Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 158 · 5 months ago

Huddle Up with Gus: Peter Jacobsen

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Gus talks Masters with the Master, Peter Jacobsen

Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Bryan here. Sports Fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with us, fifteen year NFL quarterback Gus Bar Rot. Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches. Playing for seven NFL Franchisees. With one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are one every day get to hang out with an Henall quarterback up Oka sports fans, from the decked out and plush sixteen thirty one digital studios, it's kickoff time, so snap your two straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Guss. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts Farad. I want to thank you for joining us today. You can check us out at huddle up with gustscom. You can go to wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. We will be on there. Were on every network, so we appreciate you. We want to thank all of our sponsors today, the Little Blue Pill Credit Guard, Newt genics, sixteen thirty one digital news, always a big plus. Go to sixteen thirty one digital news. Check out their sports news, information entertainment. They do a great job with that. And definitely check out to our podcast. Is How out at Sounder FM. GO TO SOUNDER DOT FM and check out our podcast, along with many, many others, and we appreciate you listening and please go to our youtube channel so you can watch the video, not just listen to the show, but now you can watch our shows on our great youtube channel. Huddle up with Guss. So I appreciate you listening and get ready for the show. It's a great one, and today I'm really excited about it because we just saw and went through four days of the masters and I think everybody was tuned into every single day. We're going to speak with the gentleman now, who is, I feel like, as a great ambassador and the face of Golf. He does so much for the game of golf, from the young kids in the drive chip and pot to being on the golf channel and he himself started back in one thousand nine hundred and eighty was on a tour. Had Seven tour wins to major championships in the champions tour. Joining me today is Peter Jacobson, with an e at the end. So, Peter, how you doing? I'm good, guess. Yeah, I get might just like you. I get my name misspelled a lot. It's not us. So when it's S E and I go back to my Norwegian heritage. Yeah, you know I am. I'm a Mutt. So my name, F rat is, is really hard to spell because everybody misses that are to beginning. So and then everybody when I was playing I had dark black hair and thought I was Italian. So I'm not. I'm Polish and Slovak. So what are you gonna do? That's right. Now it's a names, names being misspelled kind of a thing of the other sports world. When Your name is on your Jersey or up on a scoreboard and it's misspelled, you can't stop in the middle of your shot and go hey, Hey, change that for me. Wey. Yeah, you know, that's something to be proud of, obviously your name, but for me, when it happened to me in the pro ball I was just like, what are you gonna do? I'm here, you know they can't take that away from me. That's right, that's right. Now I'm really excited to talk to you. Obviously will get into a lot of things, but I want to start with your childhood growing up an Oregon and how you fell in love with the game of golf and athletics. Like I kind of want to know, did you play other sports besides golf when you were kid? I did, probably, like you and all these other kids grown up, I played every sport like football, baseball, basketball. I was a skier. I was competitive skier when I was a when I was a youngster growing up in the great state of Oregon. So yeah, I was. I was in a multi sport athlete, which I think is important for kids today. I'm sure you see a lot of parents try to specialize in one thing, football, golf, baseball, but I think what that does is it robs the kids have a chance to integrate with other kids their age and also with with respect to golf. When I started playing golf, I played golf with my father and his friends and I had a chance to play golf when I was in high school with people where there s, s, five, thus sixty, seventy. So I think it gave me a pretty good perspective on people and the different the different ages of people in the world. But yeah, I was a I did everything as a kid. So you did all these sports, you played everything. How does it come to where you pick golf? Was it just that something that you enjoyed the most or you felt like you fit in the most? Or is it like dad or older brother saying no, you're going to play golf because you're really good? My Dad, my our father, taught us all...

