Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

Jennifer Garrett

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Author, speaker, athlete, coach, executive, and inspirational hero Jennifer Garrett joins the huddle. Listen to Jennifer break down her life growing up in Chicago, her many college degrees, her time in the national guard, and, of course, how sports have shaped her life! Need something to get you through the COVID-19 quarantines? Well, Jennifer has some words of wisdom that you'll have to listen to the full episode to hear! Listen to the episode and join Gus and Dave in the huddle with hero Jennifer Garrett! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with gusts, where we talked to our guests about how sports shape their life. I'm your host, gust far at, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and cohost Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top with the sports circus and ring master sal look for us on Am TV, a a MP tvcom. Hello everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddlepe with gusts. I'm your host, guests Frat, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and cost Dave Hagar. To us and Dave, how you doing good, just quarantining myself. Yes, we're all at home, enjoying our families and our house and probably, like us, Dave, you guys are cleaning every room as well, but they're great days. Yes. So, in this quarantine mode, we got another awesome guests and we're proud to be part of RADIOCOM's original podcast series, and also people can find us on am TV and the sports circus with sow, the ring master so south. Thank you for having us on the sports circus and letting us be a part of that as well. Today's guest, Dave. You know, she's got a just like many of our guests, a lot of accomplishments. She is a speaker, she's a coach, she does everything from a to Z. She's even written a great book, as we can see here. And so two books. Yes, I think this is your first one, Jennifer, but today joining us in the huddle is is author, coach, veteran, you name it, she's done it. Executive Jennifer Garrett. So, Jennifer, thank you so much for joining us in the huddle today. How are you doing? I'm doing great. Thanks so much for having me. So, Jennifer, where we always started? If you can go back to when you were a kid growing up, what was that first memory for you? Was it? Was it a relative? Was it experience on television? Was it your parents, somebody that gave you a love of sports? Who would work for you and where did you grow up? Great questions. So I grew up in the city of Chicago. So I grew up the Chicago Bears Fan. I did not grow up in a football family, but I followed the game ever since I was a kid. My parents were very, very big Chicago bears fans. Growing up in the S and so I mean ever since I was like four, remember watching games, you know, every Sunday during the NFL season. That was kind of what really brought me to love sports, many sports, not just football. So who's your favorite? Bear? Walter Peyton? Of course, I think coach Nick. I said that was his favorite too. Than you know. I mean for me, the reason why I say that it's not just because of who he was as a player, because there's lots of talented players out there right, current and former, but just who he was as a person, both on and off the field. That, you know, a true inspiration, great leader, and so that's why he's always been my favorite pair. Yeah, I agree. Super Bowl shuffles one of the better dances ever also, so it was video still entertaining. So growing up in Chicago, what sports did you play? I played basketball as a kid. Wanted to play football, but I'm kind of a small person, five two of his, about a hundred fifteen pounds growing up, so not a big okay, but I played basketball in high school. I played tennis and badminton, but I love playing basketball. I wanted to play football. I talked about that in the book a little bit how my senior year of high school I'd started at a new school and I marched down to the coaches office and I said I want to play football and this is in the s and he wasn't too thrilled with me that. And the story goes according to my dad, he's not passed away as up, the coach had begged him to not let me play. But I don't know what the real sort of it was, if it was my dad wanting to play the coach or maybe both. Yeah, back in those days they weren't his for giving two girls coming out in the football field as they would be today. You know, because I know my boys took it pretty hard on their sister. Yeah, so I have a question about Goo. For course. You mentioned badminton. Was it competitive badminton? It it was competitive badminton. There is such a thing. I don't know how strong it is now, but yeah, there are people get they get really a competitive in that sport. Interested. That seems like a pretty good workout when you watch like I mean those people are moving. Yes, yeah, that was a fun sport. I enjoyed it. And what is the object you hit called? I I'm trying to remember it's the already right. The is it a Bertie dottle cock shuttlecock, the actual name. Some people call it a Birdie, but it's actually a shuttlecock. Yeah, that's good. I mean you sound like so...

