Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Jesse Bradley

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week's guest on Huddle Up with Gus is former professional soccer goalkeeper Jesse Bradley. He shares the journey that led to the end of his soccer career and his transition to becoming a pastor. Jesse is from Minneapolis and is a Vikings fan at heart--SHHH don't tell that to any Seattle fans.  

Jesse said his love of sports at an early age."At age three, I told my parents that I wanted to be a professional athlete." 

His parents divorced when he was 7, and he became more focused on academics and athletics during his teenage years. After graduating from Dartmouth College with a degree in Psychology, He was living out his childhood dream as a soccer goalkeeper. Jesse played soccer as a goalkeeper in the US, Scotland, and Zimbabwe. He currently leads faith and family night with the Seattle Sounders. 

Here is Jesse telling me an abbreviated version of his fight to stay alive and save his career.

"In Africa, I took prescribed medication to prevent malaria, and it built up toxic levels in my system. I was fighting for my life for a year, and it took ten years to recover. During this time, my life was transformed in the most profound ways: identity, faith, mindset, habits, career, and relationships. The greatest blessings and growth in life can emerge from the worst situations." After denying God's existence throughout his childhood, he never anticipated deciding to follow Jesus.

Thank you, Jesse, for sharing your story!

You can find Jesse and everything he is doing on his website: 

https://jessebradley.org

Hey everyone, Welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback Gus Frerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, some people say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read. 16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latest news, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favorite podcast. Follow up with gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital news dot com. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron at the diamond or on the links, we can only say, yeah, welcome to this week's huddle up with gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchises with 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the games are. One. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios, it's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us two left. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFL quarterback and I want to welcome you to the 16 31 digital news podcast studio. So today we're sitting in here and thank you to 16 31 digital news for, for hosting us. I also want to thanks Sounder FM. That's our podcast platform man. Without them. We haven't been getting the audience, you know, before we got on the sound. Now with Sounder, our audience has increased. A new listeners have come on in droves. So thank you to Sounder and all their new transcription and everything that they're doing. And uh you know, we want to thank in the last month, we did a big promotion with Manscaped and so we want to thank Manscaped for for letting us work with them and hopefully becoming a partner. So thank you to Manscaped. Um and you can still go to Manscaped dot com, put in my code Gus Frerotte all caps at G u S F R E R O T T E, and you can get 20% off and free shipping on any products that they have, and They have the new lawnmower 4.0, now it's not the lawnmower that you think, but if you're a guy, you probably need it. Uh so today joining us is professional soccer player and uh somebody that uh I think his story just relate so well to really why I started this podcast, uh because we all find our path in life. So, Jesse Bradley has found his path in life and I think he does an amazing job of it. He's a speaker. Um he goes around and tells his story. He has, his faith is amazing. Uh he's been through many trials, he's been tested. His faith has been tested and I think he just has an amazing story. He was a goalkeeper in the U. S. And Scotland and Zimbabwe, and joining us now as Jesse Bradley, Jesse. How you doing, buddy? Gus, thanks so much for having me on the podcast. I appreciate, you know, I watched you as a player. I always enjoyed watching you play and then the podcast. I love it. That you go beyond the field. You really capture the stories and the journeys of the different athletes. So, thanks for inviting me on the show today. Yeah, yeah, thanks for joining me. You know, it's it's a lot of fun to be able to get to talk to people, especially from different backgrounds and, and uh you know, we all come from a different place and a lot of times we end up in the same area. So tell me a little bit about your story in that moment where you fell in love with sports, because I read a little bit about you, where it said that you knew when you were three, you were going to be a professional athlete. It happened early for me, you know, I grew up on the campus, the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers,...

...probably the toughest mascot, but big 10, I mean we had the barn back then with both hockey. Basketball, Williams arena was shaking so there was so much passion Minnesota winters, you gotta find something. Yeah, real hockey player. So I watched it started to play it, but then basketball caught my heart and so I had to make the choice, went with basketball and you know, I told my parents our first apartment was in the parking lot of the football stadium for the goal first. And so you couldn't miss it. There's you know, maroon and gold everywhere. And I started going to the games with my parents, told them this is what I want to do when I grow up and that never changed. I mean I sports for me, I started playing, you know, football, I just grab a football as a little kid and I was the quarterback and the wide receiver and catch it the snow. Or I would put up a nerf hoop and I would be both teams. I was an only kid. So you know, it wasn't something that anyone had to say you need to get involved around our neighborhood. We just played all the time, go to Van Cleef Park and all the kids were playing out on the streets and of course we found games too. But when my parents got divorced at age seven, I would say that I even put myself more into sports if that was possible because of that pain right there and that loss, that void. It's like, well what do I really enjoy in life? And I didn't have anything I enjoyed more than sports. And, and so I played three sports in high school, it was basketball, soccer and I also baseball, but I just couldn't get enough sports. I loved it. Minnesota is a great town. I mean playing for the Vikings and living there. I lived in Rochester that I lived in uptown and, and um I've been all over and I, you know, in the winter times, obviously when we're there for the football season and everything starts freezing over. One of my favorite things was just riding around, seeing the pond start freezing over, seeing everyone started to get them ready and they were, they would clean the snow off, they'd make their rinks that all sudden there'd be a bench, then there would be a goal, then it would be lights and it was, Minnesota was amazing. It's a, it's a great place to play sports. Some of the sports athletes that come out of their incredible, you're right, you're right, you got to be resourceful. So it's ice fishing, making a pond, I mean those winter times, but minnesotans are pretty rugged as well. And you know, we had Kevin Mchale that I watched growing up, you know, Dave Winfield, we were hoping you were going to bring us that long awaited Super Bowl guys, you know, Hey, I wanted, I wanted to, I mean, I would have loved that, you know, but we've Minnesota has been so close so many times, you know, there they went from me and my old behind and, and then in 2000 and eight, then they bring Brett Farve in in 2000 and nine and I told coach Children, so I'm like, just have both of us, we're gonna have 80 years between us. Like what kind of, what team has that experience? Like? He's like, well, you know, whatever, which I get, you know, I know that they really wanted bread, but that, which, which is fine. But man, that Minnesota has been so close from Gary Anderson. Uh, uh, you know, missing that field goal, that one is brutal. Yeah, man, I grew up, you know, we would go to the old stadium before the Metrodome. The old Mets Stadium. My grandpa was a famous surgeon at the University of Minnesota, renowned, just a lot of pioneering work, but he had season tickets. So we would go, I still remember the cigars, I was there the game where they threw the bottle and hit the ref, you know, oh my gosh, I remember have a seat from that old stadium. Still, I don't want to. And then, yeah, but tell me like it's, it's like it's colder than Green Bay, I want to say because I played outdoors in Green Bay and it's been cold. I played outdoors in new york. It's been really cold, but cold. And for some reason in Minnesota is just like none other. It's no joke. We had to plug in our car and I didn't come from a well off family, but we plugged in our car at night and it still took a while to get started in the morning, the car doors would freeze and let's say one of my parents drove us to school, they brought a bungee...

