Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 163 · 2 months ago

Huddle Up With Gus: GiGi Garner

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Huddle Up With Gus_GiGi Garner

Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Gusts. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts Farad. I want to thank you for joining us today. You can check us out at huddle up with gustscom. You can go to wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. We will be on there were on every network, so we appreciate you. We want to thank all of our sponsors today, the Little Blue Pill Credit Guard, Newt genics, sixteen thirty one digital news, always a big plus. Go to sixteen thirty one digital news. Check out their sports news, information entertainment. They do a great job with that. And definitely check out to our PODCAST, is held at Sounder FM. Go to sound or DOT FM and check out our podcast, along with many, many others, and we appreciate you listening. And please go to our youtube channel so you can watch the video, not just listen to the show, but now you can watch our shows on our great youtube channel huddle up with gusts. So I appreciate you listening and get ready for the show. It's a great one. Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Brian here sports fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with us. Fifteen year NFL quarterback Gus Bar Rot. Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches. Playing for seven NFL Franchisees. With one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are one every day I could to hang out with them. Gonna quarterback up. Okay, sports fans, from the decked out and plush sixteen forty one digital studios, it's checkoff time, so snap your two straps. One can read to huddle off with us. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Guss. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL quarterback gusts Farat, and appreciate you listening to us. Wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, you can check us out at huddle up with Gustscom or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. Like I said, and we appreciate you coming on today. We want to thank all of our friends and sponsors, one six thirty one digital news. We appreciate them always helping us out. We want to thank multiformat network. We really appreciate all the work that they do and Sounder Dot FM sounders where we host our podcast. Those guys are wonderful. If you're looking to start a podcast and you want to make it easy and find go to sound Er FM and they'll help you through the process. Today's guest I'm really excited for. She is the daughter of a very famous and iconic actor and I'm sure a lot of people would know the name James Garner, but we'll get into more about him, but right now we're going to talk to gg Garner. She's a daughter James. She's done a lot in her life and now she's continuing her dad's love of what he liked to do and production and film and everything else. So, Geg, how are you doing today? I am doing great. It's an honor to be here, Awt, and honor to have you on. I appreciate it. So, you know, we usually start kind of like about how you fell in love with sports, but I know you're in a different world. So what I want to talk about is kind of like growing up as a kind of a child of Hollywood icon and what that was like. And then almost what? When did you fall in love with what your dad was doing, because it seems like you have a real passion for it still. Are you talking about racing? Are you talking about it's everything industrially, a lot of different things the industry. Well, I can first of all, I can tell you that, yes, I did fall in love with the sport because of my dad, and that sport is racing. And God yes, my dad learned how to drive a race car from Bob Bon durant in one thousand nine hundred and sixty five or sixty six, when he made Grand Prix, and he did all the driving himself, including most of the stunts, and my dad ended up owning a racing team of his own and ended up coming in second and the Bajo one thousand and so he was a real driver. And so most weekends we went to the races. We went to Ontario Motor speedway or riverside or anywhere that was close or far. He would be at the racist when he was available. So I did fall in love with the sport when I was a little kid and I'm still in love with racing and I just got back from indy five hundred last weekend where I was so blessed to be able to ride in one of the pace cars. Well, I've done that before.

