Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 1 year ago

Jay Paterno

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We Are! in the huddle with Jay Paterno, philanthropist and son of legendary Penn State football coach Joe Paterno. In this episode, Dave and Gus talk to Jay about everything from his life growing up with the coaching legend and his current opinions on topics ranging from football to his work. Join the huddle and give a listen to this week's episode! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome everyone to huddle up with gusts, where we talked to our guests about how sports shake their life. I'm your host, gusts for rock, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and Co host, Dave Hagar. You can now find us under the big top with the sports circuits and ring master. Soal look for us on Am TV, a a MP tvcom. All Right, thanks everyone for joining us another episode of Hollow Dave, how you doing today? Good, excited about our guests today. Said about our guests. How do you say? Football royalty gave the turn. Yeah, I mean, yeah, that's football royal. Yeah, I mean great. You think about the name and and everything and Penn state, how far back it goes and and what an outstanding job that his family, his father, has done at Penn State and caring on the tradition and I know he loves the game and he loves the college and I don't know. I don't know if if he's ever left Penn State or State College. I believe he's a laperopill say that'll find out. So, Jay, it's so great to have you on huddle up with gusts. We appreciate you joining us on the show today. A great to be are. So where we always start is we kind of go back to when you were a kid, and I think this question is anyone can answer, but it's always about what was that first time or where is that first moment in your life that you remember when you fell in love with sports? See, I don't know. You know, when I was a kid, obviously being around Penn State football that you know, I wasn't a practice for anything like that, but I knew that my dad was involved in something and I would start when I was very young. I get up early in the morning and I go into his den and he'd been there looking a film and I started to, you know, generalize, playing my little matchbox and cars and hot wheels on the floor of his den. But you know, as I got older I started to watch, look over shoulderer, what exactly is he doing? And this is back in the days when it was film, and then, you know, you just kind of pick up the sport from being around it and just always loved, love, just the idea of football and everything about it and all the all the stuff that comes with it. So what other sports? I mean, obviously football's in your blood. It was in my blood. It was connected to our families. But what other sports did you grow up playing or enjoy watching? What was I good at? Not many, but I'm baseball. To this day I still love baseball. There's just something about it. You know the you know the good thing about baseball. It kind of gives you time to digest what's going on between pitches and stuff. Basketball played a little bit here and there, my ski bike, all kind of stuff. But but football and baseball would probably be the two biggest ones. Love Hockey. You Penn date's got a great hockey program and guy could ask. He's a coach here who's the neighbor and a friend. So you know, I just love competition. And now I've got two kids. Two of my kids are playing college across. I've got three there, three younger siblings with all playing Lacrosse. So it's you know, it's just it's whatever's got a ball, bat, huck stick, you name it all, watch it. So, Jay, when you were growing up in stay college, was it like a bunch of neighborhood kids that would always plea you go and get pickup game of football, play Woolf football, something like that. was like the neighborhood...

...crew that played with each other. Yes, and that's exactly what it should be. Yes, I still go nuts because, you know, my kids in sports, I will practice is here and then what time to practice? I don't know. Didn't they tell you? I'm like no, you have to tell me. But you know, there was. There was. There was a high school football coach in Shaker Heights, Ohio, years ago and he and I were talking about this. Needs you know, they were having trouble developing leadership on their on their football team, and I said what do you think that is? He said, you know, from the time these kids are born and getting the sports, practice is planned by an adult. The teams are split up by adults. We're going to do this for five minutes to that provided. So everything they do is organized by adults. And will you guys grow up? When I grew up, it was hey, go call one guy and then go to his house and then go to four or five other guys houses with football or basketball or football, whatever you got, and we're going to split into teams and we're going to play. And we had to organize it so you would kind of forced to being in charge of it. So yeah, you know, I there was a park right in our backyard, so we were constantly down there all time. And you know, different time obviously, but you know, my mom had a whistle she blow about ten minutes before dinner time and if you can get home and sit down before dinner you were in big trouble. But other than that it's like get out of house and go play sports and we'll see where you get back for dinner. Yeah, so many of our guests talk about that and that's how we grew up. Is is you go from one guy's house to the next and whatever you had, you know, whatever the sport of the day was, we all played it and we didn't have parents, we didn't have referees, we didn't have people telling you what to do, what the rules were and all that. You just made them up as you went and and the little ones had to keep up and the big ones had to kind of keep control, and I think you're right. That's kind of how leadership started for a lot of people that played sports back in the day. Well, I remember two with the whistle. You'd go, when you hear you go, Damn, even though meant dinner was coming, you had to stop you. Yeah, then you'd be all right. We're back here in an hour. Right, exactly, exactly right. Did you go home and if your mom'son, you had to help me clean up the dish after's like, mom, I got a game, you know, but times right. It definitely is different times. It's so well of the question I have for you. You're right in the middle of the state. You love a lot of sports. So are you more of an East eastern Pennsylvania Guy or western Pennsylvania guy? This is a loaded question. It's a loaded question. Did you know in after coaching so many years and having teammates, you know, you got to know guys that played on so many different teams. So I really I grew up a cowboys fan, which I know is Harrisy in western Pnsylvania from the nine Sevy, but it was kind of rot your stomach. Roger Stoback was a guy idolized, and and rightfully so. Good Dude, and Gil Brandt, who was the gem of the cowboys or head of scouting, would always come up to scout guys at Penn State and he would always send my brothers and I stuff, including Dallas Cowboys Year leader posters. So what team would do? Yeah, but can you blame with? But as I got older and got to know more guys around the league stuff, I don't really have a favorite team per se. You know, Tom Bradley's coaching with the steelers now, who I'm closed to, so I've been out of stealing game. So I root for them. My wife's in Pittsburgh and if I want to keep the household happy, I root the steelers. Happy Wife, happy life. You know, that goes that. We don't have that before. So you know. So it's kind of that way. I kind of was a flyers fan and that really hasn't changed. I know that, Tarry, see in lest you pay, but you guys got a lot of cups, so you can. You guys do it all right. The fire said as much help as they can get. Yeah, but the baseball pirates. But the team I really paulow most the Red Sox because my coach at University Connecticut for a year in Summers I would listen to games in the radio at...

