Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 160 · 1 month ago

Huddle Up with Gus: Scott Stokely

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Gus talks with PDGA pro , and 17 tournament champion Scott Stokely about his Growing up, Disc golf.

Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Guss. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts Farad. I want to thank you for joining us today. You can check us out at huddle up with gustscom. You can go to wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. We will be on there were on every network, so we appreciate you. We want to thank all of our sponsors today, the little blue pill credit guard, new T genics, sixteen thirty one digital news, always a big plus. Go to sixteen thirty one digital news. Check out their sports news, information entertainment. They do a great job with that. And definitely check out to our PODCAST, is held at Sounder FM. Go to sound or DOT FM and check out our podcast, along with many, many others, and we appreciate you listening and please go to our youtube channel so you can watch the video, not just listen to the show, but now you can watch our shows on our great youtube channel huddle up with gusts. So I appreciate you listening and get ready for the show. It's a great one. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Brian here sports fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with us, fifteen year NFL quarterback Gus Bar Rot. Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches, playing for seven NFL Franchisees. With one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are one he no every day you get to hang out with am gonna quarterback up. Okay, sports fans, from the decked out and plush sixteen forty one digital studios, it's kickoff time, so snap your two straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. So today's guest, I'm really excited. He's a national disc golf champion. He's written an incredible book. You should go check it out. Scott Stokeley's joining me. His book is called growing up disc golf. Scott, how are you doing today? I am doing fantastic. Thank you so much for having me. Nice to meet you. It's nice to meet you too. So we've had all kind of people on our show athletes from all different backgrounds. You're from Pasadena, California, correct I am. Yeah, so tell me about, like your how you fell in love with disc golf. D Are you a true like all around Sports Fan as well? I did play other sports. I played baseball competitively for all through my teenage years. I bold that grew up in a bolling alley because of my parents. But the short of it is the the world's first disc golf course was put into the ground in one thousand nine hundred and seventy six in Pasadena, and that was dear that. My father passed away and my mom, being a mom, would take me to all the local parks in the area and some of them had the best swing side, some had a certain tree I like to climb, one of them had a Frisbee golf course. Didn't think it was unusual or special. It was just a parked activity. Didn't realize the historical significance. Well, I mean I suppose nobody did then, but I just grew up playing. So luck of the drags raised next to the world's first course when it was the only course in the world. Yeah, that's amazing. I mean you talk about bowling when we're young. My parents should to drop me off every Saturday morning at the bowling I like kings of lanes and hey, here's five bucks, have fun all day. That was basically their baby's yeah, same here. Say Yeah, it's you know, and I'm like man, I just need like four quarters to play donkey a little longer. It's a but yeah, so that's amazing. That the course that's you know, where you grew up, where your mom was taken you was was the first disc golf course. Now what was like? I'm not so familiar, like all the companies and the brand names and everything, but I'm assuming if it's the first course, the probably weren't made disc golfs out there there, you know, the the actual Frisbee that you use. No, ifat we called it Frisbee Golf. I mean it still can be called that today. Frisbee assists a brand name of WAMMO, but WAMO was the flying disc manufacturer that everyone threw. So, you know, just like calling asprin I think in clean x are actually brand names. We but there's generic now. That's what it was. So WAMO dominated the market up until the early S, and so it was Frisbee Golf. Yeahs so you know, it's just amazing. So how many holes? How similar is it to golf for you? So there's the thing about about this golf is that it is golf. You know, all the things that make golf. This just a sport of golf itself the greatest sport in the world. And the only reason I always say this is that I look objectively at all, well, not all, but many of the best athletes and all the other sports. Think Golf in their offseason and they golf in their retirement.

It is the common sport that all other athletes share. So I tend to give the nod to the sport of Golf as the Sport Disc Golf is the same sport in every measurable way, certainly from the neck up. That golf is your outdoors. You're getting exercise, you're competing against your previous score, your part of local clubs. You're you make one shot that keeps you playing for years. You for you're frustrated and kick your equipment, you know, like it's it is everything that golf is, well, being more affordable, more, more variety in terrain and it's so there's I don't like to say better or worse, but there are advantages to disc golf without losing any of the things that make golf great. Right. So in disc golf, do you have to wear like the crazy pants, like rowney danger fills hants and and come, or do you know what I mean? Like people go nuts sometimes, but I'm assuming disc golf is just whatever you want to put on that they well, yeah, I mean at the recreational level, for sure. At the casual level, you just show up to to play your game. You know, it's no different than of bowling alley or going out to the the you know, the basketball court at the park, right, but at the professional level we have dress codes, we have you know, getting strict all the time. Yeah, as a support grows, I mean there's now some are around twelve thousand courses, fifteen million players. Wow. We have media, we have sponsors and the the level of presentation on the Pro Tour is is elevating with it. You know, some people like that, some people don't, but that's just the nature of you know, like you know, you sponsors come first. Oh, yeah, definitely, obviously. So one thing I wanted to talk about is, like where do you know golf course is obviously people have bought the property, they built these incredible courses. Difficult disc golf, I would would assume, can be put into parks because right you're just you're not really you're not really excavating the land and doing all, you know to put the sprinklers in and you know what I mean. Like you said, it's way more dollar friendly. But so where are some of the greatest courses that you've played? So originally the courses were mostly put into public parts and the reason they went at to all the parts was that would the only place you would potentially get exposure. You had to have this thing that you did that people in the park saw you do and think that looks like fun, I want to try it. It was necessary. Yeah, as disc technology has improved, discs have gotten smaller, beveled edge. They're dangerous. The level of players are out throwing eighty plus miles an hour as well. It's not suitable for a lot of public parts, certainly multi use areas. So it has moved away from that. But the thing about disc golf, and it's just a nature of a flying disc versus a ball, is that there are far more things you can do to manipulate the flight of a flying disc, meaning a wide open fairway like on a ball golf course would be considered typically fairly boring for disc golf because discs can go over trees and under trees and around trees and make s turns, and so the worst of terrain for every other sport in the world like the side of a mountain playing through the woods with cliff dropoffs. I don't mean dangerous cliff dropoffs, but you throw your shot over it, it goes three hundred feet to the bottom of the valley. That's perfect disc Golf Turin. You can't play any other sport up there. Well, I suppose there's probably something, but it's suited for us. So that's where the courses going to the ground in the best courses are. A lot of state parts have a made. Probably a thousand state parks have adopted disc golf in the most beautiful land available and private courses are really taken off. Now to pay to play private courses. It's the evolution. Yeah, do you think social media really helped with disc golf? Yeah, for sure. I mean social media helps with everything. If you could ignore that, a twelve percented yeah, where the harm? Because, yeah, I mean it brings community together. You social media allows you to manage your club page. So every course, or at least town of courses, has club or multiple clubs. You that's where you build your community. The biggest explosion has been on Youtube, because now the sport is spectated. There's I mean videos of tournaments can get millions of views now, and that was impossible before youtube. We had to just wait and hope that ESPNO CBS would pick us up, but we weren't big enough for that to happen. It was a catch twenty two. We couldn't get big without them, but we weren't going to like they weren't looking. Look at his...