...how to play, and a mom and my two brothers and sister. He loved it and he wasn't in a teaching pro but he was a good player. He was always a low single digit handicapped player. So we first started caddying at are at in the city Portland. We said we made a little money single, maybe even the double strap, and we make some cash. Yeah, but our father wanted us to learn the game from that aspect, to be able to understand the rules, the regulations, the etiquette, how to play the game, how to tend the flag, replace the dimmit, fix of all mark on a green, which is become really the hallmark and, in my mind, of treating the golf course with respect. So I think it was probably high school. I was a pretty good player. I ended up winning the Oregon State High School Championship when I was a senior. Then I was that recruited to go to Stanford to play golf there. I had a pretty good GPA, but back then there was no greasing of the kids to get anybody in. Yeah, and I didn't get in on my own, my own accord. So I ended up attending the University of Oregon, which was great. Oregon had a great golf history and I'm so glad I did. I met my current wife forty six years ago and I have no regrets. I love the fact that I could play golf at the University of Oregon and be a be a duck. Yeah, no, I was listening to a story about you and your wife and how you met. And did you meet an Oregon or it was something like somebody introduce you and you were helping, giving her lessons and golf. Yeah, it was her older brother. He was really my hero. was named is Mike Davis. He played on the tour, he played in college. You won a lot of tournaments. So I was taking lessons from him. I idolized him and one day he said Hey, I want you to come out and I'm giving my sister a lesson and I was like yeah, okay. So I went out and he was match maker. He but all of a sudden came down with another lesson. So he sent me out to give my future wife a bunker lesson and we clicked and that was it. That was that was her freshman a little before freshman year and we were married. We were married four years later. Yeah, you know, that kind of sounds like my story. My fatherin law was my high school football coach and my wife and lived with her mom, so they were divorced when she was a little and he called me up when I came home from college one year and said Hey, I'm going to my camp to get ready for my fiftieth birthday. You want to come help me? I always went out there to go fish in and things in the Stream, and I said sure, pick me up and he picked me up and she was in the middle of the truck, in the in the front bed seat, and from that point on I never let her go. We've been going out ever since. You know, been together thirty two years. So it's it's crazy how those things work out. You don't expect it. I wasn't expecting to go to the golf course to give a lesson to my my mentors sister back that was the last thing I wanted to do, but turned out to be one of the best things I ever did. Right now, I agree. I agree with that. Yeah, I hear you. They're so you go to Oregon. I know you wanted the pack eight at that time. Or Yeah, now to pack twelve and continuales to grow, because everybody wants to win a national championship, so they have to be in a big conference. But what was it like back then, because, you know, I'm thinking back in the s when you were when you were in college. What was travel like, and I mean there's there was no internet to watch your opponents or see what work course you we're going to play like now you can get a before you go to a course, you can get a whole like overhead view of it. There's probably a drone line over the course you can watch somewhere. What was what was that like for you? Back then? It was totally a new world. You're right there was no internet. We when we put together our schedule, we had a chance to go. We played a lot of local events in the northwest because we had no money. We hardly had a travel budget, but we always had one or two big trips a year and I remember our one big trip was down to Houston to the inner national intercollegiate at in Houston, and that was the greatest because we can play against the best teams in the country. That was when we had a chance to see Ben Crenshaw and Gary Coke, Bill Cradsert, Curtis Strange, Andy Bean, the guys of my my era, and we all wanted to know how our game shacked up. Again said Kiss. We didn't travel. We Oregon, even though it's a big D one school. Phill night was still a young man right and fill night there was no nike. There was no nike backing back then. In fact, one of my when I caddy with my dad, Phil Knight, was my...

...dad's best friend. So Bill, Mr Knight, and my dad played a lot of golf and he used to talk about his crazy kid phil as a master's degree and a marketing degree from Sanford and Oregon, and all we wanted to do is make these damn shoes. Well, it worked out pretty well in the in the low run for Phil and Nike. Yeah, but it was it was totally it was totally an unknown for us. Drive and we drove, we didn't we didn't fly. We drove from Oregon Eugene to Houston and we played against the best teams in the country and that was a real, I hoping by opening experience to be able to play against the schools where in the summers they played these amateur schedules. I didn't do that. I didn't have the money to do that. I didn't have the opportunity to fly there. So really playing in college was a huge eye opening experience for me. Yeah, I'm sure Oregon or many golf programs and have a big budget. Back then, you know, they don't know. They weren't by ten playing tickets for the golfers to go fly somewhere. I didn't, I didn't understand that, but I do now, because those are non revenue sports, whether it's big swimming, track and field or nut tracking. He'll swimming, Golf, tennis, those are those are sports that that you don't make any money. The money makers are obviously college football and college basketball. So I understand the budgets now more than ever and and that's why I'm so happy to be working with the University of Oregon Golf Team, Kasey Martin, their golf coach, and the ad on raising as much money as we can every year for the golf team because non Revenese sports needed. Yeah, well, it's hard to put butts in a seats right there aren't really any seats. And in college golf really there's that and every revenue come from. There's very few home games, as you know, and go unless you host your own event in Eugene or no matter which school you are, unless you host your own event, you're on the road and it's somebody else's tournament. Yeah, and I think that's awesome that you do that for your school because I think that program, you know, all programs like that, need a lot of help and with somebody from from kind of your background and everything that you've done for the game, I'm sure those kids love seeing you come into the program and can ask you a ton of questions because if you think back to when you were probably a junior senior in college, who did you get to ask those questions to you know, like what my next step? Where do I go next? What do I do next? Well, it goes to the last week. I was there doing the drive, chip and put and the day before was the Augustin National Women's amateur and Oregon had two lady ducks playing in that and I had the chance to go out to dinner with one of them and the women's golf coach and we had a chat. We sent for two hours in the legendary tea bones steak house in a gust in. Anybody that's been there, you've been there, you know what it is. Yeah, and we set out there for a couple hours and we talked about Brian's breeze future, where she is a college and where she's going. So you know how important it is to be a mentor. You've done it. I'm I do it to where somebody can ask questions, and you're right, I didn't have that when I was in school. It was totally fine, by the seat of your pants. So who did you talk to? So you come out of college, you say I'm going to turn pro and so who was the call to to say what do I need to do now? I didn't have that call. I didn't have that opportunity. My brother in law, Mike Davis, was really the only mentor I had. But I was really lucky when I first got on tour. My first tour event was Pebble Beach, the ATNT and my first practice round on accident was with Arnold Palmer. How crazy that? So I yeah, it just like I cut across at Monterey Peninsula on a practice round and little did I know, but I cut in front of Arnold Palmer and he's so graciously asked me to play with him and we met and that started a wonderful relationship I had with Arnold and as a result, I ended up getting in Games with Arnold and Jack Nicholas and Gary Player and Heller, when it's Tom Watson and all these great players. And I'm a talk as you could tell. I got a big mouth, but I always know when to stop and listen and learn, and boy that I was masterclass when I first got on tour. Yeah, I've imagine if you're playing with those guys. said that there's a little nerves, you know. I could imagine. You know, even for me when I was playing football and I'd go up and play again it's one of the guys I've always...

