is really year. One of Internetsport sites going up many of the first sport sites and League sides launchedin ninety five through the next couple of years. So my job was to work oncontent deals for Al Back, then you're paying two ninety five an hour. So themore you stayed online, the more of the company made and the partner made. Somy job was doing partner deals for the sports channel. What's interesting iswe had met with some guys who wanted to create an athlete flog, site and n?They called athletes online at first, and so the first guys we signed up wereCujohna acarter. It was in e Mon teck and JEM harball and then a baseball. Iwas Eric Carros and Matt Williams, and so we were testing this concept ofinterviewing athletes. So I literally had this laptop. I would travel roundthe country with a laptop with that little pome cord. You stick in T, stickan outlet wouth, you know gig gearing up, and then I would interview athletesand when you interview athletes, I'm taking questions from the able members-and I would ask the professional athlete they give me the answer and Iwould tyke the answer and that's that was the beginning of whatever you calldblogging pot, everything and so in early the Fallo of ninety five, Ibelieve Proserf, which was in the area HerbsWan your agent came by said: Hey. I want to do something like you guys gotyou gotta. Do me favor you gotta, go. You got to go interview, my Guy Gus andI think one guy n estesses, but he's the back up quarterback herbs like I'mgoing to Ow. You go do this for me, so I said I'll do it so I actually got gotmy laptop and I drove and I drove and I drove and I got to Ashburn which to meseem like far away. There's reason the story's funny and I got to Your HouseYuand Anni welcome me in and I sut up my laptop, and I asked you questionsfor forty five minutes. You answered o them and you were really engaged and Iremember you were like. I think you called heat and said: Dude you got tocome over. Manis is like really cool stuff. We're doing- and this is thebeginning like we didn't- really know what we're doing right, but it wasreally cool, but that was really the beginning of interacting engaging withfans online and Youre you're, one of the first guys to do it. You see a budding podcast Nteback, notat all. No, I told, but I told I told Dav this morning I said I should haveleft a redskins and went with AOL would have been a better job. Tha would havebeen good bell. Itten. I actuallyended up saying your house for three hours. Imean I just hit it off with you and Anny, and it just you know bitbeginning of a friendship, because it...

...wasn't me that he liked it was my wife,Annie Love. Everybody loves Annie, she has a great personality and, andeverybody loves being around her Great Cook, she is a great cook. She loves tofeed people. Bt haother funny thing is about it.Fifteen months late, I was like man Guli Way, oft there n Ashbourn. Fifteenmonths later they say a was going to leave Tysan's corner we're going tobuild a campus like the Microsoft campus, Nike campus and low and beholdthe campuses in Ashburn five minutes from your house, so yeah like Awan MileAway, maybe not even yeah, where that Walmart is now it's a wegment, that'swhere they alook Camsu. So I ended up slepping there from you know from DCfor fourteen years. Well I mean that area where the Redskin Park was YeAshburn. You can't even there's no land left, everything is bought and andbuilt on, and it's just an incredible how the expansion of that area in thelast fifteen years has happened. Yeah it'sso, Loden County is now I think thenumber one highest income demographic county in the country- and I think youclearly tril- be that to Al. Then MCI opened up a campus. Next to us, sothose were too hot top commeto bid really well employes made a lot ofmoney and that changed the wholle ecosystem. New Schools won up you rods,went up shopping sponerseone up and to the stat. It's a fantastic countyaround that time is when Al, but net's Netscape, right, yeah, thats reallyfunny. I still remember in ninety five: They called a wellInternet on training wheels right then nescaped did ther righ peel in FOLVD,ninety five with no revenue and they his huge valuation that that was thebig ahall moment. But then, a couple years later we did end up buying BuyiNetscape, so it's gool, but I should transition to the the next person along with Johnal Gutthry was veryinfluential. In my life is itwas tedliansis I gat invited to a housepor picnic thatfirst month I start there and- and we had playing basketball against dee caseo CEO and Ted and after the Picnic Steve Cases, an Intrebert he's in thepool with his kids and Ted Flipping Burgers en the next a Bergar Gary. Sohe's like tell me something about yourself and turns out he's a georgeton grand we both have a love or George ton basketball. So that's where Ted andI our relationship started and I took Ted around the country for four yearsbefore we bought teams a introduced thim to Paul Taglebood. NFL Commissionbecame a one of his best friends and Mark Car Lee Steinberg and then eventually David Flockd, anCotus Popwichil. He got connected with Michael Jordan, so Tadis Bana Mento ona close friend for many years, but it was our loveos sports that reallygot the friendship off the ground. I remember we were always trying to dosomething. What we called the cyber cast in June and ninety five, where Iwould take my laptop into the oriels TV booth and then we would take questionsfrom fans and then I would tell the questions to melt proctor, Jim Palmeror John Lowinstein, and that was at the beginning of this whole interactivityon TV. But I remember at the end of the second inning I had the Tom Davissidline reporter interviewed Ted and between the breaks and telooks and megoes. You left that to come, join us. What the hell were you thinking I'mlike, I believe, you'll hipe Ibout, the Internet is for Real, but it Juessflonny how you know later that year I took Ted toa Washington bullets game. I think it was December of ninety five. I tookinto bullets game or sitting in the front row at center court and teds likewhere's gooner sit, I trun arize TAT, Mr Poland's for rose back and the Tedstands UPF. He looks at us. What is this seat? I said nineteen thousandEGAS man. Could you imagine the pressure of felling this Areni likeforty fifty times a year, and now he knows that pressure yeah, he sure doeswell the well Ise Deen a little research before wemet here Jimmy and I read somemore that you have one of the largest Rolo deckesin the...