Is that? How exciting is that? Oh my goodness, the adrenaline involved is through the roof and I got to see all the people that were there. There's so many people there and it was just really thrilling. I about halfway through the two and something laps, I thought to myself who I looked over the speedometer and I thought, Oh, my dad might not like this and I went, Oh, forget, its seventy five hundred, so we're going pretty pretty quick. Yeah, I started a race at the Pepsi five hundred one time. You know, obviously NASCAR a little different, but the the banks were so steep. I remember hanging on to the like the, as they say, the Holy Shit Bar, you know, I mean the handle up there. That that because the angles were so steep. But I know indies a little different than that. I think it a little flatter, but it was just really exhilarating to I thought it was going to be like in a little parade, you know, before the race. I didn't realize that I was actually going to be in a car behind the president from Indianapolis. Motor speed away and he had a lad foot, so my driver just behind him was just trying to keep up. That was that's what I think, but I thought I'd you just doing a little, you know, tour of the racetrack. Note we were actually pacing. It was amazing. You know, that's awesome. Did do you remember how your dad fell in love with it, with racing? Was it's because he was going to make a movie ade? Well, he fell in love with it because he I think he always loved cars. He was always interested in cars. But when he got the opportunity to start and Grand Prix, he had to learn how to be a real race car driver from a real race car driver professional and he just took to it right away. He just it was a natural thing and a lot of drivers said he could have been a very successful professional driver. Oh well, he probably loved to hear that. But you know what, a lot of those drivers couldn't be a Hollywood icon either. Ha Ha. I think I'd he had a choice between acting and racing, he probably would have chose and racing oh yeah, yeah, well, you probably don't have all the people telling you to stop, go, quit, cut action, right. You just driving and you're out there mentally doing it for I'm not sure how long an indie race takes, but you're in. You're stuck in a car by yourself for a long time. Right. He loved it. He drove on the track Momza, Monico spat mean he brought Bram's hatched. He drove all those courses himself in the race car and a formula car. Did he have a favorite? And the other people that were getting the other people that were the actors, like even Montan, Brian Dudford and Antonio Sabado? Those actors had didn't even have a driver's license before they started filming Grand Prix, and a couple of them are okay, but a couple of them were. Two didn't make the cut. So they had the real drivers driving. They had Jackie Stewart and Jack Brabham and think Jim Clark, and I mean they had real race car drivers driving those cars. Did your dad always do his own stunts? Yes, because it seems like if when I read a little bit about him, obviously he was in the military. You know, he's from Oklahoma. I'm sure he grew up and, you know, it was tough and in he seems like a really kind of hard working, kind of down to Earth Guy, very, very so. Yeah, so I you know, when I you kind of like all these stunts aren't that big a deal, I was just going to do them. Well, you know, he was the one who created that Rockford j turn and he did them in the rocker stiles. Oh, yes, so, and he loved to do car stands and things like that. There's a stunt actually in Grand Prix where he was supposed to turn off the fuel during a particular shot and he could the the button was stuck and he ended up catching on fire and they got him out without, you know, any burns, but it...

...was a little bit close. Now, Isaac, did you go to a lot of movie sets and things like that, and were you there a lot? I did. Yes, I was there a lot. My Dad was, you know, away a lot. He worked a lot, just like most people's Dad, and I did get to go to work with my dad quite a bit, especially in the summer. I would get to go or we would go on you know on location if he was shooting somewhere in Europe or whatever. You know that. Then it took a really long time to make a movie. It took about nine months, and so that's a really long time to be without your family. So he would bring us over and we get to see him. was there's something that you would love to do when you get on to set? Um? Well, one time when my dad was making a movie with Doris Day, I got to ride the horse inside the stage. So riding a horse indoors is pretty cool. But I would always want to ride the horses whenever he was doing a western. Oh yeah, now he now, I'm sure he grew up, I mean he grew up in Norman, Oklahoma with did he grow up riding horses? He did, and, to be perfectly honest with you, he he was really good with horses, but he didn't really like them that much. I know that's very hard to digest for you maverick fans out there, but he was really good with horses, but he just wasn't crazy about them. Well, I'll tell you what, Gee, my daughter's of that and she went through veterinarian school and every person told us, yeah, every person told us that she should work with horses and she because she was so good. They have a large animal facility, the University of Pennsylvania does, and every professor, everybody she had said that she just has a knack. They calm down when she goes in there and she just none of them ever go crazy when she's around. You know, she just had a knack. And I said, why don't you work with large animals? Yeah, she that's what they would tell us. And I said why don't you want to work? She wants to be a regular vet and I said why don't you want to work with large animal? She Goes Dad, those horses can kill you with one kick. No, thank you. I was like Oh, and she said then they could be. I've seen him be very temperamental, especially when you trying to shove a needle. So I get it, like I've heard her talk about it. My Dad was a huge, huge animal person. He loved animals, but he just he wasn't like crazy crazy about horses, but he was so good on a horse. I saw him do a lot of stunts, you know, where the he's fall the horse and do all these things. He was just really good with them. But I think it's probably because he grew up riding horses. They were very poor. They're in the dust bowl. He had two older brothers who would end up getting kicked off the back of the horse on their way to school. You know, he just probably had some painful memories or something like that, but he was a crazy dog person like I am, and now I have a charity called James Garner Animal Rescue Fund, J G are, and that is to continue my dad's legacy into the future by using my super passion, which is animals and animal rescue. I've been an animal rescuer for over thirty years and it's really it's what I live for. It is my purpose. But your daughter has a purpose to be a vet. He said that purpose should she's been twelve. I don't think I'm smart enough to get through that school, so I'll just going to be a philanthropist. Well, she'll tell you she's a last one in our family. Well, I'm sure that school is very difficult, very difficult being a doctor of anything. It's just like a major accomplishment, specially since animals have so many different parts. There's so many different animals. Right, exactly, exactly. Hey, everyone, we're talking to GG Garner on houddle up with Gust. Thank you for joining us, Gigi. You know, one of the things my daughter always said is like, if you're a human doctor, you study one anatomy, if you're an animal doctor, you got to study four, five, like I remember her more. Yes,...

