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Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 5 months ago

Jesse Bradley

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week's guest on Huddle Up with Gus is former professional soccer goalkeeper Jesse Bradley. He shares the journey that led to the end of his soccer career and his transition to becoming a pastor. Jesse is from Minneapolis and is a Vikings fan at heart--SHHH don't tell that to any Seattle fans.  

Jesse said his love of sports at an early age."At age three, I told my parents that I wanted to be a professional athlete." 

His parents divorced when he was 7, and he became more focused on academics and athletics during his teenage years. After graduating from Dartmouth College with a degree in Psychology, He was living out his childhood dream as a soccer goalkeeper. Jesse played soccer as a goalkeeper in the US, Scotland, and Zimbabwe. He currently leads faith and family night with the Seattle Sounders. 

Here is Jesse telling me an abbreviated version of his fight to stay alive and save his career.

"In Africa, I took prescribed medication to prevent malaria, and it built up toxic levels in my system. I was fighting for my life for a year, and it took ten years to recover. During this time, my life was transformed in the most profound ways: identity, faith, mindset, habits, career, and relationships. The greatest blessings and growth in life can emerge from the worst situations." After denying God's existence throughout his childhood, he never anticipated deciding to follow Jesus.

Thank you, Jesse, for sharing your story!

You can find Jesse and everything he is doing on his website: 

https://jessebradley.org

Hey everyone, Welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, former NFL quarterback GusFrerotte and welcome to the new 16 31 digital new studio. You know, somepeople say no news is good news. Well I say to those people you've never read.16 31 digital news dot com. Go to 16 31 digital news dot com to get your latestnews, sports, music and entertainment and maybe even listen to your favoritepodcast. Follow up with gusts. Check it out today at www. 16 31 digital newsdot com. Welcome to what surely will be a doozyof a matchup brian here. Sports fans, whether your game is on the gridiron atthe diamond or on the links, we can only say, yeah, welcome to this week's huddle upwith gusts. 15 year NFL quarterback Gus parents, passion for sports has takenhim on the field and behind the bench is playing for seven NFL franchiseswith 114 TVs under his belt. Gus knows who the players are and how the gamesare. One. Uh, it's not every day you get to hang out with an NFL quarterbackup. Okay, sports fans from the decked out and plush 16 31 digital studios,it's kick off time, so snap your chin straps on and get ready to huddle upwith us two left. Hey everyone, welcome to anotherepisode of huddle up with Gus, I'm your host, Gus Frerotte, 15 year NFLquarterback and I want to welcome you to the 16 31 digital news podcaststudio. So today we're sitting in here and thank you to 16 31 digital news for,for hosting us. I also want to thanks Sounder FM. That's our podcast platformman. Without them. We haven't been getting the audience, you know, beforewe got on the sound. Now with Sounder, our audience has increased. A newlisteners have come on in droves. So thank you to Sounder and all their newtranscription and everything that they're doing. And uh you know, we wantto thank in the last month, we did a big promotion with Manscaped and so wewant to thank Manscaped for for letting us work with them and hopefullybecoming a partner. So thank you to Manscaped. Um and you can still go toManscaped dot com, put in my code Gus Frerotte all caps at G u S F R E R O TT E, and you can get 20% off and free shipping on any products that they have,and They have the new lawnmower 4.0, now it's not the lawnmower that youthink, but if you're a guy, you probably need it. Uh so today joiningus is professional soccer player and uh somebody that uh I think his story justrelate so well to really why I started this podcast, uh because we all findour path in life. So, Jesse Bradley has found his path in life and I think hedoes an amazing job of it. He's a speaker. Um he goes around and tellshis story. He has, his faith is amazing. Uh he's been through many trials, he'sbeen tested. His faith has been tested and I think he just has an amazingstory. He was a goalkeeper in the U. S. And Scotland and Zimbabwe, and joiningus now as Jesse Bradley, Jesse. How you doing, buddy? Gus, thanks so much forhaving me on the podcast. I appreciate, you know, I watched you as a player. Ialways enjoyed watching you play and then the podcast. I love it. That yougo beyond the field. You really capture the stories and the journeys of thedifferent athletes. So, thanks for inviting me on the show today. Yeah,yeah, thanks for joining me. You know, it's it's a lot of fun to be able toget to talk to people, especially from different backgrounds and, and uh youknow, we all come from a different place and a lot of times we end up inthe same area. So tell me a little bit about your story in that moment whereyou fell in love with sports, because I read a little bit about you, where itsaid that you knew when you were three, you were going to be a professionalathlete. It happened early for me, you know, I grew up on the campus, theUniversity of Minnesota Golden Gophers,...

...probably the toughest mascot, but big10, I mean we had the barn back then with both hockey. Basketball, Williamsarena was shaking so there was so much passion Minnesota winters, you gottafind something. Yeah, real hockey player. So I watched it started to playit, but then basketball caught my heart and so I had to make the choice, wentwith basketball and you know, I told my parents our first apartment was in theparking lot of the football stadium for the goal first. And so you couldn'tmiss it. There's you know, maroon and gold everywhere. And I started going tothe games with my parents, told them this is what I want to do when I growup and that never changed. I mean I sports for me, I started playing, youknow, football, I just grab a football as a little kid and I was thequarterback and the wide receiver and catch it the snow. Or I would put up anerf hoop and I would be both teams. I was an only kid. So you know, it wasn'tsomething that anyone had to say you need to get involved around ourneighborhood. We just played all the time, go to Van Cleef Park and all thekids were playing out on the streets and of course we found games too. Butwhen my parents got divorced at age seven, I would say that I even putmyself more into sports if that was possible because of that pain rightthere and that loss, that void. It's like, well what do I really enjoy inlife? And I didn't have anything I enjoyed more than sports. And, and so Iplayed three sports in high school, it was basketball, soccer and I alsobaseball, but I just couldn't get enough sports. I loved it. Minnesota isa great town. I mean playing for the Vikings and living there. I lived inRochester that I lived in uptown and, and um I've been all over and I, youknow, in the winter times, obviously when we're there for the footballseason and everything starts freezing over. One of my favorite things wasjust riding around, seeing the pond start freezing over, seeing everyonestarted to get them ready and they were, they would clean the snow off, they'dmake their rinks that all sudden there'd be a bench, then there would bea goal, then it would be lights and it was, Minnesota was amazing. It's a,it's a great place to play sports. Some of the sports athletes that come out oftheir incredible, you're right, you're right, you got to be resourceful. Soit's ice fishing, making a pond, I mean those winter times, but minnesotans arepretty rugged as well. And you know, we had Kevin Mchale that I watched growingup, you know, Dave Winfield, we were hoping you were going to bring us thatlong awaited Super Bowl guys, you know, Hey, I wanted, I wanted to, I mean, Iwould have loved that, you know, but we've Minnesota has been so close somany times, you know, there they went from me and my old behind and, and thenin 2000 and eight, then they bring Brett Farve in in 2000 and nine and Itold coach Children, so I'm like, just have both of us, we're gonna have 80years between us. Like what kind of, what team has that experience? Like?He's like, well, you know, whatever, which I get, you know, I know that theyreally wanted bread, but that, which, which is fine. But man, that Minnesotahas been so close from Gary Anderson. Uh, uh, you know, missing that fieldgoal, that one is brutal. Yeah, man, I grew up, you know, we would go to theold stadium before the Metrodome. The old Mets Stadium. My grandpa was afamous surgeon at the University of Minnesota, renowned, just a lot ofpioneering work, but he had season tickets. So we would go, I stillremember the cigars, I was there the game where they threw the bottle andhit the ref, you know, oh my gosh, I remember have a seat from that oldstadium. Still, I don't want to. And then, yeah, but tell me like it's, it'slike it's colder than Green Bay, I want to say because I played outdoors inGreen Bay and it's been cold. I played outdoors in new york. It's been reallycold, but cold. And for some reason in Minnesota is just like none other. It'sno joke. We had to plug in our car and I didn't come from a well off family,but we plugged in our car at night and it still took a while to get started inthe morning, the car doors would freeze and let's say one of my parents droveus to school, they brought a bungee...