Washington DC area and I believe thathearing your story, the network, is, I networkis incredible, tanthat's a keystrength. What e Do- and you know, tthey used to call me the Mayor Day?Well, they cal me the mayor on Campus Mell, but I love it in sports, whereAdam silver likes a joke. He called me the marror during Hin Bayall Starweekend by walking es like all right, the mayors here the party can start soit's good on the mayorside, but this goes back to going n up in Japan, likeI learned o relationship skills and socialization and skills. So I alwaystry to treat everyone well, regardless of who they are, and that goes back towhat I was taught by Johna got three at twelve years old thirteen years old,observing how important relationship skills are. So you talk about analytics when youwere young and how you love that you know there's a lot of analytics goingon in sports all today. There's the RFID tags that they put on the NFLplayers, e Dave and I love watching when a pirate. Finally scores and hitsa home run doesn't happen that often asonally they do this occasonally. Butthere's the exit speed. You know and then there's how far it went. What doyou think about all the analytics today compared to like when you were youngand you were looking at the analytics? I woas just telling the story yesterdaywhen I was getting my NBA in eighty nine, I took a stats class and I wasn'tvery good with the quantitative stuff, but the professor actually lovebaseball stats, so I actually use the computer malling to predict a itll ail,a NBP IN EI N, eighty nine and I used asmy research the bill, James Baseball, abstract books and well as cool Aswhen.I went to Awell in ninety five statink was one of my first partners and BillJames Wat, one of the founding members and stat. So I thought it was cool howthis came for circle and then th. The other part that's need, is you knowwe're trying to get awell members tof stay online as much as possible, untiback in ninety five. Ninety six! This was a new thing, and so what we did waswe actually creep use the datapeet from stats and create the first real timescoreboards on AOL for the first real time scoreboards on the Internet andthe entire game changed after that it wasn't just live scores. It was FAfantasy, so we thought it was being primarily for the life scoring andfantasy and reality you're providing live updates for the first time andthat deeply impacts the gambling inventing industry- and you know,they're getting real time information just not on score sponan injury isweather reports and so forth and that that's when sports on the Internetreally took off in Niney six. Ninety seven, because that real time, gamingand now the gaming andbetting is here in the US. So it's been justfascinating to watch that over the last two decades, you're done with AOL. Socan you go through the next steps and I know you're with a brand new companyyeah, but I know you went you had Jale associates yeah. You had a couple ofthings. You know. Mentos are important, so I meet with Ted in two thousand andeight he's like it's time for you to leave a while you've been there a longtime. They're such good gase Jimmy you got one of the best roller decks in thein the injury. Go help start ups go like take the knowledge you have go,help startups and you're the best connector go connect e business and I had about nineteenclients and probably thirteen or fourteen were text startup, so I'd bein advised to them helping them with strategy but, more importantly, helpingthem get connected to teams and leagues and Brands N Adency Globally and thenunder armor was one of my primary clients where I was on a monthlyretainer. So I had a great threean half year running underarmor, but a lot ofhe lessons. I learned from Aowal in the S I applied under armor at that time,because they were going through that phase of being a popular domestic frandinto becoming a global brand and trying to put under armor more in th thesocial and digital and mobile, and so it was taken lessons Learne from Mawell and applying them to the next. You know, hotwriting company, I would say,was, would you say that's your biggest tech start up that you had under armor,or is there another one that no yeah? I just otherarm was different because theywere a commercial intererprize and Alesona monthrotainer. So it was a goodaddition to the all the text starters,...