...social media allowed us to just say, well, we're going to bring our own film crews, put it on the Internet and guess why? People are interested, and that's really been one of the Big Paradigm Shifts. So let's talk about like how that how it is now. It's so it's really popular. My Son's new some guy that does trick shots and all this with disc golf. I can't remember what his name was. They puney. What is it? Simon the thode? Yeah, so you know they know, like people watch it like it's interesting, it's great content. But let's go back to when you were kind of going to high school, you know what I mean. Like how many people played and how many? Like did you get your friends to go out? How did all that happen? Because we have social media. Then we had a doll phone. Hopefully somebody would answer no. So the early days of the sport, I loving Lee saying it was made up of misfits, and the reason I say that is that, even though these were the, in my opinion, the greatest people I've ever known my entire life, you could not be part of the mainstream American culture and play Frisbee Golf like you're spending your afternoons in a park playing with toys as a thirty year old adult. Yeah, that that's not that's just a little bit more unusual, and especially we're the same age. You'll remember this. Nowadays, Alternative Sports, particier pacing sports. They're very much embraced by adults who played this kickball leagues, for grying out loud. Yeah, when we were younger, there were a whole bunch of sports you played until you got out of high school and then you were done unless you were playing one of these several major televised sports. For you know, I'm generalizing, but the alternate sports weren't embraced back then. So if you were actually out there playing a game in a park, you were kind of weird. Well, and it makes me think of the movie dodgeball. Right when, you know, if you seen the movie with Vince Vaughan and Yeahs later, you know what I mean, and when he's open in the American sports quarterly and it's like it's going to be on ESPN, a the O show, you know, it's like, well, we could play dodgeballs a sport and win money, like, you know what I mean, like this. I'm thinking back then. It was it was kind of similar. I mean, obviously the people still played it, though, because it kept going through all these years. Yeah, so the sport basically grew steady for forty something years. I do not believe there was a single death in forty years. In terms of participation. Professional disc golf is association membership courses going in the ground, whatever ways you can actually measure data. We grew steadily every year and it was really just an algorithm. The sport is fun to play. A certain percentage of people who try it keep playing, a certain percentage of them introduced their friends and more people continue to play because it's fun. Then quit because they move on to something else, and it just it was a recipe for growth. But there wasn't just you know, until Youtube there really wasn't that explosion and certainly in the last couple of years that changed everything. It's you know, it's an outdoor activity that people could go out and do relatively safely and affordably, and in the last couple of years it's been insane. Yeah, you know, it's amazing to me. I actually have never played it. I mean I've thrown Frisbee a bunch, right like you go out with your friends, you sit in the park getting ready for a concert or something. You thrown just regular Frisbee. But if actually never competed in disco, I think it would be a lot of fun at I am definitely gonna have to try it. So what would be recommendations you would give to a beginner? Dumb, to a beginner it's no different than playing, you know, any other sport, let's say tennis. When near new you cannot tell the difference between a fifteen dollar racket and a three hundred all racket. You don't need to invest the money, you don't need to buy the gear, you just go out and play and when you play, if you decide that you like it, you'll just organically find ways to spend more money to improve your gear, because the better you get you'll start to realize that the cheap equipment doesn't fly as well as you wanted to at a higher level. And then it's like any other sport as well. It's just it's completely addictive. You know, there's so many similarities to golf. Here's one of them. Ninety nine. No, no, forget that. A hundred percent of golfers, how their believe that the next driver is what's going to make them better at golf. And we know it's not to equipment, but you believe that it is. Well, it's no different than DIS golf. It's like I need that next disc that I just saw on the youtube video. That's going to change everything, and next thing you know you've got a garage school of them or, like me, you have a favorite club that you never want to get rid of right and you use it still exactly. It's even though it's ten years old and technology is passed you by, you still use it because you feel...

...like it's your best. You know, I can't hit anything else. I'm sure you have an old, you know Frisbee that from the back of the day that you still like the throw. So I specifically don't because I won't throw any older equipment for the very reason that if I lose or damage it, I don't want to be connected to something that I can just replace right so I purposely avoid that, although I am the exception, not the rule. Most players have discs in their bags they've had four years, that they know inside and out. They will literally cry if they lose. So to your point, that is very much normal. Yeah, hey everyone, thanks for joining me on huddle up with guests. I appreciate you coming and listening to the show. You can check us out a huddle up with gustscom wherever you listen your favorite podcast. We are back. Thanks for listening. We are joined by Scott Stokeley has incredible book out growing up Disc Golf. You got to check it out it. I think, Scott, that I do. You feel like you were one of the first, the originators to get into the sport to try and develop it to where it is today. So absolutely not. I was at best the second generation of players, because the first permanent course went into the ground in one thousand nine hundred and seventy six. Well, Sive UND seventy six, I'm but the sport have been competed for years before then. The sport of Frisbee Right, with multiple different flying disc events. Frisbee Golf was just originally it was just one of the events that was competed at these tournaments and they would set up temporary courses. They didn't even have the pole holes, which is our targets they were. They would put tape around light poles, they would create their own obstacles. I mean the sport was literally being invented as it's being competed, and so there was an entire generation of players who came before then that were the the real pioneers of the sport. I came along when the sport had been established, even if it was only for a very short period of time, and I was also a kid, so I wasn't even part of that culture, but I was there, so I I'm part of it kind of right. The only how much in our obviously. Obviously you are your disc national champion, I which which is amazing to me. So we were talking before the show about you know, when you write a book there's ups and downs and everything and you don't really kind of understand everything unless you have some real moments in your life. So tell us a little bit about you know, when I was reading some of the excerpts from the book, and then consider some incredible moments that you went through to make you the person you are today. So explain a little bit of that to us, because I always think that's wonderful for an audience or even anybody listening to hear, because it can help them in so many ways. Yeah, I mean I was. I was a punk kid, and I think the punk here do. Yes, as a matter that was a greener pink I when I was younger. Of it was everything. No, no, yeah, much as I liked, you know, Frisbee, golf, I mean it was was the most important thing in my life. I also found a partying and using drugs and and not so much drinking, but same thing. That became a very important part of my life and I was also really angry. I was a very angry teenager. For really no reason, like I looked back in Steadis and because my dad died. is because my mom wasn't home a lot, and it's like I couldn't really pinpoint what I was angry at. I was just a pissed off teenager. Yeah, because I was, and I desperately wanted to be happy, had no clue how to do it, and so after several teenage years of struggling, I just started looking to the people in the sport that I admired the most and just said, they have what I want. What can I do to get it? And I found myself trying to hang around them. I'm not sure they were as happy about it as I was, because I wasn't like them. I was just punk, drug using kid. They weren't. They were responsible, successful as I mean the one I was an engineer at NASA, teachers. That mean they were professionals that I yeah, but they they didn't push me away and I just I learned from them the skills to be happy. And then once that happened, I've never will not never, but I haven't looked back often. Who would you say it was? Your biggest mentor of that group? Shoe Orsino, Jeff and Johnny listening on the course, and Rick Shaffer, Dan Rodick, Mark Horn t do you goll these, Susie Horn, there were another cliff town, a lot...

