Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode · 2 years ago

James Brown

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

James Talmadge Brown (born February 25, 1951), commonly called "J.B.", is an American sportscaster known for being the studio host of The James Brown Show, The NFL Today on CBS Sports, and Thursday Night Football on CBS Sports and NFL Network. He is also a Special Correspondent for CBS News. He is also known for serving as the former host of Fox Sports' NFLpregame showFox NFL Sunday for eleven years. Born on February 25, 1951 in Washington, D.C. to John and Maryann Brown. Brown attended high school at DeMatha Catholic High School. Brown graduated from Harvard University with a degree in American Government. A standout on the basketball court, he received All-Ivy League honors in his last three seasons at Harvard University and captained the team in his senior year. His roommate at Harvard was Harvard University professor/philosopher/activist Cornel West See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Welcome to our podcast uddle up with gusts, where we talked to guests about how sports help shape their life. I'm your host, former NFL quarterback, gusts fraud, and I'm joined by my longtime friend and coach, Dave Hagar. We are a RADIOCOM original podcast and you can find us on the new RADIOCOM APP or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast. Now let's get in the huddle. Hey everyone, thanks for joining us another episode of Huddle up with Guss. I'm here with my good friend Dave, I guess, and to Dave today I am so excited to bring in somebody that I've known for a while and have followed and as just been involved in the NFL for as long as I can remember. We have some old mutual friends from way back in the day and he's just an outstanding person and outstanding human being and if you want to model yourself after anybody, it should you should model yourself after James Brown. That's a tall order, but I agree with you. Well, he is taller in both of us, especially if we show it some of the right right, yeah, some of the old time. So joining us today on how to up with Gusts James Brown. Thank you, Jab for being with us and it's a pleasure. Well, I can definitely share with you and Dave. I am too dark to blocks with that Intro, but I thank you guys so very much. In quite frankly, as I was a sharing with Dave before we went on air. Gust he will be right back at you because when you play, one of the things actually talked about name association. It's character, it's integrity, it's consistency, and you've been that way all along. As a matter of fact, I think back to one of our friends when you were playing in Washington, Jay must bound, who recently passed away, but a big time executive who went on to become a serial entrepreneur and he doesn't let many people into his inner circle, but you were one of those guys. So thank you, guys, for having me on board now. We appreciate you joining in. And it's said that he did pass but he was one of our mutual friends and getting to him and his wife and it was a pretty interesting story back there. When I was living in northern Virginia, cult very close to him and you know, a lot of good stories coming back and forth between US About Jab that's for sure, and I know he had a from understand he had a lot of influence in your life as well, hey gust and to be really clear about it, the Path was a cleared for me to move into what I then realized was a passion to move into broadcasting, because of Jay must bound. He was a senior executive with the Xerox Corporation, which is where I landed after not getting an opportunity. You know, I did have the opportunity. I didn't capitalize fully on my opportunity to play pay at the professional level like you did. Mine was basketball. So when I got cut by the Atlanta Hawks and came back home, Jay must bound, who was quite the football player himself way back in the day at the University of Maryland, and he went after a number of athletes because he felt they would make good marketing people who knew how to pick themselves up off the basketball floor and football turf and battle for it and not let a disappointment keep them down. And he was quite successful with that and I was humble and certainly very thankful to be a part of his team. Well, he knew that I had an interest in broadcasting. He laid the path for me and told me I could do it as long as I brought my numbers in as a sales executive or sales manager. So he was always about making certain I met the mark and he gave me the opportunity. That led to how long I've been in the business. Of Now it's always about sales, right. Don't mean no matter what profession you're in. You are absolutely correct. It is all about sales because you're selling yourself a service, of product or would have you. It really is fundamentally about sales and we're trying to David, are trying to figure that about podcasting. Becky Part Hey, look your day. I appreciate you guys bearing with me as I was trying to figure out how to even get on lnked on. Had to have two millennials help me out for your faiths. Yeah, so, so let's go back to when you were growing up in DC. What was that first time? Do you remember where you fell in love with sport? Wow, my first love was actually baseball. Gustin Dave, my parents, God blessed them, were very much in love with baseball. My father and my uncle were very huge fans of the homestead grads, who were the Negro League Baseball team that played in Washington out at Old Griffith Stadium before you were born, Guy. So I played see why old baseball and was doing well, as a matter of fact, when we got to the playoffs, we were a plane and high school basketballll coach who obviously is...

...in the basketball hall of fame, Morgan Wooton, of the Matha Catholic high school fame. He came out to watch one of our postseason games, but he was more interested in this awesome multiple sports star, a blond hair pitcher on our team by the name of Steve Garrett. And Steve Garrett is the reason that I no longer play baseball, because fellows standing in the box going to practice one day and he had in a wicked array of pitches and he threw what I knew was a curveball, and of course it takes only a nano second to get to the plate. But here's what happened. I'm standing in the batter's box and I'm saying, Oh, there's that curveball. Okay, you know what, it's late breaking, but I know it will break. Why isn't that curveball breaking, oh my gods, get out of the way, and I dropped down to the dirt and the last nano second it broke across the plate for strike and I knew baseball was the end of it for me at that point in time and it was bad basketball after that. Yes, sir, was was, so is baseball is the first team sport you played. Yes, sir, that was the first team sport, unlike what probably many elementary school kids would say that kick ball was probably the first team sport. But but yet they but it was baseball that was the first team sport and we had some very civic mind it actively engaged parents in the neighborhood who taught us the right way to be teammates, what a good teammate was all about, taught us the fundamentals of the sport and it really carried over, as I'm sure you both know having played sports. It carried over into the game of life, recognizing that in the game of life it really is all about being a team player. Rarely is someone successful on his or her own, and clearly in the work environment it's all about being on a team as well and recognizing that our job is to encourage our teammates, if you will, reciting the Mantra of Bill Belichick for the New England patriots fame, to do your job, to pick up the slack where you see you can and keep each other encourage. So those are some of the things that the world of Sports, team sports especially, teaches you. Well, one of the things that Dave and I found with all of our guests that we've interviewed and you know, over probably thirty now, everybody talks about when they were growing up, their neighborhoods, how they used to go outside and play. They would play, as Dave's favorite sport was whiffleball and whatever it was, kickball, like you mentioned, and you just go get all the neighborhood kids, and today it's so different. We don't see that anymore. I mean, I love I mean you got up, Dad said get out of the house, come back at dinner, then don't come back until the whistle blows. That was my that was my childhood. Go play any game you want. There were no parents telling you what to do. You had to figure it out, you had to make all the rules up and I think a lot of that is is missed today in society. How do you feel about that, Jane? Hey, gus, you know, even as you were recounting that, there was a real longing feeling in my heart for those times. Again, you're absolutely correct, gust our parents would let us go probably about two, two, three blocks away from the house. We didn't have any help, cheaperons. There was a huge field to three blocks away from our home and we will get out there and we play all kinds of games or whether it was hide and seek, whether it was kidball, baseball, whiffleball, whatever you you name it, and we had a great time. And you talked about the parents indicating when to come back. The Queue for us is when we saw the street lights come on. We knew to do getting back home to get in the house. How much do we long for those times when, clearly, in today's environment, sadly, you cannot do that because of the way things that turned so south in terms of, you know, kidnappings and the liking. Certain I don't want to make this very Maudlin, but we all understand that we long for those times. Now there many people who might live in rural areas or semi rural areas that might still be able to enjoy this, but I long for that and I missed that and that's certainly defined neighborhoods and friendships that one still has till today, bonded and solidified by that kind of experience. Yes, sir, well, you know guys. You know my neighborhood. There's about fifteen kids, all within years in Adrian jury. I don't even know if they've ever met like might. My kids play sports and right teams, but not none of the kids intermingle like we used to intermingle. Well, run around and play. I spoke to a lady the other day, James, and she was telling me that her kids sometimes they go out, sometimes they don't, but they have a neighbor he took his backyard and he made it into a sports Mecca, he said. He put a basketball court and he put a he put like nets up, whatever you want, and he has four boys and he makes his sons go out and get the neighborhood kids and come over to their...