...you said your parents weren't really football fans. Now, did they really push you to be in sports or more education? How was that for you growing up? Yeah, so my parents were actually big football fans, but they were very big on academics. So I mean I was always in like the writing camps and the science and math camps more so than the sports camps, per say. And so the love of sports was really kind of on my own and just, you know, playing the game and loving the physical exercise for one, and just being out there on the court. Wasn't on the football field, but definitely on the courts. I really enjoyed that. Yeah, so so then you get to you go through your youth sports and I don't know, back in the S it wasn't as kind of like it is now. We got to drive our kids every sports. A lot of times we went out and played in the backyard and different things like that. So was there a pretty good neighborhood that you lived in where you guys always went outside. So I used to go home with a friend of mine. So I used to stay at her house after school and they had a nice basketball court there, so I would just walk over there and and play for a couple hours to my parents picked me up. Yeah, no, that's good. That happens a lot of us. Like Dave and I talked about playing whiffleball a lot when we were young and kind of picking up those backyard games in those types of things. So what high school did you go to in Chicago? So I moved when I was twelve to southern California. So I went to a good move. Yeah, it was warmer here for here in southern California, but I went to coast to Mesa High School, and then I transferred my senior year to Estancia, both of which are in Armed County, is just right south of La Awesome. So did you play? You said you played sports in high school. Right, I did. What kind of you know, when you talk about everything you've done in your career, how did those influence that you had through growing up in Chicago, then southern California and all those sports? How did that help you transition to a lot of things that you've done later in life. Yeah, I mean I'm one that is a firm believer that sports of all kind can really help shape you to be a successful individual beyond the game. I mean there's the team work in the leadership that everybody talks about. There's the resiliency aspects of it as well. There's the ability of people of different backgrounds to come together right, no matter what your background is. When you're on a team, you come together and figure out how do you work well with one another, leveraging the skills that everyone has to achieve the objective, and that is applicable no matter what you're doing in life or or in the game. Yeah, so then you're going through high school and I think you went to USC is that correct? I'm on the board at USC No, I went to Undergrad. I went to cal State Long Beach and then I've have quite a few degrees. So I went to five school seven degrees total. Oh my gosh, that's a long time in school. I go I'm lucky. I got one degree and I don't know if I could do anymore. So what. So tell us all your degrees and where you went sure, so to engineering bachelor's, one and electrical engineering and one bio medical engineering, both from cal State Long Beach. Then I went got an MBA from pepperdine. I went to Loyola Law School in La which is part of loyal a mare amount, and then I have a master's in communication and leadership from Gonzaga and then I have two there called master of law degrees. After you finish the JD you can go back and do a more specialized legal focus. So I have two of them, one in text and then the other one is in business transactions, which is like SEC regulation and Mana activity, corporate formation, that kind of thing. And both of those are from the University of Alabama. Wow, so you actually went to Alabama or was it online? It was online. We did have to we did have an in person component of it, but most of it was online. What drove you to get so many degrees and continue it your education so far? Well, I've always had a passion for learning. That being said, I don't think you have to be in the formal academic setting to learn and I would encourage people to be learning every day. But I was very fortunate to have employers that paid they had very generous education programs and so far of my degrees were fully paid for by employers. Oh Wow, that is that is awesome. So you've had quite a few jobs that as you were going through college and and all getting all these degrees. So that's that's great. No, did everyone help you take a step up and make a different transition in your life? Yeah, it did. For the most part, the degrees were very helpful in that career progression. I mean, I have quite a varied background, so people will ask you know, do you not know what you want to do? Is that why you went about all these degrees? And the answer that is no. I mean, there was a purpose for them and my view is I wanted to make sure that I could be a well rounded, differentiated, valuable asset to the team and by having these different perspectives, that gave me a different angle or...

...different ability to contribute value to each team that I was a part of. Jennifer, and I realize you're a former member of the military also, is a correct yeah, I'm still serving now in the in the National Guard. Okay, and so at what point did you enter the military? Was Was it just as as a national guards person after you're out of college, or was it prior? Yeah, so I have a non traditional path, I'd say in the military when I didn't unless right out of Cup high school and then go come. So what I did was I after law school. I'd always wanted to serve. My first job out of college was working for the Navy as a civil servant and I just had a desire to serve. So after law school decided to kind of pursue that. But I had four kids already and so just going the active duty route wasn't the most feasible path for me. So I join the National Guard. Wow, so doing all this that you do hot what what did you to say? You can stay connected with sports. Who are you fan of? Did you continue to follow the bears? Where you into basketball? What sports are you just always on ESPN watching everything? All of it, always on the ESPN. But I mean I was a big basketball and football watcher ever since I know a kid. I played. I didn't play college ball as a student athlete, but I played in their intramural so I would spend four hours a day playing basketball. So I mean I just loved I've always loved sports and it's been a part of who I am. So I've watched it, I've studied it. I've a five lessons from different sports to my life to be successful. What's your strongest basketball aspect? Dribbling. That's a great style. Wide I did play point guard, so I'll go with dribbling. Guess like you've good handles and Huh, I do. Yes, and I can't fall, I can't, don't, but I can palm one. Well, yes, I'm I sadly enough, cannot palm one, but a little stick them it helps. The volleyball can little bit. Yeah, it's I don't like to admit that to everybody, but I will do you. Jennifer so day, both of the days girls are playing basketball now as well. They're pretty good. Dave, decent. They I don't think they had the passion of that Jennifer has. That's that's the thing that they they do have height, but there I would say. They're interested in lots of things other than basketball, but they play and they're good players. I think. What positions are they? One's a point guard like yourself and then one one's kind of like a for five post center. So