...cord, we'd all leave the passenger sideup front. They don't have a bungee cord and hold the car until it warmed upenough and you can actually close it. So it lives up when I lived in Iowa, Ithought this is balmy compared to Minnesota. I played lots of pranks onpeople in Minnesota with a nice frozen tundra up there in the cold. Uh, youknow, just from freezing guys clothes and putting them back in the lockersand I did it Morten Andersen and it was a lot of fun, but so you say that yousaid that your parents were divorced when you were seven um in sports is abig passion and one of the things for me is that I hear from a lot of peoplethat sometimes that when you play sports you you you you kind of get amentor from a coach or somebody that that you connect with, did you havesomebody like that? You know, obviously your dad and your mom and you know, Idid too, but there were still coaches that I had, there were a big part of mylife that played a huge role in who I am, absolutely, especially when my dadmoved away, I would've stayed and I didn't see him much growing up, thosecoaches, the impact in my life was huge and I said to every coach, anyone'sinvolved in youth sports, those kids look up to you so much, they remembertheir coaches and you can influence those kids in such a positive direction,you know, in high school we won the state championship twice in soccer, mycoach was Buzz Lagos and his son Manny. Now you know, leads Minnesota United,the MLS team and I grew up with those guys, Tony Sanneh made the World cup,but Buzz developed talent and Buzz saw me playing basketball and that was myfirst sport, that was my first love, but he saw the potential for me to be agoalkeeper and sometimes in sports you go further in one position, then youanticipate or even different sport, then you start out with and thathappened to me, soccer was going so well and so I had Buzz in high schooland then in college I went to Dartmouth on the East coast, and bobby Clarke isa legend from Scotland, he was a great goalkeeper, but beyond that, I mean hejust helped us go from boys to men really during those years and it waslike a professional environment and everything was, it was world class andit was just top notch and the relationship with him, it's hard to putinto words how much, you know, the things that he would say and do everyday and he would walk up the field and say, oh it's a great day, lots, youknow, it's a great day and and that just carries over and all of a suddenyou kind of get some of that attitude that overcoming that perspective andpretty soon you're like, it doesn't matter if it's cold, it doesn't matterwho the other team is, like we're going for this thing and we're united andwhen the culture is that healthy sports is a lot of fun, the coach sets theenvironment. I mean for any one listening, you got kids involved in newsports, like check out who the coach is because if you get a good coach, somany other things fall into place and they're not just the coach either,right there there there there to me, there are human, right? They understandwho you are. They try to figure out what's going on in your life becausethey know that if you're having a bad day at home, probably not going to playvery well. So they want the good coaches to me are not just about theX's and oh's there, about the whole person and especially in youth sportsbecause kids are quiet, you know, they don't talk much and if you can get tothe root of what's going on and get them to kind of let all that go andplay hard, you're usually going to have some success, but the success comes in,creating a good athlete, but also a good person. That's right, because goodcoaches know how to motivate, they knew they know who they should kind of, youknow, maybe push a little harder, who needs some encouragement. And when Iwent to Dartmouth, I just felt like I already had a friend in coach whereother calls coming from coaches and recruiting, they might ask that whatwere your S. A. T. S. Again? You know, they just go through the list ofstandard questions, but it's like he wanted to get to know me and that bondthat we formed even before I arrived on campus. I mean that relationship,life's about relationships, Quality of relationships, the quality of life andcoaching. It's one of those special bonds where they're a mentor on thefield but then so much more in life as...

...well so you really didn't want to goanywhere warm because I know Dartmouth is not warm. I applied to so manyschools in California, I was set to go that direction. That's like it's likeokay I'm going to play soccer so I'm just gonna go where it's cold and wehave to play with the ball that's frozen. Oh I want to be a goalie andhave them kick that thing like 100 miles an hour in my head. I know weplayed in the snow uh N. C. Double a game. It was my junior year and we hada shoot out in the snow and when when you're a goalie and you're landing onthat frozen tundras, you said earlier, I mean that's a pounding, you feel thatyour back feels that the next day. So what is the speed, Like, have you evergot, have you ever made, like, you know, with a speed gun? Um kind of seen whatsomebody can kick, like what is the speed of a soccer ball? That is a greatquestion, I would say over 65 mph would be my initial guess, but that's a greatquestion. There certainly arrange and as a goalkeeper, I always knew the twoguys that shoot at the hardest. My it's like uh I got my w goalkeepers catch itwith the w so I got my w ready and I'm just on the balls of my feet and I'mready wherever it's coming. But yeah, I would say that overall is a goalkeeper.I I would pray for games for quick reflexes because the shots come so fastand and they can catch you if you're not in balance if you're just on thewrong foot leaning the wrong way, like you're done, that goal is pretty bigand for a goalkeeper, if you make one mistake, That's often the gamemidfielder can make 10 mistakes, no big deal, you know, if you throw that onepick six and it's like game over on that key drive, two minute drill was agoalkeeper. If I live in one bad goal, you know, that could be the difference.And so the goalkeeper is, it's a psychological position as well. So doyou play armchair goalie a lot? Like I play armchair quarterback, right? LikeI'm always, I'm always Patrick and these guys that are playing, like whydid you make that throw? I'm like, shut up people, you say that about you, youshould be talking about them. Oh, it's so true. Every time I watch agoalkeeper, I'm always like, is he in the right position? And then the secondthing is what I have made that save and and the ones that are harder, like Iknow I would have saved that, you know, that free kick right there, I wouldhave been at that upper corner, it would have been saved. So yeah,goalkeeper um you can't help but just show up and analyzed and you played aposition. Yeah, so all right, so you're in college, you're at Dartmouth, youknow, you get there from Minnesota, that's a long way from home. Yeah, so,um like for me, I went from Pittsburgh to Tulsa, which is 1000 miles, That's aculture change too, right? And you had a culture and there was no easy way.Probably while you probably take I 90 the whole way Dartmouth from Minnesota,right? Like you're just traveling the whole north, like every snowstorm thereever was while you're in college you hit. That's right. We drove it once andyeah, it's a long drive, a lot of, lot of winter scenery, there's no easyairport. What airport did you fly in? Because there's no easy way to get theDartmouth. No, and you've got to fly in, it's a propeller plane up to Lebanon,New Hampshire. And I remember going to the airport sometimes I'd say, yeah, mynext plane is Lebanon and they'd be pointing you over to internationalflights and I'm like, no, no, no Lebanon, New Hampshire. Right, right,well kept secret up there. Yeah, no, that's awesome. So you're there, you'regetting into your, your, your final year. Um do you know like what is theprocess for you to turn professional? Yeah. You know our team went over toScotland and we played against the top teams over there granted. I mean it wasguys our age, it was a lot of guys first team and second team combinationbut we played against those clubs and so I got a sense you know, we tied thebest team over there that we played against like we tied him, it was apicture that we can play at this level. You know some of us are going tocontinue to play and then you know my junior year we made it to the finaleight in the N. C. Double A. We lost to...