...of people, but really it was, you know, like I say, it takes a village. The entire Oak Grove Gophers Frisbee Golf Club was made up of an entire mixture of people, everything from the like very blue collar beer drinking, you know, chain smoking, all the way up to the the NASTA engineers. And everyone loved each other. I mean we were all part of the same club. We all enjoyed the sport and I took something from everybody. So I learned from the whole club. The Club to carry me. They had thought to me as a kid, and so all of them had something that I could that I could learn from. Right. So it really was a village. Yeah, you know, and I was I was well, you were talking about that. I was thinking I can golf like anybody can go out and golf right. Anybody can go out and throw a frisbee right. It doesn't matter if it's good, you have no idea, if you're good, bad, whatever, you just go do it. But then you go take a lesson from a pro and they say, okay, fix your swing here, your mechanics are a little off. was there somebody that kind of taught you like the real mechanics and how to throw a Frisbee better the disks, better than what you were doing when you were with that group? was there's somebody that just kind of just took you and said Hey, no, do it like this. Yeah, I mean Joe Orsino was my biggest mentor as a kid, along with jeff and Johnny. Listenman, they were a lot more about the psychology and Joe is a lot more about the mechanics, and so I definitely learned from them. But over time I evolved. I'm actually now I consider myself the best teacher in the sport and that's how I make my living now, for the most part, is teaching. I do seminars, I do clinics, I just introduced a six month online course on plane. So I take the teaching part is serious as as anything else, and my teaching has far evolved from the early days, because if it hadn't, I mean sports evolved. Yeah, and so the things that I do not me even in football, I mean the way they train you today is different than when you were playing. Like you learn and so, but I stood on the shoulders of giants because I had to learn from someone first. Yeah, so you know teaching. You know in your book it talks about how you're really dedicated. You're humble about it, but I coached high school football. I coach my son's youth teams. You know, it is difficult because not everybody understands. People take it in differently, people react differently to how you are and so you have to try and figure yourself out to be a great teacher. So tell me about some of the learnings and misgivings and everything else that would in to you to be one of the best teachers in disc Goulf today. So one of the things that I find important for me is the understanding that what I do is important. I'm not just teaching people how to be better at this golf that. That sounds very fluffy. Yeah, there are, there are billionaires out there. It would give half of their fortune to go from shooting in the S to shooting in the s on the ball golf course. Golf is an important part of many people's lives and how they performed absolutely affects their happiness. When I help players get better and they're not frustrated on the course and they're able to perform better and make shots and reach holes they couldn't reach before, I have improved their quality of life. I've taken the thing that they enjoy they might have quit next year out of frustration, into something that they're now going to do for the next thirty years now. That includes teaching in a way where people aren't going to be getting injured. They have longevity. So the first thing is not to downplay what I do but to recognize that it is important, it is a part of their life that gives happiness. And then I take it very serious. I am a student of the game. I study what works, I abandon what doesn't work. It took me decades to figure out how to teach properly, even though I was probably the best teacher in the game twenty years ago. When I look back at me twenty years ago, I think I didn't know anything back then. My method I even called I hate this, diete saying this, but I call this Scott stokely disc golf method. I hate talking about myself in the third person, but from a marketing perspective. It's what it haps. You know. Yeah, so it's just stokely method, but it is a method of teaching that is different than anyone else is doing, because I had twenty some my years to fail, basically to learn, but also learn what didn't work. And then what I'm left with now is I feel so good about I can make anybody throw correctly. I feel so confident. To me it's excited. I enjoyed the look on players faces when they just do something. They go, Oh my God, I just I can't believe I just made that shot. It's cool. Yeah, no, that is really cool. You know, the thing I'm thinking about is at least it like it. I like the Scott stokely method.

That's really good. Lee. I'm thinking like at least it's not the you know, disc golf for dummies. Yeah, you know that. Like the people write those books and I'm like really, do we need to write those kind of books? The Scott stokelyly method, to be is the book I would want to get or the the program I'd want to watch to learn how to, you know, play this game. See in defensive disc golf from for Dummies, not from a marketing perspective. We're talking about it on your pot cast. Yeah, so it's a good name. Well, I mean there's there's whatever for dummies and every know you do. You know what I mean? I'm just say like somebody took that to a whole another level. They did. I was just kind of little bit as the seizers there, but I do like the name. I mean that's what you should you. I mean, if you're if you have what you're doing, if you're the top of you're the best teacher, you're the best athlete, whatever it is, you're the top. You have to promote, market yourself because you want to help other people and you can't help other people if they don't know you're out there. Yeah, I you know, I tell people this because, I mean, humility is such an admirable trait in human nature, but when you're an entrepreneur or self employed, humility you could kill you. You Kill Your Business. So a play it with baking. ME, like I think I'm the best. I'm the best disculped teacher from Peoria, but people don't know that and I'm like, well, have you told them? Well, no, I wouldn't say that. You need to. You can need to say I'm as teacher in your town. This is why you want to hire like you have to self promote, even if it makes me cringe. On a personal level, I tell people in my seminars all the time that I'm the most humble person you'll ever talk to out at dinner tonight. I'm not humble when I teach. When I teach I say I'm right, this is how it's done. If someone said otherwise, they're incorrect. I'm not humble when I teach if that's not an effective teaching method. I'm humble the rest of the time. Right now, I I absolutely get that. Right between the white lines that we say, you just become a different person, and I guess yeah, is is, you know, between a game face. Yeah, you're putting on your game face right now. Obviously, when I played football, every game I went out and play it, I was nervous right whether it was just because the team was really good or I hate getting sacked and I don't want to get sex six times this game. You know, whatever it was like. You get nervous, get butterflies. Do you still get that way when you play competitively? I don't. I like a fish and water like this is where I belong. For example, I actually just made I made a pot that was the biggest cash put I ever made. Just happened two weeks ago. Wow, and people asked me if I got nervous on the pot. In the answers, I was not nervous at all on the Pie. I was just doing what I do. What's interesting and I certainly didn't expect this, because this is the most media I've ever had on me since I have played the sport. was just two weeks ago as well, because during my time when I was on top, there was no media, or right very little, and I wasn't nervous making a shot. I have had anxiety ever since then about missing the shot. Well, and that is never happened before. I never expected that, but I just thought I've like I've I've had trouble falling to sleep as I'm laying there just going through the scenarios of what would have happened had I missed that shot. Yeah, and so, yeah, I don't know if that makes me weird, but the post anxiety was worse than the current anxiety. But when I'm on the course, that's my home, these are my friends, this is what I'd love. This is where I'm most comfortable. I like playing in front of Galleries, in front of crowds. I mean, that is just it's my happy place. It truly is. I mean that's I mean. If you could put me, if I could go back and play still and put me in front of Seventy Fivezero in the middle of ourfk stadium and DC, I would be my happy place right like that. Now that it's weird, comfortable. Sure now. I do want to add to this. I am not a robot on the courts. I'm not nervous. I went back and joined the pro tour this this year after a long absence, and I'm fifty two years old and the next oldest players out on the actual tour are in their early S. those I mean. I am an outlier of outliers and I have had anxiety overdue. I belong. Am I going to embarrass myself? What are people going to think? Is this a publicity stunned by way? None of that. No one thinks that. If I'm successful, but what if I fail? Right. So I've had those anxieties. Big Picture, it's just not competition anxiety. But I've had life and I do have life anxiety over those things. To go out on the pro tour,...

