Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 155 · 6 months ago

Huddle Up With Gus: Ronnie Ebanks

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Gus talks with Ronnie Ebanks about his journey from champion rider, to a champion life coach, and more. thechampionlifecoach.com huddleupwithgus.com

Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Brian here. Sports Fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with Gus. Fifteen year NFL quarterback Gus Bar Rock Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches. Playing for seven NFL franchises with one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are one every day get to hang out with an Henall quarterback up Oka sports fans, from the decked out and plush sixteen thirty one digital studios, it's kickoff time, so snap your Chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Hey One, welcome to huddle up with gusts. I'm your host guests for our fifteen year NFL former quarterback and your host. I want to thank you for joining me on huddle up with Gus. Go to my website, huddle up with gustscom and check it out please. If you like the show and you listen it and you, like all of our guests, please go give us a review, give us some five star reviews. That would be great. We would love that. Go to apple, wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and check us out. I want to thank all of our partners. MFN, appreciate you guys are always producing editing the show, Terry showman for helping us get all of our guests and six thirty one digital news for always coming on and supporting us as well. And you can check us out at Youtube as well at huddle up with Gustscom. So today's guests. It's the first time that I've had a former jockey on, so I'm really excited to get into this side of sports, something that we've never discussed before. We've had a lot of different people on our show over three years, but this is a new one, so today joining us. You know, he has a website called the champion life coach. He's also known as the Change Age it and in the last year he's really been involved in a company called Saves orb where they're going around the world and they're trying to make a difference where this product can really soak up the oil in the ocean and help all of us. So joining me today is former jockey, as we talked about before, Ronnie ebanks. Ronnie, how you doing? Good Morning. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me on Gust. I'm doing fantastic, so I can't wait to talk to you. This is really exciting. You grew up in the Cayman Islands. Is that correct? Is that where you were born and I was born, came in and lived there till the six and my first stepfather brought us to the US at six to South Oklahoma and Alabama and Louisiana. Yeah, so that was like when I was my kids were little. We went on vacation that Cayans one time and there was a what was his name? He was a huge redskin fan. Right, so I played for the Redskins. He found out I was on the island. He had a bar crazy, something, crazy, something. I don't know if it's crazy reads or something like that. I'm trying to think. He drove up his red skin jeep to our hotel and the Cayman Islands and he was like he made a pirate movie in the Cayman Islands. He gave it to me and it was it was just as my whole thought, like when you when I looked up and it's all your Fil Cayman Islands, like Oh, that's my first thought is that read. Read comes up and and yeah, he was a he was a great guy. But you know, when you move to the states, you know probably on the cab and I was not so much sports as the states would have right. But you get to the states, what was your childhood like and when's the first time you remember really Love Fall in love with sports? We moved in Oklahoma, so it was, you know, camping and Rodeos, and then we moved to Texas, Alabama, and I remember when they moved to Louisiana and and I got was in seventh eighth grade and I started playing baseball and eight or ninth grade and I was the all star Catcher of my team and made the all stars and that was the first love of sports. And at the same time, right after that, I started getting involved in horses and this bait. It kind of tore me. I was at this good baseball player in my coach and my team was begging me to come back and the horses were taking me away. Just about that time, as I fell enough with baseball. I found horses and then I really fell in love with that. So before that I was much of a sportsman. My two older brothers were big, big sports fans, baseball, basketball, they were here, they loved it all, you know. So my oldest brother, whatever his team was, was my favorite team. I want to be like him. That's how I end up in orses because of him. I want to be like him and he loved horses. It's a really pretty cool part of the story of my life. Find of your brothering about your older brother, right. Yeah, yeah, my old God three brothers, that three of us that came from the Cayman and the oldest one was three years older and I was like, I just, you know, idolized him and I wanted to be his favorite team was a dolphins. That was my favorite team. He's favorite dream was the basketball was the lakers. That was mine. And Yeah, the astrols was his team. So that astrols was mine. He got used to get so bad. That's my favorite team. I don't...

...care as mind too. Well then, how did the whole horse like the Rodeos and all that come about? We well, my dad was in Oklahoma and he just brought us a Rodeos or something to doing a weekend and I didn't have no affinity for but my brother, unbenounced to me at that time, fell in love love the horses and then everywhere we travel he'd see a horse. He like that's about of Meina, that's a herb. Look at that quarter horse and I'm like, I'm so I like wanted to be like you know. But then we said twelve, we moved to Louisiana and in the south and we settled. I. We bought some property in my dad settled, but we kept moving. Before that we were moving about every nine or ten months. Of seven years in a row we moved every year. And when we settled there's a guy about four houses down we're lived out in the country and he had a little barn, a little walk and wheel, a little racetrack and my father said the first few days we're driving a town, told my brother that guy there's a horse training. Maybe I'll bring it down there. He can teach you to be a jockey you like horses so much. And my brother's like, wow, really, that would be great. The next day I was down there, I saw a kid in the front yard and I got down there, met the kid. He so so I got to go help my dad at the BONNES. I'll go help you. I went with him, I helped him. He was cleaning stalls and the next day I went back again to hang around. He had to go the same time. They had to do the warn work every day. The second day the father come in the stall. He said listen you, I was really like working at anything. The kid didn't really like working that much and his father said, if you want to come here every day, I'll give you forty dollars a week if you come and help me. I'm like forty that was four thousand a week to me. Yeah, who are poor. We didn't have no money. So that was the first of it. So every day within a month I was just in love with these horses because I was caring for him. I was the groom. He was teaching me, the groom, to clean them, clean the feet and gave them to clean the stall. So I became this responsibility that I've never had and this connection just it was like unbelievable first love. I just went and my two months and he says the three months. So you'd like to be a jockey. Maybe I'll teach you to be a jockey. I'm like, what are you kidding? He's not. So that's how it started. In six months later he was putting me on my first horse in my first race and sneaky pete coming out of the Sixhol five or six horses going a hundred and two, hundred and fifty yards and I won by a nose who and the story started. That was very good. The story to you. Do you remember the first horse you ever got on? Yeah, it was the pony rock at the farm down the road that they were going to teach me to ride. So they put exercise saddle on him and had me get in that first the first day, and then from there every day they put me on the Racehorse and the the as system would go on the pony and hold me with a Shank and and take me around till I learned the rocks. I've never been on a horse. Yeah, you were. you nervous, I was, because he's big race horses. They were fired up, their corner horses, so