yeah, it's they enjoy it, though. It's they're now. I have questions for you later in our conversation because they're going to be transitioning into college and we'd like to hear it kind of like a little summary of motivation I can give them. So we'll ask that. So then you go through and you're getting all these degrees, you you finally finish going to school, whether it's online and whatever. You finally finish this going to school. What is the next transition for you? What is that next job? Or did you already have one and stay in it? Already had one and I stayed in it. So for me, I mean I didn't go to school back to back to back. So was over a fifteen year period that I did all occasional and depp or some of them, I did, you know, look for that next role afterwards, like the MBA, for example. A lot of people that's kind of the next logical thing, right, you get this MBA and you're looking to climb the corporate ladder, so speak. So I did do that, but with other degrees it was really just to augment my education, to leverage the benefits that these employers were affording their employees at the time, really just to grow and develop as a person. Now, are your kids into sports? Yes, so I have five kids, for girls, one boy. My son played came football in high school as a quarterback, and then my daughter's, my older daughters, did cheerleading and then my daughters a senior right now in high school. She plays a cross and then I've got a ten year old that is very much into basketball. And so every day after school when they go to school, and now we're all home schooling, but she'd want to come home and run drill. So she was really excited to play basketball. How do you feel sports has helped them in their transitions and getting older in life? Yeah, I mean, aside from the the team work that we talked about already, it's just learning to adapt is one of the things. I mean you're, you know, playing football, as you know, when it's all about making adjustments as you go right. I mean there's a fast paced game that you're playing. You've got to make adjustments, you've got to figure out who you can count on on your team to help you to move the ball and get across the bowl one in the same as true in life. Until I've seen my kids, it's for in these things from playing their respective forces, the adaptability to the flexibility, to learning to adjust your communication style and how you deal with...

...different people, because we're all different. I mean there's just so many things that that being a student athletes, you know, even at the elementary high school level, can teach you to positioning to be successful in life. I think to being being able to adapt. Adaptability is such a key. I'm no expert and I certainly have my struggles, but I think if you're able to adapt, it can really make transitions a heck of a lot easier than if you're not willing to accept change and roll with it. Right. Yes, absolutely, and I think from playing sports you you kind of realize that to win you need to do that right. If what you're doing today isn't working or you know in the first quarter, then you got to change it up, and by playing sports like that, you you have that kind of built into your mindset, whereas other people who aren't playing sports kind of get stuck in their ways and they become complacent and they're not willing to make those changes that they need to make to continue to progress forward. I think accepting rejection to I mean I sports helps you because you know there's a lot of you get. You get there's a lot of humility involved with sports and in those I noticed just throughout regular life those that have not played sports are a little bit more resistant to rejection and criticism and etc. I think I think that's a big part too. Sure, yeah, I know that's a great point, because when you're applying a sport, you if you if you don't win a game, for example, that is kind of like a rejection, right, you didn't win, but you don't have time to focus on that loss. You got to get ready for the next game. Writing Right with you to come back quickly and to not allow that loss or rejection to kind of hamper you. And you just got to figure it out and move forward. You don't have time to to just dwell in the past. Oh sure, absolutely well. And I also think the sports, when you play them growing up through high school, you have many different coaches, right, you have to learn to deal and take lessons and and instructions from many different kind of people. In the real world is just like that. I mean since I've retired I've had maybe five or six different jobs trying to figure out what I want to do, and all those transitions. I had to learn to deal with different people and I know immediately right now the people that I don't really want to be around. I'm not aggressive towards them, I'm not mean towards them, I just separate myself from those situations because I've been in those situations with bad coaches and never turns out good for me at all. So I just try to kind of distance myself from those situations and go somewhere where I feel safe and and like part of the team, just like you said. Sure, so now you've done all these great things. When did you write your first book? Two Thousand and thirteen, so I actually got the inspiration to write the book I was at a Chicago bears we may packers game. It was the NFC championing shipp in two thousand and eleven, January twenty three. I was sitting there in seventeen degree weather with a lot of other excited bears and factors fans, and it was the fourth quarter and the bears were trailing and they had the ball, trying to make a comeback win and it was fourth down. Lovey Smith, who was the coach of the time, takes the time out and in that moment. I mean as a fan, everyone has their ideas right on what play you're going to run. And as I was sitting there, remember thinking about how fourth down moments are representative of our own moments in our life where we have to make these critical decisions on are we going to go for something or not, and if we are, what play are we going to run or plays to get that next first down? And so that's where I got the inspiration for the book. And so after the game, where the bears obviously lost that game, the packers went on to win the Super Bowl and I just had all these lessons that I learned over the years that I put on paper and started writing the book and in two thousand and thirteen the book was born. Wow. So so when you started writing your book and you started kind of using all these football language in terms, did you have a mentor on the football side that really helped you with all that? No, I didn't. I didn't really know anybody that played collegiately or professionally, but I knew what I knew from watching the game for, you know, twenty years, and so I really just kind of put down what I had learned. But I also reinforced that with high school college pro examples to but no, I didn't have a mentor to kind of guide me in can coach me on what to write or anything like that. So Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and suits and enjoy breakfast for two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for two on US each day you stay. For reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call one eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and ask for a promotional code s for B. What's the process for someone who when you, when you start, when you say okay, I'm going to write a book, because, like when I write a tweet, it takes me about...