...night while I was doing work or whatever, and then I went to fenway just fell in love with the whole environment that was back in one thousand nine hundred and ninety, three ninety for yeah, it's just it's just such a great experience. David, I love listen to the Games on the radio. Sometimes the Games are hard to watch, but it's something about when you have a really good announcer and and and call in the game and saying what's happening, it's just makes it so much better. Yeah, I grew up in Arizona and we could get on am. You could still get dodger games, even though I was into soon him and that was the even I wasn't even a dodgers fan, but there's nothing, you know, more relaxing and having that in the background right and scully calling the game. It's was great. That was my dad got the best things about getting satellite radio as I started listening to some Vin scully and you know few, you know, before we retired. And and part of that was, you know, he was doing games when they were still in Brooklyn and my dad grew up in Brooklyn. My Dad was a Brooklyn Dodger Fan. facting when he was a kid he was usher at APPs field and the dodgers left Brooklyn he stopped. He stopped watching baseball together. He was so mad never got over it right. So when you make that transition into high school, did you go to State College High School? With High School? HAP Thany College High School? That's a pretty good everylier. They're pretty competitive in that area. Yeah, I've done that. They've done a nice job. We're really the biggest high school within seventy eight miles and so we should be. But we're in that league and with the Harrisburg teams in the midpen leak. So it's a good, tough, competitive league and they've done a good job. The coach there's done a nice job, Matt One tell, who's dad was also the coach the at one time. And but they're always competitive. Did you play multiple sports in high school? Now I've got in a football. I did some track till I realized I wasn't fast and couldn't jump and couldn't shot put. So I realized that wasn't that was not going to be a future forming but football is my main thing and played football there and then I walked on at Penn State and played there and really had a great time and I know I wasn't going to be the starting quarterback of pensive anytime soon unless there was an absolute tragedy on Saturday afternoon. But I knew I want to coach, so that was really the reason I stayed in it. So what your dad go to your games in high school? Yeah, he while, he got two, one or two of them, partly because, you know, they were on the road on Friday nights, right, or he's with the team on Friday nights. And the one game I remember coming to was we were playing Punchatani high school and we were tied and I was going to I was getting sacked and I thought, you know what, if I throw this ball away, I'll stop the clock and we'll be third down and seven rather than third down and fifteen. So as I throw the ball away, I'm getting kind of wrestled to the ground, it hits off the other kids knee brace, go straight up in here and punch of tunny kicks it off and they win the game. Ten seven. I would home. So and my dad said, look, you had the right idea. You know, it's a fluke thing. You know, if I was great and you I would say you were thinking the right thing, but I just didn't work out. He said that's the way life goes. And it was a wondering lesson. I thought he's going to kill me, like I don't, but now he was. He took that approach and you know it's funny, years later, when I was coaching quarterbacks, that's how I would look. You did everything you could control and that's the only thing I can grade you on. I try to get away that one year when I was playing with the BANGOS and through it left handed and the coach was like yeah, excuse really doesn't work because you're left hand and it got picked up. I still remember that. You remember that play. Was It goaling? No, no, here's weird. Is like on the thirty goes it tackled and right when I got yeah, I was thrown it and I came I think a D Liman picked it off. But there are things you can control and there's definitely things in the game that you can't...

...control. I love when like so I'll give you example Ryan Fitzpatrick, who's a good friend of the show and a good friend of mine. Last week the dolphins are playing the jets. They get the ball in a half yard line coming out and they try to sneak the ball out, but Ryan gets tackled in the end zone. Basically right, because you're already snapping to get buying the goal line and it and it's a safety. It's so the media wroad how Ryan Fitzpatrick gave up a safety against the jets and I'm like, that's not how it goes, that's not what you right. Let mean, that was just a play that was called and he's doing his job and you know, because he didn't get out. There's just things you can control and you can't. Yeah, no question, Jay. was there ever a thought in your head of going somewhere other than Penn state when you're in high school? Well, now, I walked on taking about two years in, I think it was. I talked to different fierce some charities about transfrom because I was interesting, maybe communications and you know. So one up visit with Damn and just just deside of s Day Penn State, and then when I got a college I went to University of Virginia to coach for three years and then I was at University Connecticut and then James Madison University before I came back to state in ninety five, and then I'm stayed the rest of my career till two thousand and one. Who was the coach of Virginia when you went there, George Welsh, George well, short I may. I was fortune. I coach for to hall of Fame Coaches, George Welsh. Obviously Joe turnout and learn great things from George is really one of the underrated coaches in the history of college football simply because of where he won. And he went to Navy and took them two bulls and things and really turn that around. And then he went to Virginia with they had no football success whatsoever and I think in the last fifty years they've had twenty or twenty one winning season and sixteen of them more with him. So he really did some great things. Are you have? Virginia is a tough place to win. You just don't get the same athletes as a lot of the other schools in that division get. So you went on to coach and you always coach quarterbacks, not coach. Let's see, as a GA I did defensive backs, offensive line and then I coach wide receiving tight ends of Connecticut and coach quarterbacks piece Amandus is like ancient history. quarterback, said James Madison University, and then coach tight ends and there was recruity Cordin to fence state and then took on the quarterbacks of the two thousand and was also kind of CO coordinated our corded past game, calm play till two thousand and eleven. You got into school that started to get a little momentum on the national scene. It because it's died out now a little bit. Yeah, there's a few years though. That EUCLON was definitely an up and coming. Mike, my college center is now the defensive coordinator. You come loose, Spanos, Oh yeah, absolutely. Yeah, lose, lose a good guy. You know you're in a tough spot because you know now they were in that conference. How they're going to get out of it, because the fours of the basketball really runs the roost up there and they didn't like being in that conference team. Worse, they got themselves out to the east. But bring new football and people realize football is football makes a lot more money than basketballness. But you know right. So how do you think all the positions that you've coached and then when you finally settle in on quarterbacks, how do you think all that helps you coach the quarterbacks a little differently? Well, I think the most important thing, and you would know this from playing, is you know you got to try and get your mind inside what they're trying to do. You know. If you know that, you know in quarters coverage at that safety's key, and number two, if he goes vertical or you know, whatever the case may be. So having coach other positions in terms, especially on the defensive sidewhere I started out, really helps you design the way you're going to tack people. Understanding to that helped. And then the R spent the offensive wine and Uva was...