...house and place at all I wanted to do with them to go outside, and that's like one of the only people I've ever heard be able to do that, you know. But how awesome is that? When we extrapolate from that experience to getting prepared for the game of life. What that teaches you in the kind of experiences, as you said, you have to figure it out on your own. You have to realize that one can't be selfish and hauled the ball or the action, that it truly engages you in a team framework and working with the kids when you're getting the exercise in. Because of that age, you want to certainly be able to burn off that energy. Many schools in many major metropolitan areas don't have extracurricular activities that are physically or repented or even Fizzad, which, of course, was a staple part of the school experience from elementary on up. So kudos to that neighbor for doing that. And I'm telling you those friendships, those early experiences are foundational stones upon which you build that will serve you well in the game of life. I mean, akin to that book which it called everything I needed to learn I learned in kindergarten, the first ARY Goo found stones that you build upon that will set the stage for success, for the lack there of later in life, because everybody, including adults, are so focused with the mobile devices that we have even when people go out to dinner to fellowship. You look around a restaurant and look at how many adults are so engrossed with those cell phones and tablets right there, and we don't have the same quality of Socialization and interaction as we did back in the day. Well, I think also this self efficiating. You know, you had to negotiate, you to compromise. Is You learned all that at an early age because there wasn't an UNP there to do it for you get to figure out what the strikes on was, how ghost runners worked. Well, yeah, and you had to figure out who the leaders were. The leaders were the ones that pick the teams. And then, like the young kids had to keep up. The older kids had to play within the rules, and and the rules were all set with, you know, within the group. Every game was a different game. If you only had three people playing baseball in the corner, you know you can cover every part of the field. So you had home run Derby. There's always new rules and those things I miss so much, there is no question about it. When I think about my mother and father, God blessed them. They look to say that they were high school graduates, but they had Ph d's in determination. They wanted us, the five of us. I'm the oldest of five, four boys and one girl. They wanted us to have a better quality of life then what they had grown up but I have immense respect and admiration for what they did. I mean five of us. And my father was a security guard, prison working, working at a local prison, and gust would remember that from his days in Washington, a Lorton prison Washington DC. He also drove a taxi cab, but during the holidays he also took on a third job as a handy man, helper, if you will, out at the Reagan National Airport, worked in next say, aver his rent car and doing whatever needed to be done. Also, my mother could stay home because she always wanted to be an excellent homemaker and she was so and we called her the sergeant. MOM was only five five, but boy she carried a big stick and we affectionately called her the sergeant. We did not mess around with Mark Brown. When she said something it was Gospel. But that was the environment that we grew up in. With all kinds of respect, hey, Gustin, day there are people in our neighborhood and you know, we just consider our neighborhood was the universe that four or five, six, seven block area. But all of the adults, the parents in the neighborhood, we knew them by Mr and Mrs Far Rock, we knew them by Mr and mrsrs Smith. We never called them by the first name. It was just a matter of respect the way we were raised. And whenever we said Mrs Smith on fair get everybody knew who we were talking about. So that sense of community and even when we hear the expression that it takes a village to raise a child, if you will, that was certainly it, because we had such respect. If we were two or three blocks away playing and an adult told us something that we were doing wrong or, you know, to straighten up the neck, right, we did because there was that level of respect for authority. Right. So, you know, then going on into high school, you go in to ninth grade. It's a big transition for everyone, and I don't it doesn't matter if you're the star athlete or just a person who's not even playing sports, but it's a big transition. So tell me a little bit about that transition for you and how growing up in your neighborhood really helped with that. Well, I would like to think again, maybe coach telling on that point that I was making about a respectful authority. I went to a public elementary...

...school and then graduated from there and went to a middle school we called a junior high school then in the seventh and eighth grade. But I was I had an interest in basketball. Could not play a lick, but the coach kept me on the team simply because he said I was a good listener. Coach Don Fugel and Gustin Day. They had a lot of talent that came through that particular middle school, a Duran Dat Lee, who went on to, I believe, a fourteen year career in the NBA and as a hall of Famer, Kermit Washington, who played with the Los Angeles Lakers in professional basketball, et CETERA. We had a lot of great talent coming through there then. But when Morgan Woolton, the high school coach, saw me playing cy old baseball in the playoffs and he saw me and I had a great postseason hitting home runs, he interested me and coming to Damatha to play, which of course was the Mecca during my time at L is. Yeah, athletic and academic success and Rigger, if you will, and when I went to de Matho, so it was a novel experience. Hey, fellas five hundred dollars a year was that to wishing and we thought that was all the money in the world that my folk sacrifice to put me through school at Damatha. And of course, changing classes. You know, that was a whole new experience. One had to be responsible for their time. But again, the respect for authority was was was ingrained in us. So that part that transition was easy in terms of dealing with the various teachers. But here's one big lesson that came out of high school and it showed how serious my mom and dad were about the kids doing well academically, because they felt that foundation stone would be the proper foundation for success in the game of life. I was blessed to make the basketball team as a ninth grade. I played JV and I wrote the bench on the Varsity team. And this is at Damath, I mean one of the nation's in our house. And one day something happened, that practice ran late. You guys heard me reference being home when the street lights came right. Well, I wasn't it back home by the time the street lights came on. My mother got on the phone and called up to the Matha and assistant coach picked up the phone and he and she said, this is a Mrs Brown. Is My son James Brown there? And the assistant coach said yes, ma'am, he's out on the floor with coach wooching and basketball practice. And she said, well, May I speak to coach? And he said well, I can't disturb him right now. He's in practice and my mother said okay. Well, here's the deal. If my son isn't home within the next next hour, that will be his last basketball practice, because academic success is first and foremost. And boy he told coach that. Coach called practice off in ten minutes because of an unusual to be that late. Called my brother said, Mrs Brown, you're absolutely correct and we know what is first and foremost here. This won't happen again. But coach Wilton was awesome because the priorities that he had for all of us who played for him, and he was also a history teacher, superb teacher, superb teacher, which is why he enjoyed so much success athletically and Gussie also back during that time, coach the football team until they hired another coach. But he told us the priorities that we had to have, which were consistent with those in my family, was that God had he first, family had to be second, school was third, and then your sport, football or basketball. And I remember many years later getting an opportunity to go and interview coach for sixty minute sports when we have that here at CBS, and I asked coach why were those priorities so important? Because to a player today, over forty some ID years that he coach, we all had those priorities in grain. And he said I felt that if I had young men who believed in and adapted those priorities as their own, I was working with championship caliber people and we would enjoy more success than failure. Isn't that amazing? HMM now that it's really amazing because I think there's a lot of guys in professional sports today that are missing a lot of that. HMM HMM. And and I hear you lout and clear. The things I like to do for as many years as I have been blessed to do, this playing and calling a game of football. Day where gusts has forgotten more football than I will ever know, but I worked hard to just be a good broadcaster and understand the basics. I went to work with one of GUSS's bosses at Washington then bobby met to the hall of Famer who was basically walking me through all...