Alexey lawless at Rutgers. You know Italked to him on his radio show and I think I got him to admit that he wasfortunate to win that game. He doesn't really want to admit that, but you know,that taste of success on a high level here, the collegiate level goingoverseas and then that was the dream is to play and through my coach. I meanthere were opportunities, the different clubs, yet Aberdeen in Scotland andthen there was the Highlanders Bulawayo and that's in Zimbabwe and then inEngland, they were queens park rangers and then man, you, I mean, our coachwas good friends with Alex Ferguson who is a legend in the UK, so trying tosort through that and make a decision and you know which spot, a wide range,but I felt like, okay, I've gone to Scotland, I went back to Aberdeen andand was there for for three months as well and training there and I felt like,okay, I understood that context and I understood that club and I wanted to gofor something very different and so the UK, it felt kind of similar and Ithought let's go to Africa next. And uh there was later an opportunity with newZealand as well, but Africa was the choice and it was also to experiencelife there, I mean, you know this with sports, you can travel, experiencedifferent cities or countries, cultures, relationships and you see so much andI've never been in a country, there was poverty, drought, AIDS, you know, tothat level. It's one thing to read about it, but it's another thing to gothere and I wanted to experience that, I wanted to make a difference, I wantedto help out, wanted to, to some students if I could on the side. And sothat's how we end up going to Zimbabwe. But yeah, that was, that was a bigdecision. looking back. I mean it was one of those, we have different pointsin our life. There is a crossroads and you've got to decide and there's timeswhere I think well what if I would have gone to manu and tried to make it there,what would my life look like? But I don't look back with regrets. I mean Ilook back and sometimes the best experiences come out of the worstcircumstances and the tragedy I had in Africa uh that redefined my life andredirected my life in so many ways. It was brutal. But there are also someamazing things that came out of it. Yeah, I was reading a little bit aboutthat. So tell our fans about what happened to you over there while youwere in africa. Yeah. I took a prescribed medication from a physicianhere to prevent malaria and it's called larry, um meth liquid quiNINE baseddrug. And I took it every week as prescribed and after many months youput up toxic levels in my system and a flood of symptoms came on and I noticedthat I had migraine headaches. I couldn't handle any lighter noise and I,someone who never has headaches. So that was strange. Little bit of doublevision sweats and chills. And then the crazy stuff that happened though is myheart would just start racing. And here's a few conditions that the drugproduced one was tacky cardia, racing heartbeat. I'd be sitting still. Likewe are now in 160 beats a minute. Like my heart's beating out of my chest andI couldn't stop it. And then also atrial flutter, Another abnormalityskipping beats, Heart murmur and just pain in the left side of my chest. Andit was like, am I going to make it, am I going to live? I mean this was lifethreatening for a year. And I flew back because the doctors in Zimbabwe saw thedecline and they said you've got to fly back while you still got some health.And so I came back. But the other symptoms as well. Crazy dreams, justweird kind of semi hallucination stuff. And then also, I mean because if thelights were off in a room what my mind would do would just be um it's like abad trip or something and you turn the lights back on and kind of come backinto focus. But I had panic attacks, anxiety. I never had before depression,I never felt before me. A couple of suicidal thoughts would come in and myemotional equilibrium was shot. And it was like this drug was just taken overmy system. So I flew back to the U. S. We paid out of pocket went to stanford.He listed 10 things that could be one of them was the drug. And when I heardit I just knew on the inside this has got to be it. And the physicians atthat time all said I need to keep taking the drug because after youreturn to the States you take it for a...

...month and that protects you frommalaria because malaria could linger. Now. I went against all of their adviceinside I won't take the drug anymore. And we had my blood sent to C. D. C.They found toxic levels of the drug in my system. And it's a clear conclusionthat if I didn't decide that. And again that was a prayerful decision. I'm notgoing to take the drug another month of that drug would have probably killed me.And so that month right there, I didn't take the drug. Of course I didn't havemalaria. It was all side effects of the medication. There's probably people whocan relate that I've heard stories or maybe they've gone through side effectsbefore and this was like to the extreme and no one really saw it coming anddidn't identify it. And so finding out what it was, it was eye opening for me.And then of course, later on I learned about many other cases with this drugand it's controversial and many people wanted band and I just didn't know thatgoing into it. Yeah, that had to be hard. So how long were you taking itbefore? You knew for you found out it was about four months that I took thedrug. And then like I said, the symptoms all came out at once. And whenthey came on it was a flood. And I was flying back within about a week. I wasflying back to the States because the decline was pretty rapid. So once yougot off and how long did it take for you to recover? I was fighting for mylife for a year and with those heart abnormalities. I mean, it was scarystuff every night I might move back in with my parents. Never thought I'd bein that spot. You know, But they would, with a, like a baby monitor, they wouldjust be listening at night like, what's going on down there, you know, and, andit was it was out of control and, you know, making it through the physiciansdidn't know what I ever recover which symptoms would go away. And there wasnothing they could give me because they didn't want to put like a blocker inthere because they didn't know how they would interact with the overdose of thedrug. And so that could shut everything down. But the drug inhibits theinhibits my heart so the heart can't regulate itself. And I just didn't knowhow long that's gonna last, how much my heart could endure. I mean, I'mgrateful. I was a professional athlete at the time because I had to make achart that now I can walk 10 minutes without my heart, you know, over ampingup, I couldn't even drive because my heart was so sensitive. Any stimulationwould just send it raising. So I was not driving for a year. You know, I wasjust charting that. I could walk up to 20 minutes. You know what that heartmonitor on and I'm trying to watch it. And, and so to make it through thatyear. Uh, it was, here's some of the things that happened for me though, oneis my identity shifted and without realizing it, I had my identity and myperformance and that was doing well in school and grade sports, the crowds, mycareer when all that stuff is gone and you got your identity in that. Thequestion I wrestle with was or who am I? You know, who am I? And I had to shiftit instead of what I do to who I am And for me and I realized there's a widerange of listeners right now viewers. But for me, I actually came to knowjesus in college. I didn't grow up with the bible religion. My family is like31 flavors spiritually, a little of everything. We got rabbi, ex Catholics,atheist. So that relationship has started in college, but it wasn't deepand during this trial, that's where I realized, okay, I'm going to find mysecurity in a love that won't go away in a presence that won't leave me orforsake me, You know, and that was an intentional shift. I started some newhabits. I had to let people into the pain, my motives, an athlete, you know,but your best foot forward, you perform top notch. You don't show weakness. Andso for me to admit, like instead of denial, like I'm scared, I'm worried,I'm sad, I'm down, you know, and let people into that pain. That was new,new coping mechanism because my whole life, I've always thrived and you justdo better. You learn and you perform better and, and that wasn't going towork here well, you know, as an athlete to, as a professional athlete, as soonas you show something is wrong or weakness or I need help teams like, oh,okay, we're gonna go get this guy then, right, because there's somebody elsecoming along, right? And and that's what happens to so many athletes isthat they don't want to talk about...