...watched my whole career. Or like when I started in DC and Sonny Jergenson was like doing the radio but he'd come up and talk to you all the time and you're like that, Sonny Jergenson, you know what I mean, like it was just it's just different. I can imagine what that was like. And Golf, because golf is all nerves and thinking about the game, and then all of a sudden you're arnold first standing over you and your how old are you? And he's watching your potter swing and you're like, how am I doing this right, like, I couldn't imagine with that be like, well, it's when you you're obviously your cur so great. You once I thought getting on the tour would be the best thing in the world. You get on the tour and you realize you are at the first run of the ladder and that ladder is could be fifty wrongs tall, and I thought, wow, I'm playing at a tournament and I realized next, Oh, I have to make it cut, and then, oh, I need to make some money to keep going, and then you then you then you need to contend and then you need to win. And then why don't you win? You get in the majors and now it starts all over again. You have to learn how to contend in a major and then win, just like what Scotty Sheffler did yesterday. His his medioric rise is incredible, where he was a couple of years ago and where he is today. Yeah, and it's really great to see. But that can happen. Well, we've seen in in the NFL players like Patrick Mahomes and my university of Oregon Duck Alum, Justin Herbert. He came out of Oregon and everybody thought, well, he's going to take them a few years boot look what's happened is you know, the quarterback position is probably the hardest to understand and the most difficult to master. You did it, my homes is doing Herbert's doing it job, burrow's doing it, but on tour to come out and win early, like we saw tig woods do and dominate. Nicholas did it, crenshaw did it and now Scotty's cheffler. It's whether these guys are these guys are pretty impressive to do it that quickly. Yeah, I think tiger is going to give you some credit because he stole your Caddie, didn't he? Well, it's a pretty good story. Tiger was out. I've known tiger since he was about sixteen, and he was out in Portland playing in the US Hametar at Pumpkin Ridge and we hung out a little bit and when he won the tournament he needed a candy. So his agent was my agent, butch harmon was his coach good friend of mine, and so it all worked out that fluff went to work for tiger and when fluff asked me about it, I said, Mike, I would never stand in the way of anybody having the chance to go play with and work with and work for potentially the greatest player in the game. and Boom right out of the blocks they won the masters and record fashion. And then, as we've seen Tiger's career, he's certainly of this era, of this generation. He's the greatest player by for by far. A lot of people. Stay Jack played the Best Golf. Tiger plays the best golf but quite honestly, Gust it's two air, it's it's too with the technology changes. I look at my Dad Played College football for Oregon and he played professionally he was a center. Yeah, he at the ball back to you and that, I was before they had the face guards. They just had the leather helmets. He's probably like two hundred and forty pounds, maybe, if that. He played center. He's probably two hundred and ten. His nose was broken so many times he had swallowed his tongue a couple times. But as when they came in with the face guards, he said, totally different game back then they had to play off the line a little bit. So kind of like with Jack and tiger, the technology is changed so much that it's the different game at back to fluff. Yeah, I was so proud and so happy and Mike still to this day, roomads my best friend in the game of golf. We talked all the time and we have so much fun together. So I watched a video with you and farty going to like a dinosaur place down in I think it was Florida, and fairty fulls up this I don't know, look like a little broom thing, but it had like it look like a mustache and and he said Hey, who is that? You're like, oh, that's fluff, and he did a an impersonation of fluff, which was. I thought was pretty funny. So he has a distinct voice. Yeah, well, fluff. Fluff started out with a big bushy beard and it was dark because he was younger, right, he's he got older, the beard shortened up and now it's a mustache and as it's as he's gotten older, it was gray, but now there's all the colors in the rainboat in that mustache and it's so it's...