they got all this energy, but he's holding onto a rope, but still the balance and everything was like getting used to. I've never been in a saddle really, you know. So, yeah, it was a little it was nervous and scared energy, but I never hesitated. I'm in anytime they said get up, I was ready to get up, you know, and I hit the ground, I got back up, jump back on. I never I never had Nov I become pretty fearless, but it was because I know horses understand scared energy big yeah, and if I bring that close to them, they're not. They're not. They don't like that at all. Right, the most heart I was worried about was them running off, because these racehorses, if they get away, they want to go. So they get away from and they start. Once they start, you're not stopping unless, you know, until they're ready, really we call it when they run off. So that was what all is. My fear was they can go forty miles an hour and you don't know where you're going to land or where they going to turn or ducker. So, especially for any inexperienced riders, that was the only thing I was ever worried about. But I learned enough before they ever let me go to take them around by myself. So the first day that I was let go to do the track by myself. It was kind of like me and I hope. Oh Yeah, well, you said from like six months, from start till your first race. Right. Yeah, yeah, so tell me about the adrenaline rush on a horse your first race the gates go. Tell me about that. That that has a great a weirdest thing happened. We took me after I learned to ride really good. He's used to worker in the bean field every day at the school, this horse that was retired and would breeze you like a two hundred yards and he'd watch me and tell me what I did wrong. So every day I was learning. So after three or four months of that, I'm ready for a race. Lease, if we got to break you out of the gates, got to teach you how to clout of the gates. Good. Yeah, they took the whole pony rock that I started on, took him get the trap, popped him out of the gates three times and I like left. They're great, like you don't need no more, you're ready. Let's go match your race. So now we get in the race and at six horses and before they can open the gates, all six horses kind of have to be ready and you know and on point. If one is really acting up, they don't go until everybody's kind of set. So it's like a moment, a moment. All of a sudden they pulled the rope in the gates open. So I'm waiting and some horses acting up. So we're in there like five times the amount of time we should be in. We don't know when these gates have been open. So the whole time I'm the longer I sit, the tighter I'm getting. So I was so...

...tight when if ate's finally open, my legs were so tight that I had no weight in in my stirrups in my feet. So when I gates come open me I was squeezing on my legs. When they come open my feet, I'll put him down there. Now Irons my feet were. I missed the iron. Now I come out, I'm like an Indian with my feet wrapped around the horse and I just start whipping. I wipe the feel out within three jumps I was on the outs number six and I wiped all five horses out. I get to the rail in front and by the time the other horses I run overcome running. I held on one of them almost taught no, but I win by a nose. And then it was a free for all fight with the guy, the horse that we beat. Their team in my team all got it into it because they didn't want to pay. They thought it was bet. You know it was. But but the adrenaline of coming out of the gates all I knew us when I lost B Irens, I wan't going to fall off and I was going to find a way to get to that wire first. I just started whipping and screaming and slashing and shoring up. I held on the wind by a nose. So winning your first race ever, that feeling was just like I was a first guy that went to the moon. It no different, no different. So gonna ask you you get done like we was your family there that they watch? Yes, yes, my family, all my friends. I was by hundred people of the track in the back there in that day in Louisiana and this Bush track pack. So and all our crew must had thirty, forty people. That was like posse with our crew and everybody's giving me five dollars, ten dups. Everybody Bet. So now I made three times the money I would normally have made riding that race, but everybody was so excited and everybody bet. They all was tipping me. So I was like, it was overwhelming. You were like boy, this is a lot easier than veling shit and the man don't even know everything. Like yeah, on a mission. Yeah, and things rapidly picked up from there. Within six months I really become the go to guy because I was really small and I was really natural and I was just kept winning in the more I kept winning, the more of them kept looking for me to ride their horses. So pretty soon I was like the kingpin for the next two years before I went professional on just on the Bush, and that was just on weekends, on Saturdays and Sundays. We call it Bush seen books. Bush track racing is guys betting amongst each other. You know, you match a horse and I'm match a horse and yeah, take a jockey and and we run. So I was making, you know, for five, six hundred hours every Saturday or Sunday on thirteen to fifteen. That was like as much onnes my dad was making. You know. Yeah, it was crazy. Yeah, yeah, I know. So that's that's amazing. So did you play any other sports where you did it? But once you started racing words. I didn't pay nothing. I didn't not even go home anymore. My Mom said, I don't even see you. Don't have no she will try to make me quitch. He's like, what are you doing? You don't have no life anymore. You live in that barn, you living them stalls and you got to have friends, you got to have a social life. Of like, mom, this is the rest of my life. I know what I want. She says you, are you kidding me? She's I said I promised, and she's like, okay, then I'm going to support you, and then she got behind me. And Funny Story is Ano the greatest part about this. I wrote a book. The books coming out in actually first week of May is called staying in the race, right, and I'm a launching a dirty week, but in there. Where is my story going with that? Fifty so I'm growing from thirteen to fifteen on my brothers are all big. I would meant to be a jockey. I was a run with all of sudden hit a groat spurt at yeah, Dean and at fifteen and I started growing and by the time I was fifteen. So my mom I'm not going to make it much longer. I need to get right now. So my friends that he got a new birth to forget that said he was a year older. He had done it long time ago. She said. So she got the Caribbeean got my aunt. They got a new morse instead of the year rold as I could start at fifteen stead of sixteen and I went professional at fifteen and I was champion my first season at a professional racing where was the first race? yelped down. My first races at a bandelum downs, which is close to our house. A race there for about two and a half weeks in the season closed and they moved to Delta downs, which is about two hours away, in vent in Louisiana. So my mom let me leave home. I went to school in the day in Venton and I raced at night at Delta downs. That I was leading rider, the champion at fifteen years old with a print. What did you weigh? I waited about a on ninety eight, a hundred pounds. So you were you were little. I was really I run at fifteen and then I retired to twenty three and I was a hundred. I was five nine, trying to stay a hundred ten pounds. Oh Wow, I won't imagine what that looked like because I Kevin had aller and found a way to get skinnier. Yeah, seven years. I couldn't do it anymore. It's just yeah, what's what's the point to where it's too much? Wait, anything over, if ever of a jockey's over a hundred and ten pounds stripped, he's too much. Yeah, yeah, he's too perfect weight for about a hundred and seven, hundred and eight script was you're saddling. Everything is about four pounds, legit. So you did this when you're young. Are Most jock he's young when they do this. Yeah, yeah, that's actually you know, it's a real short span for Jocky's. I think the average M eight years, six, eight years, ten years. Yeah, maybe last so I hear. I'm started at fifteen. I made seven years. Not to some guys have fifty. Shoe maker road to he was fifty sixty, you know. Yeah, with a few of them. One of the champion now my expense, a good friend of mine, and he's fifty six or seven. He's one of the best...