...an hour because I kids, I'm horrible at writing and organization. What's when you're going to write a book? What's like the first step, like what you just you make an outline. Is it that basic or tell us like your thought process when you said, okay, I'm gonna write a book. Now I'm gonna yeah, great questions. First out and who do you want to read your book? Writ I mean that's the overarching framework. And then it is exactly just outlining and figuring out, you know, what are the topics that you want to include in the book? How are you going to tailor it to your intended audience, and then just mapping that out and then just write. I mean I would write chapter by chapter. Put it to write a book. Well, it's a pretty big process. I mean, can't just write something on paper once and all of good. I'm and there's a lot of editing and iterating so you get to the final product. So in your mind you talked about who what? Who Do I want to read this book? What were you thinking of? Who did you want when you first thought about this? Who did you want to read the book? It's a great question because it's actually it surprised me who ended up reading it versus who I thought was going to read the book. So originally, when I wrote the book on, my target audience were men who knew football, because that's what I was writing about. Right how you take football principles and apply it to life. And what I found over the years is there are a lot of men that that no football that read the book, but there's a lot of women who are interested in the book, not only because it's football, but because of just who I am as a person and what I've done as a single parent, as a woman, you're trying to climb the corporate ladder work in a mail dominated world as well to the number of different industries that work per dolling mail. So it was interesting to see that the audience that I thought I was writing for initially was not necessarily audience. That ended up being the you know, the the majority of the reader. First who has, who is contacted you that you said, I can't believe they've read my book, that you were like shocked about. I'd say tyrone keys. Tyrone played on the a eighty five bear team, which was the team I grewed up in, you know, really watching it and idolizing, and so we become really great friends today. I mean he's basically he's he kind of when we first started communicating, he started texting me asking me about different games. I think he was trying to test my knowledge of the game, and so I was able to pass the test and to this day I'll say that I know football more than some of the guys he played with. So to me that was pretty cool because that provides validation, you know, as someone that didn't grow up in a football family, I didn't have a dad that would coach. Your brothers have played, so that was pretty neat to get that from him. Yeah, no, that's great. That's great. So you wrote your first book. Comes out in two thousand and thirteen. It's been out awhile. Now what's your what was your next book? You started on so I wrote the other book that I wrote is called the daily Hustle, but it's really more of a planner for people to get focused over a thirty day period. And so what it is about is you basically you map out your goals. You figure out what is it that you need to do each day. So the night before you plan out what you're routine going to be for the day. You will identify those priorities. You spend time working on that the next day and then at the end of the day you come back in your assess where you are. You know, basically we review the game film, if you will. Right. Where do you do? Well, what did you do? What you need to do tomorrow? Kind of thing. So it's more of an organizational tool than an actual book book. So I feel I assume you're pretty good at that, because with with five kids in a single parent you had to be pretty darn organized. Yes, I try to be. Yes, how do you? How do you fit it all into into one day? Something that I really I've been delivered about doing every day now is practicing the power of note. So or I'm intentional with what I say yes to. So when I was in my s and S, I mean I don't wanted to do everything right. You said Yes to everything because you thought that you could do everything, and you can't do everything. Well, something's got to give, and so what I've learned over the years as you really have to be intentional and selective with what the things that you say yes do. So there's a lot that I say no to and I'm not I don't feel bad about that, because it's really about prioritization right and making sure that you understand what are the priorities and what are you willing to not focus on so that you can work on those priorities. Yeah, I agree with that. I agree with that. So, Jennifer, what so you? So you wrote your second book and I think in the meantime you've been also and what you do currently is a lot of motivational speaking, corporate speaking. Is that right? Yes, yeah, tell us about that, like who you speak to, how people can contact you, like who's your target audience, that kind of stuff. Yeah, so the target audience are really people who are looking to kind of reach that next level in life. We all have our own definition of success and we all should have our own definition, right. I mean we're we all have different priorities, every things that are important, but the thing is so a lot of people...