...so thick that it almost looks like a whip broom. Take to his upper lip. Yeah, it hangs down. It looks like almost like a little bit of a Walrus. So but yeah, well, it's amazing when you see people that can do that right, like I have a really good friend of Chicago, delbert. He has just the most amazing mustache. But then you see people that try to grow mustache. You're like that just doesn't work for you. But people like fluff and you know they just could do it. They could pull it off. Well, I was looking watching the tournament yesterday with Scottish Cheppler and Cam Smith. Camera Smith, this young player from Australia. He's a great player. I study his golf swing, I study his pudding stroke. He's great, but as you seen, it doesn't look like he's shaved since he was twelve. Yeah, and he's and I don't know, he's mid S, upper S. I think at this point you might have to give it a Fayettell and say, okay, dude, you're not able to grow a mustache for a beard, just work on the mullet. Let's let's get yourself clean shaven. Yeah, he's probably like this while we do it in Australia and I'm we're like, well, you're not in Australia, you better shave that thing off. Yeah, the MOM my death. Well, it's good. He's got a healthy mullet going. He does, he does, and he wears that flat bill hat and and you know, it was just an amazing tournament, one of the most exciting masters, I think, for obviously when tigers there just changes the whole realnd and just the first day, even the practice rounds, to see the people out watching them after we went through this crazy pandemic. I think it just kind of made everybody feel like we're back it tiger playing. I bet a lot of people that he wouldn't play after we had that rate. We had some torrential rain on Tuesday and Wednesday. Yeah, and as you know, it's a hilly golf course. You can't really get the perspective on TV, but the elevation change is dramatic. So excuse me, walk in the hills is difficult. But when it's wet like we had on Tuesday, whids and think we had three inches of rain, I thought there's no way, it's going to be too much pressure on his leg. It's like walking in in dry sand versus wet sand. Oh easy. But he played blew me away. He played well enough to make the cut. Continue to blow me away and I think he just run out of gas on the weekend. But truly a re markable athlete. His perseverance and his determination is off the chart. I've always admire tiger because you know as well as I do that when you're in the press room and you get a lot of questions and you get a lot of stupid questions, nobody handles stupid questions better than Tiger Woods. You. He gets questions, he might get the same question asked four different ways, but he takes his time, he answers the question, he looks at the the reporter and I've always admired that about tiger. He's such a professional and I think a lot of young athletes today could learn a lot from watching tiger, how he handles himself, what he's gone through and and and where he's going his career. It's extremely impressive. Well, you know, in the game of golf you can't really hide it's you and that's it. Right. In football, another sports, you have teammates and sometimes you can like push it off or do other things when I ask you questions, but the game of golf it's just you and and and that's got to be tough and that's got to be a learning experience that you go through, because I'm sure that when Tiger started out he had he had to learn some ways to talk to the press in the media, you know, and I'm sure after a year, after the thousands of interviews he went through, it got a little easier. Well, I've always called team sports, and I played team sports. I always called him a racier sports because Tom Brady can throw a bad pass and Mike Evans can lay out make a great catch and its touchdown and they go out. Brady's got another touchdown. Well, that should go to my kevins because he made a great play with tiger and he learned this early on because he was a dominant junior and a dominant amateur. And the great thing about golf is that as you come up through the ranks, college, with junior, college, amateur and then Prost you really you really learned along the way because you're giving interviews. Tiger was giving interviews when he was three or four years old, when he was on the murder Griffin show and when he was out here and when he was in Portland at thirteen winning his first US junior, and then he went when he won the US amateur. He he's always handled himself with class. Always has done that and and that's why he's I just I admire and he's he's a remarkable kid. Yeah, know that.

That is amazing. So I want to get back to you a little bit. Now you come onto the tour, obviously you're doing you know, like you meet some incredible golfers and sometimes, like you said, you like to talk a lot, so that personality has to come out and I wondered. I feel like you're also a little bit of a jokester and a prankster and, like I feel like you've done some of that stuff in the locker room. So how long before your real personality came out on tour? Funny, funny should bring that up and it came out on tour. I really thought I had to be serious, like a Ben Hogan or a tiger or any of these people that you see between the ropes. Yeah, and I don't know if you experience out on the football field, but some people change their persona and they they focus like okay, it's go time. I was doing that until I spent some time with Lee Trevino, and you know as well as I do lead Trivino is funny. He's joking. When you go on the range with Trevino, you know he's there because he's talking. He he might be before an hour before around, he hits ten minutes of balls, but be us is for the other fifty minutes. Yeah, so I kind of did that until I got on the golf course and Trevino's said to me, look, you can't be different the way you are off the course and the way you are on the course. So it really helped me so much to just be me. Yeah, on the golf course I like to joke I like to talk to people. Talking to people relax as me, and in fact I remember one story. I had a chance to win the US senior open when I was fifty and I was tied with trip, with with Irwin Hoss and Kite, and I was really nervous on the sixteen tall the five, that the sixty nine pole to day over that B seventy all the day and I hit my hit shot on the green that I was nervous. So I made a be lying to the gallery and I started talking to a stranger. Yeah, just started talking to about the logo on their shirt or the logo on their hat or how sweaty it was or whatever whatever. I get mare what it was, but that relaxed me. So I always have a tip of the CAP and thank Trevino for helping me become me inside the ropes, because trying to change it's too much of a mental strength. Yeah, you know, that was kind of me. You know, I I had a bunch of coat. You know, football, you got all these coaches and they're always trying to tell you what to do and who you should be and and I was a