...in the world. But average thirty five is year. kind of done because of a battle of weight mostly. Yeah, wait, so football takes a toe in your body, right when everyone knows that you're getting hit. You you go through all these things, but tell me about I mean, you're only a hundred pounds and you're on this amazing animal that's all muscle, and when I don't even know how fast you guys are going down and its thirty five, how hard is it on your body to be a jockey? It's hard mentally, more mentally than it is physically, I believe. But the physical hardness is the is the reducing of weight? Yeah, because the even the smallest guys are having to really watch what they're doing. It's probably only five percent that are naturally lighting up. That has no worry. Yeah, when there's thirty five percent, that's light enough, but they got to really watch it. And then there's fifty percent that are like me. Everything I ate I had to throw up. I had to become belieming to keep riding around. Wouldn't know made it past a year. Of course, the only way I was going to be able to ride any longer was to become believing, and that drained me of fluid mostly. So I really lived in in road. Probably the hydrated thirty to forty percent the fluid that I needed. My body was not there and I never kept a meal down while I was racing really. So I just ate all day, went to bed starving and woke up starting and then they ate all day as the only way I could do it. And it was a way of life because the passion, the money, that success, everything to come with it. It was like I didn't even realize, you know, it was just my way of life. I had to and forty percent of them and still having to do that. Yeah, that's the ways on it pounds anymore. You know, a little ball worlds for Christis, you know. Yeah, so that's that's got to be hard to carry. Calling it in the jockey world called it heaving. Is Eat and have to heave it get rid of it. heavings. That's about what it is right. Well, that has also all in the jockeys room. That is just a heaving bowl. Will Mayam and it is good. That is crazy. So we see best get. Back in the day they used to get into manure pits and in a rubber suit that live in a big a hole in the manure pit, getting it covered back up and sweat that's how they lost weight back then. And then we're on. They learned that, believe me. Believe me, it was the best way. Oh man, that's crazy. Everyone. We're on. Huddle up with gusts. Thanks for joining us. We have our guests Ronnie ebanks. Today we were we were talking about some of the stuff about being a jockey, Ronnie, and one of the things I wanted to know was, was there any ever lifting weights? I'm assuming there was. It right? Well, not to someone like me. Now you take their the smarter ones now in back in the smaller guys might have a little bit. But, like I say, now the one that I know is profusely the fittest jockey in the business is Mike Smith, and he works out six days a week. But he's small. He bobby tacks a hundred and now they can get away with it. They are about a how he's bobby tax a hundred eighteen. So I was trying to be a hundred and twelve and then thirteen back then. So he's so good that the he's and demand and the weight, they've edged it up the weight scale. Now, yeah, or when I was so, but he's a very, very fit but majority of them are not smart enough or discipline enough to be on a physical workout like they should. Because he's exceptionally strong and fitter than any rider in the country and he's pipped the five years old. That's crazy. Yeah, I know, I have, because we're not built muscle, you know. Yeah, yeah, muscle, they say, is ways less than fat. So I don't know, maybe I need some more muscle now, I guess. But part of it was just, you know, if you had a when you hit the ground at thirty five miles an hour is not as easy that ground. It's a sudden stop. Yeah, so until you hit the ground you were always okay physically, you know, sore, not really a little bit, but more what it was more mental stress and you were replaced in a minute on the best horse if something happened didn't go right. So getting fired. There's no contract, you know. So you're hired and fired every day and you're only happy when you win. They're only happy when you win. So that toll of battling the weight, battling, you know, trying to succeed, climbing the ladder get an opportunity. That was the mental part of it. Was the toughest part the motion, mental with the reducing of weight because you're not normally balanced, and nutrition, you know. So that effects yeah, mentally. Oh, yeah, that's beefully, I really only had one bad spill and compared to out of him, it wasn't really that bad. A horse broke his leg off and I hit the ground so hard it jarred me and I had for compression fractures, but I wore a back bracing. In six weeks I was back racing like at it would have been. They thought I'd be out twelve to eighteen months, and then six weeks. Because I was champion when I went down, I wanted to get back quicker. But I went to car practice for three weeks and he said long as you don't follow, you'll be fine. Says if you hit the ground it could be a little rough, but I think you're okay. So I being champion, I wanted to get back. I was in six weeks. I was back in the saddle. Yeah, it's like anafel. They just put you back together, you...