...the fun the mentals of football and so that I could call the sport, because my balls here at CBS. When they brought me on board, I came on as an extra announcer during the basketball season, during cottage groups, and then I did professional hoops, because that's how I broke into it in Washington DC as an announcer for first beet doing black college basketball, and then with with CBS as an extra announcer, but I was doing the Washington then named bullets games. So I did all of that so as it's become well rounded in the sport. But that's what again, I had to lay that foundation. So I got to know a lot of these of professionals at Gust is talking about, and I'm telling you many of these guys come from good family homes. But the challenges when you get around a number of successful athletes, you start making money and you start being a low into a sense of complacency by all the attention that you're getting, one may stray from the foundational principles taught in their home and the school or in their church and by neighborhood adults, and that's when you start to head down the wrong road and those things can really re havoc and indeed take you off on the wrong rails or off the rails forever in the day. So I tend to focus and all that I've been doing on characters of integrity and character like gusts Rod. Those are the stories that I looked at more to publicize it and get visibility to because even though my friend charls Berkeley, I understood what the NBA Hall of Famer was saying that athletes should not be your role models. That might be true, parents should be and other strong characters and people have in integrity in the community, but the fact that a matter is de fact of anybody who is highly visible in the world of sports is a role model, whether they want to be or not, which is why I think if you understand that and model and carry yourself properly, then your impact in a whole generation in a positive way. I agree. I totally agree, James All Right, skipping back to Matha, when did you know you were going to be possibly a college basketball player? I mean you're playing with a lot of guys that probably went on to play college and someone that went on to play the pros. Like did you? You're on Jav as a freshman. When did you crack the starting lineup? Wow, it was a result, I'm sure, and Gust, as an Expro, can relate to this. It was having the attitude day that you should always be in the process of learning, to never ever get complacent. Morgan wootton use this fundamental and athletic fundamental that had to be mastered as an analogy. He said, when you're going up for a junk shot, shoot the ball before you get to your apex, because if you shoot it before you get to your apex, you're actually going to be shooting it at the apex, because you know by the time it's registered you're asking on your way down. But also said that there's no such thing as standing still in terms of getting better. He's it. You are either getting better or you are regressing. There's no such thing extanding still. So I put that to heart. When I was in high school. I didn't adhere to that when I got to college, and we'll talk about that in a bit, but I did it here to that so dave and Gust I was out there on the playgrounds in the offseason, because he said champions are made in the offseason when nobody's looking. Are you out there working and internalizing the fundamentals you need to your sport? That's going to make you better, for you're not out there having to think. It just happens what appears to be second nature and it's not second nature. You work to internalize it so that it seems like it's second nature, but you work at that. So I did that and Morgan, he gave a choice. He was such a good teacher. He said, if you want to be an all metropolitan area player, here are some skills and fundamentals you need to work on. If you want to be an all state here some other higher skills to work on. But if you want to be one of the best players in the country and all America, then here's what you need to do and work on these things religiously every day, because if you're not out there working hard in the all season, one day on the basketball floor of the football field you're going to meet somebody who did put that time in. Who Do you think is going to win that matchup? So I work diligently on that and by my sophomore year it all started to click and that's when I was blessed to start playing much more as a software and of course there's a junior and senior, and was blessed to become a two time high school all America and the player of the year in Washington DC, and was blessed to have virtue every major...

...college in the country offer me scholarships to come play. And it was all because I put the time and to work at it. And quite frankly, we had graduated the best players on our team, a high school team that had beat then named Lou Au Cender, obviously, Aka Kareem Medul Jabbar. I was in eighth grade listening to the game on radio, boy my showing my age mail and again. The game was played at Coldfield House on the campus of the University of Maryland. It was the biggest high school game in the country. The year before, De Matha played up in New York. No, I think to me have played at Goch the house and they lost by a couple points to a power memorial. Well, there was a rematch the following year. I'm listening on radio. Twelve thousand five hundred packed into Coldfield House on a snowy, snowy day in December or January, and the map. That went on to beat power memorials, snapping their seventy one game win streak, and that put high school basketball in DC and the Maryland and Virginia area on the map and had to become a must stop recruiting trip for cottage coaches around the country. Well, I've benefited from that, but the guys who played on that team, all of our big guys, they graduated and here I am at six four, six five and I end up having to play center. But Morgan was absolutely as John William called him and read our back called him God blessed, and they both said Morgan was the finest coach on any level that they had ever met, and that was because he took no from all of those guys and imparted the same lessons to us. Yeah, no, that's amazing. That's amazing. So if you're getting recruited by all these schools, why the what we see influence to go to Harvard. I mean, I'm sure Sergeant I sure Sergeant Brown had a lot to say about that great question and the answer you just gave is exactly yeah, I just want you to go to take a look at the school. Morgan Wilton counseled us. He said, love, when you go on these college visits, they're going to show you the best of the school. They're going to roll out the red carpet and back. During this time they were allowed to go and have five college visits and they could take us out to dinner. Guys, Gouzin Day was the first time I'd ever had lobster. When I went after I was working a lotter. Everywhere I went. Yeah, coach said they're going to roll out the red carpet and you were to think, man, this is the school. But he said to me, but don't make a decision there. Tell the coach you're ninety nine percent sure you're going to come, but you need to go home and talk it over with your parents and your coach. Well, after my fifth visit, coach got five different phone calls and coaches saying hey, we think James Brown's coming here. A coach that by. He told us he was ninety nine percent were. I wanted to go to a great academic school as well and I had some break ones on the list. But I watched Bill Bradley, a former runner Senator and candidate for president of the US, when I watched him play at Princeton and that team routine made it to the NCAA tournament and got deep into the tournament. I think maybe even around the sixteen, probably the round of Eight. I'm thinking, Wow, now, if they can marry academics and athletics, then you know I want to go there as well. And I was Princeton. Had I gotten a letter from Princeton, I would have wanted to go there. But when I went into my coach's office one day I saw a letter from Harvard and I said, if I can get in, that's where I want to go and and I went up and took the visit and they wanted to relieve the recruiting pressure. So after they grilled me over to make certain one that I was prepared to do the academic work there and could bring something to the tables to capitalize on the Harvard experience and make it mutually beneficial, they gave me an early admission and I was exited, and so I shook hands and said this is where I'm coming. Hey, David Gust one week, two weeks later, I get a letter from you. See Lay uh Huh, mack up, a basketball John would and I see that and I go home I said mom, I got a letter from Ucla. I have to go visit it. And Mom said you don't have to go visit anywhere, young man. You gave them your word and you shook their hands. You will learn to honor your word, period, and I'm so glad she made that lesson palpably clear to me and I would do it again in a New York minute. M Wow, it's it's a great story. So you're at Harvard, you're going through the riggers of academia. You know, you talked about when you were in ninth grade I had to go and learn how to switch classes. Now you go from the Matha, which is good education, to Harvard, which is the best education. How...