prankster in the locker room. I love whom jokes on guys, and I always felt like trying to get guys to laugh and be together was a good way to bring your team together and I enjoyed doing it, whether I was a starter or the backup. But then, like, if you go out in the field and you try to have that person same personality, the coaches are like, he's not serious, he doesn't want you know, and I'm like, what are you talking about? I'm as competitive as they come. That's my personality and I love that you figured that out and you went out and you did it because you know that's who you are and that's how all sports should be. You can't really you can focus when it's time. Like you weren't laughing or joking when you were making the pot, but talking to that person took all that off your mind a little bit. And that's how I was. I had come on a sideline and everybody think you're you're serious. What happened the last series? Yeah, I'd look at it, but then I'd go make a joke with the lineman and like try to, you know, do some things like that. Well, Trevino said to me how he to get deeper into the Tono said, look, it takes one minute to hit a shot. You walk up to your caddy, he's got the yard inch, the bagage by the ball and he says you've got one hundred and fifty to the front, twenty to the Pin, one hundred and seventy. We don't want to go along there's big deep bunker or water, so play short of that. Let's Miss Short. So if it's either a, it's a, it's a, it's a heart aid or an easy seven, we'll talk about it. I pull the club over the ball. I'm serious. The minute the ball leaves and the club goes back into the bag, I'm back to being me. I'll turn, I'll give you some crap, I'll give my caddy crap, I'll I'll make a joke with somebody in the crowd. I remember one year at the Western open it Chicago, I had played with Bill Murray in the shootout. They will have a shot out on a Wednesday and I remember walk bill walk with me during the during the round and we would commits during during the day. I'd hit my shot, go over talk to bill and if you ever watch a player like bill, Bill Murray or somebody who plays it an atnt. They're always joking, yes, but not when the players hitting the shot. It just take that one minute of focus. When you're calling a play, your under center, you call the plague and you throw your your your your...

...your goat, your go route, and then you touch. You get a touchdown. You come back to the lock the side, the sidelining. You're joking and given guys crap, but when it's time to you get the ball back on a fumble. Now you're back in it again. So it's in, it's out, it's in, it's out. That's that's what work best for me. Well, tell you what, winning helps a lot, a lot easier. If you're in when you're joking, right, if you if you're losing in that you're joking, people take it the wrong way and it's just like now, that's just who I am. I get it well. Well to that point, that's that's it's a really good point. In Golf, confidence and and enjoyability is elusive because we lose so much. We lose more than we went. I Guess Scotty Sheeffler's one for tournaments in his last six or whatever tournaments he's played, but I guarantee Scotty's getting hit his ski. Golf careers go like this. Tiger Jack, Scheffler me, it doesn't matter. You just don't want your lows too low. But you have to manufacture sometimes that confidence and I think you do it through humor, you do it through relaxation and you and you do it through the Camaraderie of Hey, I know we're not winning any games right now. Let's go do it, let's suck it up and do it. And that can't come from coaches. It can, but it's got to come from you. If you ever have you ever been out there? I mean you've had like eight hundred and some starts in your career, which you know that's a lot of golf to play. But he ever had another player come up to you and say hey, I think was did every they call you jake or they call you Peter, because I know you have a band, you know, Jake Trout in the flounders, but it was that your nickname? Not In the tour? Yeah, yeah, Peter Peters my name. Everybody called my Father Jake because Jacob said so. Now in my t in the TV world with NBC, everybody calls me J so yeah, it's what as long as I call you. Yeah, right. So have you ever been out there in another player come up to you and say I'm really nervous. You know, what should I do? Did you tell him a joke or you like do something to calm down? Yeah, they're a great story. I was just with Aaron Oberholser. We worked the drive ship and put together and Aaron loves to tell this story. He was we I was fifty years old, playing in the US Open at piners. He was thirty two and a really good rising young player. He's been sideline because of injury, so he's now doing TV. You know, injury can rob a lot of a lot of players of their of their talent. Yes, and as Aaron's one of them. We were playing the final day and he's on the edge of getting in the masters, but I think it's top eight or top ten get in the masters, and he's tied for eight, nine ten, something like that, and he's nervous and we get on the eighteen tea and he needs to par. We think he needs a par to qualify first, first masters, and he's really nervous and he's pacing around and I can just stee it in his face. So there's a big galery stand there and I I'm the old guy. I'm fifty years old, I mean because I won the senior US Open, so I'm in it it. Yeah, and I've had a good career. So I said hey, everybody, how about if I challenge this young buck to a long drive contest? And everybody goes yeah, the old guy verss young guy and Aaron looks at me like what are you doing? I'm out of my mind with with worry here. And then he finally gets it. He Goes, Oh, you're trying to relax me. I went okay, ten bucks, long drive contest, and now the people are into it, are caddie's are into it. He gets a smile and and he's first up because he birdied seventeen. So he gets up and he's very relaxed and he he kills this drive, hits a bomb and of course he hits it probably thirty arcs by me, the old GRANDPA. That buddy hits it in the dead center of the fairway and he makes the car. Hits it up there close, makes a bar and and and I end up making a car as well. But to this day he says, I know why you did that. You were trying to relax me without actually going up and grabbing his face and saying relax, like a coach might do. I had out of disarm M and and and and distract him to get in back to having fun. So yeah, I mean I'm sixty eight years old now. I can still play a little bit, hang up with guys and it's it's really fun when somebody asks your opinion, because when you get to be as old as I am, you've pretty much you've been in every situation. Well, yeah, you've been in every situation on and off the golf course. Right. So that that makes it really easy for guys to understand, like, okay, this this guy's been through what I want to go through. So I need to talk to him and and it does feel good when young kids come up to you and...