...get back on the field right something taking tape you up and hit you with a shot hood. Now, what about like these trainers are training the horses obviously to make him these these incredible animals. How much are you involved as a jockey with that or can you just get on a horse you've never even met before and ride it? Because seventy five percent of the horses I rode I just got on a met him at the paddock, got on him and really yeah, but also twenty five percent of them the jockeys are the track every you know, four or five back then it was six days a week, seven days a week, exercising the horses, getting used to him, and the more horses you exercise, the more you get to ride. Kind of the trainers would save money by the jock doing it for free because he got to ride him. So back when I started I was seven days a week and eight or ten horses of morning and then eight or ten hours in the afternoon. So that was my fitness and getting used to the horse. And some horses, like you, work from the they never race the forre. So you work him six, eight, ten times getting them to that he's ready to run and to ride them. So you know everything about him and you're getting them fit. So that that used to happen a lot more than they doing in a small tracks. That still happens a lot. The bigger riders don't have to do that, you know, they come out and work, you know, one or two horses, three horses forces a week possibly? Yeah. Well, for a long time, you know, horse racing has been like one of the only gambling kind of almostly. You know, I don't know. I guess it's legal the most states. Maybe not, not in all states, but I'm not sure it is much is now. Texas was the only one to hold out, if I remember, and not Texas is racing and gambling. Well, you know, and the NFL in the last couple of years just went to that right. So they said, okay, we're going to make this switch to online, like we're going to be a part of this. They decided to say we're going to throw all the gambling stuff that people were throwing games and like all that they can bet on out the window. We just had a guy this year that wasn't even playing for the Falcons bet on a falcons game, but he wasn't. He was injured, so he wasn't playing, but he bet online at the game. Got Find he got suspended for the whole year and he I guess he bet like fifteen hundred bucks or I'm Calvin Ridley, and so we can not even playing. So when you were racing, did you go through any of that where there were you know, because you got to think like there's so many like you tell the stories like if you don't win, you're out, like there's no contracts, there's nobody like you're had to be some craziness going on when, because you're a kid, also right and you're kind of intimidated, probably by some of the men that we're running all this stuff. Fake time, big time. Yeah, exactly. I'm a kid in a grown up world. But funny thing be I started out a gambler from thirteen years old. I realized early on that the men were bet amongst each other and when I was in racing I'd be out there listening to him and they'd be bet on the wrong horse or that hours can't win, and I'm like I should. I know that great horses. I rode him, they can't beat him. So pretty soon I'm like, when I wasn't riding, not be in the stands thirteen years old, would thirty, forty, fifty year old grown men Bettingham Finn Fifteen dollars on this race. I was winning, making as much money on the side when I wasn't riding as I was when I was riding. So I was really slicking and a savvy guy around racing. But so now, when I started racing, a jockeys allowed to bet on himself to win, only I can't bet myself to place. Does that mean I was trying to not win? Right? Well, legally I can better myself to win, but I can't bet on anything else or anybody else or any to know that. Yeah, yeah, I didn't know that for a long time too. But I'll tell you a funny story. In the jocks room right I had a habit of thinking I rode that three horse before, I mean against him. Now. I wanted to rideing, but I was committed to this horse. He's probably going to win. I can't beat him. I'd Bet a small amount. Nobody knew it was, you know, righting my ballot. He'd get the sweeper, the cook, to go run down and make the bet. He Bet ten dollars for me on the other horse. Ninety five percent of the time that I bet on another horse in the race that I was riding. I want really yeah, because I ten going to make me forty fifty dollars if I want. I was making six, eight nine hundred right. Yeah, I wouldn't bet enough money to like going to make a difference where I'm going to not try. I was trying a thousand percent every time, but no one knew it. But I had to stop by ballot. But laugh at me. I'd lose forty, thirty fourys a week bet than another horse in the race that I would ride. That was always winning the race. So that's an inside story. That the course. It was illegal. But again, it wasn't causing me to not give a hundred percent, and you don't. Was the joke was always on me. Now I got to thinking, if I bet on him, I'll stop him from winning. Right, right now, you're just gonna go out. Sometimes that their point where you're when you're in and you're getting ready to start, you forget all about that. Your competitive juice is just take over. To know. Yeah, absolutely, you would have win the race. I hired and drained I was, and in Maln you cherished and dehydrated. When the gates open, I felt like King Kong for the next two minutes. Yeah, soon as the race was over. I mean as soon...