...their problems. They don't want to say,hey, look, if I can just get this help mentally right, right? Or if if you canunderstand me in a different way, like it's so hard for us because we can'tsay that stuff. So what happens to a lot of NFL players that they don't putdown what has happened or what's wrong with them? Like after the season, right,they give you physical and then all of a sudden you don't tell them everythingthat's wrong. And then when you go to get your disability afterwards, you'relike, well, you didn't have this. And like, yes, I did. Well not down so Ican't imagine, well how was your team with that? Like when you, like you'regoing through all this, you've been a professional athlete. That transition,as you said had to be crazy because it was hard enough for me. Yes. Aftertrying to transition from the NFL, I can't imagine like yours was like, youhad to just stop. Yeah. Is no choice involved. Sometimes life's going oneway and it's just not going that way anymore. And I saw it with someteammates because in Zimbabwe AIDS was so rampant at the time that there wereguys on the national team that were like 20 years old, 21 they were justdead couple months later. So they had seen that of course I left. But youknow that transition, I didn't know how to grieve. I'm not someone who likesgrieving grieving doesn't come natural anyway. It's like, I don't want a pityparty and I didn't know how to enter into some of that grieving and so muchloss when your childhood dream, when the job you love and I had no PositionI was going to step into. I didn't know what career I didn't have like aplanned life after soccer goalkeepers can play sometimes to their 40. So Ijust figured I'd be doing this for like a good 15 years and I love doing it too.I love doing it. So I missed it so much and you know, trying to discover, okay,well who am I and what are my gifts and what are some of the options and whathealth am I going to have? It's so humbling because athletes know theirbodies and when you lose control of your body, especially like an organ,like your heart, you know? And then also I felt like I was on the brink oflike, trying to keep my sanity and so, like, am I going to be in my right mind?Am I gonna have a body that can actually do any work? You know, and andwhat options are there? And doctors couldn't say, oh, you'll be better atthree years or you'll be better at four years. I mean, it took me 10 to fullyrecover. I would say that it was very gradual and just little by little itfind that, say about 9, 10 years, there was a turning point where it's like,okay, I really, I feel comfortable in my own skin. I got my stuff back. Thesymptoms aren't so obvious, like I'm moving forward now, but I mean, that'sa long haul with no guarantees. As athletes. We train our tails off the training, that you had to gothrough to be a professional athlete. All the lifting the running, the, youknow, there's always something you're going through. Then all of a suddenyou're you're put through this other test. Did you draw back on all thattraining, like the times that you were running and couldn't breathe in highschool? Right? Remember those things like when you thought that you couldn'tget it through it then, and all of a sudden, you know what I mean? Like Iknow I know all those fitness tests that you dread, you know, they'recoming for months. You just work so hard and then you still you take thefitness test and you throw up. I mean, that's I don't forget those. But what Iwould say is that discipline, I see it with athletes and see what people havegone in the military is that you develop this discipline and sometimesyou learn how to do things maybe you don't want to do, but they're good foryou. And there's a tenacity with it as well. For me, it shifted instead of thephysical endurance and seeing how far it became between my ears and and thatwas the fiercest battle. And I'll tell you what started to changes. I realizedmy first thought, I can't control. I mean, if it's a negative thought, ifit's a morbid thought, if it's a suicidal thought, I can't control thatfirst thought, it comes in. But I do get to decide am I going to harbor it?Believe it, entertain it, reject it. And then I'm gonna choose my secondthought. You know what's true, what's good and I can't tell you with the drugand I don't know exactly how it works.

But it felt like again a storm ofnegative thoughts all day long and I wanted to keep my mind out of the ditch.And so I mean one thing I started doing, I've never done before, it's reallymemorized the bible. Just find some verses that are good, some things thatare solid and start to marriage. So whenever those negative thoughts comein, I'm going to go back to what solid. But it could just be also justgratitude. I start to write down literally just 10 things a day thatbecame my new habit Habits are powerful. They're small intentional steps withbig results. I had to choose 10 a day. I'm going to write down because I wouldotherwise over focus on what I lost. Now there was sadness there, but Ineeded to still remember what I do have and I need to stay grateful. So I wouldwrite down those 10, I would intentionally think about those things.And if I could win that battle in my mind, then out of that healthy thinking,you know, life is going to come back, lights going to move forward, there'sgoing to be healing. But I had to guard that and like I was guarding the netfrom the opponents, in the soccer balls. I was guarding my mind from thenegativity, destructive thoughts, the lies of discouragement. And it wasfierce. I was on goalkeeper mode I think. Yeah, yeah. You were definitelyprotecting everything about your soul and your heart and everything else. Sohey, everyone where you are talking with Jesse Bradley. Um he, he obviouslyhas told us an amazing story about how he overcame a drug that he was taking aformal area. We're gonna come back, we're gonna talk a little bit moreabout his professional career and we're gonna get into what he's doing now andhow that hard transition that he went through has led him to what he's doingtoday. So don't go away, we'll be right back. Mhm. Hey, how come up with Dustlisteners Manscaped. They sent me uh they hooked me up with a bunch of toolsand formulations for their package three point oh kit. Uh So, you know, Iwant to show you guys what's in the perfect package, right? We all think wegot a perfect package, but they sent me the perfect package three point Okay,And I want to show you what they sent me. So it was crazy. It came in thisgreat box. Uh you know, and you can see what it says. They will thank youbecause they sent us this awesome trimmer. They sent us uh, you know,stuff that makes you smell better. And then, you know, they sent me this greatuh, some boxers what you get right, protect them. And then, uh, you know,they sent me this, cool it uh, sack, I guess you want to call it to store allyour stuff in. So, uh, it's been great. Manscaped sent me a bunch of product.Um, you know, and you know, you can see it all on here. Uh, you know, you cango to Manscaped dot com and put in the code. Uh, Gus Frerotte, that's G. U. S.F. R. E R O T. T. E. Get 20% off and free shipping when you use that code.But you can get a kit, you can get individual items like, uh, this waycool rumor that has a little LED light, um, ceramic. These things come apart.They're waterproof. You can do a lot with them. So, you know, manscaped isgreat. You know, it's funny money. I remember when I was playing with theDenver broncos and I'm not going to mention any names, but there was agentleman who was playing on our team. And uh, you know, if you ever hears thestory, he'll know exactly what I'm talking about. But he brought his ownclippers in one time and he used to trim his beard up his goatee andeverything and he had him there for about two or three weeks and he goes inaround the corner, he walks in and there's a person, another player thatis actually manscaping with his beard...