...great because, you might remined, Gary tranquill was a coach at head coach at one time and he go offens court a bunch of different places, one of the first first years out of Virginia. We're all sitting there, a bunch of Ga's all right out of college, I'll think. We know everything. You we're drawn up all these past plays and hey, this is the greatest pass in the red zone. This past that pass and Gary tranquill to set. There you go. So that's all great, but how you going to protect it? And I see, what do you mean? Because well, you can't get that pass off unless you can protect your quarterback and and he started. He taught us and then when I work with offensive line, everything I did as a quarterback coach started with how do we protect this? So you you know, learning defense, learning the Offensive Line and then coaching tight end. You know tight ends are involved in run, run blocking, pass blocking well past game. So I learned all those other aspects before I really started to coach quarterback. So I think that was a real benefit. Yeah, I think it's so important. My Son Is Coaching and William and Mary. Now he's in a senior year and he's coaching the quarterbacks and I told him that you got to learn what the Lineman are doing. That's the most important because you got to learn. As a quarterbacks coach you have to learn every aspect, what the defense is doing, what the lines doing, you have to understand all their calls. You have to understand what everybody's doing, because you're the leader, the ultimate leader of the team, and if you don't know what's going on you you're not able to put anybody else in a right position or tell them what to do unless you know exactly what to do. And it's so he's really taking at the heart and he said it dad. By far it's the hardest thing to learn is the lineman all their calls, he said, because every run we have they have a different call and then every defense gives them another to call. So you're right. I mean learning the line is probably one of the hardest parts of the game. No question. That's great advice you gave, because it's you know, when that quarterback steps in the huddle. Well, you know, don't even be starting the fact that so many teams don't huddle anymore because there's, I think, just a balance somewhere, or never take a snap under center it. Yeah, don't. Didn't. When I see teams that cannot run a damn quarterback sneak on a third down and six inches and their staffing a guy five yards, I want to pull my hair out every like. How hard is it to teach that? Welcome to the world of the steelers. I mean they did. They never go under center anymore. They won't go into center and in Roethlisberger ways like to sixty six five and he hasn't had a quarterback sneak in about seven years or something. But yeah, it's that's very fresh tided. But but you know, the guy, a guy, that guy, that can get in the huddle or, certainly as a quarterback, you could sit there talking the offensive line. They earn the respect of those offensive lineman too as well, because they know he respects what they're doing now and it is really important. I had some of the best centers that you could ever play with. That had Matt Burke, Tommy Nayland at the broncos. I mean those guys made all the calls. It's like it's pretty easy for me. I don't have to call anything out. They just get all the work. It was actually pretty nice. Well, you know it's now it's you know they're coming up every play and they're calling out the mental linebacker and you know you telling the defensive what you basically tell them defense where you're setting your protection, where you're setting your run blocking. It's like you know what's part of the game. Start Your Day sunny side up at the Weston Bonaventure Hotel and sweets and enjoy breakfast or two on us. No matter how you plan to spend your trip to Los Angeles, start every day with a hearty meal to kick start your morning. Enjoy breakfast for to on US each day. You stay for reservations, be sure that Promo Code S for B appears in the Promo codebox when making your online reservation at Marriottcom. BACKSLASH LAX BW or call when eight hundred two to eight one thousand two hundred and ninety and ask for a promotional code s four B. Right, yeah, no, I agree. I agree. So you go and your coach and at the quarterbacks and then you're also a recruiting coach. Right, yeah, what is the heart's part about recruiting high schools in college football? Because I think that...

...was my thing. I never wanted to be a college coach because of the recruiting aspect. I felt like it would take so much for my time. Oh, it does now, you know, if you look at the way college football programs are organized now, you know they've got so many interns and assistance in their whole recruiting operation. You know, for nine years of recruiting operation was me and I had a staff assistant and maybe a Ga that would help me out with it, organizing everything. Now there's, you know, twenty thirty people working on it, so they're not working as much as they used to, but you know, don't you go into high schools and now you've got to try and get to know what makes this kid tick. What is going to be deciding factor? Is this kid a fit for our school? Because you really want to go to class and there's so many factors and it's a content challenge. And when you talk about about college football, you're going to sign two thousand, two twenty three kids in a class. Sometimes you're starting out with there might be three, four hundred kids when you first start that you're interested in and you know, yeah, there's a great wide receiver in California and everybody in the world chasing but this kid really going to go away from home? Does he want to come out and play football in Pennsylvania? and Are we overlooking a kid in, you know, in Western PA, while we're chasing the kid in Florida? And you know, we used to have that fight all the time. In fact, you know, every once in a while my dad would even committing and say when you when you were playing guss because hell yeah, there's guys from Western Pa. How do we miss them now? I wasn't on the staff at that time, because those your bat that's because your Buddy Bradley wanted me to play linebacker and I'm like that you're Jim Kelly. Yeah, and that lust settler. Kelly was off the lineback and dig too. Yeah, and high satiler to way live back was a jeff hosteather pen states a little bit and then he left went to West Virginia. Yeah. Well, you know, have on was in the recruiting class when when Jim Kelly was coming out, Frank Rocco was like the big name out right and they had gotten black legend and they'd gotten another guy, and so Jim Kelly was like, well, you got all these quarterbacks and he was jt white may have been recruiting of time. He so. Well, you know, Jim, you're a good enough athlete. If quarterback doesn't work out, you could play linebacker. Nobody said you're going to be a linebacker, right. He just said if he doesn't work out, you can play linebacker. When he heard that and went the other way, ran the other way, which you know, we worked out for him and Black Leve's got US national championship. Was the first round pick and so maybe really everybody came out of head but you know, it's you know, I hear from people all time about what you got a recruit Florida, you got a flute. Recruit Georgie, you got recrud all these players's if you want to be successful, and I you know at the end of the day, you know higher state last year, for example, because I had a another I'm on the board of Trustees of pens day right now and one of the trustees so well, we're not recruiting all these places. I said nineteen of a high state starters last year came from big ten states and I said they're pretty dangn good and couldn't even believe I go look just kids from went right down the list. I go, you guys get all caught up in these recruiting guys and say this guy in Florida's a five store and last year the rookie of the year was, say, Juan Berkeley and NFL, who went to High School in Pennsylvania? And Don what's the name? The defensive tackle out of the rams are and Donald Donald, he's Al Quippa Guy. I mean, so there are two of the best players in the entire league that are right here in Pennsylvania sides. I don't want to hear that crap. You know we got good enough. You know good enough players right here. Yeah, sometimes you miss him when it right under your nose. Right, no question. So what do you what do you think? I always thought it. Thought about this like your dad especially. What do you think your dad was say about how football and recruiting goes with social media, because he probably would just be like I I'm not doing that. If you guys want to do it. I could just see him like trying to figure it...