...because I'm really big on social media. My my story that I was going to tell was I'm going to bring all of my followers along on the pro tour with me. Yeah, I'M gonna perfet behind the stains and I'm going to tell them about my success as my failures, my fears, my excitement, wins, losses, but also training and off the course, like I'm just going to take you on tour with me. But that put, you know, self inflicted. I put myself under the microscope where then, oh boy, whatever happens, everyone's watching me and it's my own damn fault if they are. Well, you know, yeah, major anxiety. Yeah. Well, I look at that Scott like you know, you've played for so long, you teach it, you're humble, you say you know you it's like everybody El should put your game face on and there's wins and losses and everything we do in life right and and when you accept all of it, whether you win you lose gracefully, you give praise. If you lose, you know you thank you, if you win. All those kind of things. I know I know there's you know, when you're it's your a everyone is looking up to. Yes, because you're like the new mentor. who was that you said, that showed you the techniques, the like do Orsino? Yeah, so you're your Joe Racino to you, right, to all these younger people out there now, and you're teaching them and you're doing all these things and you're showing that guys, look, you can go and do this sport for a long, long time, right, and it's so amazing what you're doing. So I would say to you just keep doing it as long as you can, because for me, once it's stopped, it stopped during there's no there's no old man foball game that I cann't know playing. So keep now it, because I know the People Watch you and they love to see what you're doing. Yeah, and there's definitely a difference between like a robe and anaerobic or strength versus finest sports, that you can't go back and play football or basketball at a professional level. In your s sports, you know, whether it be darts or billiards or bowling or golf, like you, the gap is smaller, although it's certainly still there. Like your athletically. I mean you there's a gap, it's just not as big. Well, yeah, but yeah, I mean, like you said, millions of people are playing, millions of people watching. I mean, for God's sakes, there's a corn hole tournament on ESPN. You can watch. You know what I mean, like like yeah, that was something that we just did for fun when we were out at the camp or something, you know, before we went fishing or whatever, and now it's like people just want that little bit of competitiveness to have some fun and and then all of a sudden turns into something that can be really competitive and a lot of fun, and then it creates incredible people like you who are or great teachers of that sport. So one of the one of the things I wanted to ask you is is my wife's a therapist. We talked about mental health a lot. You know, you went through a lot when you're younger. You talked about you know, you were a punk kid and you had issues, you were angry. So tell me about when you grabbed your your Frisbee disc golf and you stepped up on the course. How did that help you? How did that change your mindset? You know, because I feel like that was your you know, you talked about that being your outlet. The people don't understand that when you have this other side, you're angry and you you don't know what's going on with you, but then you go and play a sport, you just absolutely change in all the kind of let's go. So I went through both sides of that as a teenager. or I will all explain both sides. Would you certainly experience, because everybody sets themself up different ways and I when I was younger, I like being the bad guy in a sense, like I'm going to be Cocky, I'm going to be arrogant, I'm going to beat you, if I lose, I'm going to throw a temper tanger from just so you know that I don't accept failure and I embrace that role. But it was never really what made me happy. It's just it's almost like I wanted attention but didn't know how to get it the right way. Yeah, so I could at least be that guy and I played with a chip on my shoulder very much. And what I realized, you know, pretty early on, is that instead I wanted the respect of a different type of people, the people I actually want to respect from from didn't respect the way I behaved and then I set out to get their respect and initially I basically faked it. You know I'm never going to show anger on the course. Well, that doesn't mean I wasn't angry, yeah, or disappoint they're frustrated. I'm going to fake it. I've come to realize that a lot of people who are professional and carry themselves professionally are faking it. But that's also part of being a professional, like in a sport like Golf...