...don't really take action towards those things that they want to because they're busy doing other things. So I'm really looking to help people that want to make changes and their left, that are looking to be better leaders and that really, at the end of the day, they can go to bed at night feeling really good because they made the most out of each and every day. And so I do a lot of work with all kinds of organizations and meant fortune, five hundred companies will do workshops on how they can take the athlete mentality and connect it to leadership to be better leaders in the organization. I'll work with different sports organizations, a lot of work with both sports communities as well as the veteran committed and transiting ya on the uniform alcohol and into, you know, civilian life as well. That's that's probably a that's a big deal. I mean there's but there's so many people that have to go through that transition and it's probably not always very easy, right. Yeah, I mean in the sports world as well as the veteran space, you have this identity that's wrapped around who you were right as a player, as a veteran, as a service member, and when you leave that that identity is gone, right and and so you have to figure out, what do I do now? You've lost the team, you've lost the structure that you used to have before. Used to know where I need to show up, what I'm going to wear, what I need to do, and that's all gone. You have to figure it all out and there's a lot of people that struggle with that. In my focus is let's not just get you grow up, but let's get doing something that you really love right in setting you up for a successful career, because so many people just look to find a job because I have to pay bills. Right. But let's let's put you let's put together a playbook so that you can position yourself for a career that you're really enjoying. Life's too short to not be happy each and every day. Right by Dave and I interviewed a gentleman named Brad Mitchell and he has a group out of pain state called Napsa, where what they do is they take your sports competencies and they relate them to business competencies. So, for instances, if your quarterback, you're very good at seeing the whole field, knowing when a blitz is coming, reading a defense, doing all those things. So they've taken that terminology. Now how does that translate into the workforce, into the real world, so that you understand that language that it's really not that different, it's just you got to think of it at a different language and a different way. So it's really interesting what he does and he what he's doing, is doing a lot of the things that you're saying. God to look him up. I appreciating sharing that one. Why, as a group called an APSA, napsa okay, out of Penn State. Well, I think there's also a lot of employers that may underestimate the talents of those coming out of the military and what they can bring to the table. You know, there's a lot of people maybe who didn't serve that maybe don't appreciate that's it's quite an organization and your you have to be pretty well rounded and also very specialize in some things. I think people overlook that. Maybe you know and that's it's probably helps to be able to convey that as a former military person to the employer. How does skills can translate right? Yeah, and for me, because I did spend a lot of time in corporate American, I did a lot of I've done a lot of hiring and reviewing resume. So I actually one of the things I do now is I work with people on putting together those resumes at highlight these transferable skills in a way that really position our service members and former athletes in a way that these hiring managers and companies can understand and appreciate the experience dances of these folks have had. Well, as we talked about, to as former players, as veterans. They don't do things while you're in there to help you figure out what your next part of life's going to be. Right there. You're there to work for them and then you're going to figure out, okay, when you're done, you're done. They're not coming back. I've never had one team call me and say hey, guys, how's your life going? Do you need help with anything? They don't do that. So you know, even though I played fifteen years, or guys have played three years, but they've played football their whole life and they only know one thing. So that is a difficult transition for me, even like in military, most people go into the military when they're eighteen and if you serve five years or twenty three, twenty four and you're trying to figure out what the heck is next for me. So what you're doing is great. Thank you well, thank you. I appreciate that. Jenner, for you the podcast to don't you I do. Yeah, my podcast is called the ball, after the book, and the focus is on conversations with professional athletes and successful business leaders on how you can implement the right strategies and habits in your life to be successful, to move the ball and it's not just about in business. It's about really living that fulfilling life, being successful in all aspects, been happy, not just in your career but in everything that you do. Have a deep relationships with people, making sure that you are feeling fulfilled and satisfied. None as it's good. How...