...cord, we'd all leave the passenger side up front. They don't have a bungee cord and hold the car until it warmed up enough and you can actually close it. So it lives up when I lived in Iowa, I thought this is balmy compared to Minnesota. I played lots of pranks on people in Minnesota with a nice frozen tundra up there in the cold. Uh, you know, just from freezing guys clothes and putting them back in the lockers and I did it Morten Andersen and it was a lot of fun, but so you say that you said that your parents were divorced when you were seven um in sports is a big passion and one of the things for me is that I hear from a lot of people that sometimes that when you play sports you you you you kind of get a mentor from a coach or somebody that that you connect with, did you have somebody like that? You know, obviously your dad and your mom and you know, I did too, but there were still coaches that I had, there were a big part of my life that played a huge role in who I am, absolutely, especially when my dad moved away, I would've stayed and I didn't see him much growing up, those coaches, the impact in my life was huge and I said to every coach, anyone's involved in youth sports, those kids look up to you so much, they remember their coaches and you can influence those kids in such a positive direction, you know, in high school we won the state championship twice in soccer, my coach was Buzz Lagos and his son Manny. Now you know, leads Minnesota United, the MLS team and I grew up with those guys, Tony Sanneh made the World cup, but Buzz developed talent and Buzz saw me playing basketball and that was my first sport, that was my first love, but he saw the potential for me to be a goalkeeper and sometimes in sports you go further in one position, then you anticipate or even different sport, then you start out with and that happened to me, soccer was going so well and so I had Buzz in high school and then in college I went to Dartmouth on the East coast, and bobby Clarke is a legend from Scotland, he was a great goalkeeper, but beyond that, I mean he just helped us go from boys to men really during those years and it was like a professional environment and everything was, it was world class and it was just top notch and the relationship with him, it's hard to put into words how much, you know, the things that he would say and do every day and he would walk up the field and say, oh it's a great day, lots, you know, it's a great day and and that just carries over and all of a sudden you kind of get some of that attitude that overcoming that perspective and pretty soon you're like, it doesn't matter if it's cold, it doesn't matter who the other team is, like we're going for this thing and we're united and when the culture is that healthy sports is a lot of fun, the coach sets the environment. I mean for any one listening, you got kids involved in new sports, like check out who the coach is because if you get a good coach, so many other things fall into place and they're not just the coach either, right there there there there to me, there are human, right? They understand who you are. They try to figure out what's going on in your life because they know that if you're having a bad day at home, probably not going to play very well. So they want the good coaches to me are not just about the X's and oh's there, about the whole person and especially in youth sports because kids are quiet, you know, they don't talk much and if you can get to the root of what's going on and get them to kind of let all that go and play hard, you're usually going to have some success, but the success comes in, creating a good athlete, but also a good person. That's right, because good coaches know how to motivate, they knew they know who they should kind of, you know, maybe push a little harder, who needs some encouragement. And when I went to Dartmouth, I just felt like I already had a friend in coach where other calls coming from coaches and recruiting, they might ask that what were your S. A. T. S. Again? You know, they just go through the list of standard questions, but it's like he wanted to get to know me and that bond that we formed even before I arrived on campus. I mean that relationship, life's about relationships, Quality of relationships, the quality of life and coaching. It's one of those special bonds where they're a mentor on the field but then so much more in life as...

...well so you really didn't want to go anywhere warm because I know Dartmouth is not warm. I applied to so many schools in California, I was set to go that direction. That's like it's like okay I'm going to play soccer so I'm just gonna go where it's cold and we have to play with the ball that's frozen. Oh I want to be a goalie and have them kick that thing like 100 miles an hour in my head. I know we played in the snow uh N. C. Double a game. It was my junior year and we had a shoot out in the snow and when when you're a goalie and you're landing on that frozen tundras, you said earlier, I mean that's a pounding, you feel that your back feels that the next day. So what is the speed, Like, have you ever got, have you ever made, like, you know, with a speed gun? Um kind of seen what somebody can kick, like what is the speed of a soccer ball? That is a great question, I would say over 65 mph would be my initial guess, but that's a great question. There certainly arrange and as a goalkeeper, I always knew the two guys that shoot at the hardest. My it's like uh I got my w goalkeepers catch it with the w so I got my w ready and I'm just on the balls of my feet and I'm ready wherever it's coming. But yeah, I would say that overall is a goalkeeper. I I would pray for games for quick reflexes because the shots come so fast and and they can catch you if you're not in balance if you're just on the wrong foot leaning the wrong way, like you're done, that goal is pretty big and for a goalkeeper, if you make one mistake, That's often the game midfielder can make 10 mistakes, no big deal, you know, if you throw that one pick six and it's like game over on that key drive, two minute drill was a goalkeeper. If I live in one bad goal, you know, that could be the difference. And so the goalkeeper is, it's a psychological position as well. So do you play armchair goalie a lot? Like I play armchair quarterback, right? Like I'm always, I'm always Patrick and these guys that are playing, like why did you make that throw? I'm like, shut up people, you say that about you, you should be talking about them. Oh, it's so true. Every time I watch a goalkeeper, I'm always like, is he in the right position? And then the second thing is what I have made that save and and the ones that are harder, like I know I would have saved that, you know, that free kick right there, I would have been at that upper corner, it would have been saved. So yeah, goalkeeper um you can't help but just show up and analyzed and you played a position. Yeah, so all right, so you're in college, you're at Dartmouth, you know, you get there from Minnesota, that's a long way from home. Yeah, so, um like for me, I went from Pittsburgh to Tulsa, which is 1000 miles, That's a culture change too, right? And you had a culture and there was no easy way. Probably while you probably take I 90 the whole way Dartmouth from Minnesota, right? Like you're just traveling the whole north, like every snowstorm there ever was while you're in college you hit. That's right. We drove it once and yeah, it's a long drive, a lot of, lot of winter scenery, there's no easy airport. What airport did you fly in? Because there's no easy way to get the Dartmouth. No, and you've got to fly in, it's a propeller plane up to Lebanon, New Hampshire. And I remember going to the airport sometimes I'd say, yeah, my next plane is Lebanon and they'd be pointing you over to international flights and I'm like, no, no, no Lebanon, New Hampshire. Right, right, well kept secret up there. Yeah, no, that's awesome. So you're there, you're getting into your, your, your final year. Um do you know like what is the process for you to turn professional? Yeah. You know our team went over to Scotland and we played against the top teams over there granted. I mean it was guys our age, it was a lot of guys first team and second team combination but we played against those clubs and so I got a sense you know, we tied the best team over there that we played against like we tied him, it was a picture that we can play at this level. You know some of us are going to continue to play and then you know my junior year we made it to the final eight in the N. C. Double A. We lost to...