...and gentlemen's game. That is expected behavior. Doesn't mean you're not seething on the inside. I don't feel that way now, but I mean, there was a transition period where I really was pissed off but you weren't going to see it, and I just said I need to act in a way that's going to get the respect of the people around me. I'm going to shake hands of the people who want to congratulate them. I'm not going to make excuses. All the things that I thought they wouldn't respect I wasn't going to do. But I settled into that role and realize that's actually right, that actually is how you're supposed to behave right. I think it that part out fairly early, I think, but it's, you know, it was a transition from from the to the two different phases, you know, but it was, you know, clearly certainly became a lot happier that way. Well, I mean that's kind of part of it, right, that sports helps with so many people, that your a lot of kids are lost. Sports brings a lot into it, but sometimes it does give you anxiety a penny rate, that do I have to be good, all those kind of things that we've been talking about throughout the show and I think in your life. What makes your book so interesting is that you've been through all this. You've been through on both sides, like you just talked about. You've been the ups and downs and and finally you hit that equilibrium. When do you feel like? What age you feel like? You really just felt like, okay, I'm settled in, I understand who I am and this is what I'm going to do. Last week really. So, basically, I played until I was about thirty on. I toured and competed. That was my entire life. My daughter was born when I was dirty and I quit playing for thirteen years. Wow, and I completely dropped out of the sport. I completely left all of the people in the sport which were was my base, my foundation, by my safety, that head, because just being around the sport hurt too much, like it was hard to see people doing this thing I that I wasn't now doing. Yeah, and the last period of those thirteen years I went right back to substance abuse again. This is about eight years ago, so it's been. It's been. Why? But I went right back into that. Not right back into it, but eventually fell back into it. And I'm positive that went to happen had I stayed with my base, but I was just on my own. Yeah, and when I came out of that, I the way I came out of it was I actually said I got to get back on tour, I got to get back on the road plane discolf, because that is my well, so I didn't really have a family. So this should be no different than a person who's struggling substance to be saying I need to go back home to my small town in Kansas with my family and find that base again. Right. It's kind of what I did, but to me that was point out on the road competing and disc golf tournaments and I went out and that's where I got the attention that I wanted, the things that made me feel good. I think one of the things that all professional athletes feel, and I don't want to speak for you, but I suspect you can relate to this, is you get addicted to there's a lot of dopamine that flows when you're competing and you're playing sports, and when you leave the sport you're kind of dependent on some things happening in your brain that you're no longer getting and I think that's why a lot of athletes struggle after they after they're they're done playing their sports, because, like, you lost your drug. Yeah, well, it be PSD, you know, as we call it. Right. You think about anybody who's a professional athlete that's been in a military you're just pre wired to do this for so long. I did football for twenty five years straight. When I was done, you lose the locker room, you lose the the practice, you lose the meetings, the coaches, all these people that have been a in your community and then you're just gone and you don't know a lot of so many guys don't know how to deal with that. And so, you know, I completely get what you're saying and I'm so glad that you got to go back into something that you love to do and your found your community again. Yeah, it was, it was really great. Well, initially when I left, I didn't really feel as much of a loss because I got into the early days of Internet business as and was very successful very quickly. So I was able to substitute with having lots of money and buying stuff and doing cool things, like I was doing well. But when the business started to fail, I realized I didn't have anything. Yeah, that you know, I was I was, I'm not going to say I wasn't enjoying myself before then, but when I when things went downhill, I realized that foundation was no longer there. It was there, it's just it was out on all the disc golf courses in the world. And so when I came back to the sport, that's what saved my life, is that I came back and the sport like it was shocking how quickly I was in immediately embraced and just welcome back, and it was good. It was amazing...

...and I like I'll never leave it again, but I I needed to when I left, I needed to leave my daughter was born. I didn't want to be out traveling. Now I completely get that. I get this. So with the first term and you came back and played in did you win, lose? What happened? No, I actually, no, I did the first tournament. I went back and played and I did. I actually won, but that was it was a very small local tournament, so it was yeah, I mean it was small when I actually went out on the road as right as hard to hear you good, the air condition you just turned on in the room like the auto studying, I'm going to get turned off. So the when I went back got on the road, I played for nine months, competing every weekend, without winning a single one, playing in the open division, which is against the best in the world, even though the time I was like forty four. And then finally I can see that that I needed to play in the forty and older division and as soon as I did that I started winning every weekend. But it was hard to not compete against the best in the world. Like I felt like I went to a martial arts tournament and I won the Blue Belt Division, but there's black belts over there that could kick my butt. Yeah, it wasn't really as satisfying as I wanted it to be, but it was still more fun to win and then delude. So, you know, no, that's kind of how everybody fell playing the lions last year. You know, you know, we play the lines, but there's these better teams. We want to be over here. So I get it. I get it. Hey, everyone, welcome to huddle up with guests. Appreciate you listening. Check me out a hudle up with gustscom wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Like to thank all over sponsors, sixteen, Thirty one digital news studio, the Little Blue Pill. You guys know what that is. Don't have to explain that, but if you need it, go take it. It will help you, and credit guard and new JENIC. So thank you to all of our sponsors. We appreciate it. Scott, we were talking about, you know, all the things that's gone on in your life. You've had a lot of ups, a lot of downs, and now you're kind of very fil you look very stable, you look very good, you know, like happy, and I feel like you're at a point in your life like it takes all of us all these ups and downs. I'm fifty now. I still try to figure things out and just doing certain things. How is it, you know, that you came to tell this story through a book about Your Life? Like was it somebody saying you need to do this or to use it? I got to write this story now. And what happened was I had after I came back to the sport and I spend a number of years getting everything back. I came back to excuse me, finished out my last couple of years trying to be a better dad to my daughter. I was a very good dad for a number of years and then I was a very poor dad for a few years, because substance abuse and good parenting don't really go together now. Yeah, so I had to come back and rebuild that with her, which we're wonderful now. Happened for years, but you know, I had to earn it back and so I got into for the first time in my life I had a job, because I was an entrepreneur of my whole life, but I started selling software and turned out was really good at it and I can make a lot of money selling software. But I lost my job in Fort Collins and Colorado, which were at where I was living, and the only place you get a software sales job that paid well was in Denver, which was our commute each way, and so I had an our community to way. I was like, well, that's ten hours a week of dead time in my life, like I got to make some productive use of that time somehow. I don't want to just listen to music or podcast or documentaries, like I want to actually do something. And then I came up with the idea of finding an author and what if I narrate my autobiography on my community today and then they could transcribe that, and that's that's what we did. Aaron Wrath, who actually I had co written a couple books with before, but he decided that that would kind of like a fun and I just narrated my entire life up until when I quit this golf. So there's actually more books in the works, but up until when I quit. And the interesting thing was is I did that and when I finally said in the last audio tape, I thought sweet, I'm done. Turns out there's about eighteen months more work because there were six full rewrites. It was actually that was the beginning, not the end. I was under the illusion I could just tell my story and that's it. Not The way it works. Yeah, not at all. So you still got the disc golf on your of course. Look at that. Absolutely by the way. So took to go back to what we said before because I kind of got a little side like a little bit yes, about finding the happiness. Now,...