...long have you been doing your podcast? It absolutely just kicked off the day after the Super Bowl, so this year. So it's a fairly new podcast, but it's been it's been great with hats and it's not just football athletes I've got. I've had a couple of folks that play Major League Baseball, that played coach the hockey had not a lot of football athletes on as well. Eric Dungee, who's Tony Dungee Sun, was on recently. I'm interviewing my Carrera next week. So great people you're sharing their insights and perspectives from being around the game. Yeah, everyone, you know, and we always say this is everyone is different. Right, there's thirty two guys to play quarterback every year. We're all different. We all approach the game differently and we come out with different competent season skills and we go into the game with that too, and hopefully you pick up a lot of things as you go and so what you're doing is really good. Given people an inside perspective of how athletes and veterans see the game or see the field, or see the you know, the battlefield, whatever you want to call it, and you know how to we all make transitions in life, because I've had a lot of relatives who've lost their job and they're not going to get the same job they've had before in and they really get down on the dump that they don't know how to deal with that. So sometimes that little bit of information can really help them through. Yeah, absolutely, and I've had people that are listened to my podcast that do not know sports at all and they've reached down and said, Hey, I really enjoy the insights and the conversation for having so to me that's pretty cool because that means that the conversations are explained in a way that you don't have to know anything about the sport of man. I love having people that love sports as well, but really I'm looking to impact as many people as I can, whether you're a lover of of the game or not. Jenner, Jennifer ice, and on your website that you're involved with the W NFC? Yes, yeah, what could Pascity tell us a little bit about that? Yeah, so the WNFC is the women's National Football Conference and so they are women semi pro football organization. So I sit on the board of that organization. Another board member is Lifford hobbly. Lifford play for the dolphins back in the s and he's now the president of the NFL Alumni Association Dallas Chapter. We've just added a couple more board members as well. Katie sours now a board member, and a few other great people too. And but I mean that organization started off last year. Fantastic Group of women athletes and I mean they're just doing really great things to to promote the women in sports. Dr Jen Welter has been a part of the organization as well. There's just they're doing a lot of great things. We had a postpone own the season because of the global pandemic that we're in right now, but but they're just doing great things and I know they're going to continue to do some amazing things in the sport. There's a lot of teams, I think isn't there's a lot fifteen or sixteen teams, isn't there? Yes, and they they keep expanding to like this year where there was going to be an expense expansionto Mexico as well. Now they're an international organization. So they're doing great things. I mean just to be in her two of this league and seeing everything that they're they're doing in the number of teams they have and and the women see that a lot of them have their own nonprofit organizations or other organizations. You will watch you at the end there. We want were watching here. If we got you back where? Yeah, we got you there. So I have a good friend who runs the D he owns the DC divas, okay, and you know they're is it a competing league to that or is it kind of the same? Like we have the Pittsburgh Passion here in Pittsburgh. Is Now the league that you're in? It's a is it a different type of league or is it just another league separate, like go would be the NFL in the xfol yeah, it's just another league that's separate. So, Dave, how many teams did you say we're in it? I the looking at the list, look like about like sixteen or so. I don't think the one that passions and is not that extensive. Yeah, so, if you if you have Dr Walter working with you, she's great. I've met her, I've known her and seen her around several times of different functions. She's really intelligent, really smart, loves the GAME HAS INCREDIBLE PASSION FOR IT. She's a good one to have in the league, that's for sure. Yes, Stef I love her energy and she is definitely passionate about it and she does a lot of women's camps across the country and I've had the pleasure of going to a couple of them. She did one right before the super bowls, so I was out there for that and I mean she's just so passionate about what she does and really trying to promote the sport and promote women and get young ladies involved in so she's doing some amazing things too. So are you going to go run a forty and put...

...the pads on and try out? Yes, I would love to. Your Dad's not around to say no anymore. No, he's not. She could be like almost like a little like an Eric Metcalf, kind of behind the line, you know five. Oh, yeah, hard to see, you know, get through, scored through will berry standers? Oh yeah, definitely, definitely. Then you can send films your old old the old high school coach, and say, see, I can do it, but I don't know if he's still there, but hey, find him out. It will be Cathartic. You could send it to him say this feels really good. I told you I could play Um. So so what do you have on on deck next for you? Well, I mean you've every time. You know, it seems like every few years you're just doing something bigger and better. Well, so, I did leave the corporate world four months ago to focus on the move the ball brand full time. So that was a big move, given the cell I am a single parent of five. But you know, for me it was really about you're either going to be all in or get out right. I mean we need to take risks and find or dreams, if you will, and so I've just been really excited to grow the brand. You know, I've got some online courses that I'm going to be releasing which, again, it's all on the theme of how to help people move the ball forward. So I've got one that I'm going to launch next month that's geared towards women specifically just to give them some it's really getting back to basics, giving them the fundamentals that they need to move the ball in the direction they want to move. I mean know oftentimes we think that we have to make these monumental changes in our lives to achieve the results and sometimes it's just small shifts right, doing little things different that can yeeld the big result for us. What's your best way for if someone wanted to contact you for speaking or maybe purchasing some of your services? What's the best way for someone to contact you? Yeah, I mean I have a website, Jennifer a Garrettscom, and then you can also if you go on any social platform and search, just move the ball, you should find me. I'm very active on Linkedin, so that's the big one that that I'm on all day long, most of the time. So I'd say, you know, find me there if you want to connect that I'm maxed out on connections, because I don't know if you know that Linkedin doesn't let you you can only have thirtyzero connections there, but anyone can send me a message. So you don't need to have a premium membership to send me a message. there. Okay, so thirtyzero. I mean I feel like I connect with people all the time. I only have like four thousand. It's like, so you must been really working hard on Linkedin. It's it is a great site for all that to do your work and to tell those people in the corporate world what you're doing. Oh, it's a fantastic platform. I mean, if you're not on Linkedin, linkedin's got over six hundred million users that are, you know, professionals. It's a great way to connect, to grow your business, but to really just build great relationships with people. I mean linkedin literally did change my life. I've met so many amazing people through the platform, not just for business but just to make me a better person. Right, right, yeah, because I always get worried on linkedin. Should I ask a question? Should I ask the audience for this? But then it's like, you know what, you never know until you ask and you put yourself out there, and then usually what happens is you're going to get a great response from it. If you do, and I don't know if you've felt that way on Linkedin. Absolutely, I think back in the day people thought that Linkedin was really just for looking for a job writing. You should only go on there if you're making that next career move, but it's a great platform to engage with the community, to learn, to follow people, to see what they're doing, to really build your tribe. You know, there's so much to do on that platform, not just look for a job. So a good place to move the ball right, that's right, exactly. Yes, all right. So, you know, I think that what you're doing, I mean, Dave, we couldn't talk to somebody who's busier, who's had more going on their life. I just can't believe that you've been a single parent five children and done everything that you've done. Going to classes. How many degrees? Seven. Seven degrees, Dave, that's by far the most of any guests we've ever had on possibly the most children also. Oh No, Fitz he had more. Yeah, Ryan Fitzpatrick had seven. But yeah, Jafifer's Knox selling. Yeah, that's yeah, you're done it. Five, right, got it. Five. Yes. So, you know, one of the things that we end up our show with is, you know, we do a segment called the no huddle, but before that I want to thank radiocom and all of our listeners out there. We're one of RADIOCOM's original podcast and also you can find us on sports circus under the big topless sile, the ring master, and on amptv, on hotel television. So we end our show. We love this segment. It's called the no huddle segment, where we ask you a bunch of questions and you...