...yes, well, you know, it's like l depends on what you want to kind of study. If it's exotic, if it's kind of normal. I mean there's so many different animals and species out there, and she just kind of stayed with the large animal and you know, cats and dogs are kind of normal pets of people have. But she's in DC and and she's a friendship animal hospital. She tells us some amazing good and bad stories, you know, because not everyone loves our animal takes care of them like you and I would write. Right. And it's a tragedy and that's why I established this one c three charity is to try to help either individuals groups all over the world to try to help them with their medical care, with lodging, transport, food, mostly emergent care, medical care and yeah, what's extremely expensive and it just is what it is. They are they have no voice and I want to be a voice for them. No, I agree. So we have three dogs at home now to a rescue. So I get it. What's a furthest that you've ever traveled to get an animal of Thailand? Wow, yeah, I had three. I saw a picture of three puppies in an alleyway in Thailand and I just thought to myself, if this is the last thing I ever do, I'm going to rescue this three puppies, because in Thailand they eat dogs. Yeah, and you know, it's just not you know, it's not conducive for, you know, three puppies. So I work with a rescuer there and we coordinated the entire thing and we got them all the way to Sonoma, California and we got them adopted out. Yeah, that's crazy, because we have a dog from Africa right now of a Senjih, and she was rescued, her and her yeah, her and her sister were rescued by my wife's nephews, wife's brother, he's a diplomat, and they were out one day and they saw them at a market and it's the same thing. They were going to be sold for me and he rescued the sister, the the two sisters, and and the story and the journey that that dog had to go through just to get back to the states, through quarantine and being stuck in a crate. Yep, she's been with us for over a year and she still has issues. It's traumatic that you have no idea what these rescue dogs have been through before you get them. I'm going to be patient and you know, it just is what you know. It's a very it's kind of depressing if you want to, you know, think of it. I mean, I've sent a lot of money to meet Ukraine recently because the situation over there is very, very, very serious for everyone, people, children, animals. It's all very frightening right now. But yeah, I can just do a little bit and I do what I can. Yeah, I saw the one organization ever putting out these tubes full of food for all the pets, right because the pets obviously had so many of them have no homes anymore and they don't know where to go and the people are just escaping and it's hard to take your animal with you and you just trying to fight for your life, and so these great organizations were going over and putting these long tubes every time up and the food would come out the bottom and, you know, just for pets to be able to come and eat. Wow, yeah, you mean there's there's a lot of people that want to do a lot of good and, like you said, they can't speak for themselves. They can't you know, they need help because they've been domesticated, right, they're not wild animals, right. So we have to be able to help them as much as possible. They can't open a can of dog food because they don't have thumbs, although my dogs have ripped open a few bags of dog food. I'm talking Cannes, it's not that. Yeah. So what kind of did you guys have grown up? Um, well, my dad got me a dog when I was six years old, got my first dog, and he was an Australian Silky, and he's like those are like Yorky's and really love that dog. But we had a lot of dogs growing up, a lot. We had...