...ask you questions. Right, it's like it's like okay, like what I've done in my career, somebody's notice, you know, not just the fans, but just it's almost like being a mentors is I want to carry on what I've learned. What's interesting about golf is that guys recognized what you've done and I'm known where on them on the radar. But when you've got guys like Watson and Tiger and and and Tom Watson and in people like that, they may not say it because they're trying to beat you, but they do recognize it and and that's that's really kind of that, that silent tip of the CAP. When you watched the the honorary starters in Augusta Jack, Gary and Tom. Yeah, you just those guys need to know. Nobody says it like a young player, like a bubble watson or a tiger or any other player may not come up and go, Oh my God, I and I love you and honor you, but you just know that it's there because if they again, it's hard for me to put it into words. It's just a silent thing that players respect that. Yeah, you know, and I think it's really hard for young guys come up to guys who have been there. Like if I when I was a rookie, it was really hard for me to go up to older quarterbacks that I've played against and known to just shoot the breeze with him, you know what I mean, like say hey, what's your career like? It's really awkward it's it was almost like a hey, are they going to come up and talk to me, because I don't know if I should talk to them, you know, but it's really not like that. Like a young guys should understand that you want to talk to them, you want to, you know, introduce yourself and just like Arnold Palmer did to you. Yeah, we had a program on tour when I when I was playing on tour, we had a big brother little brother program and we did that specifically for that reason. And over the years my little brothers have been Casey Martin, know, to big gay Gary Nicholas, as if Gary Nicholas Jackson needs a mentor on tour, but Jack Wasn't playing much anymore. You know how sons don't want to listen to their dad through that all the time. That doesn't matter who they are, what they've done and David Duval and what we did is we interacted together and I guess as I got older I just said to these young kids like Kevin Kidsner caddy for me one time in coody in the blowfish proam and he gives me crap about that and I give him a crap about it. Right, I said did I pay you and he goes, yeah, you gave me a hundred dollar bill, you cheap bastard, and I say yeah, well, you know, you didn't keep my clubs clean and you never read a Putt and all that. But I will, if I know the player well enough, like I know bubba Watson and Kissner, I will say look, if there's ever anything you need or a shoulder to cry, not cry on, but you know what I mean. Yeah, someone to bounce ideas off, let me know. So sometimes you have to say it. Of course I'm more approachable, I think, the lot of those guys. So it's easy for me to say well, yeah, I agree with that, like everyone. Thank you for listening. Huddle up with gusts. We appreciate you listening. Go to huddle up with guestscom check me out, or wherever you listen your favorite podcast. We're talking with Peter Jacobson today. Peter, we were just talking about being a mentor and people coming up to you and and you know, like you said, the shoulder to cry on, but it's just just a conversation. Calms people down and I think the people see you now, like on TV a lot right because you're on NBC or and Golf Channel. You do all these things. So people hear you know you and it kind of lets you into their lives and you're not just a guy, another guy that played golf, you know what I mean. So I think it maybe that way it teaches them that you're more approachable. Well, I think I've always been fairly approachable and I think with golf when I'm doing broadcast, I never making about me versus some broadcasters. They always want to remind you how good they used to be. Well, I wasn't that good, so it's easy for me to God they do great. But but that's the one thing when you're when you're doing golf podcast, your your a voice and you're a you're a you have the knowledge of what's going on and I'm always trying to bring that to you. GUSS, if you're watching a tournament and I'm doing the TV, I'm talking to you about what Bubba is going through or what Scottish cheffler's going through or the situation on the golf course. What are the opportunities? Does a Birdie help him more than a Bergie Bogie hurts him? Things like that, but it's it is odd when you're in somebody's living room on a Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday at but that does make you more approachable, which I like. I like it whhen I'm in a mall...