...know, it's like marching down to field right we're move it, we're moving the ball right now and we're going to fire a bunch of questions that you have a little fun. So Day've always starts us off. Go ahead, Dave. Okay, this is more timely one than we normally ask, and not to make light of it by any means, but we are in quarantine at the moment. If we're going to read a book and it's not either one of the books that you wrote, what book would you recommend US reading? Can I give you two? Yes, okay, so I would say one book the I love is called how full is your buckets? It's an older book, around two thousand and five, maybe two thousand and seven times frame. But how fully use your boocket in your bucket is about really owning the energy that you have and then you take into every room and you can choose to dip from people's buckets by being negative or you can choose to fill people's buckets through positivity. And especially in today time where you know we've got this global pandemic and some people are freaking out, some people are not right, I actually did a post the other day where I talked about how it's your time to step up and lead right and there's people in your community that need you to be positive and to lead the charge. So couple of your bucket is a really good boockets. It'll take you like an hour to read it. It's a short read. And then the second book is good to great by Jim Collins, another older book. But what that talks about is not only do you need to have the right people with the right skill sets on your bus, you have to have them in the right seat on the bus. So as you build your teams, it's not only about having the right of having talented people, but making sure that the job valet stay and play. On Your next getaway to Los Angeles, the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer. Whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking. For reservations, use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation or call one, two hundred and three, six, two four one thou and ask for Promo Code PSF. All right, tell us a little bit of again about the good to great. Okay, the second book, good too great, by Jim Collins, is a book about having the right people on your team in the right this is the bloods as well. So you want on roster, for example? Right, okay, awesome. So all right, what is your biggest pet peeve? People that are not prepared for conversation and things our meetings that have them, and it's it's important that people respect other people's time right in them and everyone has the same amount of time of the day and I just absolutely hate it when people did not come prepared the conversation and they just don't have respect for your time. Right now, I agree that that's I think that's my puppy is not respecting someone else's time. As a it's not a good one, a lot of people unfortunately demonstrate. Yes, okay, let's see. I was going to ask your all time favorite athlete, but I always already think it's sweetness. So is that right? That is true. That is okay. So, if you were going to go back in time and give a young girl, Jennifer Garrett, some advice, what would that be? That advice would be don't think that you can't do something. And the reason I say it that way is I've always been a person that's like thought you could do whatever it is that you wanted to do, but I placed limit those things, and I'll give you an example. You know, I grew up wanting to be an engineer. I thought that I was going to be an engineer my entire life. Things happen, are you know, our interest change, priorities change, my dad passing away, I was a very big turning point for me and and what my priorities were. But I never thought that I would be working with perfectonal athletes, that people that uses the sportiful fall to help people all to become successful in the laws. And I remember back in early two thousand there was a show that I forgot what the name of of it was. It was a reality TV show where, basically, if you won, you would be a sports commentator, and I remember talking to a friend of mine every day when I would go into the offside passed by his cubic ball. Donnie was his name, and we'd always chat about sports for a while and then we would talk about this show and I used to say, you know, that's a pretty cool...