...several white shepherds and my dad also found a rescue dog in the desert who was like, I don't know what he was. He was like a shepherd mix. But my dad went in a motor home with his best friend and parked out in the middle of the desert because my dad had to quit smoking because he was getting ready to do some advertisements for some Non Smoking Gum, I think it was, and so they part to the fillin nowhere and his puppy came from just literally out of the desert. My Dad scooped him up, brought him home and called him and named him nicotine in him and Nikoline, call them nickame best friends. Right, yeah, that's that's how you did Rehab back in the day. Right, yeah, drive out to the desert and can't partake in anything, right, right, you can't get to any stores to buy cigarettes or anything. So you did you start the foundation of Your Dad, the James? I did you know? I did. I started it after he passed away. So there's a big auction coming up. Correct, that will bear it. Some of the funds will go towards this. Yes, well, actually, in January I sold my dad's car at the Barrett Jackson auction for a hundred thousand dollars. I couldn't believe I raised a hundred thousand dollars in my charities did in January for a two thousand and nine Cadillac. Wow, but it was his cadillac and it had his license plate. Maver rock on it and there were some animal lovers who were very interested in you know, they love cars and they loved animals, and so they bought it. But I have a watch auction coming up in New York City at Phillips, Phillips Auction House on I believe it's June eleven, and I'm selling five of my dad's watches. Oh, which ones are they? I think there's four cartier watches, there's one Bang Noir, which is an oval shaped watch, which was his dress watch, and then there's another one that's very rare. It's a Carrera. It's a Hoyer, tag Hoyer, and there was a watch forum on the Internet and they reached out to me and they said we're what we see this watch all the time on the rock first files and we're trying to figure out. We know it's a career of what. We can't figure out what is on the face of the watch and I just candidly said, Oh, his name. And come to find out they don't put names on watches. That's so. Did your company doesn't do it? Yeah, we don't. We think it came from the factory because it has the same thought and the same color ink, but you don't know how my dad got it. And there are almost well, obviously there's only one James Garner Watch. Yeah, so it's James Garner's James Garner, but you know it's a racing watch and hoyor thought it was very special, extremely special, and I want to raise money from my charity, so I'm going to auction those watches off in about, I don't know, a week's time. Yeah, city. That's awesome. That's awesome. So when you when you I don't know if this will be a tough question or not, but when you see things that we're your dad's being auctioned off the the how do you feel about that? Because you know a lot of people have so much emotional attachment to things that their parents had or family members had. How do you feel about all that? You know what, it's bitter sweet. But all the things that are being auctioned, and I'm auctioning off every thing, everything this year. I'm auctioning off all of his Hollywood memorabilia on July fifteen through Julian's and I'm also going to auction his helmet from Grand Free Wow at pebble beach concourse. Della Goss in August. I'm the one who's auctioning...

...all of it off and I'm auctioning it off because I want other people to share in the joy that my dad had for his things. I have an original costume from the TV show Maverick. I have his as wardrobe from Murphy's Romance. I have a helmet with his name on it. I have the dressing gown from Victor Vittoria. I have a lot of I have a golden globe of his. Have a lot of things that I want to share. My Dad wanted to be remembered with a smile and I am hoping that his stands will think this does the trick. Yeah, no, I you know, that's pretty interesting and I was going to ask you about like when he started keeping all that stuff and and or did did like the studio stored for him? But I you know, I'm thinking back to my career in the NFL. It's like I kept jerseys, I kept all kind of different memorabilia from the Times that I played, and so it makes sense that he would do that from his acting career. You know, my dad did not end up with a lot of wardrobe because basically, if you took something from wardrobe, that means that they gave it to you or you just stole it, and so he did have things. You know that I'm going to presume that we're given to him or they said he could keep Um, and that's probably how he ended up with I think he ended up with that maverick costume because he got into a lawsuit with Warner Brothers over Maverick and he ended up suing them and he ended up actually winning breach of contract. But I think one day he got mad, and that was the last day was on the set and he was wearing his costume and he just brought a home you just wore at home. That's what I think. What do you get? Yeah, what are you guys going to do to me? Right? I think that's how he got it. I'm not sure, but I mean of course he would want to keep the helmet from grandfrix and even when he was racing a by he wore that helmet. Yeah, no, that's great, that's real ob peace. Yeah, I'm sure that's going to be bitter sweet for you to watch it, you know, and somebody's going to you're going to make somebody very happy, but it is probably going to be bitter sweet for you. I hope it's somebody who really appreciates my dad and understands his legacy and, you know, respects him and things like that. I mean, I'd love to see this stuff end up in a museum or, you know, it's some somewhere where people can other people can enjoy it. Yeah, I know, I completely understand that. Hey, everyone, we're talking with g she garner, daughter of iconic actor James Garner. We appreciate you listen to huddle up with gusts. CHECK US out at hudle up with guestscom so gg. One of the things I think is crazy, which I always wanted to ask. I know when I was playing and you wanted to go out somewhere, you'd come and say hey, you know, discuss fraud like you CANNA. You feel weird about it, but also you take advantage of it. Do you remember times like I could you call place and go, yeah, my dad's James and my name is Gigi, can I get in for dinner for to tonight? You know, obviously they're like yeah, of course. I don't recall doing anything like that because I might have gotten in trouble. For that? I don't know, but I don't recall me doing anything like that. No, Oh, come on, yead do something like that. I mean it's might yeah, found out, I probably get in trouble. What it was? He a stickler for all that. Well, you know, I try not to abuse my privilege. You know, I have been gifted many, many honors and and and been in the presence of royalty and all kind of you know, done all kinds of things that I've been so lucky to do, but I can tell you I never feel entitled to it.