...was that all? And then all of a sudden you're it's a different level. When you go to college athletics, it's a job, it's a little work. So how was that for you? To put all that together? To the riggers of that academics. I mean I think second or Third Harvard Guy, because we had fits, he on, fitzy, Kevin Rabbit, Kevin Revit, he would digrats. But we've had some amazing people on and and you included in that. So We'd love to hear about how the that you dealt with all those things you had to go through in college. Well, first of all, of you had a guest on who went to the Grad School. The conversation amongst everyone at Harvard was the real Harvard are the graduate programs, for sure, as opposed to Harvard College, but it's all good. Look, I was thrilled and before you or day were born, those were very challenging years. You guys were teasing me about the big Afro you saw me where. Let me tell a little humorous story. Their first so you know, clean cut, consider urvative, you know, straight laced family. I go up to Harvard and of it's one thousand nine hundred and sixty nine. So you have the Vietnam War, you had the students for a democratic society, you had the Black Panthers. I mean talk about a real cauldron of activities going on in the world. Then we didn't even take any stams, I think, certainly not the first semester, because students were protesting part tight in South Africa. You they wanting to see schools the vest themselves of investments and countries that, you know, perpetrators separation, the racist or whatever, if they were against the Vietnam War. So I mean this was all novel to me. My eyes are wide open. So we had guys who came in, the White Guy, some of the white guys had long hippie hair. We had a Jewish guy who had an what we called an Israel they looked a whole lot better than our Afro. Then you have me. I had braids in my hair and they ran a picture in the New York Times. Boy, my mother saw that picture. She came up to Cambridge the next week and she gave me a stern talking to that was something like, young man, I didn't send you up here to act the part of fool. You go get that haircut and you'd be serious about the business of education. And indeed my Afro went from about Oh, about a foot high to about to thigh. So absolutely, but it was a great experience. Looked some of the brightest students from around the world, many of whom have the opportunity, coming from great families, that they went to the best prep schools in the country. Harvard was almost like a sabbatical for them. It was hard work. For me, I could have worked harder and that to be very honest about it, and I wish if I had a more mature mindset I would have capitalized on that even more. It was the year after the race riots, so you had more African Americans on campus. Our Freshman class was one twelve hundred, their five. They were five thousand in the entire student body, a full twelve hundred out of one twelve hundred four hundred. So one third were African Americans who were there at Harvard and also over at Ratcliffe, the sister school. So there were quite a few people of color there. But it was awesome because every virtually every one of them went on to do meaningful things in the game of life. It was tough athletically because and and look, as the team captain, I shoulder the responsibility when I say I could have been a better leader and I forgot some of the lessons, got complacent, got cocky. Big Man on campus. And we all know there's an expression in a Bible that pride it comes before the fall, and if you let pride creep in and infect you, it is a precipitous slide downward from there. And so I let my teammates down because I should have led by example and coming from some great coaching and high school, yeah, you know what, but irrespect if I still could have worked a little harder. I think there was an article in one of the Boston papers, it might have been the Herald at the time, that was entitled was it a dream deferred? A dream? It was something along the lines of a dream that never materialized because we had so much talent on that team. Freshman couldn't play Varsity Ball, so we have to play freshman basketball and we were ranked the number ten. No, we were ranked the second best freshman team in the country to St John's in New York. My Sophomore preseason we were rated as a ten best team in the country preseason and we never materialize. We never fulfilled those dreams and it's an excuse to say that it was because of those challenging times on campus. You know what is we all know as ex athletes coach, Tony Dungie, had a great expression that he had on the wall for his teams, both in Tampa and with the super bowl winning indianapais. Coachs no excuses, no explanations, get the job...

...done and I did not do my part. So I certainly heard from that. And when I was drafted by the Atlanta Hawks, I'm speeding ahead a little too quickly here, but you're one of the playing Pete marivage and he and I got blessed. We were very good friends. We both were into the martial arts. We had a great budding relationship and he was saying, Gosh, young man, you can really play or rock talent, just keeping those cleaner, work hard. And so when they called me at the end of training camp to say I was being released, I knew that I could play at the pro level in the person and that they kept over me. I felt I mean, I knew that I was lights out better, but often times decisions aren't just on talent, and when people tried to say, Oh, JB, you know what, they were unfair to you and doing such as such. Know, I knew that in my heart I didn't work as hard or harder to stay on top, as I did to get to the top, and that's where one of those lessons that coach Morgan Wood in high school came back to my remembrance that there's no such thing as standing still. You're either getting better or you're regressing. And I did regress, although the following year, after being cut and then working at Zerox and jess bound Augustine, I mentioned a mutual friend, he gave me an opportunity because red our back asked me to come try out with the Boston Celtics and jus bound said, well, I want you to answer the question in your own mind and heart whether or not you could make it. I'll give you the time off to go try out for the Celtics, but if you don't make it, if you come back here, then I want you to be resolutely focused on carving out of an excellent career. I don't want you, at the age of sixty five, looking back to say I could, should have, would have. He says. I want you to answer that question. And when I was the last person cut from that Boston Celtics a team trying out, I knew I could play. Red Are back wanted me to go overseas and play. But I said no, you know what, I've given it too shots. You don't make up a four makeup for four years of not giving it your best in a short period of time. Let me go ahead and get started in the game of life. HMM, yeah, that's that's pretty power. What a great story. What was what was red our bouck like, because you hear a lot of stories and you know us being from Pittsburgh, we don't know them like somebody would know him from Boston or something. You hear all these great stories about him. What was what was he like? In that short time you got to know coach are back and always called him coach. Of course, he went on to become team president as well too, and we had a good relationship. He was, I think he was actually from the Washington DC are and always spent a lot of time there because he did coach Washington basketball team there as well too. But he was awesome. He was just like my high school coach, Morgan Wooton, cut from the same mold of the John Wooden's of the world, the Henry Ibus Mike's, Chefsky, you named John Thompson. He was the same kind of guy hard work. He left no stone unturned. Really a genius when it came to understanding people searching. Understood the fundamentals, necessarily Sary to be well and do well in a basketball but he under still had a motivate people. And I know I was doing a radio show back then and I asked a coach if people come on the radio show. And this was during a time when Shaquille O'Neil was the big man in the NBA and tearing up the league with Kobe Bryant, and so I asked coach. I said a coach it was. It was a by phone and I can hear him puffing on the Cigar and I said the coach, I'm let me ask you a question. How would, how would bill Russell handle a Shaquille O'Neil today? All of a sudden it was silence. He puffed on a cigar, then he blew it out to smoke. He said, Brownie, you got the question all wrong. Took another pop on the cigar. He said question is not how Bill Russell but handle Shakill O'Neal. The question is how she killed O'Neal handle Bill Russell. Next question plays actually, ha ha, ha, but coach was awesome and and and when he left as coach and made Bill Russell a player coach in Boston, unfortunately a very segregated city at the time. So this was novel for him to name an African American head coach. And I don't know my history one up, but if he wasn't the first, he certainly was one of the first. And it was a player coach. And I asked him. I said coach, that was a pretty novel mover, pretty bold and Gutsie move on your part to name Bill Russell as player coach. Why did you do that? And he said, Brownie. WHO Better to motivate Bill Russell then Bill Russell? And of course he went on to win two of the championship. So I think that made for a total and you can fact check me on this, it was even. It was either eleven out of thirteen total for certainly nine on the eleven. That during a stretch. But you know, he that was just a master stroke because...