Alexey lawless at Rutgers. You know I talked to him on his radio show and I think I got him to admit that he was fortunate to win that game. He doesn't really want to admit that, but you know, that taste of success on a high level here, the collegiate level going overseas and then that was the dream is to play and through my coach. I mean there were opportunities, the different clubs, yet Aberdeen in Scotland and then there was the Highlanders Bulawayo and that's in Zimbabwe and then in England, they were queens park rangers and then man, you, I mean, our coach was good friends with Alex Ferguson who is a legend in the UK, so trying to sort through that and make a decision and you know which spot, a wide range, but I felt like, okay, I've gone to Scotland, I went back to Aberdeen and and was there for for three months as well and training there and I felt like, okay, I understood that context and I understood that club and I wanted to go for something very different and so the UK, it felt kind of similar and I thought let's go to Africa next. And uh there was later an opportunity with new Zealand as well, but Africa was the choice and it was also to experience life there, I mean, you know this with sports, you can travel, experience different cities or countries, cultures, relationships and you see so much and I've never been in a country, there was poverty, drought, AIDS, you know, to that level. It's one thing to read about it, but it's another thing to go there and I wanted to experience that, I wanted to make a difference, I wanted to help out, wanted to, to some students if I could on the side. And so that's how we end up going to Zimbabwe. But yeah, that was, that was a big decision. looking back. I mean it was one of those, we have different points in our life. There is a crossroads and you've got to decide and there's times where I think well what if I would have gone to manu and tried to make it there, what would my life look like? But I don't look back with regrets. I mean I look back and sometimes the best experiences come out of the worst circumstances and the tragedy I had in Africa uh that redefined my life and redirected my life in so many ways. It was brutal. But there are also some amazing things that came out of it. Yeah, I was reading a little bit about that. So tell our fans about what happened to you over there while you were in africa. Yeah. I took a prescribed medication from a physician here to prevent malaria and it's called larry, um meth liquid quiNINE based drug. And I took it every week as prescribed and after many months you put up toxic levels in my system and a flood of symptoms came on and I noticed that I had migraine headaches. I couldn't handle any lighter noise and I, someone who never has headaches. So that was strange. Little bit of double vision sweats and chills. And then the crazy stuff that happened though is my heart would just start racing. And here's a few conditions that the drug produced one was tacky cardia, racing heartbeat. I'd be sitting still. Like we are now in 160 beats a minute. Like my heart's beating out of my chest and I couldn't stop it. And then also atrial flutter, Another abnormality skipping beats, Heart murmur and just pain in the left side of my chest. And it was like, am I going to make it, am I going to live? I mean this was life threatening for a year. And I flew back because the doctors in Zimbabwe saw the decline and they said you've got to fly back while you still got some health. And so I came back. But the other symptoms as well. Crazy dreams, just weird kind of semi hallucination stuff. And then also, I mean because if the lights were off in a room what my mind would do would just be um it's like a bad trip or something and you turn the lights back on and kind of come back into focus. But I had panic attacks, anxiety. I never had before depression, I never felt before me. A couple of suicidal thoughts would come in and my emotional equilibrium was shot. And it was like this drug was just taken over my system. So I flew back to the U. S. We paid out of pocket went to stanford. He listed 10 things that could be one of them was the drug. And when I heard it I just knew on the inside this has got to be it. And the physicians at that time all said I need to keep taking the drug because after you return to the States you take it for a...

...month and that protects you from malaria because malaria could linger. Now. I went against all of their advice inside I won't take the drug anymore. And we had my blood sent to C. D. C. They found toxic levels of the drug in my system. And it's a clear conclusion that if I didn't decide that. And again that was a prayerful decision. I'm not going to take the drug another month of that drug would have probably killed me. And so that month right there, I didn't take the drug. Of course I didn't have malaria. It was all side effects of the medication. There's probably people who can relate that I've heard stories or maybe they've gone through side effects before and this was like to the extreme and no one really saw it coming and didn't identify it. And so finding out what it was, it was eye opening for me. And then of course, later on I learned about many other cases with this drug and it's controversial and many people wanted band and I just didn't know that going into it. Yeah, that had to be hard. So how long were you taking it before? You knew for you found out it was about four months that I took the drug. And then like I said, the symptoms all came out at once. And when they came on it was a flood. And I was flying back within about a week. I was flying back to the States because the decline was pretty rapid. So once you got off and how long did it take for you to recover? I was fighting for my life for a year and with those heart abnormalities. I mean, it was scary stuff every night I might move back in with my parents. Never thought I'd be in that spot. You know, But they would, with a, like a baby monitor, they would just be listening at night like, what's going on down there, you know, and, and it was it was out of control and, you know, making it through the physicians didn't know what I ever recover which symptoms would go away. And there was nothing they could give me because they didn't want to put like a blocker in there because they didn't know how they would interact with the overdose of the drug. And so that could shut everything down. But the drug inhibits the inhibits my heart so the heart can't regulate itself. And I just didn't know how long that's gonna last, how much my heart could endure. I mean, I'm grateful. I was a professional athlete at the time because I had to make a chart that now I can walk 10 minutes without my heart, you know, over amping up, I couldn't even drive because my heart was so sensitive. Any stimulation would just send it raising. So I was not driving for a year. You know, I was just charting that. I could walk up to 20 minutes. You know what that heart monitor on and I'm trying to watch it. And, and so to make it through that year. Uh, it was, here's some of the things that happened for me though, one is my identity shifted and without realizing it, I had my identity and my performance and that was doing well in school and grade sports, the crowds, my career when all that stuff is gone and you got your identity in that. The question I wrestle with was or who am I? You know, who am I? And I had to shift it instead of what I do to who I am And for me and I realized there's a wide range of listeners right now viewers. But for me, I actually came to know jesus in college. I didn't grow up with the bible religion. My family is like 31 flavors spiritually, a little of everything. We got rabbi, ex Catholics, atheist. So that relationship has started in college, but it wasn't deep and during this trial, that's where I realized, okay, I'm going to find my security in a love that won't go away in a presence that won't leave me or forsake me, You know, and that was an intentional shift. I started some new habits. I had to let people into the pain, my motives, an athlete, you know, but your best foot forward, you perform top notch. You don't show weakness. And so for me to admit, like instead of denial, like I'm scared, I'm worried, I'm sad, I'm down, you know, and let people into that pain. That was new, new coping mechanism because my whole life, I've always thrived and you just do better. You learn and you perform better and, and that wasn't going to work here well, you know, as an athlete to, as a professional athlete, as soon as you show something is wrong or weakness or I need help teams like, oh, okay, we're gonna go get this guy then, right, because there's somebody else coming along, right? And and that's what happens to so many athletes is that they don't want to talk about...