Well, I kind of sense that when I was kind of reading a little bit about your biography, because you've done so many things right where. You've been a private investigator, you've you've obviously done you've been a print model, you've kind of have a talent agency, you've written books, you there's so many things in areas that you've covered in your life. Because, I don't know, it's like you said you didn't want to like just say that I was James Garner's daughter. Well, let's just let me be frank. I mean there is absolutely nothing in the world that I'm ever going to do that's going to be as good as what my dad has done, but he would disagree. HMM, I don't know. I mean I have done a few things, but you know, I just feel like yet like like, for example, you are the greatness, you're the person that did all these things to achieve all these goals. I'm just spot of greatness. Well, you see, I I don't like necessarily deserve all these things, but I try a little bit to be a good example and, you know, represent my dad well, especially with this charity. Yeah, no, I definitely agree with that. Like, but from my standpoint, I don't know how you, dad would feel, but like my daughter is doing something great, my kids are doing anything's great, my wife is doing all these awesome things and and I'm just, you know, I just got to do something that I fell in love with as a kid, right. But yeah, I just I just think he's look at way you've achieved in your life. It's some as literally amazing. Oh yeah, I got a bad bad knees and back and everything to prove it. You know, I just think it's pretty amazing all that you've accomplished, though. So what like when you wanted to go do something, you must have some big entrepreneurial spirit like you, wanted to go and do all these different things. I think one of the things my you know, coming from where I came from, I came from a place abundance and no matter what crazy idea I had, nobody ever told me, no, you can't do that. Yeah, and I just basically thought, okay, well, I can do that. I recently became an artist over the pandemic because I was going crazy, stir crazy in my house and so I saw one little video on painting and I thought, Oh, I can do that, and then the next thing you know, I have two hundred canvases. I'm like and I call this gallery in Beverly Hills on Canadena asked them, Oh, do you guys have a photographer? I want to take some pictures of these paintings I did, and they're like yeah, we can recommend one, but can we see your paintings? I'm like sure. So I bring in like fifty paintings and they sign me right on the spot. Wow, that's awesome. I had literally only been painting for a couple of months. Well, you must have some talent in saying which dog did you paint first? Now I know I don't even paint with paint brushes. I paint with other items, like I paint with balloons, popsicle sticks, napkins, paper towels, plastic, just string. What's the weirdest thing you've ever done? No, paint with they're all weird. Yeah, probably elite. Just said I'm going to try this. But they were comparing me to gearhard Richter, and I'm like, who's Gearhard Richter? Because really famous Gard Banner. But I mean, nobody ever told me gg no, you can't. So I always thought I could and I did. What do you paint like? We are you like a landscape painter? Like what do you paint like? What your know, see, it's heart. It's very hard to explain. I'm not a painter like you would think, a regular painter, like I'm painting things. I'm actually manipulating the paint on the canvas and they a lot of times turn out looking like a desert, looking like the ocean, looking like a lot of nature things. Yeah, it's very hard to explain. Flowers, trees, I mean they but they kind of present themselves.