...what if I finally found this peace and happiness? Is that once my daughter went off to college and now I was just free to do whatever I want in life. Yeah, I got really evaluate what makes me happy, and what makes me happy is I gave up every single possession I own. gave it away or through away. I do not have a storage in it. I hit the road and I'm permanently going to be on the road. I will never have a living room, I'll never have a yard, a mortgage. I am happiest when I'm traveling, and so I completely have abandoned any homebase and now I travel competing and teaching, but in between that I'm just traveling and adventuring. My girlfriend of two and a half years so I met, had been doing this for seven years before I met her. So she was a fulltime nomad as well, raising her child on the road, and then when we met, it was like I basically said, like this is how I live my life, and she said, well, this is that's the only way I want to live mine. So I'm like, Hey, this could work. No, we're we're permanent travelers now and that is what makes us happy. It is what what is the vehicle of choice to do that? I just drive around a pickup truck. Basically, when you stay in hotels all the time, you don't have the hear anything. Now, hotels and Air BNBS, we will can, but not out of necessity. We can't because we like the backpack and get in the backcountry. Yeah, no, it's one of those I toured for years where it was sleeping on people's floors and rest areas, you know, couchsurfing, which was a blast. I mean I recommended everybody there's twenty should do something like that, but as you get older, there's I know, I need a I need space, my space. Yeah, I know, so I know you feel. Yeah, so we yeah, we we don't. We do. We do all right, we were not struggling or anything. We do find so we we're hotels are every night yeah, I mean to me that would be I mean, I have this yard I got to take care of, I got all the stuff we have, doll you know what I mean. Like it is a lot of work to have your own home, and there's a side that a lot of people want to be kind of nomadic and and be free and go out and do what they want to do, and I applaud you for that, because that's not an easy decision to make. So here's what I figured out, like, and this is where they by the way, your I think you said you're fifty one. Yeah, okay, it's great, because once you hit fifty you can get on your soapbox and young people have to listen to you. That's the lion. Well, my kids don't listen to me, so I don't know that think kids. The kids are exam but everyone else has to the thing that I figured out, the absolute key to happiness, is that you have to abandon preconceived ideas of how you're supposed to live your life and then wipe them clean, start from scratch and decide what type of life makes me happy, because I believe that we're preconditioned to a certain path, like you're going to marry one person the rest of your life. You're going to have kids, you're going to have a career, you're going to hopefully have a home and you know, you go from renting, but when you own a home that's the greatest thing in the world. And and I think that things like that is exactly what will make some people happy. Yeah, but we we're kind of program that that's what makes everybody happy, and it's not. There are different types of relationship structures, many of them that aren't traditional. There are different careers, and so for me it was like, I'm not happy in the same place every day. I am happiest if I don't know what I'm going to see tomorrow. That's how I have to live to be happy, and so I think the key is to to somehow wipe your brain clean and just start from scratch. Does this make me happy? You know what, that thing that I was told to make me happy my whole life actually kind of doesn't. I think like kids, I think a perfect example. Plenty of people are made to have kids like that is their lot in life. It's what they fantasized about. The vast majority of people have kids without ever considering is that the life I want as a parent? And it's they're not for everybody, but we don't know that. By the way, I'm not not all hide mighty. When I was younger, I did all the traditional things, are a lot of them anyways, as well, because I thought I was supposed to. I didn't figure out who I was like late s that I could just live my wife completely different than anyone else I know and be successful and be happy. Yeah, well, you know that makes sense, because you know, a lot of it is, hey, I have these beliefs and things and everybody should be like me. And I'm like, you can be whoever you want to be, I don't care. You know what I mean, like I if you want to go do that. Go do that, like it...

...doesn't affect me, it doesn't do anything to me. And today's world is like this is what I believe and if you don't believe it, then we can't be friends. I'm like why, why is that have to be like that, right, like if we're friends and you're you're no. Man, Hey, that's awesome. Scott's going to come around every now and then. You know what I mean, check us out, because he's got to stay here or they'll go there, whatever it is, and like I think that's so great and that story needs to be told more, because there are preconceived kind of ideals that we all grow up with and live through. Right, like, like my parents did this for me, so I want to be better and go do this for my kids, you know, or my family and that my dad was one of fifteen kids and that was like they all kind of believe the same thing. So that's awesome that you get to do that. So in all of your travels you've been to a lot of different parks, you know, National Parks, I'm sure, everywhere. If you could go to one place and a great country, where would it be? SOUTHERN UTAH. Wow, southern Utah is the most beautiful part of the whole country. For what I like? I like deserts. Yeah, there's five national parks. I said. They said the disc golflies further in the desert, so it can, especially if you're in the desert where there's like heavy winds. That, yeah, yeah, and I helps, I mean it helps a lot. Yeah, know, the southern Utah Is Everything from arches to Canyon Lands, Capital Reef, Brice and Zion can you are all down there. The people of Southern Utah are just they're they're like, think salt to the earth. That the expression. Yeah, like they just got this great live and let live. Everybody's cool with everything, like, but it's a beauty, the natural beauty. It's like nowhere else I've like, I've ever seen. That's the that's if I had to be one place in the US, but I would not stay there. Yeah, it's out of me. Yeah, exactly. But also, is that where you would go eat then, like, is that your favorite place? Like if you you're thinking right now, I'm hungry. I could just go anywhere, all over the places you've been. Where is that food that comfort you, that you love? So we we all we only eat local. We try to avoid chains. I like supporting local business, but also I want something that's different every time. Like the meal we went we went to a hot pot place and last remember, like, let's see you, we're in Santa Cruz, we went to this hot pot place in Sanator's. This what's awesome. But I like local, hole in the wall places. Now they're not necessarily less expensive. Some of them are. They can be pricey, but they're just their local yeah, I like farm to table restaurants because then it's locally grown. I try to avoid being that like hipster guy that does it out of like ironically. I just want like I don't want to eat the same thing every time. It's why I don't want to live in the same place. Like I don't want to go to a chain restaurant because that meal is identical to the one I ordered it every time. Yeah, so, you know, when I was well, up until this last year when I was training, I would eat ice cream every night, and I would if people are like well, you must set a lot of different ice creams, like well, no, I it's always chocolate, but since it's local ice cream places, it's always different. Yeah, it's not basking robins, chalk and every day it was that that local place. Yeah. So, yeah, if you go to Cincinnati, go to graiders. Great, it says great ice cream. I played for Kengals one year, so you know they have really good ice cream. And then if you come to Pittsburgh, go to Glen's I and it's more of a custard than a ice cream. So here's the thing about Cincinnati. I say I avoid chains. Like to play there are a couple exceptions. I Love Skyline Chili. Oh you do. I know I'm the only one. Now. It's just it's so awful, but it's just there's nothing like skyline chilly stoke. Shout out the skyline. Maybe the only chain I you that now. The only other chain I eat that actually is that. And boy, I'm going to people are going to hate me for saying this, but the local owned steakhouses can cost twice as much for a piece of meat to taste exactly the same and it's thirty percent smaller. So right, I can do that. I could do chain steak house is just because that could get so expensive. But that's some but, but that's probably about it. Yeah, I know, I hear you. There there's certain places, like if you know a chain is good and they have high quality stuff, then it's okay. When you're on a road and you need something quick, I can go into a chain and get it. Like you know, you're not getting the worst of the worst and and there are better chains than others. Obvious. I won't go hundred to avoid et out of chain. Right, that I remember. Yeah, right, yeah, they're not...