...their problems. They don't want to say, hey, look, if I can just get this help mentally right, right? Or if if you can understand me in a different way, like it's so hard for us because we can't say that stuff. So what happens to a lot of NFL players that they don't put down what has happened or what's wrong with them? Like after the season, right, they give you physical and then all of a sudden you don't tell them everything that's wrong. And then when you go to get your disability afterwards, you're like, well, you didn't have this. And like, yes, I did. Well not down so I can't imagine, well how was your team with that? Like when you, like you're going through all this, you've been a professional athlete. That transition, as you said had to be crazy because it was hard enough for me. Yes. After trying to transition from the NFL, I can't imagine like yours was like, you had to just stop. Yeah. Is no choice involved. Sometimes life's going one way and it's just not going that way anymore. And I saw it with some teammates because in Zimbabwe AIDS was so rampant at the time that there were guys on the national team that were like 20 years old, 21 they were just dead couple months later. So they had seen that of course I left. But you know that transition, I didn't know how to grieve. I'm not someone who likes grieving grieving doesn't come natural anyway. It's like, I don't want a pity party and I didn't know how to enter into some of that grieving and so much loss when your childhood dream, when the job you love and I had no Position I was going to step into. I didn't know what career I didn't have like a planned life after soccer goalkeepers can play sometimes to their 40. So I just figured I'd be doing this for like a good 15 years and I love doing it too. I love doing it. So I missed it so much and you know, trying to discover, okay, well who am I and what are my gifts and what are some of the options and what health am I going to have? It's so humbling because athletes know their bodies and when you lose control of your body, especially like an organ, like your heart, you know? And then also I felt like I was on the brink of like, trying to keep my sanity and so, like, am I going to be in my right mind? Am I gonna have a body that can actually do any work? You know, and and what options are there? And doctors couldn't say, oh, you'll be better at three years or you'll be better at four years. I mean, it took me 10 to fully recover. I would say that it was very gradual and just little by little it find that, say about 9, 10 years, there was a turning point where it's like, okay, I really, I feel comfortable in my own skin. I got my stuff back. The symptoms aren't so obvious, like I'm moving forward now, but I mean, that's a long haul with no guarantees. As athletes. We train our tails off the training, that you had to go through to be a professional athlete. All the lifting the running, the, you know, there's always something you're going through. Then all of a sudden you're you're put through this other test. Did you draw back on all that training, like the times that you were running and couldn't breathe in high school? Right? Remember those things like when you thought that you couldn't get it through it then, and all of a sudden, you know what I mean? Like I know I know all those fitness tests that you dread, you know, they're coming for months. You just work so hard and then you still you take the fitness test and you throw up. I mean, that's I don't forget those. But what I would say is that discipline, I see it with athletes and see what people have gone in the military is that you develop this discipline and sometimes you learn how to do things maybe you don't want to do, but they're good for you. And there's a tenacity with it as well. For me, it shifted instead of the physical endurance and seeing how far it became between my ears and and that was the fiercest battle. And I'll tell you what started to changes. I realized my first thought, I can't control. I mean, if it's a negative thought, if it's a morbid thought, if it's a suicidal thought, I can't control that first thought, it comes in. But I do get to decide am I going to harbor it? Believe it, entertain it, reject it. And then I'm gonna choose my second thought. You know what's true, what's good and I can't tell you with the drug and I don't know exactly how it works.

But it felt like again a storm of negative thoughts all day long and I wanted to keep my mind out of the ditch. And so I mean one thing I started doing, I've never done before, it's really memorized the bible. Just find some verses that are good, some things that are solid and start to marriage. So whenever those negative thoughts come in, I'm going to go back to what solid. But it could just be also just gratitude. I start to write down literally just 10 things a day that became my new habit Habits are powerful. They're small intentional steps with big results. I had to choose 10 a day. I'm going to write down because I would otherwise over focus on what I lost. Now there was sadness there, but I needed to still remember what I do have and I need to stay grateful. So I would write down those 10, I would intentionally think about those things. And if I could win that battle in my mind, then out of that healthy thinking, you know, life is going to come back, lights going to move forward, there's going to be healing. But I had to guard that and like I was guarding the net from the opponents, in the soccer balls. I was guarding my mind from the negativity, destructive thoughts, the lies of discouragement. And it was fierce. I was on goalkeeper mode I think. Yeah, yeah. You were definitely protecting everything about your soul and your heart and everything else. So hey, everyone where you are talking with Jesse Bradley. Um he, he obviously has told us an amazing story about how he overcame a drug that he was taking a formal area. We're gonna come back, we're gonna talk a little bit more about his professional career and we're gonna get into what he's doing now and how that hard transition that he went through has led him to what he's doing today. So don't go away, we'll be right back. Mhm. Hey, how come up with Dust listeners Manscaped. They sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch of tools and formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh So, you know, I want to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think we got a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package three point Okay, And I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in this great box. Uh you know, and you can see what it says. They will thank you because they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh, you know, stuff that makes you smell better. And then, you know, they sent me this great uh, some boxers what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know, they sent me this, cool it uh, sack, I guess you want to call it to store all your stuff in. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product. Um, you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, you can go to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G. U. S. F. R. E R O T. T. E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code. But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like, uh, this way cool rumor that has a little LED light, um, ceramic. These things come apart. They're waterproof. You can do a lot with them. So, you know, manscaped is great. You know, it's funny money. I remember when I was playing with the Denver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was a gentleman who was playing on our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears the story, he'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But he brought his own clippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up his goatee and everything and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes in around the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player that is actually manscaping with his beard...