I just manipulate the canvas and it comes out how it comes out. Are you name them. You name your paintings are yes, I do favorite. I Steve Oh man. I can't pick a favor. Throwing my baby. But if you want to take a look at them, you can go to ACCA gallery in Beverly Hills and look online. There they are that everyone go to a spar glories in Beverly Hills and check them out. Check them out, but part of the proceeds for that also goes to my charity. That was my idea. I sold some like on twitter at first because I was like, Oh, so I taught myself how to paint during a pandemic and I posted some of my paintings and they all sold out and I was like wait, so I used all that money for my charity. I'm always trying to come up with ideas how to raise money for charity. It's not not easy, no, it's not. There's there's definitely a bunch of ways you can do it and some are better than others. You know, the next thing you know you'll be your golfing now I know I tried. I tried that. My Dad was a scratch Golfer. He was a brilliant, brilliant athlete. He also had bad knees from football, but I've tried golf. No good. What position did he play? I don't know. I don't even here to tell some old stories from when he played football in high school, I can. I think he played for he might have played for Oh you, let's go on telsa right. Yeah, you know that Oklahoma football. It's pretty tough down there, that's for sure. Yeah, yeah, it is. So did you guys used to go back? Did you guys go back when you were growing up to yes, Oklahoma, sure, yeah, all of our my cousins are still there. Yeah. So did you ever go noodling? No, but what is noodling? That's where I learned it in the next career. noodling is where you going under the water. You put your hand in a hole like a catfish, bite your fist and you pull it out. That's where I learned what that was, because I was from Pennsylvania and my buddies and I never heard of that. And we had one of our line and who was from Norman and he was up having a big birthday party. So we all go down there and we pull up to his house and we're like where is he? And they're like Oh, I's down at the pond with his buddies and we go down there. They're all like under the water and they're like pulling up catfish with their bare hands. Were like what are these crazy people doing? And that's why we find I know, they're like, come on in and do it. I'm like no, that's now never do that. That's insane. You know, you know, you never know. You catch you can catch something else by accident. And there too. Yeah, yeah, definitely, Definitelyudn't want it. Ags and all kinds of stuff. Yeah, that that I just wandered. It was kind of funny. That's because Norman, Oklahoma's where I learned to do that. That's a great story. Learned other people to do that. I mean that's crazy, but so you know, you've been through all this and and you're doing all this in and you're kind of continuing the legacy. I talked to not too long ago, interviewed Kendrasstabler, and you've remember her dad, Kenny Stabler, who played for the raiders. She's kind of doing the same thing. She started a foundation. She's doing it. She's continue on her dad's name and legacy and you know, I think it's great that you're doing it and talking about him, because it keeps them in the present, because it teaches so many people who would not otherwise hear about them to remember him and kind of realize how famous an iconic he was. Well, most older people are very familiar with them. The younger people only know him from the old guy from the notebook, right. But but there is a resurgeon of the rocker files. A lot of people are like watching it, binge watching it and getting into it, you know, like, because I think it holds up, and so he's got a lot of you know, he's got a lot of people still remember them, but it's really important that, you know, I keep his legacy alive and keep his name relevant through this charity. Yeah, I think that the pandemic helped with a lot...

...of that, right where people were just searching for all these things to watch and and kind of take on because they had nothing to do. Like you said, during the pandemic we were all trying to figure out what are we going to do with our time? We're not used to that that and then that's probably where a lot of people started digging through everything they did. I think that's a good point. Yeah, I didn't even think of that, but yeah, a lot of people re found it or found it like we're making their kids watch it and stuff like that. Did your dad ever an Ague surgeons right? Did Your Dad ever ask you, like if he was going to do a movie or somebody approach him with something? Do you ever ask your opinion on it, like what do you think I should do this? That would be a no. Now, he wouldn't ask my opinion whether I thought something that's good or not. But, um, he had a real knack in just knowing what translated from paper to screen, what was going to translate well and like, I remember his reaction when he first read the notebook. He was like nuts about it. He knew, you know, he really want to do it exact. He wanted to do that, you know, film, as much as he wanted to do his other like favorite films like the Great Escape and Grand Prix and the Americanization of Emily, which is Patty Chatsky, so manny. He has a really good he's made some duds. He's made a couple duds, but that is because, you know, he was contracted by the studio. If you do this, you have to do this blah, blah, blah. But on the ones that he fell in love with them picked, they've all done pretty well. I feel like that happens to some people, like hey, we want they like if you wrote a movie or if you have an idea, they take it to the the studios and then they say okay, yeah, we'll produce this, but you got to do three other movies for us and then in just throw one out there just because I got to make it. Well, I think the whole ugliness of Hollywood has been revealed recently in the depth heard trial. I think people have a better understanding of how sinister and black this industry can be. Yeah, it's changed a lot. It seems like Your Dad's kind of you. He really stayed above all that. He really did, but I mean he had he had, you know, solid morals. He knew when he was right. He knew that he he said in one thousand nine hundred and fifty nine, I guess, that he was going to see Warner brothers and they said you'll never work in this town again and he sued them and he ended up winning the breach of contract and his lawyer was the guy who ended up being the president of Walt Disney. My Dad also sued universal because universal tried to say that there were no residuals from the Rock afills. My Dad knew that was wrong and he had enough gumption and enough money to retain lawyers for nine years and then he knew he had them and on the morning of the trial, you know, they settled because, well, they didn't want to have to open their books to every other TV show that they may have not paid residuals to. Well, I mean you see that a lot actors and actresses are yeah, I mean they have to go back in. That's like an old court case, right, that you have to go back and and who did this before? What are we going to try and prove? All that kind of stuff. Yeah, there's my dad did a lot of things in the industry that people don't know about, like there's this pay or pay clause, play or pay clause. Pay Or play clause, excuse me, whereby if you sign as actor and if the actor for some reason, let's say, you don't end up making that film, you still have to pay that actor. My Dad was the pioneer of that whole thing and it's amazing. He had just a very strong conviction about what he thought was right and he just went with that. Now that's that's incredible. Set the pace for a lot of people to have success in their lives, that's for sure. who was his best friend in kind of acting in all the...