...or I'm in a golf tournament, someone comes up and says, Hey, Peter, let me ask your question. Did did driver? Didn't tiger put a new driver in his bag when he won them asks? Yeah, yeah, and ill, yeah, but watching you want TV. You're like this right, you're very personable and your kind and and you just have a good personality that a lot of people can connect with. When I watch verty, I'm like, I go up to ferity might rip my head off, so I don't even want to say hi to him. You know, you know, but he's not like that. I know it's a good purse, a good friend and like can is funny, but sometimes when you're watching you know he has a little kind of cutting little to him. I tell you, David Partty, he's one of my most favorite people in in all of existence. I love working with them. He's he's hilarious. Just everything that comes out of his mouth is funny. And David, I think, has done more for the United States military than anybody, certainly anybody in our government. Yeah, but David hosts these events around the country and I'm honored when he asks me to participate. He has a foundation called FERDY's troops. First I've seen it. Yeah, and David is an amazing human being. I love him to death. I love working with him. I wish I could work with it more because he's he's just he's just hilarious, one of the funniest people I think I've ever met and if we went up to tell him, tell him, when you go up to him, not to bite your head off. I'm no, but I feel like he's the he's the kind of friend that like you got to get Your Jab in first because you know they're coming from him. Oh, he's hilarious. I think I could. I could sit and listen to David Ferrety. I've been to see his show live twice and I highly recommend it. If you haven't seen August, or anybody listening right now. If charity live, the live tour comes to you in your town, you've got to go. It's amazing. Definitely got to go and do that. I appreciate. I'm going to try and do that but now you obviously you're, you've been a professional golfer. That takes precedent and all of our lives when your professional athlete. But then you've transformed it into so many other things. You have what your production company like that you do things with. You're providing for other tours and different events that you're out there doing. Plus, are you still part of the the Jacobson Hardy Group, like where you're doing a golf golf? We've all that stuff. Yeah, Jim Hardy and I started a golf design company about fifteen years ago and we did quite a few courses. But then, as you know, the economy went this way. So there's not a lot of golf courses being built. There are quite a few being renovated. But yeah, I started a production company to create tournaments and I've done that my whole career. I'm we're in the middle right now of creating a couple of events that I'm really excited about. But one one event that I've started. When we talk about diversity and inclusion in the game, yeah, the game is always been inherently white and don't I don't think there's been any any buddy appressed in the game is just it. A lot of people of color don't start in golf. So I started a program called the Golf Diversity Program, a love where I have a board of Friends of mine, White, black women, you name it, and we're going to HBCUS, historically black colleges and universities, and we're doing seminars right now for the men's and women's golf teams to try to educate and and create awareness of the opportunities in the game. Trying to identify the next Tiger Woods or on Aka or Nancy Lopez is really difficult. That's like trying to become the next August bar rot or the next Tom Brady, and that is that is a very narrow space. Getting into the golf through player management, event creation, aground me, working for the tour working for corporate groups. So we're trying to open their eyes to two things, those opportunities. So that's really a fun of fun program that we that I that we've started in our company. Yeah, I know, that is a great program. I think through drive, chip and put, you can do that because it says anybody, any background, any any ability, you come out and and do this, and I think that's wonderful. That's what needs happened for the game of golf. But also, you know the other thing. I mean, you do all these things and then you also start a band. Yeah, yeah, Pachy yourself to play guitar, which is amazing. Yeah, we years ago pain Stewart and mark lie and ranker and I all to our...

...players payin. Obviously we know we lost years ago to that tragic plane accident. But everybody on tour, they fish or they hunt. We didn't do that. We played music, we played guitar, we played piano, and so we put together this band and we've actually we actually did to records which are on itunes. But what we did is is I'm unfortunately singer and I'm not very good at it, but I don't know that they have all like they have auto tune now, like it's either like your voice sounds really good on there. I listened. So I wish technology. I wish technology was I wish that was doing that back then. Right, we we got the Golfer, the rock and Roll Hall of Fame Golfer, musicians that played golf. We leaned on them. We had Alice Cooper and Huey Lewis Glenn Fry, Steven still's, Graham Nash, these guys we all played golf with and they were on our record. So if you if you have an interest, to check out took up jake trout and the flounders on itunes. For me it's a great memory of paint Stewart, because pain plays playing page Harmonica, Mark Play Guitar and and I sing. Yeah, I think it's interesting like that, that you can go and do these things and teach herself. Like you said, everybody has a hobby. That was your hobby and you have a passion for music. They you know, all the groups that you talked about that you following your love and when you when you love music, it never goes away. Now it never does it. Music Inspires me. In fact, just before this call, I was in I live on youtube with all these new artists. That's a really how I learned how to play, how to play guitar and learn how to play these songs. I've got an ear that if I hear a song, I know which court attends, so I could start playing the song before this song is over, which is which is a gift. I wish I was. I wish I was better at it, but it's yeah, it is. It's a passion. Every time I play Golf I have a Bluetooth Speaker in my cart and it's blaring. I'm sure I drive people crazy, but but I'll love to help to suit me. I love that, like you just put you like I was a member at a country club here and like you couldn't do any of that stuff, like they wouldn't let you do any of that