...trimmer. So you know, one of the thingsis, you don't want to use the same trimmer down there that you use up here.So uh, he kind of freaked out a little bit and he said, hey, how long have youbeen using that tool there? And he said, well, showed up here about three weeksago and I've been using it ever since, so you know, there is a lesson learnedthat, you know, don't leave things out and probably if it would have just saidmanscaped on it, we wouldn't have had that issue, but it's probably one ofthe funniest, uh, taking care of your ball stories I've ever heard or beenaround in the locker room in the NFL, so it's a great story. Um, but you know,I always said there was no way to know, there's no name on it and the guy wasjust using it and another guy was using, it was not good, but it's a heck of afunny story. So, one of the best I've ever heard in my 15 years playing inthe league. Um, but you know, there's so many great things about Manscapedand what they're doing because guys, you got to take care of yourself eventhough I got great hair, um, and getting older, but you still have tomaintain some sort of grooming, right? And so, you know, we all work out forme. I like working in my yard doing those things now that I'm retired, geta little sweat on everything. You want to smell good. You know, you got totake care of yourself, They've got some great products. Um, you know, this one,uh, a little uh, all deodorant, we'll need that here and there. Um, after,you know, working the yard, taking a hike, doing a walk, whatever you do. Um,it's a great thing, but uh, there's so many great products um I want to thankManscaped for sending them to me. Um The lawnmower 3.0. Obviously you canuse it anywhere in your body, but I'm sure you guys have all seen thecommercials, but this is one just letting you know that the lawnmowerthree point oh comes with the perfect kit. You can buy the lawnmower byitself by all these products individually. They even sent me thiswonderful shirt. You can see the back. Your balls will thank you. And thenhere's the front. So it's an awesome shirt. They have a great gear. And youknow what? Sometimes you can just sit back, take care of your balls a littlebit and and read the paper. So Man's Cape even has their own daily news, sowhich is great. So don't forget that you can go to the Code Gus Frerotte andthat's G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O. T. P. E. Uh And you can save 20% on any products,the complete the perfect uh package gift set and uh you know you can save20% and get free shipping so use the code just for A G. U. S. F. R. E. R. O.T. T. E. Hey everybody spells my name wrong, they even spelled wrong back mypro bowl jersey. So you know I gotta I gotta help you guys out so don't forgethow important it is that you use these products, take care of yourself downbelow and have some fun right there's nothing closer to you than your littlebuddies. So use the lawnmower. Uh Use the code Gus Frerotte, save 20% and getfree shipping and uh order some great manscaped products so. Uh mm. Uh huh. Mhm. Everyone welcome back to huddle upwith Gus um we're back in the 16 31 digital news studio. I want to thankSounder FM for hosting us are great podcasts on their platform and we wantto thank Manscaped, go to Manscaped dot com, put in the Code Gus Frerotte allcaps and get 20% off and free shipping.

Uh We were talking to jesse about, youknow, his his I don't know, I'm trying to think about what happens is likealmost like a near death experience because you're taking a drug that isruining like your dreams that you started from when you were three putyou in this place, and I can't imagine the thoughts the the motions that weregoing through and then tell me about the moment that if you can rememberwhat really brought you out of all this. Yeah. You know, I think in lifesometimes it's getting blindsided. I mean, gus when you're in the pocket,the guys, you could see coming, you kind of race yourself and you get ready,you take the blow, but when they blitz and it's on the outside and they hityou from behind, and that's what this did to me. I mean, it shook me to thecore and it meant a lot of changes in my life and That 10 years, that's along haul. And it's a long haul. And part of charting that progress was justto note, because when it's that long, you don't always feel like you'retaking steps forward. But I could go back to the charts and say, Okay, lookwhat's happened and start to remember, honestly, I would try jobs and I justphysically couldn't do it. I mean, there was one where I took it for thesummer three times I got stepped, strep throat, my body just couldn't handle it.I was like, OK, I can't do this yet. So I would try to take a step forward. Itwouldn't happen. I ended up going to school and I realized, okay, that willbe the least physically demanding, you know, four years. I never read thebible growing up. So I knew if I'm gonna be and I just startedvolunteering in churches and and for anyone thinking about a differentcareer or a second career. You know, maybe after your first career is overwhat I'd say, Shadow somebody, get a little experience. It's hard to steerapart car. So get involved. I just started volunteer with kids and Ididn't do much. I didn't know much at the time either in that context. But Istarted to get involved. Just serve and something inside started to wake upwhere it's like, this has got some potential, not exactly sure what'sgoing to look like, but through internships, uh, and, and again, notphysically demanding, but you know, volunteering part time, I was able thento go to school and take those four years diving in Dallas and then endedup going up to University of Iowa and I served up there. I was serving as acollege pastor Hawkeyes. So still in the big 10. But now I'm going againstthe rival except on their, you know, hopefully serving you. But I loved itbecause I knew what it was like to show up on the college campus at that time.My life, everything was good on the outside and sports grades, parties, youknow, everything was good and I couldn't figure out why something wasmissing. And there were just so many people showing up on campus, a lot ofthem grew up in religious homes and uh you know, in the midwest, there's a lotof Lutheran catholic, but they never really knew about a relationship withGod and so just being able to enter in and I worked with, you know, guys likeAaron Kampman in Dallas Clark and you know, there's guys that went on to theNFL, you know, that we're in our group, but it was just a great time withcollege students and I just noticed even when I accepted the position, soyou have to go for a weekend to try to get, you know, the position kind ofcall it can dating weekend and I gotta tell you, I just didn't know if I wasgonna be able to handle that weekend, I was still at that point, you know, somany years later where I don't know if I can get through the weekend, So itwas I was out on a limb trying to come come back and come forward and I didn'tknow what my body could handle and you know, I made it through that weekend,it was like, and it invited me up and then that first year, about the end ofthe first year, all of a sudden, I just felt like I had my strength back andthat is such a good feeling. I mean if you've been sick for a while, even ifit's like a week or a year, you had knee surgery when you start to get yourstrength back, it's one of the best feelings, and I just felt like that isa gift to be able to just, you know, trying to keep up the college students,but be able to do what I really enjoy and health is something that can befragile. Don't take it for granted. Uh you know, I had to face it in mytwenties, Most 20 year olds, people in their twenties aren't thinking abouttheir mortality. No, the limitations...