...as I passed the finish line, my whole body would just you and I was just like getting a hard stopped. It was the hardest thing and getting back and if I had a break, getting up there to get something eat and do it again. Yeah, so over your ten year right, so from thirteen to twenty three, I think it was when you retired. Right, you had about almost six thousand starts. Is that somewhere right in there, right at six thousand? Yeah, and in between the Bush tracks and that I think. I want to have an hundred and something at the main track. I know I want at least three hundred on the bushes. So I went almost a thousand races in ten years. Yeah. So it says it's crazy, like you came and it says first it was like I was just looking at some stats. I don't know, was like raising for yeah, you didn't want but your career earnings were like four point four million. Yeah, and that was don't forget, I was fifty eight. That was thirty. Yeah, that was in the year or forty years ago. Yeah, in the S. That was in the S. Yeah, I'm retired in eighty seven. Seventy nine hundred and eighty seven. So today that would translate to, you know, ten times now that, yeah, it's probably even more big fish in the small ponds. I never wrote in the big exclusive tracks or races. I wrote a smaller tracks, but I was always like in a top guy. So I was leading Rider Turf Paradise, I was leading rider Delta downs, I was leading rider at Bal morals, leading rider at Hazel Park. Where else? Yeah, so the small tracks, I want a lot, a lot of races right when the bigger tracks I did okay, but I didn't get to ride the top horses because I was so tall that I looked at normal standing next to the other guys that was a foot of all that really was a handicap against the people look at us that you're too big for this. As I'm like, if he can run fast, I'm not too big, believe. So we're the odds always like better for you then or word are you well the odds. I'm getting them, since people might have looked that my odds might have been a little higher, but odds were against me of getting the bigger opportunity because of my size. Great, I have heard bigger than it I really was and people has in those all he's too big. The next guy might be two inches shorter and they think he's okay, but I'm too big. You know, it's yeah, the list of perception. So yeah, I can ride all horses. I want a lot of races and a lot of small horses. If they can run fast, I could get down on him. They were easy to ride. The slow ones, no matter how big they were, didn't matter, or how small didn't matter. You know. Yeah, that's amazing. So in your whole career of racing, right in that ten years fan, if I said you tell me the one race that meant the most to which race was it? The whs stakes Kentucky Derby Day. It was the fourth race of the day. It was the first a major race of the day. Was a hundred and fiftyzero dollar race and I was riding for my father in law. Last minute. The Jockey had the horse that run once and one and the jockey was supposed to ride him was taking was in New York, leaving for New York that day to ride in New York and didn't tell my father. I found not late, so he had to get a jockey to replace. I was in Chicago. He called me and asking the one to come to Kentucky and ride him. I'm like, Wow, Kentucky Derby Day? Yes, and never been to the Derby. So I got to go down to Kentucky replace him. I got the ride and they took Gary Stevens, at the time was the leading right in the nation. He was it. Put Him on at the last minute but my father law wanted me instead, so they took the meeting rid of the nation off, brought me in and I won the race by a nose on a horse called twice around and it was the big most prestigious race and in front of a you know, hit millions of people around the world that got to see him. So it was really that was my biggest the biggest day in racing. Oh, that's awesome, that's a that's a great day. It was really special. Yeah, that's amazing. So you go. You have this incredible career. What what caused you to decide, because it's never easy to retire, right. What was that point where you said, okay, this is it, I'm done. I was really the last year. I knew it wasn't going to be able to make it much longer because I couldn't keep the weight light enough. I was cheating all I could with wait but everywhere I could and was still getting a little, a little too heavy and the business was slowing up because my size. I was and a friend, the leading guy, said to me one day that he was mad at his agent. He was elite, number one jockey, and he said, you know what, you'd be the greatest age. I could fire my agent and you quit ride and I hire you. You'd be the best. I'm like you think. I never thought of that. I never had an idea what I would do. I mean want to think about it, because I didn't, because nothing else I could do. Is All right. Knew was horses. I quit school in the ten grade. So what am I going to be besides racing? But when he said that it opened my eyes and he was actually serious and thought about doing it and finally cooled off and didn't fire his age and here he was the champion, you know. But that opened the wheels and then four five months later a young kid from Louisiana came into Chicago that I knew of. I didn't even know you had become a jockey, but I watched him ride and he looked like a superstar and no one knew about it. He was just starting to come up and the light went off and I said that I kid. I said, you want to come to chic I talked to a couple top trainers about him, the top the biggest guys there,...

...and I said, Y'all saw that kid is wow. Yeah, he you get him to come here, he'd be on label. I said, well, I'm talked to the kids. Said what if I quit writing? And so that's how it started. And he said Yes, I'd love to come right to this track, the biggest I can get you going. I know the biggest guys here, and they said they'll support us. Let's do it. So sure enough, I quit riding eighty seven and spring of eighty eight I became his agent and then I had an unbelievable career. Meeting him. Together we become big is in the country over the next ten, twelve years. So how many? How many clients did you have? Then? We won, we wrote, we went to the top of the nation, we win. The last year I had it, we won fifteen point eight million in verses one year. So I went over a hundred and forty million in verses with him when we want over four thousand races. We wanted and that was your only well I've ever hearing. And once in a while I had a second guy, but mostly he actually gave me a raise to thirty percent and from twenty five percent to work just exclusively for him. So he didn't want me. He was jealous that you want me having nobody else. And we had a record every year I had him, but thirteen years we had a record breaking career every year and then he got hurt. In thirteen years and then I went on and took a bunch of other top champions. I represented some of the best shockeys in the world over twenty eight years and that your company's code came in racing, because there always came in racing. Yes, yes, and that's that's pretty amazing that you got to do that. So you got to see it from both sides like you got, and it was a joyful and fun and I felt like I was part of the racer, part of the winning when he won. Are you didn't have an agent? Right, I did. Yeah, I had the age it all the long. Oh, yeah, yeah, so I knew it. It was to be an agent, you know. Yeah, so you that was leading righter, had good ages that you would a bad agent. A good agent was. So are you finding them racist all the time or la yeah, I do all the bookings. He's traveling, every horse he rides, I make the decision, I solicit the trainers, I book him, my manage him. Well, I coach him, I book all his flights. I decided where he's going out of town the ride or not. So you're kind of like a full on full service agent. Yeah, I was a motivational speaker's Big Brother, is dad, is coach, is agent, his promoter. That's kind of how it is. That's why you got. We get twenty five percent of their gross but you don't work just for the one right big percentage. But you did a lot for it. Yeah, no, you do a lot. I mean that's a lot of work. If I was, I'm sure. I'm sure you're getting into arguments with people big time. Yeah, you're all there and I'm the bad always got to be the bad guy. Everything goes wrong. I take the blame. I don't want to mad at him, automatic at me, because I'll I can think it's over right