...trimmer. So you know, one of the things is, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here. So uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have you been using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeks ago and I've been using it ever since, so you know, there is a lesson learned that, you know, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just said manscaped on it, we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one of the funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or been around in the locker room in the NFL, so it's a great story. Um, but you know, I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy was just using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of a funny story. So, one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing in the league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscaped and what they're doing because guys, you got to take care of yourself even though I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you still have to maintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, you know, we all work out for me. I like working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, get a little sweat on everything. You want to smell good. You know, you got to take care of yourself, They've got some great products. Um, you know, this one, uh, a little uh, all deodorant, we'll need that here and there. Um, after, you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um, it's a great thing, but uh, there's so many great products um I want to thank Manscaped for sending them to me. Um The lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you can use it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen the commercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmower three point oh comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower by itself by all these products individually. They even sent me this wonderful shirt. You can see the back. Your balls will thank you. And then here's the front. So it's an awesome shirt. They have a great gear. And you know what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a little bit and and read the paper. So Man's Cape even has their own daily news, so which is great. So don't forget that you can go to the Code Gus Frerotte and that's G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. P. E. Uh And you can save 20% on any products, the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know you can save 20% and get free shipping so use the code just for A G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. T. E. Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong back my pro bowl jersey. So you know I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forget how important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself down below and have some fun right there's nothing closer to you than your little buddies. So use the lawnmower. Uh Use the code Gus Frerotte, save 20% and get free shipping and uh order some great manscaped products so. Uh mm. Uh huh. Mhm. Everyone welcome back to huddle up with Gus um we're back in the 16 31 digital news studio. I want to thank Sounder FM for hosting us are great podcasts on their platform and we want to thank Manscaped, go to Manscaped dot com, put in the Code Gus Frerotte all caps and get 20% off and free shipping.

Uh We were talking to jesse about, you know, his his I don't know, I'm trying to think about what happens is like almost like a near death experience because you're taking a drug that is ruining like your dreams that you started from when you were three put you in this place, and I can't imagine the thoughts the the motions that were going through and then tell me about the moment that if you can remember what really brought you out of all this. Yeah. You know, I think in life sometimes it's getting blindsided. I mean, gus when you're in the pocket, the guys, you could see coming, you kind of race yourself and you get ready, you take the blow, but when they blitz and it's on the outside and they hit you from behind, and that's what this did to me. I mean, it shook me to the core and it meant a lot of changes in my life and That 10 years, that's a long haul. And it's a long haul. And part of charting that progress was just to note, because when it's that long, you don't always feel like you're taking steps forward. But I could go back to the charts and say, Okay, look what's happened and start to remember, honestly, I would try jobs and I just physically couldn't do it. I mean, there was one where I took it for the summer three times I got stepped, strep throat, my body just couldn't handle it. I was like, OK, I can't do this yet. So I would try to take a step forward. It wouldn't happen. I ended up going to school and I realized, okay, that will be the least physically demanding, you know, four years. I never read the bible growing up. So I knew if I'm gonna be and I just started volunteering in churches and and for anyone thinking about a different career or a second career. You know, maybe after your first career is over what I'd say, Shadow somebody, get a little experience. It's hard to steer apart car. So get involved. I just started volunteer with kids and I didn't do much. I didn't know much at the time either in that context. But I started to get involved. Just serve and something inside started to wake up where it's like, this has got some potential, not exactly sure what's going to look like, but through internships, uh, and, and again, not physically demanding, but you know, volunteering part time, I was able then to go to school and take those four years diving in Dallas and then ended up going up to University of Iowa and I served up there. I was serving as a college pastor Hawkeyes. So still in the big 10. But now I'm going against the rival except on their, you know, hopefully serving you. But I loved it because I knew what it was like to show up on the college campus at that time. My life, everything was good on the outside and sports grades, parties, you know, everything was good and I couldn't figure out why something was missing. And there were just so many people showing up on campus, a lot of them grew up in religious homes and uh you know, in the midwest, there's a lot of Lutheran catholic, but they never really knew about a relationship with God and so just being able to enter in and I worked with, you know, guys like Aaron Kampman in Dallas Clark and you know, there's guys that went on to the NFL, you know, that we're in our group, but it was just a great time with college students and I just noticed even when I accepted the position, so you have to go for a weekend to try to get, you know, the position kind of call it can dating weekend and I gotta tell you, I just didn't know if I was gonna be able to handle that weekend, I was still at that point, you know, so many years later where I don't know if I can get through the weekend, So it was I was out on a limb trying to come come back and come forward and I didn't know what my body could handle and you know, I made it through that weekend, it was like, and it invited me up and then that first year, about the end of the first year, all of a sudden, I just felt like I had my strength back and that is such a good feeling. I mean if you've been sick for a while, even if it's like a week or a year, you had knee surgery when you start to get your strength back, it's one of the best feelings, and I just felt like that is a gift to be able to just, you know, trying to keep up the college students, but be able to do what I really enjoy and health is something that can be fragile. Don't take it for granted. Uh you know, I had to face it in my twenties, Most 20 year olds, people in their twenties aren't thinking about their mortality. No, the limitations...