...nobody they played harder, nobody played a more cerebral game than Bill Russell's and that was a master stroke by red. Our back out closed with this about red in terms of the question about red. So my high school coach, Morgan Wooden, read our back, used to come up to St John's high school where coach wooden had his basketball camp with Joe Gallagher, high school coach at St John's, and red aurback will come up there to play tennis. Rabbit add the tennis player, and he invited read to come with him when he was coaching the Catholic League all stars against the Public League all stars in a summer game. And you know Morgan was a young coach then and so red was sitting on the bench with Morgan while he was coaching the team. The place was packed. Jealous Boys Club and down in Georgetown, Washington d step packed for this big game. Coach had taken a Camtholic League all stars against his great talent, to publicly all star team and they went into like double or triple overtime and but they lost to the public school all stars. Well, the next day at Camp Morgan had red come into the gym while he's conducting the camp and he's fishing for compliment a red our back. He said You saw the game last night, pretty pretty competitive game, right, and read said it was absolutely competitive game. Morgan kept fishing for a compliment and read didn't give it to him. So Morgan said, well, is there anything that I could work on and improved, and read it took a drag when his cigar again. He said, Morgan, it's a shame you lost that game. For the kids, and Morgan looks at him. To be off again for the kids, he said, during the timeout, I was listening to you talk to your team and you were instructing them on offense. Your problems weren't offensive. Your problems were on the defensive side of the ball, but yet you kept coaching and instructing them offensively. He says. What you did in essence was you lost the feel of the game. You could never lose the feel of the game, and Mark Morgan said he never forgot that. So fast forward even to today, with analytics taking such a prominent role in the game, as I've heard coaches say. But what analytics can't tell you is if you look in Guspar rock's eyes and you see he can't wait to get back out there, champion at the bit to get back out there and action, you know that guy better. You've seen Gustin practice all along. I don't care what analytics say you make a call baseball on your field of the game and the player that you know, and Morgan never forgot that. And of course he went on and I believe he was the first coach, principally at high school level, to be inducted into the basketball hall of fame and they Smith Basketball Hall of fame strictly for what he did at the high school level. I was blessed to be there to represent all of his past players and read our back was one who presented him into the hall of fame. HMM, well, well, story. That is it. It's amazing. Well, JB, tell us now the path that took you from working at Zerox in then. How did you get into the media? So after being cut by the Atlanta Hawks, been and ultimately by the boss in Celtics. You know, I was a hometown, you know, product and wellknown and got my opportunity, you know, to to, you know, realize some degree of visibility there. And one one of the local broadcasters, a gentleman by the name of Pete Green, but there was a movie out by Peter Green called talk to me. Here was a guy I don't even know what grady was in whether he finished the eighth grade. African American gentleman who was in prison for a while, but he came out of prison, pulled himself up by his own boost rafts, worked in local government agency, working with waiver kids on a street and encouraging folks to walk the right path. He had a radio show in the TV show and he had me on his TV show and at the end he said, Jab you know there's going to be an opening for the analyst for the then named Washington bullets. I want you to go and audition for the job. And I said a PD, I don't know anything about television work. How am I going to do that? And his attitude was as he looked at me with just, you know, incredulity, if you will, incredul size. He says, women, young men. Didn't you go to college? I said well, yes, sir, but what does that have to do with anything? He says that means you're imminently trainable. You can learn. Why I go down there and set up an audition for an interview. I followed him. I just said yes, sir, and so the Washington bullets. Back to them. They're one of their team stars. Was Phil Shanader, Great Shooting Guard who did a broadcast work for them for years. He was a team star and I played against him in college in the Far West Classic. So I went to fill. I said, Hey, Phil, I've got an audition for the Washington bullets as the announcer because the previous analyst, Mike Reardan, who played for the bullets, he's going to devote his time to his restaurant opening in Annapolis. So I've been incorporated America as a salesperson. I...