...out. Well, twitter was starting to hit big when before he was done coaching and he said, look, I don't know what's going on that stuff, but are we doing everything we should be doing as an organization? You know, are we out there? Are we doing a good enough job? And he was always very conscious of that. I think the last year, when I'm in two thousand and ten eleven, he got a he got his first computer, not that he exactly running, but he had he had one of those big apple computers on his desk to do skype and stuff with recruits and people. Could you did it? He goes, why do you guys think this is such a big deal? It's nothing but teleconferencing. We've been doing telecomferencing for how many years for other stuff that he seemed. I said, well, this is free goes. Well, that's even better. So he so he enjoyed that. But he started doing that with recruits and we really really enjoyed it. But you know, he wasn't going going tweet and all that kind of stuff. And and you know I don't one thing of driving nuts is, you know, these recruiting visits now and drives me nuts. You know, you see the kids dress up in the uniform and they're pose in it and as you know what you didn't learn that uniform yet. You know that. That is always bothering me. That's my one gripe with all the recruiting stuff, that you weren't allowed to let kids do that before. Right now I'm well, does it and they just turn and doing like you know, when you earn that uniform then you can put it on. If ivery at back in the coaching, which I may, that would be one of my rules I've ever run the program were like Hey, you come in here, you want to put the uniform. Good, you commit, you signed and you come here and you learn it. So you got to have coaching in two thousand and eleven. And what are you doing now, since you got out well. I wrote a book about my really about my life experience with my dad. I've done some venture capital things for private equity raises. I'm on a board of Trustees of Penn State. I do a TV show every week now that's in the eastern part of the state on Penn State. So a lot of different things. I'm working on another book now. Like there's too really the pipeline, but one them further ahead on the other one. So a lot of different things. So you know, it's I missed coaching and and part and part of the last seven years, really seven eight years, has been dealing with some of the fall out of the stuff that happened in two thousand and eleven as it relates to our family and my dad and that kind of stuff. So that's takes up a good chunk of time. Jill Jay, when you're in a board of trustees, what like? What is your task? What is you know, when you have a I don't know how often meetings are like. What do you guys do? I think a lot of people here board of trustees they don't know what that is. Sometimes I don't know now, but we were really, we really the governing body of the university sub speak. So when we approved budgets, tuition, all that kind of stuff, as well as oversee the really pretty much everything. And when you look at a school like Penn State, we, when you count in, are much like Pitton. You PMC, with Penn State and our Penn state health system. You look at it almost a seven billion dollar operation. So there's a lot of things that come with it. So, you know, it's been a great learning experience, but also it's been a way for me to kind of get back involved at Penn state and really have a hand in trying to make sure that we do the right things to the students here. You know it's I'm dealing with. You know, you see it with my own kids. You know, the cost situation, those kind of things, but also trying to make sure that we oversee the athletics programs here as well so that we continue do things the right way Penn State, as we've done for so many years. Are Your siblings involved with Penn State as well? Well? My my sister Mary Works in development of Penn State. She's involved by rating, but everybody else is. I want to five kids. So I once, as you lives with billy another's brother lives here. He's not involved with Penn State and another brother lived...

...don a hershey and he's not involved either. But so to my sister and I and my mom is still very much involved trying to help them raise money to the library and things like that. That's good at philanthropy. Part is always big. I mean your your name carries a lot of weights. So just like we're friends with Roverta Clementi Junior, you know the cleny name carries a lot of weight and a lot of people really like to see Roberto and when we had him on our show he was our first guest we've ever interviewed. He talked about how it took him a long time to realize that you know who he was because when people would see him they always thought of his dad. Right, and I'm sure you get a lot of that as well. Enough question and you know it's and you don't really realize it growing up because you're not old enough to really get your head around right. And you know, I had a friend of mine that I want to tell ementary school with and he knew my dad's name was Joe and he knew my dad's name had something to do with. He did something with football and he knew that he was famous and he's got my dad was Joe Namouth. I'm good as well. You know, Joey was a goodlooking guy, but I don't think I could handle it. I don't think I can handle that as a husband. But you know, you don't really you know until you step back and are able to kind of see it from a different respective it's hard to really understand that that people look at you that way. And you know, the sooner you kind of get around that and understand that and the sooner you start to do some things on your own, then people start to see you a little differently, and that's you know, it's a constant it's a constant thing that you get all time. Let's see if you're probably constantly, at at least at the beginning, trying to prove yourself that I'm not here because of my dad. I'm sure there's something to do with it, but you you're worthy of whatever position you're in right. Let e learn your last name. Well, you know, when I first came back to Penn State, one of the other sistant coaches said to me, he said, you know, Jay, just just remember he said in a guy's close friend previous that. He said, you know, you're going to have to be twice as good as anybody else because the public perception and even perception of some guys within here is going to be your only here because your dad. So you know, you understand that good enough isn't necessarily going to be good enough for some of these people. You got to go and voute beyond and I tried to carry myself that way. It was great advice. You know, I learned a lesson very early on. You know, we had winter workouts I got I got hired I think it was in February of ninety five and we had those six am workouts and I went out to coach and I had sweat pants on and my dad calls me over and says, Hey, I don't ever want to see out in there in cracsfield sweat pants again. Put on a pair of pants, you know, use a professional environment, and I went okay, I looked around. They were like three other coaches and sweatpants. Are like insane of them about it. But you know, I've never were sweatpants to a six Ay of work at nobut. It was pretty seasy can't we get away from shorts? But I know sweat, but I never wear sweatpants on a practice field ever again. Oh, yeah, you don't. You know what your dad coming down on you? I know not. And and you know the other thing. Two that was funny. It's Bill Kenny, was our offensive line coach for the entire time I was there. I and bill said he gets just remember Jay. He said sometimes you may not have been something wrong, but dad knows you can handle him yelling at you, so he'll yell at you about something somebody else did or other guys in the staff we're doing too, just so they'll hear it and then they'll stop doing I said, okay, I got you. I got a sty like that, but yeah, I got you. Yeah, I always had that to like the coach was going to yell at me because he likes you the best and he knows you can take it. I'm like, well, that doesn't make me feel any better, like, you know, when he's chewing on my ear and nobody else getting chewed on. Why? Don't think my dad liked me best, but I think he just felt like, like, well,...