...aren't there. And I think it it forced me to in some ways, um, just go face to face with some of the most intense realities and I don't think I would have grown if I didn't go through this. You know, if I coasted at a great career in England and, you know, we won some different titles, like, I would just be coming back feeling good. But when you go through the valley, I mean, there's just things you learn there, you can't learn in the classroom, you can't learn in success and that thing just tested me the core. And so I'm grateful in that sense, but it was brutal, like I said, so who who was so when you play sports, like we were talking about earlier that you have these mentors, you have coaches, there's people that you can relate to. Was there somebody when you were going through all this that you would call and you could just sit and talk to, did you have a coach or somebody like that? There was a guy, Jeff, Jeff, Johnson graduated from Stanford, and I'll tell you, um I just didn't feel comfortable letting guys in, and it's like, I just can't think of like a guy, I just felt safe enough to even cry, you know, with him there, and with Jeff, I just felt like, you know, when there's a great relationship, you can describe it, but there's just something about it where you just know, and you can be yourself safe, you can just put it out there and, and it's solid, you know, you're going to be loved, you know what the same page and I just started to shadow Jeff, ask him questions nonstop, which he was patient with me. He had such an impact in my life and my family wasn't too excited, I was going this direction just because it's not their belief system and I understand that respect that. But Jeff was someone who is, you need someone in your corner. You know, you can go back to rocky and Mick, you know, if you want movies, but you need someone in your corner that you know has your back that has your best interest in mind and knows how to help you take that next step forward. You can spread your wings and just discover, you know, new experiences, new gifts. And uh that was Jeff johnson ah He sounds like when we played, when I was with the Vikings and we played the packers in Minnesota. And I turned around to Adrian Peterson and we had a score touchdown at the end of the game and I said I'm giving you, I'm throwing you the ball every place like all right, let's do it. So I literally threw the ball before placing the road toward a touchdown. Yeah, Jeff johnson and it's my Adrian Peterson for you. So that's right. That's when you pretend like you can't hear the offensive coordinator. The signals are feeding the ball, threw it down the field, nope, all day baby. So yeah, that's awesome. So that is great. So tell me about your, I mean it sounds like obviously your professional career was cut short. Um But tell me about your most in like, your greatest moment that you have, that you can remember, I mean, you've played overseas, you've been everywhere, was it a Dartmouth? Was it over your professional career? Let's talk about that. So tell me about like that, because you had to have that moment where you run out right now, you're playing to get some incredible athletes, yep, yep, when, when I was in Africa, you know, the athleticism is incredible there, the stadium there, Barbara field, when you step out and playing that stadium, I mean, I know there's probably fire codes, but it's like everybody comes in there, it is so packed. And then to be in an environment where when I was in Zimbabwe, in a kind way, they would say Makita, which means white man, and so the kids would follow me to the stadium, you know, and they just want to touch my hair I had here back then. They want to touch my skin. And it was just so unique. They just didn't see white people coming through for many of them. And so to be a maquis, what to be in a different culture, different country. To hear those fans to be up against that level of, you know, athletes and soccer player. I mean, it almost felt surreal. It's like, wow, this is really happening. You try to keep a clear mind, you know, and get involved. When I was in college, the relationships are so tight. I mean, I would say, you know, that can happen in professional, but college is unique because it's those years where you're all really stepping into manhood, like you said, you're away from home, you're figuring out who you are. And then that bond, you're...

...with each other all the time, You're doing life together in the dorms together in classes together and you and that bond right there. So when we won the ivy League, we didn't want it in 25 years and I showed up as a freshman and we won the ivy League. It was like, what a breakthrough for the program. You know what I just remember. We got off that bus coming back from Brown running around the campus and, and then my junior, your, you know, when we had the success and we're just like, are we going to win the national title? You know, we were at that level and that bond, I still jump on zoom. You know, in the last year I jumped on zoom multiple times with these guys. You know, and that's not, I don't do that with like a protein, but I do that with those college guys because those are lifelong friendships and we're still joking about, you know, back of the bus card games or you know something someone said or did or a blunder who missed the bus and the plane for that one trip and you just enter right back in its it's like family. It really is. I forget at the time it's the games and who won in the score and who we knocked off the upset. But I'll tell you 10 years later, 20 years later, you look back and it's the relationships. I forget a lot of the other stuff. Yeah. Because people always ask me like, do you miss the game? Well yeah, I missed the game. I don't miss getting hit right. Like I don't want to get hit like that anymore. But you miss the locker room, You miss the camaraderie. You missed everything that goes into it right all week we're together. Yeah, we have families and we go home at night. That's what's different about, you know, college and professional now, you're getting older, you're, you know, you're doing different things, but those guys in the locker room, you've just been through blood, sweat and tears with and it's just something different that you can't, you know, it's a different way that people that you don't understand, it's different than your family. It's different than your kids, right? It's just a different feeling. And there's nothing after sports that's gonna quite imitate or replicate or replace it because you're going to war together. You've got a shared goal, you know, and especially if you win, it's a healthy culture, you know, that bond together and and that team work and you just know each other so well and you know, each other's roles and when that thing's clicking on all cylinders and then you've got fans and you know, you got championships and you just can't create that another context. Now, there's things you can do that are, I'd say even more significant. Obviously, family life, I mean, I look at you, it's like, well, what do you enjoy after your career? It's like my family and it just flows out of your mouth because sometimes the athletes, we don't spend as much time as we should with families of professional athletes, but family is more important than who won a game, but at the same time it's just different too. And uh, and for athletes, there's a lot of guys that at the end of their career, That's a tough transition because you just can't have that back. Sports is limited run our bodies our livelihood. Yeah, yeah. You know it is and my goal always was to be a good husband and dad. And then you know whatever happened, I played for 17, we went everywhere together. Um that was my important because I saw so many guys who didn't put that effort in and then all of a sudden they have this family at home when they retire and they don't know what to do. They don't know how to Deal with the kids. You know, they haven't been around. And so that's why the divorce rate in the NFL is like 80%. It's terrible. A lot of guys they want this but they don't want to put the work in so you can do it. It just takes effort. That's right. And you were thinking real well through that. But I mean for a lot of guys, they haven't had that much money before. So how do you manage your money or all the temptations? So many things, So many things here pressure. Like, you know, there's a guy that's been playing for 10 years, right? That has all this money because he's been successful. He's put a lot of time and he deserves it, but he's got rings and cars and watches and suits and then all of a sudden somebody's 23 comes in and it's like, oh, I'm going to get that stuff...

...to write and then they're in over their head. I've seen guys who gambled all their money away every weekend, they get their check and they go gamble it. So he's just never know. Um but one thing I wanted to ask you because you grew up Minnesota, you've been to NFL games, you've seen the craziness that you know, how many of the fans love it. Soccer is actually the world's biggest sport, right? Tell me about like, compare like when you're in Africa, when you're in the UK and go into a soccer game, what that fandoms like and what those arenas are like when soccer game compared to the NFL. Yeah, that's right. Because I love going to Minnesota games and school and you know, you have the purple people eaters back in the Yeah, Yeah. So I mean it's passion levels are definitely high. But I would say when you go overseas and you experience soccer, I mean here we have a lot of professional sports and a lot of best athletes don't play soccer in America, but overseas that top sport of soccer and there's not a close second. I mean it's a huge distance between the second most popular sport and fans. It's so deep that like when you go to, I'll take Scotland for example, like the classic rivalry, Celtic and rangers, well rangers are blue, Celtic green and white. You got the hoops. And I remember my dad went over there on a business trip and he was just wearing a hat that was green, you know, that was just the hat he brought over and he's going over into the rangers fans and the guy next to him just said, you take that offer, you're gonna get killed. You know, and it's like you wear that color over there. And, and so it's not quite like inner city gangs, but you know, it couldn't be more revved up. And, and for a lot of people that's their number one is their football team and uh, nothing casual about it. And you know, there's a lot of singing, there's joy, There's, there's dancing and singing and soccer stands, uh, it's a great sport. But I would say that even in some of these context is not as much of a family sport, like I'll grab my kids, we go to the baseball game, It's a family sport, you know, a good time for the whole family. Uh soccer in the stands, like that's probably going to be PG 13 or you know, it's like it's a competitive environment, they tell you, it seems like they take their drinking way serious over there. Like for the soccer games right? There is, there's both and there's some that, you know, go excessive there, but there's also a culture where you go to the pub and you just relax together. That's the place you go and a lot of people just have a drink at the pub. But what I'd say about the appreciation of the sport overseas is that they pick up on every little nuance. And sometimes when americans watch soccer maybe, I don't know the sport as well. It's like, oh, is there a big collision or is there a goal, you know, and those happen. But when you understand the sport, um, and I just encourage genuine overseas, if you're overseas, go to a match because you pick up on it and you just see there's a lot of soccer intelligence in the stands and they appreciate they understand the game in great detail. Yeah, I had a gentleman on uh, he's a, he's a, and it's a law professor at American University and my, his name escapes me right now brian you may remember. But um, and he grew up seven years in africa and then he moved to Maryland and he was an incredible soccer player. He said, I need to have shoes growing up. We just played soccer. Like we go out, we had a ball, it was raggedy, we'd kick it around America, everybody has these great shoes, that grass is perfect and it's like it's like it's crazy. He said, he said that's what got me through though. It was I was so good at soccer that it made me, I wasn't great in english, I didn't speak it well, but I had so many friends because of what I could do on the field brings so many different people together, you know, just like what was the word that they called you...