...understood how set up, if you will, as simulated interview, because you do that all the time in sales. And I went there and they said they like me, they were going to give me a shot to become the broadcaster. So that's how I got the job. And a Poland who on the team, then Bob Ferry, the father of a Danny Ferry, and Bobby Ferry Junior, who went to Harvard. Of course Danny Ferry went to dude. They said they're going to give me a shot to be the announcer and I worked diligently at it and loved it and said Wow, this is as close as I could get to playing the sport that I love. Right. Jaden US bound, Gust's friend again, gave me the opportunity. He said you can be the broadcaster for their away games. I had to give up my vacation time because I was going to be missing days from works, so I seed it all my vacation time to go to the away games. But I said I wanted to pursue this and I gave myself a five year time frame within which to grow and develop, to see if I could work this into a full time opportunity. And thank God it did work out that way. And that's exactly what I did when they offered me the job to be their analyst. And then the following year I added on, as I mentioned, to your work with black entertainment television, doing track and field, doing basketball, doing the non traditional sports, until I got a chance to work with, and Gust will remember this, name the broadcaster for Washington for football team, working with Sonny Jerkinson and Sam Huff. Was Frank, frank hurzog right, and so Herzog and I got a chance to be extra announcers when CPS won the INSCAA basketball tournament contract. That first week when they were like sixty four or what. However, many games are where the game and all sixty four teams were playing. That will make it thirty two games. They need to bring in extra announcers and I was one of those extra announcers that they brought in because they heard me doing a regional game between St John's of New York and Georgetown on one of those broadcast that I was doing a regional broadcast and that's how I got into the business. And they said, well, look, if you want to make a career out of this, you're going to need to become well around it. You're going to learn how to learn how to be a good play by play guy, analyst, reporter, studio host and do other sports and I said, hey, that's fine by me. and Gustin Dave, I did not forget how I failed the opportunity at the professional level and I said I would never ever allowed an opportunity that I really wanted to maximize pass me by because I was not prepared. So I work hard at it and when I was finally extended an opportunity to work full time at the CBS station in Washington, went for short period of time into the ABC station, but them back to CBS and they offered me a full time job about five years later and and that's how we got started. M Well, you know, Jamie, what's amazing to me is that, just from hearing your story, in the love you have for basketball, you grew up in it, you've been around some of the most amazing people in basketball through college, through your time in the in the pros and in meeting tremendous people, that your ultimate career has turned out to be talking about football. I know, I know. What was that? Where was that that transition for you, because you've been in how long have you been talking about football now? When, whether Fox or CBS? Yeah, yeah, because that's a great question. I'm chuckling because back in the day, a Madra shod it was right for football guy. I was a basketball guy. And it's CBS. We had the NBA and the commissioner then, David spurring, said Hey, we've got a new show coming out called it was then called NBA entertainment, but it would up being inside stuff and we want you to host that show and I was all the t you remember that and if I was all excited about this? But in terms of football, in parallel with that, you know that I was, as I mentioned Bobby Mitchell, how helpful he was to me, along with some of the so many other guys, Tony Dunge, the people that I work with, Kenny's stabler, hanks, tram I mean, you name them. I worked and took notes from all of these guys. But before I even got to call my first football game, my boss at CBS back then said, look, we'd like to give you an opportunity to do bast to do football. So study up and be prepared and we'll give you an opportunity to do a couple of games and see how it goes. Well, I studied, work with the Bobby Mitchell and so many others, and the game that I had to do that they gave me back into the at CBS was a game I would never forget. It was in Tampa, Tampa Stadium. It was a Tampa Bay buccaneers...

...hosting the Atlanta Falcons, and they said okay, JB, just call a clean game. Don't worry about getting fantasy, just do it fundamentally sound. Two things that keep in mind. We've got a big TV monitor in front of you. Watch the monitor because that's what people at home will be looking at. And then when you go to commercial, don't look up at the stadium clock because it might be wrong. You look at the clock with the time remaining in a quarter on the big screen in front of you, because that will be right. I said, okay, got it. So I'll go through the first half and I'm thinking, man, football is not that difficult. God complace and Dave and gus that, because from the third quarter I'm getting too excited for getting the basics. Didn't play the sport like Gust. So I said, Steve the Burg is up under the center, he takes the heat, takes the other snap. The lete hand off the James, while to the running back he's at the forty. He's at the forty five. He's got daylight. He's at the fifty. He's at the fifty five, he's had let the sixty yard line. Producer got in my ear. He's did take be there's no such thing as about sixty yard line in American football. You go to commercial. Now I'm all shook up. I didn't look at the TV monitor because I'm nervous now. I looked up at the stadium clock and I said we're going to step aside and take a quick time out with the bout eight minutes and ninety nine seconds left to play in the third period of play. Pounded the mistake. So when we came back from commercial, my partner was a guy who went to Undergrad at Harvard play pro football alignment by the name of Dan Jackets. He tried to cover for me and he said, for those of you who heard Jb say, that they were eight minutes and ninety nine seconds left in the third period of play. He was just throwing a little intellectual a puzzle your way. He wanted to see if you could make the conversion to know that he really met nine minutes and thirty nine seconds left in the third pier in the place. But Hey, thank God that game was just being televised to the local Piggley wiggly store in Tampa the TV truck, because I was allowed to overcome that mistake and move on. So I've been at it to answer Gus's question, along with the fashion, sinceineeen eighty, for was the first game of then he hired the full time in one thousand nine hundred and eighty six to come here to CBS and I've been doing it ever since. In Gust and day. I am fully mindful that's a long time and let me just be clear. I thank God very much for the blessing because, as Gust said, I was best football. I'm Rochard was football, I'm Richard wound up doing that inside stuff a basketball show and many kids only knew him from basketball. I wound up being associated with football because we lost the NBA contract. I will wind up being associated with football, and even when CBS lost the NFC contract to Fox, I was humbly hired there to come over. So I've been associated with football ever since, but I would never profess to know the game as well as Gus Farad. My job is to understand the basics, understand the mechanics, understand what a team is trying to do. Yes, I can recognize some of the nomenclature. If on defense, you know when they talked about well, they're running a t list, we're doing games. I understand what all that means. What we're to make it simple for the audience and that's where I would lean on gusts to explain the subtleties and nuances. My job is to set him up. Teamwork. Again, from what you guys were talking about things we learned way back in the neighborhood playing team sports. This is a team game. My job is understand what gust wants to talk about, what he sees as a vocal point of this matchup, who to look out for and to set him up for him to look good, because of the old expression or rising tide lifts all ships. Well, it Gust looks good, we're all going to look good. MMM, I hear you. So do you miss being in the box and doing the play byplay? You know what I do. Hey, a Gustin, Dave. One are the things that really was a nice blend of that was when we did do Thursday night football. It was so awesome to even though it was a busy schedule, it was awesome to on a Wednesday, fly into the city where the game is being played and talking to the coaches, like you're so familiar with what announcers do, get a chance to see the guys, the coaches, everybody, get our firsthand field. It's exciting be there in the arena and filthy enthusiasm and to connect with the players the studio is wonderful. Not Thank God very much for doing against setting my colleagues up, but that was the best of both worlds for me. So, yes, I miss being at the stadium and thought that maybe there could be a blend of that. But you know what, I'm very thankful for the way things have gone. Yes, sir, definitely so. You are still part of teams, right, everything that you've done and you've been a part of team for your whole career, whether it's basketball, you've been in a company ISS like rocks. You've been a part of all these teams. So now you're part of...