...like I could deal with it, you know, and you know we you know my dad, he loved argue and mean it didn't matter. He every night and dinner we would end up, you know, we always hate the whole family, all five kids, my mom and dad. It was going to be family dinner. My Daddy get home off the practice field of thirty. We ate forty five, seven o'clock when he got home. But at the end of dinner he would always, towards the end of are always start some discussion or argument and it would just be, you know, arguing. Our dishes are getting clear to people. We arguing and so and I got to pen sate. You know, we get in these coaches meetings and you know how those go. I mean one coach wants to run this play, another coach once your block it that way, another guy wants to do this, and we get these discarguments and I would just keep arguing. People like you know what is with you too? You guys just love to argue. I that's what we do, but there were certain coaches didn't. But so it did get definitely carried over to the coaching part of it. Well, that's kind of like it goes back to where you get it all out at the table and then you forget about it right, you leave the table, you forget about it, you don't carry it on with you through the rest of the night or the next day. I mean, I've got it to me what arguings all about with your family. You get it all out, speak your peace and there's you know, there's nothing left. Absolutely. So what was your dad more of a one the offensive side defensive side? I always wondered at because I didn't really know that about him, you know, or was he like kind of one of the guys that just kind of oversaw it all, that his coordinators work all the above? I mean, he really was me, you know, in six thousand eight hundred and sixty nine, think all the way up to like seventy one or seventy two, he called every offensive and defensive snap the Games. Wow, as a coach, I mean, which you know, I look at that now I go how in God's yeah, how do you do that? Did he just did it? And you know, he started at people always thought he was more of an offensive guy in terms of what he was in bold in, but he started out really I think it was the summer between sixty six and sixty seven. He went and he spent the whole summer really kind of redesigning things that they did on defense and then, you know, obviously had some really good, great players came along like Mike Grade and Jack Hammons, guys like that, which, you know, I don't know if it's sessor x's nose or it's just shot some great players and right, but it really reshapes some of the things they did defensively. And then, you know, then got more involved in offense. But he was a guy that knew both sides of the ball. You know, savings like that. Right now, I mean saving as a guy that if his if his defensive line coach got lost on his way to practice, saving you coach, go coach The d line for that practice or the office. And my dad's that way, was that way and he was all over the practice field. You know, when we went out in the practice field, you know he would kind of let us do our thing, but he would come and say, hey, why don't you tell him to do that, or hey, why is he reading it that way? He didn't we talk, you know, but he would really second guess you in front of players. But he would make notes. He come in after practice and say, Hey, Tom Bradley had. Why is the corner playing that post route that way? And he would say the Bill Kenny, why is the guard? Know what calls the guard making when they went, I've dumped that guy into a three technique. We're going to bring the tackle down and pull the guard all he knew all those those ins and outs and, course, the game same way. And he jump into a game and say hey, he would let us, you know, call the game, but we would know Monday night I put the game plan in his mailbox, or even facts to him. He's still had a fact machine back then. And then he would commend Tuesday and say on third and three, two, six, you got too much. Third and eight are like this. Hey, on your you know, have we thought about this play? That play? Hey, you got too many things here. And they'd go to defense and say hey, when they're running that zone play, how we going to stunt? So he was involved and everything and then once the game started, he let you call the game, but he would jump in and say hey, at slants or hey, the backside and is chasing. We got to run at bootleg off that or each say that and Tom that guy can't cover this guy. Remember one time we were playing Indiana and Indiana a really...