...in africa right? Like it wasn't meant to be mean or hate, it was what they knew. And um so yeah, it's just amazing. All his name is brian terry told me, jeremy do room. So jeremy, jeremy was was awesome with a great story too. But tell me a little bit about that how integrated soccer has become, because you do hear a little bit about how it's segregated, but it seems like it's been getting better over time. Absolutely. And the love of the game overseas, like in africa you see kids in, like you mentioned don't have shoes, they'll take anything recycled, put it together and that's the ball, this is the love of the game on the streets and then that's international. Every place I've gone to, every city in America, we gather together and play and usually gus Even the pickup games that I play now, uh, there's probably 10 or 15 nations represented and people just come and they come together around that game and with sport there's a bond, you get to know each other's character. You laugh, you're joking about the place that are happening. And also in Seattle it's really a soccer city. So I've done Seattle Sounders have faith and family night, you know, I speak their player speaks And uh we get about 40,000 actually for sounders games and what you see at all levels is people coming together in the stands and it's from different cultures and there's that bond around the sport that soccer is unique in terms of international popularity. Not a lot of football guys point that out. So you're, you're well researched right there. But you know, I think it's it's amazing because it's, it's, it's the greatest, you know, the whole world plays it right football as we know it in America. There's only in America like we're trying to get it into other countries. We had NFL europe and different things. But um, I know they're trying to put it in Japan and china, but it's just not the same right? Soccer as let me put the ball on the ground. You don't need anything else. Right. Right. And also in our country, what's really positive is our women's team has done so well and they have been pioneers really because the women's game around the world, it's now so much more elevated and uh, we're seeing competition levels there and the US, although slow to make the top level with the men, the women have been phenomenal and that's another plus as you see a sport now with men and women and again, you see all nations, we need to come together different cultures. I mean, even in America, you know, we need more unity. We need more racial reconciliation and soccer can be a tool for that. It can be an avenue where you build those friendships because I believe we're going to overcome in our heart, we're going to overcome it with friendships, We're gonna open up our homes and sometimes you start out playing with guys on the soccer field and then that leads to, hey, let's get together during the week. Hey, why don't you come over to my house for the weekend and pretty soon now it's much more than soccer and we need to do that on a lot of levels. And that's one of the great things about sports that can build those bridges. It's like a common language when you're playing together and the friendships are rich. I have, you know, right now, there's a couple of guys from Africa than just in the last two months I have become great friends with and that started on the soccer pitch. Well, that's amazing because I think that our country needs that more and more, right? That, that, that we've become so divided for no reason and we all bleed the same where all the, you know what I mean? Everybody comes from a different background. That's why I love going into a locker room. You know, seven teams every year. There are new guys. They were all different from me. They have different backgrounds. They didn't grow up like I did right? They may not have had parents, they may have had parents, they may not have siblings or they had more than me. So there were all these stories, but we were on the field, it just brought us together and it just made you realize how silly some of that uh stuff really is. Let's break through it. Let's overcome. I mean love is what's needed ultimately. And I mean, you played a position quarterback where it's like you've got to build relationships, you got to build trust.

You got to know the guys, they've got your left tackle. Yeah, that's true. I'm glad I didn't have any tag as a goalkeeper. I never had to, you know, have guys right up there next to me, well, I'm relying on my defense, but you know, still I've got to communicate and when there's good relationships off the field, it shows on the field, it builds trust too, right? Like when you have that teammates that you build trust with on and off the field, you just know they're going to do their job, you know who they are and maybe, you know, if they're not too, then, you know, you've got to protect that side a little more. It's so true. I mean, I wouldn't know again like which guy I could lean into and motivate him and then which guy I got to be here if I don't crush them out there in the middle of the game with some comment, you know, and it's like you just get to know those dynamics. You get to know each other so well. You can't hide it sport when you're going all out. You see the personality, you see the character and then you want to bring out the best in everyone. And I think that's true on the field. That's true off the field. That's the foster, the mindset. How do I bring out the best? And, and this guy celebrate this guy strength. So tell us what you're doing now and you know, like kind of that journey after that 10 long, 10 years you've had and how it led to, uh, where you are now and what you're doing. Yeah. And you know, now I'm married, I have four Children and three boys and a girl. We also adopted one of our kids. And I love that every adoption story believes the healing story. And so we have a lot of fun at home. Uh, they do play soccer, but I think there's only one that really is into it. The other ones are pretty casual around it. And in addition to that, you have a pastor in Seattle now And you know, I really love unity. We've got been leading about 100 groups, churches ministries that come together in Seattle and pastors and it's just so healthy instead of it getting competitive or weird or divided, it's like, let's unite. How can we serve together? How can we, you know, if we've got extra chairs, let's give it to that group over there that needs some and looking out for each other and that. I just want that in every city around Seattle and we're seeing that happen, which is incredible. You know, Covid has been pretty wild, never gone through something like this. I mean, restrictions, the church was closed for a little while happened this last year is, in terms of digital or online, it's just taken off. So now, you know, we're connected with millions of people really around the world through different ministry stuff. It's online and we wouldn't have seen that coming. So it goes back to again, I believe some of the best stuff can come out of the worst circumstances and just love like connecting with people, meet with people, whether it's Pakistan India, you know, Israel all around the world, the internet brings us together. And and so there's friendships happening there, but we're serving the community. We've got we've made hope boxes during Covid. So take those hope boxes, put some gifts in there and then just give it to someone, you know, build up a little hope, spread some hope. And so we we've done that, you know, hundreds of people doing that service projects. We've done giveaways with food. And what I like about my position is that it could be marriages. I mentioned my parents got divorced. So we made videos together. I'm so grateful for a media team and in Joel and the crew and we made 30 videos for marriage is real practical to just help build up marriages. And so we get to do that. You know, I like um studying teaching, but then also, you know, he got the counseling, meet needs in the community. Uh just in Auburn. There's there's a great vibe there and this good relationships and you know, the mayor will say, can you pray for us? You know, and so there's just a real good relationship report feels real healthy and I love what I do, I I didn't see it coming, but I just wake up everyday, fired up because for me I get lives change and and to me there's nothing better than people um when it's healing, growing overcoming, you know, encouraging each other and when you see lives change, I mean, I look at you gus it's like you're doing a podcast because you love people, you love their...