...but the other thing I was doing at thesame time as I also start teaching at Georgetown in two thousand five, twothousand and six. So I teach in the business school. Butthen, eleven years ago we created a masters, tave program and sportsmanagement. So it's people like for your son, who you know, goes to a goodcollege, but doesn't do the internships and they get out of college and likethey want to work in sports, but no one has been there. So we created a mastersprogram targeted to people right out of college who want to work in sports, sowe're now the largest program in the world. With over over three hundredstudents, we built a program Adoa Guitar, to help them prepare for he,the World Cup, I'm working on a program in Tokyo, I'm going to Tokyo in twoweeks, T to lecture there- and you know the the business side of sports in Asiahasn't been taught very well, and I want us to take a leadership position. What's your greatest reward fromteaching, I THK is giving back. So you know, tedleyonsis came tael in thes as the son of Greek Emmigrans, Rom Brooklyn. You know he stayed at hisparents made like twenty eight grand and he came to Georgetown first timearound a lot of smart, wealthy kids and he was lost and he was mentored byseventy five year old. Jez with phriesttang father, Dirkam and FatherDirkan, mentored Ted, so well, three years later, Ted graduates number onehis class, an seventy seven and then ta goes on much about you know, beingmentord and giving back to the community at that age and Tad taught methat and for me to this day I mentio two dozen students a year Georgetown ad most a majority of the students are, I know what he students and firstgeneration students, so Mantesa well over a hundred over thelast ten years and te me is positively impacting their life and changing theirlife is the most important thing to me and you know. In addition, I met to twoChinese American kids from a Asian nonprophit. I work with, and so tenyears ago, when the girl was nine, their frother was thirteen. I promisedher parents, I put them through college, so I'm paying for their TuitionUniversity of Maryland and the dozzy just graduate from Baan. Last year. Nowhe works capital, one and Wilmington Delaware and his sisters, a sophomorein Maryland, so giving back and changing people's lives and a positiveway is to me the most important part, a teaching and being part of a universitycommunity. That's great! So what are you doing now?That is disrupting because you've done so many things that have disrupted theindustry right and your love of sports and your mentors you've had. So whatare you doing now? That's disrupting the industry great question, so I am a copemoner ofa great mobile video company called Kiss. We mobile my two partners areJung. Kim and Winswelljong is a you know you can tie everything. We've beentalking about the last hour, together with this Jons, an Immigrat from Korea dam here, Selftaught Johns, Hopkins,Mabel, aw tmin. Ninety eight for one point: onebillion to locent. He went on to become President ofbelt labs, talk researchlab in the world, but he's been one of Ted's longest biggest partners with thecapitals and wizards and mystics since he early two husand. So I know Jumkthrough ten and five and a half years ago, Jung talked to me about what hesaw was tha third wave happening in digital and thit's mobile video, and hejust you know these smart guys like that, can see a few years ahead and hejust saw where the court cutting and cord nervous is happening where theyoung people aren't going to be watching as much TV or watching more onthe mobile device. So he he and some of his friends fromacatell Lucen are some of the best engineers in the world on cloud base.Mobile video and that's what we focused on my strength is my context, myrelationships and that's what we're a good team, where we've got a bunch ofreally smart guys and Technology and innovation, and I can get us in a lotof places: Media Companies, leagues, agencies all over the world and th.That's what we're doing so. We've been...

...we've been at it for five years andmore building. What a few leagues acks have told us is the we're doingprofessional work in the cloud that no other company the world can do so.We're working with leagues, work, win media companies and we're doing thisaround the world, not just in the US, but in Korea, in Asia and in Europe in terms of TV production. Will that eliminatemaybe the need for the mobile trucks and that kind of stuff or Thincan goBingo? So one of the things we're passing with a few people? Is therewe're basicall BCOMG more more like a production truck in the cloud, and sothe way you're able to do things is it felt o definitelyreduce the cost on the promection side in terms of having to have the truckthere and the huge manpower by being able to produce games virtually offyour laptop with most of the production take taking place in the club. So is that so like right here at Tribthey have a whole high school sports network and they go out and they do allthe championship games. They do games that are going on locally, whether it'swrestling or girl. Softball and they try to go out and really give a view ofwhat high school sports is going on, and I think that there's a lot of youknow they can't be everywhere. So that's something like like a smallthing like for high school games. Is that something where kiss we can reallyhelp an organization like this and to really bring all that info all thatdata in in a real time and let those fans of those schools see that Yep. Sothere's a couple things if you look at the three reasons: People the threebiggest reasons: people use our mobile APS or for the video socialization inthe gaming, but right now, they're on all different APP. So what we've doneas we put all three on the same platform, so, for instance, we have adeal with a propiders league on of the top me Ma organizations. We did a coolevent last night you can actually watch the matches. You can also chat. Thenyou canno, you also have the game invication feature who's going to winthe fight? How are they going to w n when the fight? What round are theygoing to win the fight, and so you see the usage increases dramatically whenpeople don't have to leave the screen so instead of having watching somethingon TV, then on your phone, where you're, interacting with your friends, we puteverything on the same platform and that's a path that hat's that'sdefinitely happening. The other really key thing about this. Going back toanalytics is if you're have a sports event on TV, that TV network can'treally tell you who's watching the game who's watching the air. If same thing,you spier er, can't tell you who's. Reading Their newspaper Radio can'ttell you who's listening to the radio, you can do arbithon, you can do Nealson,they can't tell you, but with a mobile lap, you know everything about the user,so the analyss game is so much deeper, so that resonates the markers and mediacompany. So much more, and so more and more TV networks have to have a mobilecompanion going forward in order to play in a leverage wayacross all the different multimedia platforms. Definitely I got T I got tointroduce you to my buddy. You might have met him at one of my golftournaments, Sean Glees and now he's the CEO of PBRprofessional bullwriters that Ma perfect that be e, because what they'redoing is theyre growing right and so back in the day back in the day, theycould not like get the scores out like you know, when they raite a guy he's onfor eight seconds or, and they have judges, writing their scores down wellback in the day, it would take two or three days for people in Venezuela andother countries to see what their scores, because they have the whole worldwide scoring. Now it's all, it'sall immediate right, an here's! There's o the perfect thing with that. Many ofthe top bollwriters are from Brazil are from Argentina right, but when CBR doesthefeat it's in English, only we have a way that that a person can call thatevent off Tal Laptop at home in their Tshirt and Portuguese or in Spanish.What we do is we take the TV feed in the caster calls the game in theirnative language. That goes up in the cloud sinks it with the video feet andyou got the perfect match. So that's how these sports can grow their sportby super serving EC each country right.