stuff. But if you go out and play your music, I love that. Like just be yourself, go out and have fun. Game is all about. Like, yeah, if you're at the master's, yeah, you're not doing that stuff right. No, you know what I mean. Like and then last thing is I want to talk about your kind of send off and golf. Right, the last round you played at Pebble Beach. Like that was you. You said, okay, this is it. You know it's time to kind of be done. But you played a pebble beach for so long. Had to be crazy emotional for you. My family would drive down to people from Portland, Oregon every spring break can we played at Pebble Beach. We had a big fan only six of us, mom, Dad for for kids. So Pebble's like home for me. It's like my second home still to this day. So my first tournament I ever played in was the atnd. That was my first event and I told you I met Arnold Palmer. Yeah, so when I when I won there, it was an incredible thing for me emotionally. So as I progressed in the game, I played the champions tour, transition to doing some TV while I was still playing. But it's sixty eight years old, my body is completely broken down. So I thought I've got to play one last tournament and it's going to be pebble. So because I won there, I'm always in. So I asked Fluff Mike Cowan, who won, who I won with there, to come caddy for me and he did. And I was going to play with my longtime partner Huey Lewis, of Huey Lewis and the news right, and we were just going to go experience the week now play with the young kids. I knew I wasn't going to be competitive. I shot eighty one the first day at Spyglass, seventy five, I think pebble, and I birdied eighteen. So I birdied the last hold e in the Pebble Beach and then I had a four undred and seventy five Monterey. But it was a dream come true to be able to start my career at pebble and end my career playing career at Pebble Beach. And it's cool. Is My daughter my old I said, Dad, you played at six decades, s, s, s, two thousand tens and S, which that that's okay, that's means to cool thing. Yeah, it's just fun to say that. Yeah, it is amazing. So before I let you go, what would you go back and say to young Peter Jacobson and and say like the look at that this way, this is your story. What would you go back and say to him? Wow, that is a that is a good question. I would say probably just always be...

...yourself. Don't try to be somebody else, because I see a lot of players, as we said earlier, trying to come out and they are one way and then they try to adhere to what they think is the norm of a PG eight tour player. Yeah, I would say just be yourself because if your game is good enough to get you there, it's like in the NFL. If your games good enough to get you there. Keep your mouth shut, keep your ears open, learn along the way and try to improve, but never deviate from who you are. Yeah, because I would feel like being a professional golfer. It's probably almost the same percentages as like being a professional football player. I mean it's yeah, as you get up there, you go from junior golf to college golf and the next thing you know when you're on tour. That's why we talked about Jack and Arnold, because it's a pretty narrow space up there at the top. There's only room for one guy. Yeah, and you better, you better be comfortable with who you are while you work on your gap. Learn from a lot of people, learn from coaches how to throw a better, how to spin it better, learn how to chip better, learn how to how to shoot free throws better, but learn, keep your keep your mind open, but be yourself. If you can teach me how to read, agree, and I would appreciate that. Cuts Up. That's easy thing. Yeah, all right, for you, it is. You know. Now learn how to read a defense. I can help you with that as well well. I would say this is the best hip I could give you on putting hit the uphill puts harder than the down hill pots. Yeah, it's it's it's right. We don't have time to get into that. Yeah, it's just simple. All right, before we go, tell us where all of our fans can find you, how they can follow you and where you'd like him to help you out. I mean, you mentioned so many things today. I'd love for a fancy go and check you out wherever, whatever you doing. Well, I'm on. I'm on twitter at Jake Trout. I'm on Instagram live or Instagram Peter Jacobson Sports, Peter Jacobson Golf. We have. We have a lot of cool things that we post about events coming up and I've got some pretty cool we have some pretty cool events popping up here within this year and next year, maybe one with a very famous retired quarterback, you knew that played in the big metroplex down there in Dallas. We're working on some way Tony, but the golf diversity program him and just just having a lot of fun as I get older and I don't really have to worry about making puts anymore. And but just kindness costs nothing. Caught Arnold pumping two things. Kindness always helps and always show gratitude and thanks to the people who brought you where you are today. Well, he is a Pittsburgh, well kind of Pennsylvania guy like my he's latrobe. I grew up like forty five minutes from where he grew up. So obviously you know, I know that most Pennsylvanians are kind people. Most, I say most. Yeah, you know, some of those meal guys my dad worked with weren't you know? They they were kind of grumpy. Anyway, Peter, I appreciate you joining me on huddle up with guests and it was so great to meet you in such a pleasure to have you in the game of Golfin and just what a personality and and appreciate all that you do. Gust thanks for having me and look forward to a meeting you and maybe play teen it up and maybe showing you how to read some greets where you'll have to give me some strokes because my body's beat up as well. Thank you, thank you, thank you. have a safe flight back to Florida. You got it. All the best. All the best. Thank you and everyone. That's another show. What a great incredible guests. We had. Peter Jacobson and you can follow him at Jake Trout on twitter and check out all the stuff he's doing to go back and listen to show. I appreciate joining me on huddle up with gusts and check me out wherever you listen to your favorite podcast until next week. We'll see you again soon. M that's a wrap, sportsman, thanks for joining in the fun. At the sixty thirty one digital studios for another act, puddle up with gus, featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback gus far at. Huddle up with GUS is probably produced by one thousand six, hundred and thirty one digital media and is available on Apple Music.

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