...good defensive been, this guy named Rassma, Rass Mussel, and we basically said at halftime, look, we're not going to run a rast must anymore because our tackle can't handle it, you know. So we were running left runt, the left, front, left and one time play comes in. We're on the wrong hash and we've run it right in. RAST Mussein makes play from lives three and joe comes running down. He's I told you, guys, we're not going to run it raspute and ever again it's the game. I think he was a you know, he was short bearded guy. Said well, RASP gets the game, will be able will run out of but Raspmus we already because you know what I meant. Maybe he was. He was very much in touch with that stuff and flow the game and probably saw him. I can't tell. Anytimes Bill Kenny would say, Hey, your dad came down to the guard. Miss that and as in bills he didn't miss it. And we look at the film and bill would say or Dicky Anderson say, we've done gone. He was right. It was a garden that play and he see that from the sideline. You know, the sidelines, one of the worst seats in the house right. Yeah, that's pretty interesting. So what is the one like if you get back into coaching? What's the one thing that you've learned from your father that you always think of when you when you when you go into coaching? What was that one lesson that he taught you that you take with you? Well, I think one of the most important things. It's easy to forget us a coach sometimes, you know, we would sit there and draw up, hey, will run this player, run that player, if they do this, will do that. Way, they do this, and you do it on a back end of a chalkboard, and there were two things you said. Number One, you got to get the chalk last and basically always trying to anticipate a step or two ahead of what the other guys can do. So, Hey, we're great running to sweet play. What are they going to do to take that away? And then what are we can do to hurt them when they take that away? And then he would also say, look, guys, all that stuff looks good on the blackboard, but it's not what we know, it's what they know. Can they handle all this stuff? And he would always cut us back and said rather be great at fewer things than pretty good at a lot of things. I think so many coaches get caught up in that where, Hey, we want to be in spread, but we want to do this and we want to do that and we're going to stand that the last scrimmage and we're going to we're going to make our call and then let them adjust and we're going to make our call and they're gone. And you know, sometimes we overcomplicate the game to where guys can't play fast. So those two things really was you know, you want to put your kids in position to play as fast as they can and you as a coach, got to anticipate two or three steps ahead of the other guy. Right. If you yourself thought about being a head coach, yeah, I mean, you know, it got the point where I thought about leading Penn, say, but I don't. You know, I did not want to be somewhere else and my dad finally finished his career. Right, so I kind of made it. You know, would have been better head I left a couple of years earlier. You know, in two thousand and eight we had a great offensive football team match. People call about, Hey, what you think about leaving because we had really done some really good things and I just, you know, I just don't feel like I want to leave and if I were coaching somewhere else and he was walking off to the old last time, I don't know if I've been able to live with myself, you know, just to not be part of that. But you know, so I wouldn't trade those memories I have and those times I had with him for anything. So obviously I get back into coaching, work my way up and love the head coach because I really think that one of the good things about being away from the game was I really appreciate what I had and also have given me some perspective to look back on some things and evaluate where I was and where I could go. Valet stay and play on your next getaway to Los Angeles, the Weston bondaventure hotel and sweets offers effortless access to all the city of angels has to offer, whether you're hoping to catch a concert or sporting event. Our hotels just moments away from all the action and accessible to Hollywood, beaches, museums and theme parks. The package includes a guest room and valet parking for reservations. Use Promo Code PSF in the code box when making your online reservation or call one two hundred and three, six, two...

...four one thou and ask for Promo Code PSF right. So, yeah, I can't imagine the change you've seen in Penn state from time your little till now. Yeah, how like the stadium and everything around it, and just explain a little bit like that progression of Penn say you being such a part of it for so many years. Well, I like the first year I had season tickets. I was for going on five. Capellettie was a tailback and I went with my brother and sisters and we sat in the end zone bleachers because the end zone was open. Right. It was for five bucks. I think it was four bucks a game and my mom let me go because I was the one kid that would actually sit down and watch a game start to finish even then. And so you know I remember that. And they close it in. But then then he used to be a kids section. It was six bucks a game and the stadium went from Sixtyzero to seventy seven. Then it went to eighty five. Thou, that went to ninety some thousand. That's under seven thousand and you know, six bucks doesn't get your hot dog anymore, I'm right, gets your bottle of water, I think. So obviously that part of its changed. I think the TV coverage is changed and so much around it is changed, and some of it for good. So we're not for not for better. Some, you know, I think the game in some ways the money's gotten so big and obviously there's going to be big changes in terms of NCA with student athletes and what they can what they can make and what they can do, which is a whole mother and you could do eight shows on what that could entail. Right. But you know, just seeing a change and it's been really a lot of fun. I think the tailgating his room remained consistent, though it's one of the best places. It's got to become outside the state undrained believables. Yeah, maybe that's that's the neat thing is now not coaching. I now know why everybody wants Tail Gates and watch although I don't know. We know win our night games and friends of mine like yeah, we're going up at zero am and I'm like, what do you do for nine and half twelve hours? Kick off your nine am kick offs and eight, like all we play corn old play stopped at me. They got games, they got we of me. It's like holy down, like I had no idea. Ay, this was going on while I was coaching. No people ever cliners and couches everything. I mean it's seen. There are vs. they just go sleep in bed for another two hours, taking that and go back hold up days floors and stuff. It's when I was a kid and I used to go up my uncle Paul when we go watch Mitch play and played with Shane Coll and all those guys, and we used to park right by the locker rooms, and I think that's all change kind of out from back into early s. But yeah, we would park there. That's where we tail gate, like right where the players would come out. I think they used to get on a bus to go to the stadium, Yep, and then they would come out. Like remember being a little kid, high five of them all and and my mom my uncle's they'd make pin state. My Dad was one of fifteen kids, so am my uncle Paul was this guy. He didn't care if it said no entry players only. He was going in there and I I used to take him to all my training camps from the NFL and inevitably during practice I'm out in the middle taking a snap and I'd see my dad or my uncle's talking to a coach on the field. I'm like, how the hell they get out of here? They just, you know, out of nowhere. They just came out like belong if that's what they did. But I could always remember fit. They did the same thing up there. We'd be in a late room, we'd be in the locker room, they didn't care. We were everywhere. It was so much fun. Yeah, and you know, now every you know, with everything being so controlled and so much, you know, especially since obvious season elevens and the other thing security. Now the different time and in some ways it was a lot better because it was better access. You know, you could be around the team and kids. You know, everything is so scripted now, whereas back...