...movies he's been in, he's been with, you know, he's kind of been opposite of a lot of people that he started with a lot of people. But who was his you know, his really good friend, his really good friend and his mentor was Henry Fonda. My Dad was in a traveling company of a play called King meet me, Court Martial, where Henry Fonda was the lead and my dad had like two lines every night, and so my dad would just watch Henry every night and that's how he learned how to act and they remained friends, good friends, until his death. We couldn't be a better mentor right for somebody to kind of learn the industry and learn what to do. I think what an amazing person he was. Great actor. Did your dad like to like did your did he like to host a lot of people? Do you guys have a lot of parties at the house and things like that, or was he pretty much like keep working family separate. Um, you know, they enterchage some but you know, my dad, my parents weren't like big Hollywood party people. My Dad really only went to something when he had to. Now, if he's promoting a film or something like that, he would. He would have to because it's like a contractual thing. But Yeah, look, much rather stay home and watch football, to be honest. WHO's his team? The raiders. That's awesome. That's awesome. He was always very tideline. He was always on the sideline, he was in the locker room. He loved those guys who very close to them. Yeah, what? WHAT ICONIC team? The raiders. Yeah, amazing. So have a raiders? Had the time, though. I think I'm maybe selling one in that Julian's auction in July SAS teeth. Wow, it's awesome. Well, you know, it's raids stuff. You know, it's kind of interesting as a player. You know you're playing a sport a lot of people watch and love, and then in comes a famous people from other genres or sports and it's kind of you just kind of appreciate each other, you know what I mean? Yeah, yes, I think there's a mutual respect for what they do for you. Do. Yeah, definitely, definitely. Hey, everyone, appreciate you listening to huddle up with guests. Check me out a huddle up with guestscom wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. So Gg, before we kind of get going here, I just think it's pretty amazing. You know, your dad worked really hard in that industry. You know, you see, like my career is fifteen years and it felt seems like an internee eternity in the NFL, but your dad kind of he's acted for so long and you know, it's just amazing that his legacy. What how many decades did it span? Yeah, I oh, I'm not sure, but I mean he worked a lot and quite I mean I don't think became an actor until he was like almost thirty and then he passed away at eighty six and then he was working a little bit up towards the end but not much. So it's quite quite a big span of time. But I mean, you know, it's maybe it's like football, where you're really on, on on during football season or you're on during while you're making a film or TV show and then you're off on hiatus. So it's kind of on off thing. But yeah, he worked for many, many, many years. His career span quite a long time. So in that time he's made television shows, moved to TV movies, you know, regular movies. I think he was all so did he not do? Did he do Broadway now or something? No, try. What was it with with Andy Fondo? What was that? That was like a play or something called Knuny Court Martial. But yeah, it was a play and it was the traveling company of that and I think I don't know if I was on Broadway or not. I'm not sure where it was, but it was all over the place. But I wouldn't say he was playing Broadway. Little different.