mentally. That's tough. Right, right. If if you had to go do all that, then get on a horse. Oh, there's no way, yeah, no way, you're choosing on the guy. Be Mad because you picked the other horse and you never ride you again. You know. So rain the agent, lame the agent, always told him that. Make me the bad guy. I can handle it. Never take responsibility. Leave it right. So for twenty eight years I had an unbelievable record breaking career and then I stepped away about three years ago. In other businesses. You know, I own a ups store in New Orleans and I own Gameman racing and I have saves orb and then I'm motivational speaker coach. Yeah, yeah, it will get right into that. Hey, everyone, thanks for joining us on huddle up with guess. We appreciate you being here and listening to the show. Go to huddle up with guestcom like and subscribe and we appreciate you listening. We're talking with Ronnie e ebanks. He's a former jockey, former agent, as we just heard. So, Ronnie, you've been through this whole horse racing that was your life. Like for me, football was twenty five years for me straight right that's all I did and then all sudden I'm out of it and you're done. You're done. It's like I can't go there was no more going back. Right, you're out of it. So when you got out of it after being an agent for that time, like, what was your thought? Like I got to go work, or like I got to take a break for a while. Well, all along I wanted out of it. The last six eight years I wouldn't happy anymore. I'd reached the top of the game. I was capped on how much I was going to make and I was the guy that d dreamed bigger. I want to make a million, five million a year. If I could, and I knew being an agent, my top was about a half million dollars. If you would number one, breaking every record as an agent, you could make maybe a half million dollars. So, I mean that's a lot of money, but I done up for so long and then the toll of kissing ass seven days a week, getting, you know, abused verbally every time anybody wanted to, and I couldn't fight back because I had to bite my lip. So being the pounding guy and just I got tired of not being an honorable guy with my word. I did a course, a hundred eight personal development course in the most important thing I got out of it was I wanted to be honorable by work, because inside that's who I was, but outside I couldn't be that. In the business. I was to be the best agent. I had to be a slick and smoothie and, you know, changing my mind on my word. So I really wanted to be that in life and I didn't. I don't want to be an agent anymore. I just really I want to go on the different things and I always had a business dream in my life to start a business of something that could bring and take care of my family leave behind, you know. So I invested eight, nine years ago in a ups store that my ex wife was divorcing and needed to sell it, so I bought it...

...and kept her running it. That was my first business venture and from there I am setting myself up one day that I wouldn't have to do what I was doing, that I once I could make enough to replace what I was making. So it took me about three years, in and out, in and out. You know, I was part time for about three years, fear of the money, fear of walking away and then finally I just like one day I say is that I'm done, I'm not going back, I'm going to make it work and I just, yeah, did what it taken and all this sudden the door started opening with all these other things. And the other thing I didn't tell you is I'm a professional, semi professional, poker player. I've been playing poker for forty years and I actually play right now on a show called high stakes poker at the Hustle Casino live. If you go here, if you go to youtube and putting in a hustle Tocino live, I play by three, two to three nights a week on that show for big money high stakes poker. So, but I know, when I saw that, I wasn't sure if that was you. I'm like there can't be ready to say me bank. I want to poker tournament in Vegas on Fox. Yeah, I want to show a poker show and I've been playing since seventeen years old in the jockeys room. We played cards every day. Yeah, well, we played all the time on amble in the hotel room. You know what was your game? You always played with and the track. It was racehorse. runny was a seven card runny. But then it's seventeen. They taught me poker and that fascinated me. So I've been playing since seventeen and for but twenty, about thirty years. I made a small living on the side, playing with all the racetrack friends every week at my house. I'd hope mem I'd put on the game and win about seventy percent of the time. So I did really well for a long time and then whatever year it was, ten fifteen years ago, I quit racing for a year and just went and traveled in the world poker tour. Wow. So you look me up and hint the mob, you'll see my stats. How many big ones up there? I can ten thousand buying. I played fifteen or twenty of them. Who would you say your rival is on the poker tour? One Guy, that's brand that I met in the still. But one of my best friends today is one of the biggest in the game, is Antonio Espendari espenion. That's been Darry. He's like the number two biggest earner in the world. He lives here next to me in Venice. We played his house, you know, once a month a little fill, a small game is wife loves to play, but he schooled me early on. He went and often did really well and I went back to racing. We were starting out kind of the same time and he hit right away. He won a big eight million out of tournament is but with the year in and became at the face of poker and I didn't have that. I had a really unlucky first year. So I'd like, you know what, I've got to go back to my world and Mason, I have kids that I'm responsing or and I wouldn't handling it responsibly. So ill went back to racing and then saw it just got only because covid did I really get back into it. That kind of stepped away about ten years from poker. Now I'm really and you back in it and design. What is the tour like? You know because I hear the world poker tour. So what do you what do you like? What's that mean? Well, that means are you just traveling a different so you know's a little. Anyone can do it. I chose to get on the tour or and what I did was I show up at a tournament, I put up tenzero and I buy a ticket and it's about six days if I make it to the final table, the last six players. If you don't, then you get bust. If you make it, the top ten percent gets money. So you'd get your money back if you finished in the top tip ten percent of the field if you lasted like the day for day five. But anyone can do it. But they went for every month there was another one in another town or another country. Every thirty days they were there was a six, seven million dollar tournament up for grabs on a roll poker tour. So I was traveling trying to, you know, become a professional poker player and I said, didn't cut it the first year. So do you kind of know all the people you're playing against and what their kind of ticks are or what they're not all about, because you're playing with five hundred people. So yeah, hop guys you kind of get around and get to know and get to see and you know. But still, at the end of the day, every game is different, every hand is different. So but you know the beat, the better ones and the good ones and kind of what you can do with something. What you came with others and the toughest ones to play against are the rookies who you don't know because you never know what they're going to do. You don't know what good player you kind of gage what he might be doing there. What was your biggest bluff ever that you that one you a big tournament because you know you're got to get sometimes where you're going to get not the greatest cards and you got to go and there's so many that I don't have a particular one. In the tournament that I won on TV, on Fox, I went to the final table of six and I had sixty percent of the chips. I was a commanding leader. So I bluffed all the way through. Yeah, that caught a few time, but in the end the last hand that won me to tournament was two aces. So Oh yeah, lucky like that. But I had so many chips it didn't take a lot. I was just overwhelming favorite to win winning that tournament, but all the way into that a lot of bluffing. So I don't have any particular hand that I said that I can remember that I've bluffed. So for people out there the...