...refusing to not eat there because I'm starving. But before we get into kind of what you're doing otherwise other than golf, but I want to go through like what it's like to go through a disc golf course. Right. I don't know if you can see our chat here, but my team that are producing the show and a multiform at network, they all said they would caddy for you. I don't know to disc golf has can't have caddies. Yeah, it's awesome. They do have caddies, but I travel with my cat. Oh, so she candies for you. Yeah, and I always tell the people that offered a caddie that my caddie comes with certain requirements that you might not be on board for. So so I guess, yeah, you'd probably not the right candidate, I would suspect. But no, I we do have caddies and the lot of the pros use to caddies, but I just I mean she's my happy spot. I mean I feel so comfortable with her. Like one thing is we don't talk about golf at all when we play. We talked about everything, but and that's you know, to me, that is with most sports. It is the less thinking you do, the better you are, because it's not the conscious processing parts that allows you to do physical activities. It is a part what we call muscle memory. It's not in the muscles, but what you call muscle memory comes from another place of the brain and I believe if you shut off the thinking part, the or the more you shot off the thinking part, the more the higher you can function. So I don't like thinking about the the game as much as possible. That's there's exceptions. I mean you got so. Yeah, I didn't get most part. I want to think about other things. So you know, like if you go play are like ball golf, as you call it, right, and you go to brand new course that you've never been to before, right, and you get there and you're like, I don't know anything about this course. They give you a little book that has every hole and now far it is to sand and all that. But as you play it, if you played it two or three times, you know some shortcuts. You know where I should hit it where I shouldn't. So it is disc golf like that at all. Yeah, it's exactly like that. You you know, playing a course blind is challenging because your perspective on obstacles is only so good. Do you also have a lot of shots that are blind. So your you you need to be able to get a feel for the distance and throw shots and get it feel. But you are correct. By the time you've played a course three times, you're probably about ninety percent. Sorry, for a professional, like a high level player, right three times you're probably ninety perc seven percent is good as you would be if you played it a hundred times. Yeah, like local advantages at the highest level are very small because everybody's very highly skilled and you learned shots. But you have to learn that. Man. We have caddie books and we have all these different things. But also you're just you're throwing shots and getting engaged and you have had a bound areas, which is what we can call them, like say, sand traps or anything else. I mean sometimes you got to just quote, hit the ball, get make a clean shot and if that clean shot land in the trap, you realized I should be laying up short. Yeah, but until you've done it, you know it's you you're at a disadvantage. So yeah, I mean it's amazing the parallels between Bob Golf and disc golf are. I mean they're they're they are literally the same game. You know, from the neck up. It is. There are no differences, and even the physical skills are very similar. It's about Cortita, you know. It's about finesse and coordination and accuracy and timing as opposed to strength and endurance. Oh Yeah, there are times when you say, can I swing really hard and still hit the ball straight? I'm sure. Can I throw this as hard as I can and make it go where I wanted to go, you know, and and when I'm closed to, I have the touch the field to put it where I want. It's no different than chipping or whatever. Yeah, but are there different discs that you can use while you play, or do you use the same one the whole game? Because you're obviously you have a driver, I five iron, everything like that. So what is that? You have a variety of disks. A typical touring professional player will carry twenty ish really with them. Oh Yeah, because they do have different flight characteristics. Some of them are are well, I mean we equaintance this, like all golf, except that it's not just that some fly shorter and farther. They do, but some turn rights, some turn left and some turn fast right, fast left. Some have more glide, some you know which means they carry longer when they run out of speed. otherwies will drop when they run out of speed. Both have advantages because you're going over things, under thinkings, long shots, short shots. So you definitely you have a bag full of disks you'll throw. So now...

...when you start playing, you can start playing with one. Yeah, yeah, don't you don't need a bagful, but you'll very quickly realize that it helps to have multiple. So how do you name them? So, like, you know, when you watch golf, the guy goes, Hey, give my pitchuon wedge. You know, we're a hundred, forty yards out, all right. So now you go to your caddy and and you say, okay, I need the one that turns left quick like. What what is that like? What is the terminology for that? Like, do you have that all the other disc and you know? So the disc that I carry, or the the looats to stalled, the bird, the assassin, you name them. Or that the name they know? No, no, that's the company name. Oh, okay, I didn't know. I mean that's why I was wanted. I know, every every company has a you know, if a company manufactures ten discs or you know, eighty discs. Every one of their disc has a name. So you go out, you know, you purchase a starter set, would include a destroyer or a rock in an HR like at the starter say you get a one more. I could be wrong, but I think that's what they start with and that's those are just the names to disc and what it is. It's the mold, so disc or it's injection molding, plastic injection molding. So you basically have this big steel dye. You melt the plastic, forced the plastic into the Diet. That's the shape of the disc. Yeah, the plastic cools, the die opens up, the disc pumps out. Well, every single disc is it's its own unique mold. So that's how you can make the same disc over and over again. Every disc made from that mold, with slight variances, it's going to fly the same way. So it destroyed. Your mold can only make destroyers. Well, that's that's so interesting to me. I didn't know any of that. So now you have up the twenty different disc in your bags. That right. Yeah, I don't know if there's I don't believe there's a rule about carrying more, but there's just no reason to. And are they heavy or they light? Yeah, they're heavier than the discs you would buy at the at a grocery store or a toy store. Yeah, there's a pointed to mansion return. So I have your disk will penetrate the wind better or be less affected by the wind, which is an advantage. And heavier disc will fly farther because they penetrate the wind. But at a certain point, if they're any heavier, they will lose glide because they become too heavy. But we will throw a variety of weights. There's a range of weights from a hundred sixty something too a hundred seventy something. Grahams that you're going to be throwing most to the disks. So when you made the put to win the money that you were just talking about a little bit ago, what did you hey give me this. What was a disk, but by potter, so it would be the same. I mean it's the same disc I put with every time. It was a the marvel from Birdie disc golf supply. Yeah, yeah, they'll be happy about this. The MODEL, I love it. The marvels, the name, the name of the disk, and their companies called Birdie disculf supply. They're fantastic, but it's just that that's the that's my potter of choice for a certain range and then I used the wizard from gateway when I get outside of a certain distance because of a different flight characteristic. Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah, it's just like golf. I mean you got to understand all your clubs. How long are you hit them, what they can do for you all that. It's very similar. I love hearing about all this and I get I definitely gotta got to try it. One thing I did want to ask you about is, you know, social media and now with draft kings, fandel and prop betting at all this. Is there a lot of betting or prop betting that goes on and in disc golf? No, but there's there will be. I mean it just as the sports gets bigger. It's going to happen. It's really just a matter of the market size. You know, can the market? Is the market big enough to sustain these companies interest in it? Because as big as disc golf is, if the betting on disc golf was one percent of the NFL, it would be massive. Yeah, that's probably not going to happen tomorrow just because we are smaller. I really can't say that. Just fifteen million players. I suspected would be more than one percent. But it's a question of like you just hit critical mass, when do they recognize you? It's no different than getting on, you know, TV, I getting on the ESPN, ors, CBS. How many people are going to watch? Last week it wasn't enough. Next week it's enough. It's we're growing so rapidly that it's it's kind of hard to ignore it. I mean we've been on ESPN A bunch of times. I was on actually ESPN in nineteen ninety eight. I was playing on MTV and nineteen ninety four. Wow, but it was very sporadic. But that one interested in thinking about social media. Is that as great as it would be to be on these these networks? Traditionally, the world's change like, you know, if you were just a television show, if you weren't on one of the three major networks, and now it's all screw you, dead in the water. Yeah, and then yeah, they're well, then went to syndication. Okay, there's other options, and then it's but now it's like it's great to be on CBS, it's not required. Yeah, it's great to be on the big screen in Hollywood. That's no longer required. So...