...aren't there. And I think it it forcedme to in some ways, um, just go face to face with some of the most intenserealities and I don't think I would have grown if I didn't go through this.You know, if I coasted at a great career in England and, you know, we wonsome different titles, like, I would just be coming back feeling good. Butwhen you go through the valley, I mean, there's just things you learn there,you can't learn in the classroom, you can't learn in success and that thingjust tested me the core. And so I'm grateful in that sense, but it wasbrutal, like I said, so who who was so when you play sports, like we weretalking about earlier that you have these mentors, you have coaches,there's people that you can relate to. Was there somebody when you were goingthrough all this that you would call and you could just sit and talk to, didyou have a coach or somebody like that? There was a guy, Jeff, Jeff, Johnsongraduated from Stanford, and I'll tell you, um I just didn't feel comfortableletting guys in, and it's like, I just can't think of like a guy, I just feltsafe enough to even cry, you know, with him there, and with Jeff, I just feltlike, you know, when there's a great relationship, you can describe it, butthere's just something about it where you just know, and you can be yourselfsafe, you can just put it out there and, and it's solid, you know, you're goingto be loved, you know what the same page and I just started to shadow Jeff,ask him questions nonstop, which he was patient with me. He had such an impactin my life and my family wasn't too excited, I was going this directionjust because it's not their belief system and I understand that respectthat. But Jeff was someone who is, you need someone in your corner. You know,you can go back to rocky and Mick, you know, if you want movies, but you needsomeone in your corner that you know has your back that has your bestinterest in mind and knows how to help you take that next step forward. Youcan spread your wings and just discover, you know, new experiences, new gifts.And uh that was Jeff johnson ah He sounds like when we played, when I waswith the Vikings and we played the packers in Minnesota. And I turnedaround to Adrian Peterson and we had a score touchdown at the end of the gameand I said I'm giving you, I'm throwing you the ball every place like all right,let's do it. So I literally threw the ball before placing the road toward atouchdown. Yeah, Jeff johnson and it's my Adrian Peterson for you. So that'sright. That's when you pretend like you can't hear the offensive coordinator.The signals are feeding the ball, threw it down the field, nope, all day baby.So yeah, that's awesome. So that is great. So tell me about your, I mean itsounds like obviously your professional career was cut short. Um But tell meabout your most in like, your greatest moment that you have, that you canremember, I mean, you've played overseas, you've been everywhere, wasit a Dartmouth? Was it over your professional career? Let's talk aboutthat. So tell me about like that, because you had to have that momentwhere you run out right now, you're playing to get some incredible athletes,yep, yep, when, when I was in Africa, you know, the athleticism is incrediblethere, the stadium there, Barbara field, when you step out and playing thatstadium, I mean, I know there's probably fire codes, but it's likeeverybody comes in there, it is so packed. And then to be in anenvironment where when I was in Zimbabwe, in a kind way, they would sayMakita, which means white man, and so the kids would follow me to the stadium,you know, and they just want to touch my hair I had here back then. They wantto touch my skin. And it was just so unique. They just didn't see whitepeople coming through for many of them. And so to be a maquis, what to be in adifferent culture, different country. To hear those fans to be up againstthat level of, you know, athletes and soccer player. I mean, it almost feltsurreal. It's like, wow, this is really happening. You try to keep a clear mind,you know, and get involved. When I was in college, the relationships are sotight. I mean, I would say, you know, that can happen in professional, butcollege is unique because it's those years where you're all really steppinginto manhood, like you said, you're away from home, you're figuring out whoyou are. And then that bond, you're...

...with each other all the time, You'redoing life together in the dorms together in classes together and youand that bond right there. So when we won the ivy League, we didn't want itin 25 years and I showed up as a freshman and we won the ivy League. Itwas like, what a breakthrough for the program. You know what I just remember.We got off that bus coming back from Brown running around the campus and,and then my junior, your, you know, when we had the success and we're justlike, are we going to win the national title? You know, we were at that leveland that bond, I still jump on zoom. You know, in the last year I jumped onzoom multiple times with these guys. You know, and that's not, I don't dothat with like a protein, but I do that with those college guys because thoseare lifelong friendships and we're still joking about, you know, back ofthe bus card games or you know something someone said or did or ablunder who missed the bus and the plane for that one trip and you justenter right back in its it's like family. It really is. I forget at thetime it's the games and who won in the score and who we knocked off the upset.But I'll tell you 10 years later, 20 years later, you look back and it's therelationships. I forget a lot of the other stuff. Yeah. Because peoplealways ask me like, do you miss the game? Well yeah, I missed the game. Idon't miss getting hit right. Like I don't want to get hit like that anymore.But you miss the locker room, You miss the camaraderie. You missed everythingthat goes into it right all week we're together. Yeah, we have families and wego home at night. That's what's different about, you know, college andprofessional now, you're getting older, you're, you know, you're doingdifferent things, but those guys in the locker room, you've just been throughblood, sweat and tears with and it's just something different that you can't,you know, it's a different way that people that you don't understand, it'sdifferent than your family. It's different than your kids, right? It'sjust a different feeling. And there's nothing after sports that's gonna quiteimitate or replicate or replace it because you're going to war together.You've got a shared goal, you know, and especially if you win, it's a healthyculture, you know, that bond together and and that team work and you justknow each other so well and you know, each other's roles and when thatthing's clicking on all cylinders and then you've got fans and you know, yougot championships and you just can't create that another context. Now,there's things you can do that are, I'd say even more significant. Obviously,family life, I mean, I look at you, it's like, well, what do you enjoyafter your career? It's like my family and it just flows out of your mouthbecause sometimes the athletes, we don't spend as much time as we shouldwith families of professional athletes, but family is more important than whowon a game, but at the same time it's just different too. And uh, and forathletes, there's a lot of guys that at the end of their career, That's a toughtransition because you just can't have that back. Sports is limited run ourbodies our livelihood. Yeah, yeah. You know it is and my goal always was to bea good husband and dad. And then you know whatever happened, I played for 17,we went everywhere together. Um that was my important because I saw so manyguys who didn't put that effort in and then all of a sudden they have thisfamily at home when they retire and they don't know what to do. They don'tknow how to Deal with the kids. You know, they haven't been around. And sothat's why the divorce rate in the NFL is like 80%. It's terrible. A lot ofguys they want this but they don't want to put the work in so you can do it. Itjust takes effort. That's right. And you were thinking real well throughthat. But I mean for a lot of guys, they haven't had that much money before.So how do you manage your money or all the temptations? So many things, Somany things here pressure. Like, you know, there's a guy that's been playingfor 10 years, right? That has all this money because he's been successful.He's put a lot of time and he deserves it, but he's got rings and cars andwatches and suits and then all of a sudden somebody's 23 comes in and it'slike, oh, I'm going to get that stuff...