...job, but that would never be something that we would ever do or you know, I just kind of dismissed it. And so I think the advice that I'm it's a long story here, but I think what I'm getting at is oftentimes we think some some career choices or some past are so far out of reach, but they're none. Mean, you know, when I was a kid watching, you know, the Super Bowl team, the Chicago bears, you know, in one thousand nine hundred and eighty six right, like, I never would have thought that my life was bought in this direction. And so I would tell someone that is thirty years younger, like you really can do whatever it is that you want to do and like you just got to figure out how to go do it right exactly exactly. So what is your favorite sports movie? Remember the titans, right, that's a good that's that's right up there, I think, with the most out of a lot of our guests have picked his. Remember the titans. Day I stopped. I still haven't seen it. So maybe we have some time now. We all do, so I might. Maybe that's one I'll rent day days more into watching the show's never seen it. There's a lot of good videos, though. I've never seen Godfather. I've never seen all the classic s team movies. I've missed, you know. So I'd like to say it was doing better things, but unfortunate I don't think I was. But I can catch up. We got about two weeks to catch up at least. Okay, let's see here. If you could trade places with anybody ever in time for one day, who would that be? Elon Musk Oh. I like it. Why would that be? Well, so I do. I am a tesla owner for once. I love the car, but I just think he's such a visionary. And Yeah, I mean some people love him, some people don't care for him, right, but I mean he is. He is the great leader. He is a visionary. Is Looking at paving the way and pushing the boundaries of technology and different things, and so I would just love this with places and be in those conversations that he's having with people about how to really make a difference and shames the world. No, I agree with that, like. I mean, what a visionary. What what up? I mean he's done everything you can to think about. Just say hey, we're going to build these tunnels and we're going to run speed trains throne and you know, just we're just going to start it and nobody's going to tell us now, and it's just amazing that that that's happened, you know, because when you have a coach like that that's a visionary and it can get his team to do things that are other people would never think as possible, that's moving the ball right. That's are a lot of the people that get the jobs done and that's why the Patriots, I think, have been so good for so long. But it's really going to be interesting this year to see. All right, is it good? Is it Bill Bell, checkers? It Tom Brady? Which one? Was it right? Yes, it'll definitely be an interesting next season. Okay, I mentioned this earlier in our podcast, but I've so I have a daughter who's going to be a junior and a daughter is going to be a senior in high school. What you know in like thirty seconds. Can I have some advice to convey to them about making good decisions, about good going in the direction that they you know, maybe maybe they want to go to direction, but it's not like super popular with their friends or whatever, but like something that could maybe steer them on the right path as they head to college. Sure, couple things. One, I think it's important to have the courage to pursue what you're passionate about, whether or not other people stand with you or you go alone, for one. But you definitely want to choose who you surround yourself with. I mean, they talked about your that the you're the average of the five people you surround yourself with. Right. So, I mean my view is, I don't never want to be the smartest person in the room because I'm in the wrong room, because you want to be associating yourself with people that are going to help level you up right. You don't want people in the room that are pulling you down. So I think as you leave high school and move on, you're going to meet new friends make. You'll have some old friends that you'll stay in touch with rights and social media and stuff, but you're to meet New People, to choose the people that you want to associate with. Very wisely good stuff. That's, you know what, David, makes me think that Olivia's kind of done that already. She's made some choices that she in the last like six months and really changed her no, that's absolutely right. Now Jennifer, my youngest daughter, was hanging around with a crowd that we're weren't super crazy about, and I don't think she was, but she was involved with it and she just pur she just made the decision, you know what, I'm not going to be with them anymore and I think she's a lot happier person and we're seeing, you know, a better person really, since she's kind of removed herself from that, because that the average of those that group was probably not the number we wanted it to be. So I appreciate the advice. That's really good stuff. Sure, I would say. I would add one other thing to that too. It is as you continue on. I mean there are people in...

...this world that are going to hate on you, that are, you know, gonna say no, that are going to reject you, and rejection and hate is a gift that you don't have to accept from other people. And if someone tells you know, all that means is they're not meant to be on the journey with you. No more good stuff, good stuff, so very good stuff, Jennifer. We really appreciate you being on huddle up with guests, with Dave and I joining us in the huddle. Everyone can go and, you know, check out Jennifer and get her pull. Okay, move the ball. You can move the ball on linkedin all the social media. You can check out our new podcast. Move The ball. So it's a brand that she's building and I think she's doing an outstanding job. And just keep up the great work and thank you for doing what you're doing, Jennifer. Well, the daily Hustle too. I'll don't forget the daily Hustle. That's that's what I actually I'm thinking about getting as we leave this podcast. My organization's ridiculous. So it sounds like a daily hustle is going to be able to organize. You need. You need a hustle out and pick that update. I need to past soon as we're allowed to go. Thank you, Jennifer. We really appreciate your time. Thank you both for having me on the show. I hope you're in a conversation of great, absolutely wonderful thank you. Thanks, Jennifer. Stay healthy and safe. Thanks all. Right. By Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests, where we talked to a wide range of guests about how supports shake your life. As always, been joined by my great friend and cohost Dave Hagar, and we want you to be able to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with Gust and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time and listening to our podcast.

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