...these teams that when you were with Fox you were Howie and Terry and those guys. Now you were CBS ro it's a different team and every team I've been on I've been the PRANKSTER. Hmmm right. So tell me about who's the WHO's the biggest prankster that you've worked with and on some of those teams you just mentioned the name. There's no question it is the blond bomber from Pittsburgh. I just think that flat out. You know, when I work there at the Fox for twelve years, flying back and forth to the West Coast, I never ever remember going into a production meeting or a telecast where he just wasn't a crack up. He really is a comedic genius in that regard and I know people tease them a lot and it's unfair and unfortunate because many people did not know the one. He was suffering from clinical depression at one point and they had not diagnosed. They had not diagnosed what you call it dyslet see, they had diagnosed wow. And so for him to overcome all of that to be the quarterback that he was, and then he goes from I mean he is a southern boy all day long, to go up to Pittsburgh and deal with the cold, deal with a completely different culture and even, as he shared one time in the story that I did with him, when Joe Gill Him of course, the backup quarterback there and because of a strike coach truck, no gave Joe Billamo, if he were to break the line and come to camp, the opportunity to start, and he did. There was the added pressure of him being ridiculed because he lost his starting position to a black quarterback. You know, he and Joe Gillim were the best of friends and he had asked, he being Terry, he asked to be traded and many people miss read that, thinking that it had to do more with racial issues, if you will. Terry said No. I asked to be traded because he had a better arm than I did, he said, but he wound up giving the job back to Terry because sadly, after one game, I think it was playing a real tough team like the raiders, Joe Gillim, who was wiry, thin as you well know, but a remarkable arm, remarkable arm, had been beaten up so physically. Terry happen to be in the bathroom and someone didn't know that he was there when he heard one of the guys offering Joe Gillim to take some cocaine to numb the pain and be able to do it, and that began a downward slide for Joe at that point in time. Fast forward and number of years later, I'm actually doing a piece for HBO's Real Sports with Joe Gillim, who had gotten cleaned up because at one point he was living under a bridge in Tennessee, I think, Mashville. Yeah, it had been that bad and I'm interviewing him and as I started talking about Terry Bradshaw, just the biggest smile came across his face thinking about the relationship they had and the Times they had. I said, will hold on, let me call Terry. I called Terry. They talked like two elementary school chums, yelling and screaming, hollering, REC recounting all these great times together and it was so good for the both of them and within and if I have my time frames recalled correctly, within two weeks Joe Gillam was found dead later and it really did her terry and of course so many others as well. But that's the back story to that relationship. But to your point, Terry Bradshaw unmistakably was the crack up on our team. Now here in the CBS studio it's Bill Stems, Phil Sims is the it's always you can't write a quarterback at you know, as funny as I think, Terry was always my idol growing up. That's why I chose my number, you know, growing up in Pittsburgh, you know he was the ultimate when I got to meet him finally when I played for the Redskins and he came and interviewed me one time. I'm sure he'll never remember that, but that was like the be all end all for me right at the guy all always wanted to meet and he's just like, very personable, a lot of fun to be around and just, you know, always want to emulate myself aster Terry, but you know, I don't think I could ever throw the ball like him. I mean it was amazing watching him play and I couldn't imagine the fun you had day in and day out with him in that crew all. Just a major league crack up he was. But he was awesome because it kept us all loose on the set. And let me say this about him as well. To one a gifted football mind. It was all intuitive, if you will, with him, but I'm sure it's because he worked hard in practice and understood it and just great stories. By the way, for the last twenty years, twenty five years, one of the best public speakers on the speaking circuit period. He is...

...a phenomenal speaker. He's a crack up, he's extemporaneous, he's got great jokes. But I'll never forget day one out of Fox, our debut show, and Terry had some great insight. He was a star. He was a studio star. John Madden got blood. God, God bless he actually a pet somewhere. All his partner, God bless Pat Samer a. But somewhere all in maddened they were the big stars and they had to have madden to be legitimate and Terry Bradshaw, they had to have him to make the studio legitimate. And they have been a decided number one pregame show team. Make mistake about it, but I'll never forget on that first day, as we're doing that show, we get to the last segment of the show and we're a little heavy in time and our producer says, as posed to the three minutes that we have for this last segment, we only have a minute and a half. One of you guys will have to take yourself out of this segment. Terry offered to take himself out of this segment. He's the studio star and it also talked to a coach and got some great insight that nobody else had. He said, how we the rookie. Why don't you take this information and you share with the audience what to look for in this game? And I got this from coach such and such. That set the tone for us that if the studio star, the four time Super Bowl winner, two times super bowl MVP, was that unselfish that he could share with the newest guy on the set and make him look good. That set the stage in you know, all other things being equal, if you know that your superstar is not hung up on himself and that has to be all about him, that raises the love of performance in all of us to make certain that we would never get complacent. But that many people don't know about that was that is Terry Bradshaw. HMM, that's that's awesome. Well, it's our job to get it to the playmakers. That's what they always told me. Right. So, so, Jab. We appreciate all the stories. We're going to do a little thing we call the no huddle. Now we're you. Blastom questions at you and give us some give us answer some day. Of all, he started saw on shoot. Dave are gimp. Dave, what's your biggest pet peeve? Hmm, you know what, I'm a stickler about. That's great. which what is my biggest pet peeve? Well, it used to be keeping my afro meet, but clearly with resistance hair line. He's yeah, so you know what, I don't know if I really have a pet peeve. I'm trying to think. Do I have one. If I had to come up with one, it would be that I always want to be neatly attired, because you'll never know that when I was when I was interviewing for jobs when over the IBM, didn't understand what the dress code was there and the boss pulled me back in the room and the any reason he read me the riot act about my dress and the tire was because, you know this big time a lum from Harvard, I had a velvet blue boat tie on the plant, blue suit, blue shirt, I have my afro fixed, that he'll shoes and he told me don't ever go into a job interviewing like that. You make sure that you're neatly conservatively attired in the world of business and you'll be fine. So I have a pet peeve about having my shoe shine and looking neat and proper. They stopped inviting me to beach parties and when I was out in California working for Fox, because they said I would show up for a beach party with a tuck seed on the top had on. So all right. So this is a good one. Do you think that Antonio Brown will be in the NFL next year? You know what I would not doubt it, because but that kind of prodigious talent and I've been hearing rumblings from folks who would like to still bring him back. That's a loaded question from the standpoint that I personally feel the guide needs some help. I understand that people will always be lured and then entice because of talent, but there are times when you also need to take the guys health into consideration to find out if that's the right environment for him, because there is a such thing as life after football. That's my bigger concern. So I would not be surprised and because I've been hearing some rumblings, I would not be surprised. I think he needs a little sergeant Brown, What are you do? Yeah, Hey, my crown. Yeah, yeah, that's for sure all right. JB, who's on the Harvard Mount Rushmore of Sports. Wow, that I'm going to be leaving some people out. I would have to plead the fifth on that one because I'm not not as well. First, in terms of we've had an outstanding crew team there for years, back during the days when Joe restic was the football coach up at Harvard. There were some great players there as well too. Many of gone on to success in the game of life and because there were so many talented student athletes, they're who gone on to do significant things. You know what, I wouldn't even take a stab of that one because I would leave somebody out right now. That's hard to do. There's a lot of amazing...