...to write and then they're in over theirhead. I've seen guys who gambled all their money away every weekend, theyget their check and they go gamble it. So he's just never know. Um but onething I wanted to ask you because you grew up Minnesota, you've been to NFLgames, you've seen the craziness that you know, how many of the fans love it.Soccer is actually the world's biggest sport, right? Tell me about like,compare like when you're in Africa, when you're in the UK and go into asoccer game, what that fandoms like and what those arenas are like when soccergame compared to the NFL. Yeah, that's right. Because I love going toMinnesota games and school and you know, you have the purple people eaters backin the Yeah, Yeah. So I mean it's passion levels are definitely high. ButI would say when you go overseas and you experience soccer, I mean here wehave a lot of professional sports and a lot of best athletes don't play soccerin America, but overseas that top sport of soccer and there's not a closesecond. I mean it's a huge distance between the second most popular sportand fans. It's so deep that like when you go to, I'll take Scotland forexample, like the classic rivalry, Celtic and rangers, well rangers areblue, Celtic green and white. You got the hoops. And I remember my dad wentover there on a business trip and he was just wearing a hat that was green,you know, that was just the hat he brought over and he's going over intothe rangers fans and the guy next to him just said, you take that offer,you're gonna get killed. You know, and it's like you wear that color overthere. And, and so it's not quite like inner city gangs, but you know, itcouldn't be more revved up. And, and for a lot of people that's their numberone is their football team and uh, nothing casual about it. And you know,there's a lot of singing, there's joy, There's, there's dancing and singingand soccer stands, uh, it's a great sport. But I would say that even insome of these context is not as much of a family sport, like I'll grab my kids,we go to the baseball game, It's a family sport, you know, a good time forthe whole family. Uh soccer in the stands, like that's probably going tobe PG 13 or you know, it's like it's a competitive environment, they tell you,it seems like they take their drinking way serious over there. Like for thesoccer games right? There is, there's both and there's some that, you know,go excessive there, but there's also a culture where you go to the pub and youjust relax together. That's the place you go and a lot of people just have adrink at the pub. But what I'd say about the appreciation of the sportoverseas is that they pick up on every little nuance. And sometimes whenamericans watch soccer maybe, I don't know the sport as well. It's like, oh,is there a big collision or is there a goal, you know, and those happen. Butwhen you understand the sport, um, and I just encourage genuine overseas, ifyou're overseas, go to a match because you pick up on it and you just seethere's a lot of soccer intelligence in the stands and they appreciate theyunderstand the game in great detail. Yeah, I had a gentleman on uh, he's a,he's a, and it's a law professor at American University and my, his nameescapes me right now brian you may remember. But um, and he grew up sevenyears in africa and then he moved to Maryland and he was an incrediblesoccer player. He said, I need to have shoes growing up. We just played soccer.Like we go out, we had a ball, it was raggedy, we'd kick it around America,everybody has these great shoes, that grass is perfect and it's like it'slike it's crazy. He said, he said that's what got me through though. Itwas I was so good at soccer that it made me, I wasn't great in english, Ididn't speak it well, but I had so many friends because of what I could do onthe field brings so many different people together, you know, just likewhat was the word that they called you...

...in africa right? Like it wasn't meantto be mean or hate, it was what they knew. And um so yeah, it's just amazing.All his name is brian terry told me, jeremy do room. So jeremy, jeremy waswas awesome with a great story too. But tell me a little bit about that howintegrated soccer has become, because you do hear a little bit about how it'ssegregated, but it seems like it's been getting better over time. Absolutely.And the love of the game overseas, like in africa you see kids in, like youmentioned don't have shoes, they'll take anything recycled, put it togetherand that's the ball, this is the love of the game on the streets and thenthat's international. Every place I've gone to, every city in America, wegather together and play and usually gus Even the pickup games that I playnow, uh, there's probably 10 or 15 nations represented and people justcome and they come together around that game and with sport there's a bond, youget to know each other's character. You laugh, you're joking about the placethat are happening. And also in Seattle it's really a soccer city. So I've doneSeattle Sounders have faith and family night, you know, I speak their playerspeaks And uh we get about 40,000 actually for sounders games and whatyou see at all levels is people coming together in the stands and it's fromdifferent cultures and there's that bond around the sport that soccer isunique in terms of international popularity. Not a lot of football guyspoint that out. So you're, you're well researched right there. But you know, Ithink it's it's amazing because it's, it's, it's the greatest, you know, thewhole world plays it right football as we know it in America. There's only inAmerica like we're trying to get it into other countries. We had NFL europeand different things. But um, I know they're trying to put it in Japan andchina, but it's just not the same right? Soccer as let me put the ball on theground. You don't need anything else. Right. Right. And also in our country,what's really positive is our women's team has done so well and they havebeen pioneers really because the women's game around the world, it's nowso much more elevated and uh, we're seeing competition levels there and theUS, although slow to make the top level with the men, the women have beenphenomenal and that's another plus as you see a sport now with men and womenand again, you see all nations, we need to come together different cultures. Imean, even in America, you know, we need more unity. We need more racialreconciliation and soccer can be a tool for that. It can be an avenue where youbuild those friendships because I believe we're going to overcome in ourheart, we're going to overcome it with friendships, We're gonna open up ourhomes and sometimes you start out playing with guys on the soccer fieldand then that leads to, hey, let's get together during the week. Hey, whydon't you come over to my house for the weekend and pretty soon now it's muchmore than soccer and we need to do that on a lot of levels. And that's one ofthe great things about sports that can build those bridges. It's like a commonlanguage when you're playing together and the friendships are rich. I have,you know, right now, there's a couple of guys from Africa than just in thelast two months I have become great friends with and that started on thesoccer pitch. Well, that's amazing because I think that our country needsthat more and more, right? That, that, that we've become so divided for noreason and we all bleed the same where all the, you know what I mean?Everybody comes from a different background. That's why I love goinginto a locker room. You know, seven teams every year. There are new guys.They were all different from me. They have different backgrounds. They didn'tgrow up like I did right? They may not have had parents, they may have hadparents, they may not have siblings or they had more than me. So there wereall these stories, but we were on the field, it just brought us together andit just made you realize how silly some of that uh stuff really is. Let's breakthrough it. Let's overcome. I mean love is what's needed ultimately. And I mean,you played a position quarterback where it's like you've got to buildrelationships, you got to build trust.

You got to know the guys, they've gotyour left tackle. Yeah, that's true. I'm glad I didn't have any tag as agoalkeeper. I never had to, you know, have guys right up there next to me,well, I'm relying on my defense, but you know, still I've got to communicateand when there's good relationships off the field, it shows on the field, itbuilds trust too, right? Like when you have that teammates that you buildtrust with on and off the field, you just know they're going to do their job,you know who they are and maybe, you know, if they're not too, then, youknow, you've got to protect that side a little more. It's so true. I mean, Iwouldn't know again like which guy I could lean into and motivate him andthen which guy I got to be here if I don't crush them out there in themiddle of the game with some comment, you know, and it's like you just get toknow those dynamics. You get to know each other so well. You can't hide itsport when you're going all out. You see the personality, you see thecharacter and then you want to bring out the best in everyone. And I thinkthat's true on the field. That's true off the field. That's the foster, themindset. How do I bring out the best? And, and this guy celebrate this guystrength. So tell us what you're doing now and you know, like kind of thatjourney after that 10 long, 10 years you've had and how it led to, uh, whereyou are now and what you're doing. Yeah. And you know, now I'm married, I havefour Children and three boys and a girl. We also adopted one of our kids. And Ilove that every adoption story believes the healing story. And so we have a lotof fun at home. Uh, they do play soccer, but I think there's only one thatreally is into it. The other ones are pretty casual around it. And inaddition to that, you have a pastor in Seattle now And you know, I really loveunity. We've got been leading about 100 groups, churches ministries that cometogether in Seattle and pastors and it's just so healthy instead of itgetting competitive or weird or divided, it's like, let's unite. How can weserve together? How can we, you know, if we've got extra chairs, let's giveit to that group over there that needs some and looking out for each other andthat. I just want that in every city around Seattle and we're seeing thathappen, which is incredible. You know, Covid has been pretty wild, never gonethrough something like this. I mean, restrictions, the church was closed fora little while happened this last year is, in terms of digital or online, it'sjust taken off. So now, you know, we're connected with millions of peoplereally around the world through different ministry stuff. It's onlineand we wouldn't have seen that coming. So it goes back to again, I believesome of the best stuff can come out of the worst circumstances and just lovelike connecting with people, meet with people, whether it's Pakistan India,you know, Israel all around the world, the internet brings us together. Andand so there's friendships happening there, but we're serving the community.We've got we've made hope boxes during Covid. So take those hope boxes, putsome gifts in there and then just give it to someone, you know, build up alittle hope, spread some hope. And so we we've done that, you know, hundredsof people doing that service projects. We've done giveaways with food. Andwhat I like about my position is that it could be marriages. I mentioned myparents got divorced. So we made videos together. I'm so grateful for a mediateam and in Joel and the crew and we made 30 videos for marriage is realpractical to just help build up marriages. And so we get to do that.You know, I like um studying teaching, but then also, you know, he got thecounseling, meet needs in the community. Uh just in Auburn. There's there's agreat vibe there and this good relationships and you know, the mayorwill say, can you pray for us? You know, and so there's just a real goodrelationship report feels real healthy and I love what I do, I I didn't see itcoming, but I just wake up everyday, fired up because for me I get liveschange and and to me there's nothing better than people um when it's healing,growing overcoming, you know, encouraging each other and when you seelives change, I mean, I look at you gus it's like you're doing a podcastbecause you love people, you love their...