...it's no different than our sport. So we are it's nice to be on these networks and we love the attention that we get, but it's no longer as required as it would have been fifteen years ago, to umber twenty years ago. If you're not anyt and you don't make there's no money. Now now we don't. Now we have other options. It's really it's a cool time. Yeah, well, we're going to see the Scott stokely twitch channel now, of course. Yeah, all game, like, Hey, you can follow me a whole way through and you know it would be really interesting to watch. So before I let you go, Scott Stokely dotnet, tell us about that. Tell us any current foundations or charities you're with that our fans can help you with, or maybe go and and see what you're doing. Yeah, so I run an organization and I put are quotes are on organization because it's very loose, but it's called blue power. I have been teaching the classes, discolf classes for gives an adults with special needs all over the country four years. I've actually been to two hundred eighty three cities teaching these classes. Incredible and I also right now I donate my prize money on the pro tour. Like all my prize money just go straight to a local actors an organization. So I technically I'm an amateur, but at that's on the pro tour. When I did the money that I went a couple weeks ago, a portion of it went which was all the skins. I wanted to skins match, but there was a pleds money became that. I promised that I would the person raising the pledge money and gave you promises like you got to keep promise me. If you win this, you're going to keep this. I'm like, fine, a promise. I did expect to win, but, but, but the kid's money all got donated. I don't take donations. That's the thing. I'm not an organization. I don't only with money. I don't want it to become a business. So if you are a supporter of what I do and the work I do in autism community, support your local autism organization, school or assist a living community. That the way you support me as just donate locally. Yeah, that's probably the biggest yeah, something I enjoy. It makes them really a book. Right, but, but your but book. The only thing I would love to find is I need a hotel sponsor and a vehicle sponsor. Those are my two massive expenses traveling. So, if marant is listening, we like right now. We stay at all holiday inns and we were like dynity league members, whatever that means. But we stand. I'm like a hundred fifty or two hundred nine year wind up at holiday and but I would love to find a hotel sponsor. So that would be the only shout out of something like for me, Jesse to, you would love, love to have. Right, as the special needs community, I don't think then should, like I said, just don't it locally. Volunteer locally. There's nothing more fun than volunteering at a special needs school and they will not turn you away. They need volunteers as much as they anybody. So that's right. A city. Yeah, no, amazing, amazing, Scott. It's been an amazing show. I learned. You know, you never think as you get older, like okay, I've heard it all. Literally learned so much today from an incredible teacher player. And where can I get the Scott stokely disc or Frisbee? So if you go to Scott Stop being done that, there's a store. I have merchandise with with with all my endorsed products. I one of the ways I make my money is that I endorsed the number of products. So there's a number of discs with my their tour series stamps we call them, but they have my logo and hot stamp on them. You can buy those from Scott Stokeley dotnet and that is where you would be find my merchandise. Awesome, awesome. And last question, one last question for you. If I'm a player, I'm on the tour and I win a big event, what kind of Earnie's can I expect? They the big events right now are in first prize might be between ten and thirty thousand. Wow, it's awesome. Yeah, it's okay. I mean compared to that, certainly other sports that's very small. But, like there are a number of different sports with different models in them to make money, and so the players that are making money to support, myself included, it's not for prize money. Yeah, like I remember a few years ago in the highest paid athlete in the world with Michael Phelps. If he never want a dollar of prize money, you know he'd like. So there is, there are the players on tour are are making a they're successful. Yeah, and, by the way, if you're able to just do this for a living and eat and put gas enter tank and you're playing discolf for living, I consider that wildly successful. Yeah, but I say, you're in nature every day plan. Yeah, but there's players that have signed million dollar contracts, a few of them that. So there's there are million dark contracts out there and it's getting bigger. So...

...like it's coming, but they act specifically. The prize money is, you know, it's I mean it's I used to travel to tournaments in the s were first place in the tournament, if I won first place, was less than what my airline ticket cost. Well, I could win back my air fare and I was a professional discolfer. That would be rough. Yeah, that was rough. That was that would be right. No idea how easy big go at it. But yeah, well, disc golf is definitely growing because of people like you and they're passion in your pursuit of happiness with with with the sport and trying to share it with others all over the country. So, Scott, I appreciate you. Everyone can check them out. A Scott Stokeley DOTNET. Go buy his book, check out his gear. What is it? Bertie's right, that's a company. Got A let's as a Burty disculf supply pretty disc golf, the wizard. I also work at dynamic discs and cast the plast are the other two big companies I'm working with, and others are. Haven't been announced that they will be. So all for those are very good to me and a lot of what they do is the reason I'm able to do all this work in the special needs community is because companies like dynamic, cast, the class, Birdie and gateway support my career in other ways. So they are actually supporting my special needs work, but they're doing it via me right. That's awesome. That's awesome. Most got good luck with everything. Thank you for sharing your story with us today on huddle up with Gus. That's our show today. Folks, check us out. Next show we're going to have one of my old lineman on the play with me at the bengals. Richmond Webb's going to join us for our next show and you can also check out our youtube channel huddle up with gusts. That's it. I appreciate everyone coming on. Thanks allar sponsors, thanks to MFN, thanks to Terry Schorman for always getting incredible guests, and we'll see you next week on a huddle up with Gus. That's a wrap. Sports student things for joining in the fun at the sixteen thirty one digital studios for another active puddle up with gus featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback Gus Farat. PUDDLE UP WITH GUS is probably produced by one thousand six hundred thirty one digital media and is available on Apple Music.

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