...like to play better, better amateurs or just play for fun, what would the one thing you would tell them? That to be good at poker that they should learn. If you want to play poker and you want to be a winning player, you've got to be aggressive player. And the second thing with being aggressive you got to be patient. And then when you do play, play aggressive. Otherwise keep your hands to yourself. Another don't play ten hands, played two and play them hard and fast. Yeah, that's the best advice. The second best advice is play from position, meaning the dealer button is the best position, the one right before that to cut off as the next best, the one before that the hijack. Play all eighty percent of your hands. If you play in them three spots, you're going to be a winning player on the first round. Or your hands away unless they're the best hands. Yeah, lets you get that. That's the great that's the key. If you do them two things, it don't take a dummy to be a good player, right. Yeah, I like other Games, but I'm not because hold them is it's not my fam I'm not good at I don't know why. I just never heard. The only reason as you haven't played ten million hands. But yeah, you gotta play a lot of hands. It's like golf. If you don't swing at it seven days a week, to five years. You're not through a great golfer. Yeah, you got to do it same thing all the time. It's like anything. It's the same thing different. You could be as good as anyone if you put the amount of time needed in it. So you do all these things. You went through your life, former jockey, former agent, kind of started your entrepreneurial career playing poker all the time. You've done all these were and all these hats and and then you become a life coach. So tell me. Like you said, you went to like a hundred day my good friend and coaching. That's Sendari enrolled me. He said, I just did this course ofthing I've been doing. I've been did two weeks of it so far. He says it's changed my life. And he was a Cocky, high flying, big single pamper, private jets and parties, you know, but we were good bud's. He said change. I'm like what you got? Did something to help yourself, but you really? He said, Bro, it's the greatest thing ever. I'm telling you. My girlfriend taught me into it. I didn't want to go, but you gotta go. I said, well, okay, when I get okay, that give you say I'm going to listen. Then I guess. I said I can go in July's no, he says it's in ten days. I'm like, what do's no way I'm leaving around in the nation with the is an age and I can't takeawaysis it's not going to is they're going to change your life. If you did, you're gone before it's only a weekend, ten days later, another weekend. You know it's five weekends over a hundred days. So I went the Vegas this thing called choice center and it's emotional intelligence training and it just teaches you on limiting beliefs and emotional intelligence and just but the come become your best self, making this some an emotional level place. I went and it changed my life. I'd never even knew they were that kind of teaching something to teach you to grow as a person. I became the best person I'd ever been and it inspired me. So thirty days later I went back and did the next course as an assistant coach to give back back, because I didn't had my daughter and friends in it that I've told it. You got to get in it. So you wanted to go and support them and help be a coach and during that everyone was so impressed with my showing up in my support. Is said, you're going to make a great coach one day. I'm like, and that's open my eyes, like that's what I want to do. I want to help change people's lives because my life was changed. I know what that felt like. I want to give that back. And then I found out I had a knack and a talent for it, a natural gift for it, because I love people, I love helping people. So with that, the next ten years I've went and and supported and help them that series, that choice center, a coach, a lot of classes and in my life now I just naturally do it to my friends and family and when they have like you know what, this is what really makes a bigger difference to me than anything. I enjoy it. This ls me up more than anything. is changed seeing someone have a different, you know, change in their life because of me. So I decided to take a full time so I spend a year with a mastermind coach ready to set the business up, and then that was during covid and then this company dropped in my lap and I have a fortune of a money invested in this. So I had to go back to represent that money and this company and this product that it's got to be taken to the world. So it's like, you know what, I got a payot. This is my first vision, my first dream, and it's available to me. So I've now got to stop hit it, do this and then come back to the coaching. So I'm still coaching now on a small time basis, one or two plans at the time I'll take while I'm doing this, but when I get this company scaled and launch, I'd like to sell it or transition it off the management and let me go back to my passion. Is What I want to do, is I really want to motivational speak and do some life coaching. Yeah, so why is saves? Saves or were so important? Well, save storb is. First of all, I've got, you know, a fortune of my money invested ringing that they almost had it tanked at the people that...