...stories. I mean everyone's got a story,stories are powerful, we want to spread hope and I mean there's not a lot ofpro athletes that just love like interviewing other people and drawother people because sometimes these athletes, we get focused on ourselvesand I just see the way you serve to the podcast and when you get to start doingthat, life is not going to be most rewarding when we're self consumed, butwhen we're actually looking out and serving and helping people make adifference in the community, then you you come alive and you're part ofsomething bigger than yourself. And so I feel like I get to do that now. Yeah,that's great. So, tell all of our fans how they can find you and how they canmaybe find where they can come and follow you or, you know, be a part ofwhat you're doing. Yeah, that'd be great. My website jesse Bradley dot organd we launched that in the last year. And for opportunities like this, justto connect. I love connecting with people. All my social media stuff isthere. And our churches, grace community church in auburn Washington,Grayson auburn dot com. You can get there from the jesse Bradley dot org,anybody that's just want to talk about any of these subjects, you know, itsleadership or citywide unity, uh, face stuff. Sports, soccer. Uh, let's do it.I I love to connect. Yeah, I know that that's that's great. You know, becauseI think one of the things that that you talked about that, you know, I've beenmarried going on 26 years. We've been together over 30 years, my wife and Iand it's it's not, you know, when you live with someone and you share withsomeone, it's not always easy. So you have to, like, you know, we've had todo therapy. My wife is a social worker and a therapist and a psychiatric nursenow, but you know, so we've been through a lot and there's a lot of loveand a lot of give and take and you have to learn how to do it. Absolutely. Youknow what I mean? You said that because, you know, there's no shame in going toa counselor, getting some help. It's like a broken arm to go to a doctor.And so in every marriage we got two wills to personalities. I mean, eventhis week, like I'm trying to put into practice, but teaching, you know, andthat's communication or conflict resolution or kindness or sacrifice.And I mean, you've got to um make a lot of sacrifices because love includessacrifices and you know, that commitment to each other. It's not justin the easy seasons, it's where you don't feel like doing something, butyou know, it's right. And so you apologize or you know, whatever that isto strengthen the relationship and and that's, you know, you do it on thefield, but it's even more important off the field. It's that old saying, youknow, are they working out when nobody's watching? It's kind of thesame thing. Are you working on yourself when nobody's watching? And for me, I always wanted to be who I try, itshould be who they need me to be, right, not who I want to be. So that's kind oflike, you know, I've always tried to do with my family and my kids and and I'mnot always great at it. I you know, I'm not perfect, but you know, you justkeep trying and it works out. That's right. I've always wanted to beauthentic. Like if I'm gonna be one way in public, I should be the same way inprivate. You know, there shouldn't be this big guy and that's not easy to do.It's not easy. It's not easy to pressure is tough sometimes, you know,and it's it's tough to get over that. But it goes back to what you said.You've got choices. Yeah. And then you got to make decisions and then theconsequences come from that. And you talked heavily about all those thingsthat that projected you down this path you're on today and sharing your lifewith your kids in your community, which I think is awesome, jesse. So I'menjoying it. I'm grateful for it. For sure. Yeah. So, hey, I appreciate youbeing, I hope you're still a Vikings fan. I'm not one of the 12 men overthere. A great question, you know? No comment. Let's see. What do I say? Yeah.We don't want, we don't want to hurt your, we don't want your community tofeel bad out there. But it's a little school with them. I think. I know I do,I do. It's a tough call. You know, I still, you never leave the team yougrew up with as a child and I'm always pulling for the vikes. But when theyplay the Seahawks, it's like, who am I going to go for? And then Minnesotafans start trash talking. So I'm like,...

...all right, Russell Wilson is prettygood, is pretty good. So we have a lot of it's kind of a both hands, man. Whata sports town Seattle is. Yeah, what there is some of the best food youcould have like. Amazing. That's right. I love Seattle, incredible city, greattown. And coming from the Midwest, Midwest, the winters here are so mild.I mean 30° is about as tough as it gets snow is optional. We go up to themountains, you know, that's optional. If you want cold, you go up there. Butwe could use your help to get us a basketball team. We need those sonicsto come back someday. Man, man Shawn kemp. He was the man back in the day.Yeah, I live in Pittsburgh. We haven't had a basketball team since thePittsburgh fish. So it's been a long time. You got a lot of Super Bowl ringsover there though. You got a few. We had a few, but I don't have any. But Iknow the Steelers do. So just man, it was, it was a great talk. I appreciateyou. I appreciate your story. And I want to thank you for sharing it withus on huddle up with gusts today. You do an awesome job being the podcast,Make it real comfortable. It's a good time. So thank you so much for invitingme. Yeah, no, I appreciate you. I want everybody to go see jesse Bradley dotorg, Right? You can find all his social media, check them out at his church. Um,follow him see his past viewer speaker. You're a great speaker. If you needsomeone to come to your organization, uh, you know, call up jesse. He's gonnacome and he's gonna just give you a great I don't know how long you speakfor, but maybe an hour probably. Yeah. There you go. Love it. All right,everyone. Thanks for joining us on another episode of huddle up with Gus.I want to thank 16 31 digital news uh, in their studio. I want to thank mysuper producer brian. I want to thank terry for help me get everyone andalways being on top of everything. Ian kissed. Who does all of our socialmedia. We want to thank Sounder FM for their new platform, all thetranscription they're doing uh, and how they're growing. Thank you sounded forall the great technology and go to Manscaped dot com. Uh put in my codeGus Frerotte all caps and save 20% and get free shipping. Have a great day,everyone. And we'll see you next week on huddle up with gusts. And that's a wrap sports fan. Thanksfor joining in the fun at the 16 31 digital studios for another to huddleup with gusts featuring 15 year NFL quarterback Gus, parent huddle up withGus is proudly produced by 16 31 digital media and is available are atthe music.

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