...then, you know, like you said, you just end up high five and guys like Shane Kman and people like that. But yeah, and you still remember that and you know that's I hope we know. So there's a love of the game at connection of the game. That the way things are now. I know what a cost to take a family of game now versus then. You know, I HOPE WE WON'T LOSE NEXT GENERATION FANS, because Ryan will camps telling us about going up to the what game was that camp? Michigan, the Michigan Game. He even I think he went to the game. You just went to. What bar was that? I was at take of all night pickles, wherever pickles is, but he said it was packed the whole game and like two hundredzero people come on to campus for a game. It's insane. Yeah, there's a lot of people at show up without tickets and they don't care. They just want to be intense. You know, that's the thing it's gotten to be as like a white out has become like a bucket list item for coach football fans. In fact, one of the things I said to some other people the University said, you know, the stadium is not as loud and that white out game as it was ten or fifteen years ago we first started doing the big white out games. And he said, why didn't givins a tourist? Because when you need tours I go because there are people I can't tell. I met a guy's open home with man. I'm at Texas fans. I met all these fans and other schools. I said, what are you doing there? Because, oh, this is a bucket list for me and I paid x amount to air B and B and I paid him. But I mean, so they're not as invested in the game. Yeah, they wear their white stuff, but they're not as invested in the outcome of the game, whereas ten years ago when it was all penn state fans. And I was just listen to Paul fine bomb show the other day and there's talking about, you know, eight years ago when Lsu Played Alabama, when they were one two, that they as meant there were fifty or sixty thousand fans in Tuscal Lucy who didn't go to the game. Wow, and you know, and that's that's happening. It's like it's you know, they just want to go up and see Game Day in the ESPN Game Day and go to be around a tailgate. And you know, nat with satellite TV, a lot of just sit in the parking lots and watch the game unt pace, though they don't even have to, you know. So they're there, they feel like they're part of it. Yeah, I went to Lsu, was Lsu. gave him about the maybe two thousand and six or so, and it like the guy was saying. Our cab driver was like it's a hundred thousand and it's easily a hundred thousand out. And the tailgating. We got there in a Thursday night and there was about, no joke, like Fifteenzero people tailgating on a Thursday night. I mean it was just it was the most insane thing. Oh yeah, I mean there's just some schools. Yes, we talked to Dana Folk, who who she wrote the whole tail gating a not a cook for tailgating, all that she talked about. I mean it's just such a big thing every weekend now. You know, especially college is way bigger, I think, than he had a feller anybody else. Yeah, and you know, there are even companies now that contract with schools and they have an area and they'll park a bunch of RV's there and basically they're hired out to corporate clients or just people with too much, much more money than sense, and they basically say, you know, just show up at seven am, we've got RV parked, we've got the location, we've got the food and you just bring you and your guests and we do everything. I'm like that to me is like that's just wrong. But you know, but you look at the links some of these people go. I just saw an article about the one of the RV areas at Penn state and these guys had an inflatable hot tump. So the things. They blow this thing up and they plug it into the generator and it heats the water. They got them like where they get the water? I didn't. I didn't. Didn't say in the article where they got the water from which it might be. It may be beer. You ever spear? They wouldn't waste beer by soaking a so what are some of the big charities you're involved with? No, Jay. Well, my mom is very, very involved in Special Olympics. So we do stuff special Olympics. We've done stuff with dance marathon of the Penn state and still obviously some things for Penn state and turn to raise money for them, but the...

Special Olympics is a thing that the State Special Olympics is thing my mom has been involved with thirty years and she does a cruise now every year called Ha ally cruise, where I think Frank o'harris goes on it. Letting light the elements was going to go on. A bunch of former Penn state players, brandon short, western PA got, as well as some former coaches and stuff. So she's done that and she's just mean and she's not one of those people that just gets into something. Lately she's in that thing up to rivals and as a result, she makes us all do it. We do a beaver stadium run where it's a k that finishes going through the tunnel at the fifty yard line. You know, several hundred runners. It's raises one hundred thousand dollars for Special Olympics every year. So a lot of different things that were involved in, mostly because my mom really drives the bus on all of us. You know, hey, you're going to get on this thing and help us and and that's those the big things we've been involved and if you don't, she's going to be arguing with you at the table why you should right. Well it. Listen, you know they whether it's your mom or whether it's your wife, whatever it is, at some point you know you're going to lose. So just don't fight it. Just say okay, mom, I'll do it. All right, all right, okay, Jake. So one of the last things we do here we have a lightning round with you. We call it the no huddle or two minute drill, whatever you want to call it, but we fire some questions at you try to have a little fun. So, David, won't you start? All right, Jake, if you could trade places with anyone in the world for a day, who would that be? And it can be any time in history. Oh my God, I've no idea. I would say probably Mick Jagger. I would love just think for the stones for a while. That would have been nice. What's your biggest pet? Peeve. Biggest pet, peeve, good Lord, people who can't get understand it or on a quarterback snake. I think that's most of the ANCIATA. Oh, I know, I well don't. My son's in ninth grade football. They're never they're never understand her. Like you're in ninth grade right, get stander. Damn it. What do you mean? What's your coach teaching you guys? It's like you could, you know, you can do both. You know, like it's not that hard. But Anyway, yeah, the best pizza at Penn State. Now our producer, Kim says brothers that's his vote. What's your brothers? Brothers is around the corner of me. Very, very good. Fat Luna is another place in Tolona. It's really good too. All right. What is your favorite sports movie? Oh, Geez, favor sports movie. Good Lord Bull Door was on the other night, which is probably comedywise. That exactly right there. I have a soft spot for the movie WHO's your beause my dad took me to see it as well as remember the titans. And remember the titans. We took the whole team to the night before game and and and my dad was sitting across the aisle from me. So then, probably those ones would be the ones. If you could be the president of the NCAA for a day, what rule change would you make? Cheez, let's see. As a tough one. I don't just beling answer. I think right now it would be too I don't know if it's sensory a rule change, but I would like to be one of the people overseeing how this whole California legislation stuff is going to get implemented, because I don't think anybody in say I've had this discussion with people penn state and I wrote a column a couple weeks ago for state collegecom about how to exploit this new loophole, and I don't think they have any idea what's coming, because everybody thinks it's going to be oh, will only be a handful of players who gets endorsement deals? What this is going to end up being? As your top running back in the country and eleventh grade is kind of an agent and he's going to want appearance fee set up by the school and it's not going to be going to Gatorade. It's going to be just imagine a guy like to at...