...were running it and managing it. And secondly, it's the greatest savior from mother earth that no one knows about in the world. I said global it needs to be globally used, for any spill that happens must less in warehouses and factories and mechanic shops where we sell most of it too. One day the world is going to take it on and use it in the ocean because when it absorbs oil the ocean it'll float to the bottom and sink and never harm the environment because the oil is trapped inside the fibers and its biodegraded over time. So it's the savior. Just throw this on it, leave it alone. If you don't get it back out, you got to worry. As they're doing now. They drop chemicals on it, breaks it up and goes to the ocean and it shows up on the beach somewhere. So my mission, if nothing else before I die, my mission to my vision is to waken the world. That is plant material. There's enough for the world of this stuff because it grows around the equator, around the world on the line of the equator, but majority of it comes out of eastern Canada and it grows in the ground and it's regenerative, it's sustainable. So it's God's miracle of plant that you know, and I actually use it in the horse stalls. It's great betting because it absorbs the urine and it takes the fat soils and reach Stud of the manure, so kills the odor and it's really soft and comfy. So it's good cat letter, it's good for horses, it's good for cleaning out wow, blood vomitic it does. It's all this miracle things it does. It's really a unique so I'm just like, I'm so passionate about it that I just have to do it, and it's caused me a lot of sleepless nights. Yeah, I hadn't made a lot of money, but I'm going to get it done. I'm going to go brow. So you've been through this crazy project and saves or bright that you had to take over. How did your coaching help you through all this? Confidence, believe in myself, staying from a place of new, trout, neutral. I can only do with what's in front of me. I can only be with what is I let go of what happened yesterday, the last deal that went bad, the last day that didn't go good. Today's a new day. I live in the present. I live from a positive creation. I can do anything. Everything is possible for me and I'm fabulous and amazing just as I am. I need nothing but another day. So your self care has grown since you've been doing this. It's the most important thing in the world to each individual is self care. Without that we can never be our highest potential because we can't think, feel, act right if we're not taking care of our body, mind and soul. So so many of us, through the pandemics, have struggled with all this right, we've seen it. I was telling people I'm thriving surviving. What a surviving? I don't know what that means. I don't understand that. No, I wake up thriving, I wake up in purpose, I wake up meditating, I wake up running, I wake up eating healthy, I wake up reading, I wake up watching something that improve myself, taking more courses like who you don't survived, survivor of people that you know or hang on that don't know better. So that's what I want to coach. I want to teach him into thrive, not into survives. You know, I love that. So I mean that's where who coined the term change agent, because I love that. A Brandon girl I was working with, because what's what I wanted to do. I want to change. I was in jockey agent. Yeah, as you're not a jockey agent, you're the guy that changes. People now say, yeah, I'm a change agent. Now this is you're right, Bam. So that's remarking it. Why not? Because that's what I want to do. I want to change people's lives. I'm the agent of change. I'm agent changing people. Yeah, that's amazing. There their future and the president. Yeah, I was. I would wonder if you go back to your thirteen year old self and give them a little coaching, would there be a different career like we are, or different path for you at all? Been Same? No, he he'd created more earlier. He branched off from racing earlier. Probably, I don't you know. I was so passionate, I loved it so much and then when I start of becoming an agent, it just swallowed me up and it became so again. I become so popular, it was so fun, so prosperous, that I was like, you know, half of a celebrity and my nickname back then was called a love man. For Twenty Years in horse raising. This guy gave me this nickname and and I was single, you know, at twenty eight on and it became this this alter ego. So everyone wanted to love man, to perform. Everywhere I went so I lived on this like almost as different person. Yeah, but my thirteen year old self was he was everything he needed to be. He was a go getter, he was a not a quitter and he had dreams and he was going after them and the body was stopping him and he was living life fund every day then. So I wouldn't change him too much, I don't think. Yeah, that's a turns awesome. I you wouldn't be the guy, the man you are today, right and helping other people change. wrote because I only reason I wrote the book because it a Dream Life. I had a one of other people to see the opportunity that's there for anyone if I could get it. I was poor from the...

Caribbean. We were in poverty where I grew up, you know, and here I am become, you know, a millionaire, and it's for successful and multiple careers and all this fun, all these frings. I just a life of that. I would only dream of. My brothers look at me and I'm like the black sheep. I'm the only one that any left home and broke off and they live as simple lives, all at home, you know, in this little home town, kind of quiet. So yeah, so staying in the race. I love that. You know, it's it's perfect what you've been doing. Like you left, you left and you said I got to stay in the race and, like life, you got to stay in the race along the wind. I love it. sidelines, there's no winners on the sidelines. Yeah, no, what I think, Ronnie? I think it was a great conversation. I appreciate you coming on. I learned so much today about what it takes to be a jockey and what it takes to personally go through it all, because those are always questions I've had and I've never been able to ask anybody those kind of things. So I appreciate you being here. I honest joy it. Like yeah, no, I appreciate that's a fun tell all of our fans, because you have many. You have a facebook, looky if twitter, eventor you have a lot of stuff. But tell or fans how they can follow you, how they can get a hold of you, and I speak a lot the best places as facebook. Just Ronnie ebanks. I'm Ronnie courtesy banks. Might Be Ronnie See ebanks on facebook. I'm senior. I have a junior my son, so I'm Ronnie Banks Senior. Mayby, but facebook, I really I do a lot of posting. I have a facebook group called living your best like a Ronnie ebanks that I really speak to a lot. But instagram I'll also Ronnie underscore, C underscore ebanks, EBA nks, and that's Ronnie row in and I eat and I'll be posting about my book when it's coming out, staying in the race, and that story is kind of like some memoirs, a motivational memoir about this great the story of this journey that I was just fortunate enough to live in enjoying. So that would be the best place. Twitter, I'm dull love Man DA, hello the EMA and at the Loveman, but I don't really do twitter a lot. So I'm an instagram or facebook is the best place. They can always reach me in. My email is Ronnie ebanks at yahoocom. If anyone is every about your website, website is the champion life coach. Yeah, champion lifecom me upcom right. Yeah, because I was on and I'm checking out, because you can go. You can check it out and go there and book me and solicit they want to talk, if they want to have a your books on their works and then saves orb. Obviously go to saves or check it out on if you need if you have a spill of any kind of leaker fuel at your house or in your house, a food oils you need to clean something up, staves ORB is the best natural absorbent on the planet. Sad so arbcom. I love it. I love it all right, Ronnie, I appreci appreciate it. I appreciate you telling me your story and sharing it with all of our fans and I'll let you know when when the episode comes out. But thanks for joining us on huddle up with gusts. Read guys, I appreciate it so much. I really enjoyed it. You're a great interview thank you so much for Madden. All right, thank you for being on. That's IT, everybody. Well, another episode of huddle up with Gusts. CHECK US out and huddle up with gustscom or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Was a great show and to thank all of our sponsors again and we'll see you next week on huddle up with gusts. To Wrap Sports, thanks for joining in the fun. Studios for numbers cuddle up was gus, featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback just farrock huddle up with ghosts. Is probably produced by one thousand six hundred and thirty one digital video and is available Happy Music.

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