So if PBR wants to grow globally, theywant to put it in Portuguese and Chinese and French and German. Here's areally cost effective way to do it, as opposed to before you' have to bringthat person in he studio where you got studio, cost alike cos staffing costhere you just have the laptop and that's the production, ucper Wowl, that's that is amazing. That'sdisrupting the industry, don't you think Savin it up, Tet shake it up. SoHey we're going to break the hudble right there, Jimmy we're going to comeback to you and we're going to do a segment. We call no huddle right now we're going to go into ournohondl segment and we're going to fire some questions at Jimmy and we're goingto see how fast he can score touchdown so Jimmy Day, fire. The question aJimmy: what's your most prized piece is sports memorabilia. I have onethousand nine hundred andsixty six baseball bet from the Los Angeles dodgers, my favorite uncle'snext door. Neighbor was Genle Mandel, the Denver beares, who was the TRIPLEAteam for the LA dodgers. He New Iwas, a big baseball, fansoe game in this, aone thousand nine hundred and sixty six alright great. What about the mostoverhyped element in sports today? Most overhigh element LA LAKERS. I don't know just you know, ther's justso so much that I don't know. I get sick a so many t, Ramarti and too muchhype for the teams and t too much media coverage for these teams that I don'tthink deserve it. I welllik how about if a guy goes doesn't want to be on his teamanymore and gets to do all his stuff through social media and then o get totrade and goes to another team exactly and it's just on the news. Every dayright you get franzy get tired of it all right. How about the Best Game Day,atmosphere, you've ever been a part of th. This is actually going to surpriseyou Princeton Pann basketball at the pluser onethousand, nine hundred andninety nine. So here we are, my friends are coaching at Princeton and thinkabout it. It's IT'S PAN is up twenty five points over princeon with fifteenminutes to go and Princeton runs at that motion of offense ave, pete corelinvented and they came back. Twenty five down and Chrish young and MasonRocka led that team, and it was a thing where you just turned to your friends.He kept saying no weapon way no opin way, but that atmosphere, becauseplaster is probably the greatest basketball venue in the country- and Idon't Know Thet, took me BAC K on Thos N S and even though I go t all thesesuper bowls and Olympics World Cups, that's a that's! That's something Inever forget. Ive got a couple more for you. What'syour most disappointing or heartbreaking moment as a fan? Well, capitals I mean the capitals getso I mean so much good for me. In the city, I've been to Seeo, TAK or twentyyears brought so much joy, the city buthaving them lose game. Saven and overtime. Couple Os have been very,very disappointing right last one if you could tradeplaces with any athlete ever who would that be just for a day just for the day H, you know what I like is. I actuallya'm, not a huge fan of Lebron, but ILO, like just like I've dedicated mythe last part of my life to helping under publage low indcom Kit forgeneration. Call like Lebron is doing with those kids in Acuin is n he'schanging those lives. Those kids are going to go to high school, going to goto college and each person's like Pou Change. You change dozens of people, soI think what Lebron is done is heroc wow Jimmy. Thank you so much. We got to cut it off because we gotcoach dicket coming on a couple minutes aind. You know we got TA. We got Tareally heare from Iron Mike but appreciate you coming on. I mean yourtransitions in life and where you've come, and what you're doing now forpeople wos incredible. So thank you so much from Hotdo up with Gus, and I me Ilove to got a Copey and I want to share it on social media eyeah. We definitelywill thank O uy. Thank you. Tak Care, byebye.

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