He only had two lines. Yeah, well, I mean he's kind of like been everywhere. But through all that stuff, what is your favorite? What is your favorite film or movie or TV show that he's ever done? His favorite TV show was called a nick was a show called Nichols. It was only on for one season. That was his favorite. His other favorite was his film the Americanization of Emily. Probably my favorite is a not politically correct film by the name of skin game, just because I thought it was so funny. It was a comedy, like comedy with Nausea Jr, and it was just a really funny movie. There's a name, Lu Gossett Jr, you know, and you see that name and it like, but your dad span all these people. It's amazing when a career and now that you've create a foundation kind of in his name and for something that he loved. I think that's incredible. What do you kind of have plan next besides the auctions? Well, the auctions are, you know, my main focus. But my main focus is raising money for my charity, Jg Aref. That is my passion. It's been my passion for thirty years and it's going to be for the next thirty years. You know, you are asking me if I have any weird feelings about letting go my dad's stuff. You know what, no, I gave all my relatives all the you know, photos, photo albums and things like that that we're family photos and this and that. But the other stuff I'm okay to part with it because I would sell my soul to the devil to help animals. So anything I can do to raise money is really, really important to me. It's more important to me than then the item. So I just want to share them. How many animals do you have at home right now I have one little puppy. I had three dogs. Last year I left all three dogs and I was just heartbroken crying for months, and then I just adopted a little girl who's about for she's her name is princess pupperrs. She's four years old. She had somebody bred her and dumped her on the street as she's just the sweetest girl and she's like a mishmash of all kinds of breeds. She's like got a pugtail, she's got kine core so ears, she got a little pay, she got a Frenchy face, maybe a little Boston chair, but she's really adorable and I just chure my whole world will volves around her. Yeah, I know, it's so hard. We lost three dogs in two thousand and nineteen, like right through the pandemic. It was, it was awful. Yeah, we lost the bulldog ranking a French mass of and a pity it was. that. That's really tough, you know. Yeah, it's really tough. I don't have I don't have any children and I don't have, you know, a partner. I don't have anyone to leave these things too. So it I just really came to the conclusion it would be just best to let them go and so hopefully other people will enjoy them. Well, that would be like you have family everywhere. Think about all the people that will have it all over the place. They'll be a little and I'll be great and making pass it down to their people will be fantast exactly. Now, that'll be wonderful. Yeah, I think it. What you're doing is wonderful. And but one thing before we go. I didn't really get to ask you mentioned it, but I didn't really get to ask you. So tell me why? Private investigator. You know, it's a lot more glamorous, I think, on TV than it really is in real life. I became a private investigator when I lived in Tennessee. I was really interested in law enforcement. I work for a sheriff's department outside of Nashville where I lived, and I was doing undercover work, trying to bust crooked judges and DA's and things like that. My Dad was absolutely miserable. He hated it and really I only did it for a short amount of time because he thought it was just too dangerous. Thing was it, and it was citing. To you. It was exciting and it was kind of like acting, but I really do think I've had like twenty five careers. I've been a jewelry designer, I've done all kinds of crazy things. That was probably the craziest. Yeah, well, I mean, yeah, you can add painter to it now,...

...and who knows what's next? Could be you know next. Yeah, it could be a well, hey, I was a metalsmith. I loved it. You know, really I'm always looking for something to do, but this charity is my really it's my heart. Helping animals is my purpose and it's I'm very lucky to have found my purpose. Definitely have to. So please tell our audience how they can follow your charity and follow you. Oh, that would be great. So I am mad rocks girl on twitter. Mad Rocks girl twitter, and then my website for my charity is J G A R F dot Org, Jg are dot org. That's my charity. Awesome, and people can go on there and donate, see what you're doing and really, you know, if you're an animal lover, please go to jgrf DOT ORG and check it out and and help Gig you know, save a lot of animals that need help out there. I mean, we do a lot, as much as we can for all the animals and you know, just to see you one, to help one, is amazing thing, because it really is hard, isn't it, to see what people will do to dogs and cats? It's really hard. But I feel like we have been given the responsibility to take care of animals and I take it very personally and very seriously. So, you know, a lot of people the abuse and they don't say anything. It's important to speak up because you may save a life. Yes, there's no doubt about it, and I just don't know why it happens and I don't see why people can do that to a living thing like that. But and then there's people like you who just want to help them all and do everything they can form. So thank you for that. I want to help them all. I can't help them all, but I can help quite a few. So that's my that's my that's my whole purpose. Awesome. So everyone, go to go to Jg are aarf dot org and please help Gigi help all these animals. And if we do it all together and we all go there, then she's gonna do a lot more because you know she's going to put everything she has into it. So, Gigi, thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for sharing so many stories about your father and tell us a little bit about yourself as well. Thank you so much for having me. It's been really an honor to be on your show. I really appreciate it. Now I appreciate you. Thank you again and I look forward to all of our fans going and helping you out and hopefully we can help you save some animals as well. I'll definitely tell my daughter to check it out and tell of her her friends that are veterinarians and that text and everybody else to go there and check it out and we'll do as much as we can to help you, because we're all animal lovers to thank you so much. All right. Thank you, Geegi appreciate you joining us on huddle up with US everyone. That's our show for today. Thank you for joining us and we'll see you next time on huddle up with Gus. That's wraps. Thanks for joining in the fun. At digital studios for number puddle up with gus, featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback Gustar rock. Huddled up with GUS is probably produced by sixteen thirty one digital, video and disavailable Happy Music.

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