Alabama if he could make appearance money. How many sweet sixteen birthday parts and weddings do you think Alabama lung higher in five twenty grand pop right to show up at. He might pick up half a million in the summer just doing that stuff. So I mean I'd like to be involved in the INN say, to make sure they get this thing right. All Right, so you've seen a lot of amazing players, as very talented players, come through Penn state. If you could pick for what's your Mount Rushmore of Penn State football players? Oh my God, you can get me killed because it's hey, it's a tough question. Honestly, you give me killed. There's too many. The limit to four, but I'll throw for just off top of guys that I coached the played with, Shane Thilan would definitely be on that list. ME, he was. You know, I'm not going to see you, says, the best lineback every play atten Steve because again it's too hard to cross genres, right or generations. But I never saw him be bettered. He wasn't. He would just he's tough as tough as nails. Mike Robinson, who I coached quarterback, was a guy who just a tremendous leader and really took a team over right. My Dad says we never saw a better football players than any more, going back, you know, when Se Quan Barclay was playing two years ago. So we see, well, you know, he returns kicks and returns punts and or and he catches the ball and he runs into football and I see well, anymore did all that and played every snap of defense in college to know. I didn't realize that I should. That's true. Other build we get ten carries a game. You'll yeah, I mean, why let any more really get take care of the game world? Why? Because you played you know Si six and seventy snaps defense. Great. Let's say any more Shane Conlin, Michael Robins, and I'm forgetting somebody. I know I'm moving in trouble, but if I limit just as some guys like that, Oh God Dang, you kill me now because I don't say Franco Harris, he'll kill me. Mike Mun Chack was one of the Great Offensive Lineman history the game. And obviously got to have that Jack Ham, who will run into a give kill me if I don't mention him there. You gotta, you gotta have more than four on that Mount Rushmore. But that's just for those these guys off the top of my head. Those are good one that gives a good taste. Um, what's the most under right, underrated aspect of state college or Penn State that people may not know about? Well, I think there's a you know, everybody thinks right in the middle of nowhere there's nothing to do. There's so much going on here. I mean, you know you've got a great hockey program now. So you got hockey games, you've got all kinds of we obviously football is part of the sports stuff, but I mean the concerts that come through here because we have the Jordan Center now. It's a great place to raise kids. So many of those are probably things people are realized by stay college. You have all the things you would you would get in a big city without some of the hassles in the traffic. What is the best bar in State College? Because I know they're for for they're known for some pretty good places to go have a there's a couple here. Yeah, I would say right. Well, well, champs gets to this is bar downtown champs. It's gets a lot of pressing pub right now. But I would tell you that I don't. Can't probably shaking his head over there because he knows I'm talking about. But there's place called Doggies, which used to be the old rast Keller. Yeah, the people that own it are friends of mine, so if I don't say them I'll get in trouble. They've done a great job renovating it and then they built a big outdoor beer garden in the back, which is really, really unique. Set up an environment and in fact they have a big projection unit now and when pens, they plays night games. Places just packed with kids, all twenty one of course, but but they've got expact with and then steelers, you name an eagles, whatever it is, it is such a good spot. That's US and that's exactly...

...the camp. Predict that you'd say. He said how he said Doggies. That used to be the RAST skeller. And then the next day, after maybe a long night there, maybe stop at the waffle shop. Yeah, woff shops, good breakfast, and then the corner room has an early bird special which they just raised the four dollars and twenty five cents. They're making a feeling. It was like, well, it was two hundred and ninety five until like the two months ago, which killed me. I went waits. Four hundred and twenty five. You can't raise a part from a saint. Hash Browns, a two piece of toast for two hundred and ninety five until just about five months ago. Okay, what about the best recruit that got away? Someone that comes to money, we go? God, I thought we had him and he ended up going somewhere else. Oh God, that's hard. It's hard to guess because you know the middy commit somewhere else in like the hell with him. Done of you know, I think that the ones that get away that there are ones that got away from us that I really wished we had gotten because I think we may have been able to do a better job for them. And, and that's not a criticism, where they went and and it's not a coincidence, both of them went to high state. But I thought Terrell prior had he come to penn state and really kind of sad a year before all that the he you know, and mature a little bit might have helped them. Not that he did never bad career. He had great career high state and and that kind of stuff, but I felt like and then Maurice Clarette was another one we really we were we really had him as a sophomore and his junior year when tressell got the job, he committed to high state. Went Up. Were going to get him. And again, you know, some kids do well in city environments, other kids don't, and I thought our environment would have been better for both of those guys to be here where we can keep a little bit better an eye on them. But again, you know, Terrell had a great career and that's not take anyway from what he did it high state. And Murray's Clarett. I really feel like we could have helped him out in terms of maturing process. Maybe you know when he was alread, you know he's a freshman high state, put him in a room with a season the ESPN reporter, and he asked him, do you think you could be a one and done? And he did. He said Yeah, whereas we've been like, okay, give us a thirty second time I get over here. You're not going to answer that question. You know where. Don't get into that and you know that cut. That kind of took a life of its own. People have stick presented the fact that, and he did that the ESPN magazine Article who was taking the Jersey off and throwing down and that wouldn't happen here and it probably helped him walk right right. Okay, last one, Jay, if you could go back and tell a younger Jay PA turn of one thing, what would that one thing be? Probably just enjoy every minute, because you know, you think that things are going to be forever and you think that. You know, you don't realize when you're coaching, you get into that week to week and the Games are flying by and the years are flying by and the next thing you know you're thirty five years old. Then you're forty years old, then you forty five and you don't realize that you're missing time with your kids, you're missing time with but you were still it's always going to be that way and I think one of the best things that's happened to me in the lastic seven years I have that understanding appreciation of what how do. Specially really wants to be a part of football and coach my dad. And my dad was good. He's he said to me, I'll just remember, you know, when you're home. Be Home all right, you know thinks. Don't just be there physically, be there there mentally, and I was good with it most of the time, but there were times. Now I'm like my web to say don't remember this, and like no, I don't, and I feel bad about that, but that would be some things. I you know, just just enjoy it right. Well, thank you for going on a huddle with us and sharing your story. Great meeting you and we really enjoy it. And Hey, we want to thank you for joining us today on huddle up with guests where we talked to a live rate. Guess About for shape that I have always been going by my great friend and Cohost, a Tagar and we want you to be able...

...to follow us on all of our social media at huddle up with dust and we really appreciate you and thank you for your time, wh.

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