...stories. I mean everyone's got a story, stories are powerful, we want to spread hope and I mean there's not a lot of pro athletes that just love like interviewing other people and draw other people because sometimes these athletes, we get focused on ourselves and I just see the way you serve to the podcast and when you get to start doing that, life is not going to be most rewarding when we're self consumed, but when we're actually looking out and serving and helping people make a difference in the community, then you you come alive and you're part of something bigger than yourself. And so I feel like I get to do that now. Yeah, that's great. So, tell all of our fans how they can find you and how they can maybe find where they can come and follow you or, you know, be a part of what you're doing. Yeah, that'd be great. My website jesse Bradley dot org and we launched that in the last year. And for opportunities like this, just to connect. I love connecting with people. All my social media stuff is there. And our churches, grace community church in auburn Washington, Grayson auburn dot com. You can get there from the jesse Bradley dot org, anybody that's just want to talk about any of these subjects, you know, its leadership or citywide unity, uh, face stuff. Sports, soccer. Uh, let's do it. I I love to connect. Yeah, I know that that's that's great. You know, because I think one of the things that that you talked about that, you know, I've been married going on 26 years. We've been together over 30 years, my wife and I and it's it's not, you know, when you live with someone and you share with someone, it's not always easy. So you have to, like, you know, we've had to do therapy. My wife is a social worker and a therapist and a psychiatric nurse now, but you know, so we've been through a lot and there's a lot of love and a lot of give and take and you have to learn how to do it. Absolutely. You know what I mean? You said that because, you know, there's no shame in going to a counselor, getting some help. It's like a broken arm to go to a doctor. And so in every marriage we got two wills to personalities. I mean, even this week, like I'm trying to put into practice, but teaching, you know, and that's communication or conflict resolution or kindness or sacrifice. And I mean, you've got to um make a lot of sacrifices because love includes sacrifices and you know, that commitment to each other. It's not just in the easy seasons, it's where you don't feel like doing something, but you know, it's right. And so you apologize or you know, whatever that is to strengthen the relationship and and that's, you know, you do it on the field, but it's even more important off the field. It's that old saying, you know, are they working out when nobody's watching? It's kind of the same thing. Are you working on yourself when nobody's watching? And for me, I always wanted to be who I try, it should be who they need me to be, right, not who I want to be. So that's kind of like, you know, I've always tried to do with my family and my kids and and I'm not always great at it. I you know, I'm not perfect, but you know, you just keep trying and it works out. That's right. I've always wanted to be authentic. Like if I'm gonna be one way in public, I should be the same way in private. You know, there shouldn't be this big guy and that's not easy to do. It's not easy. It's not easy to pressure is tough sometimes, you know, and it's it's tough to get over that. But it goes back to what you said. You've got choices. Yeah. And then you got to make decisions and then the consequences come from that. And you talked heavily about all those things that that projected you down this path you're on today and sharing your life with your kids in your community, which I think is awesome, jesse. So I'm enjoying it. I'm grateful for it. For sure. Yeah. So, hey, I appreciate you being, I hope you're still a Vikings fan. I'm not one of the 12 men over there. A great question, you know? No comment. Let's see. What do I say? Yeah. We don't want, we don't want to hurt your, we don't want your community to feel bad out there. But it's a little school with them. I think. I know I do, I do. It's a tough call. You know, I still, you never leave the team you grew up with as a child and I'm always pulling for the vikes. But when they play the Seahawks, it's like, who am I going to go for? And then Minnesota fans start trash talking. So I'm like,...

...all right, Russell Wilson is pretty good, is pretty good. So we have a lot of it's kind of a both hands, man. What a sports town Seattle is. Yeah, what there is some of the best food you could have like. Amazing. That's right. I love Seattle, incredible city, great town. And coming from the Midwest, Midwest, the winters here are so mild. I mean 30° is about as tough as it gets snow is optional. We go up to the mountains, you know, that's optional. If you want cold, you go up there. But we could use your help to get us a basketball team. We need those sonics to come back someday. Man, man Shawn kemp. He was the man back in the day. Yeah, I live in Pittsburgh. We haven't had a basketball team since the Pittsburgh fish. So it's been a long time. You got a lot of Super Bowl rings over there though. You got a few. We had a few, but I don't have any. But I know the Steelers do. So just man, it was, it was a great talk. I appreciate you. I appreciate your story. And I want to thank you for sharing it with us on huddle up with gusts today. You do an awesome job being the podcast, Make it real comfortable. It's a good time. So thank you so much for inviting me. Yeah, no, I appreciate you. I want everybody to go see jesse Bradley dot org, Right? You can find all his social media, check them out at his church. Um, follow him see his past viewer speaker. You're a great speaker. If you need someone to come to your organization, uh, you know, call up jesse. He's gonna come and he's gonna just give you a great I don't know how long you speak for, but maybe an hour probably. Yeah. There you go. Love it. All right, everyone. Thanks for joining us on another episode of huddle up with Gus. I want to thank 16 31 digital news uh, in their studio. I want to thank my super producer brian. I want to thank terry for help me get everyone and always being on top of everything. Ian kissed. Who does all of our social media. We want to thank Sounder FM for their new platform, all the transcription they're doing uh, and how they're growing. Thank you sounded for all the great technology and go to Manscaped dot com. Uh put in my code Gus Frerotte all caps and save 20% and get free shipping. Have a great day, everyone. And we'll see you next week on huddle up with gusts. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanks for joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another to huddle up with gusts featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus, parent huddle up with Gus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available are at the music.

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