...athletes. I'm always partial of Ryan Fitzpatrick, but you know, hey, we played together. I used to mess with him money. Lucky Speck this out, and the guys talk about you quarterbacks. You guys can count the money really well and even though they Ryan has been to so many different teams and he's done this and done that. Let me tell you something, he's racked up a real nice financial portfolio backing up and going wherever he's gone. So he has to. He is he has seven kids. He has to. Well, okay, I think they're covered for the next two lifetimes. Right, right. So you know, Tom Brady is obviously the goat M he's going to pass that torch. Of all the guys you see playing right now, who do you think he passed that torch to anywhere in the League? Yes, why, you know what a gust and see, just to stay true to what I was saying about leaning on you because you are forgotten more food all than I'll ever know, and that there are things that you see and assessed in a quarterback that a late person like me would not have the best clue to. Let me just take answer that. From a big picture standpoint, it appears to me that there could be a real significant change in the sport and the direction that it's going when you look at the phenomenal success that the Patrick Mahomes the world is having, deshawn Watson and this, and you know I say this disusing the athletic vernacular. Heavens, I'm happy to see what Bryan Tanny Hill is doing and in in Tennessee and coming back, you know, with all the pressure that was on him in Miami. But the unquestioned Guy Who could change the game is this freak of an athlete and quarterback who makes great decisions. Per John Harball. They're in Baltimore. This kid is flat out phenomenal and gust to make the kind of growth and change that he made from last year, when he didn't have much time in the saddle to do that, to where he is now. He's hungry at wants to truly learn. It is all about we. He doesn't like all his attention on himself and the fact that the team is really tweaking the playbook to maximize the strings that he brings to the table. Look, I think this kid has fled out phenomenal. He's must see TV to me. I stayed up late last night watching just to see what this kid was going to do next, and he's unbelievable. But it goes back to what you talked about the whole episode, JB, complacency. Right, we have that Tom Brady is to go because he's never got complacent. He always wanted to be better than he was last year or the day before and he always looked ahead. Now that's what I that what's going to be interesting to see with all these young quarterbacks. Are they going to be complacent because they've had some success? You know? Is Patrick mahomes going to be able to do it? You're in and you're out. Is Amar Jackson Right? Because that's what I see, that that these young guys have to really show us every day. There are some flash in the PAN guys, but can these guys change the game and be at the top of the game for as long as this guy, as Tom Brady, has been. You are absolutely spot on and what you just said resonates across the employment and or career spectrum. That's in any business. If you get promoted to be a CEO or chair person, it's the same fundamental that needs to be in place not to ever get complacent or consider yourself having arrived. Using that athletic analogy that I gave you, that has application in the game of life, there's no such thing as standing still. It is either getting your getting better or you're regressing. From everything that's there right now with Lamar Jackson, from all that I hear and talking to folks who closest to him and and what I've heard him speaking. We had him on inside the NFL and interviewed him. He's all about team and if you look at the ridiculous trajectory of where he came from last year to where he is thus far, he needs to maintain that because the moment you start believe in your own press, the moment you start thinking it's about you, it starts internally first, and the rest of that team is playing probably above their level of ability, if you will, because they've been infused seeing what this is a quarterback the league if they've got a quarterback who's set in the pace for them, even as I described what was the case over there at at Fox and certainly here looking at Fil Sims and, quite frankly, built coward who is the consummate student. You know they set the tone for you and you don't want to let them down. So let's see if they can maintain that. But that's a great point that you make. In terms of the weather or not, they will be there, because Tom Brady by no stretch of the imagination was he a gifted athlete. Nor is he a gifted athlete in terms of all of the measurables that scouts look for at combine. But what you can't measure, I know it sounds like it's a cliche, but the heart and the head and he has mastered the particulars to where the...

...game is actually moving slow in front of him and he sees things. And you know better than me, I guess the acronym will be essay Q, The as small area quickness, if you will. He doesn't have to be a blazing speed a guy like Lamar Jackson, but in terms of that pocket just being a step up, step to the side, one of two steps and still focus down. Fill. The guy is a master, he is, he is. So two more jb all day, our Jimmy, name one thing you wish you were better at? HMM, man, investing money, so I could be filthy rich, ha ha ha, hey, I think you are. I think you're dude. Okay, now a look. The good Lord is bless me. I'm just wanting to learn to be a better multiplier of it. Not For me not to Feast on the lust of it for myself, but I've got four grandkids and the Bible says a good man leaves an inheritance for his children's children. So that's a real honest answer with you as far as that is concerned. And also maintaining a good, healthy weight and not fluctuating one from a swollen pick like them feeling right now to you know, being in better shape. So that's one of the things I need to exercise some discipline on. That being right, I guess I go through that every day. So you know, it is just what it is. You look pretty good. From her partner, you look great. You look great as well. So you got one more form day. Um Yeah, if you were commissioner for a day of one of the major sports leagues, What Rule Change would you make? HMM, what rule change would I make? You know I actually was a hockey announcer at at Fox back in the day. Boy, that provided an awful lot of laughs for people. It's welcome. So it would actually be. It will still be in the world of football. I would just want people to understand. Look, Roger Goodell has the mandate of making the game a safer game. Many people think that it won't be as fun a game, but I remember there was one year I am steed the hall of fame dinner and of all the old timers coming through, at least half of them. You know, we're either walk through the canes with Walker's football is a tough sport art and never forget John Madden, who was the one who ultimately taught me so much about the game and respect for the game. But he says those guys who step a cross those white lines of play that sport their men, because that's a tough game. But it's also very important when you see how many guys are showing the effects of that brutal game move that long period of time. I'm all for making certain that safety is rule number one. I've heard enough players say if an ex player is telling me that I'm putting myself in harm's way, I'll liften. I have huge respect for those like gusts, who I say they are from the fraternity. You don't hear me on the set picking Games who's going to do what or trying to act like I'm the knowledgeable one. I want to understand the game well enough to ask, you know, the likes of, say, here and inside the NFL, Ray Lewis and Phil Sims and Brandon Marshall or Michael Eurvin to Steve Smith seeing you, I want to ask them to get their thoughts and I remember here and players say, you know, if another player tells me that or was advocating on my behalf, I'll do that. So the one rule changes is to do exactly what they're doing now, to be in fatic in cleaning up the game, because you don't want these guys not being able to live a quality life after football. I'm impressed and involved in the post athletic career pursuits of these players with what the NFL has been provided. Both the NFL and NFL Players Association, but I want to safer game out there so that when they leave the game they have a healthy life ahead of them because, you know what, the average life span has four point but actually less than four years in the NFL order. Backs typically have a long lifespan for sure, but you want all of the guys leaving the game healthy. So that's the one thing. Any rule that would that would strengthen that, I'm all behind it. They absolutely well. Great, great. Well, Hey, we really appreciate you coming on and telling US your story and getting in the huddle with Dave and I and joining us on huddle up with guss. I thought it was a great episode. We learned a lot about you and and just you have an amazing story. Coming from basketball and learning about the game of football. It's not easy and you've done an outstanding job and I can't say enough great things about you. J being, we appreciate your time. All right, well, we appreciate it. Jab, was awesome. Thanks again, man. I can't tell you how much this means to me. So we really appreciate it. Hey, this was awesome. You guys got me to be excited and more animated that I typically am on TV. So thank you, guys for bringing it out of me. All Right, thanks James. Have a great day and appreciate it again. Thanks jabing. They got blessed. You guys. Take care. I say thank you. We want to thank you for...

...listening to huddle up with gusts, a RADIOCOM original. You can find our show on RADIOCOM, the new RADIOCOM APP or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcast. Please leave us in review or comment if you enjoyed the show. We are on facebook, twitter, instagram and Youtube at huddle up with Gus. You can also visit us on our website, huddle up with gusscom.

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