Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 152 · 4 months ago

Huddle Up With Gus: Dr. Gary Russell

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Today Gus sits down with the renowned Dr. Gary Russell.

winningprofile.com

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Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Brian here. Sports Fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with Gus. Fifteen year NFL quarterback, Gustar Rock Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches. Playing for seven NFL franchises with one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are one every day get to hang out with an Hennell quarterback. Up Oka, sports fans, from the decked out and plush sixteen forty one digital studios, it's kickoff time, so snap your Chin straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Guss. I'm your host, Gusts Rod, fifteen year NFL quarterback, and I'm excited to have you on the show today. We're going to get into a lot of great discussion that if you're an athlete, even if you work in business. How this next guest of mine can really help you. But check me out at my website, huddle up with gustscom. If you like our podcast, please like and subscribe. And you know, wherever you listen to, your podcast can be on any one of the many, many, many networks out there. GO CHECK US out. We're on. We're on almost all of them. So check me out at huddle up with gus and on social media. So today's guest is a very, very, very good friend of mine. We have a lot of great, deep discussions. That a man that's very knowledgeable and I think can help many, many people look at themselves in a way that they've never done before and can help them improve. So today joining me is my good friend Dr Gary Russell. Gary, how are you doing today, buddy good man, I really appreciate it's an honor to be on with you. I've watched you over the years. We've had many discussions and it's just an honor to be sitting here talking to you. Yeah, you know, we have had many discussions and you know I think about I wanted to ask you because we've talked a lot about currently and maybe kind of how you started your company winning profile, and we'll get into that in a little bit, but I wanted to ask you first about when you fell in love with sports. Well, is one of those dead end kids that played out in the dirt and I was the keen kid in the neighborhood who could wrap baseball's that the covers fell off, so I used to get white tape and tape them all up. So every day out in the dirt playing, no matter what season it was. It's just an exciting part of life and still is. Yeah, so when you say you're the key guy to rapid baseball is there's something hard about rapping a baseball. Well, apparently everybody else looking was where I was to believe that I was the one who could. But my mom used to buy this weight tape which we use on bandages, and I very meticulously spent time wrapping the ball so that when it's we took it out, it look brand new. And you know all the silly things that kids do, but it was fun. There's so much fun. Did you did you draw the Little Red Lines on it? Then they have to my profile wouldn't allow me to do that. Yeah, so what area did you get like? Where did you grow up? The PHILLY boy? So I grew up there, went to college in Pennsylvania, could stown state, come on. Went on to Duke, to Kane University to get my master's and then my doctorate at University of Pittsburgh and then finished its California coast and La. Why you been around so when you were growing up, did you have an idol like a? I mean sounds like you were very into baseball. Did you have an idol like that that you followed with the phillies? Where you philly? I'm sure you were phillies guy. I was until they put a dagger in my heart when here, I think, they're up eight games, but seven days ago and I can't remember the exact numbers and they locked the Pennett and I swore then I'd be I was finished. But yeah, Pete Rose was my idol in terms, or Richie Ashburn, who play center field for the phillies. These were not the biggest people on earth and they weren't home run hitters, but they they always got on base and, as we know, Pete Rose, Charlie Hustle and all that stuff. Yeah, they just looked up to them as people I wanted to model my actually my life not so much pete later. Yeah, yeah, you were. You were fixing the baseball's when you were taping them up. Yes, so, so you go through all this in your life and what was your so when you were young and you're going on to college...

...to get your masters, to get your psphd, your doctor and all that stuff that. So what was your purpose when you were in college and what were you thinking of? Hey, this is what I want to do the rest of my life. It's an interesting question because I'm still thinking. What I'm going to say was it doesn't take someone very bright to realize that all human beings are different. That's pretty obvious. But I was fascinated what was causing the difference, what was inherent in the idea of performance or behavior or talent? So I began literally my studies then, which is over fifty years ago, which is interesting because I'm going to age six now, so we'll go with that, and I am still pursuing it. I'm still trying to figure out this equation of per woman's was there, like we talked about, who you looked up to in baseball? was there somebody that you looked up to in the field that you wanted to, you know, in this talent and this profiling, in how to figure out somebody's performance and their emotion, mental state, all those things that you always talked about. was there somebody that you looked up to in Stut in education or this field that you were into? Yeah, there was a gentleman named Carl Rogers who wrote the book on becoming a person. It was my I always felt there was something about the way people interacted. There was, you know, a new affective people, and when I read his book on becoming a person, he was a psychologist or psychotherapist who wrote the book because he wasn't helping anybody get better. A minor flaw in therapy, but he at least admitted it and he went on to study other people who were having success and came up with about five key points that would make the difference in terms of you being a coach, teacher, parent, whatever and that. But it's on my bookshelf right now and it's something I refer to all the time. What were those five key points? Now you're putting me under the gun here. The first first one freedom, which is the idea of giving people the opportunity to speak and talk and chat, which is something even in this two thousand and twenty two, we haven't learned yet. Whether it's sport, you know that you experienced it, whether it's parent and helping people to learn to have a voice. The other one was what was called unconditional positive regard and which is demonstrating that you basically love somebody no matter what, and the best thing you can do with someone who's struggling is hand in Iraq if they spill something, as those to making a big deal that you spilled it. The other one was congruency, which is, you know, Walk to talk, make sure you're living what you preach. I'll stop there before I get too stuck, but they were key points, in fact, in our programs that we developed over the years. If I take a moment to tell you a little bit about that. We develop programs for the NFL. I actually created place sixty, which is now the one. Television was called playback when I developed it with Bill Walsh, and we developed at what we called a kid riculum, was designed to match the systemic nature of children. We went on and created that program we did it for major league soccer. We had three hundred thousand kids, five hundred coaches around the country working out of did it with Jack Nicholas, golden bear and Jim Flick develop programs for the boy scouts of America and JC see, and they were all based on this philosophy that strength and talent is the key to getting people to perform well, which gave us a peatree dish, if you will, of many, many years and over millions of kids and interactions and training of coaches to get us to where we are now in terms of understanding. Sounds funny what we were actually doing. Why did it work? And we think we have that formula now. I don't know that it's perfect, but we think we have that formula. So, you know, one of the questions I always wondered, like we you deal with kids a lot, right with your camps, and you know I've talked about other camps, but you know, when you started, did you say like, okay, if I go to adults it's going to be hard to change them, but if I go to kids, we can create a new way the kids...

...think, listen, learn and then be positive out in the world? Did you? Did you think about it that way, or did you you know what I mean like, because if you go to a bunch of adults who have, you know, our parents and everything, and you're trying to say you know you're doing this wrong. Sometimes they they oppose it. They don't know why, they just oppose it because they don't want somebody tell them what to do. So I was wondering if kids you kind of can build in that understanding of positivity, because not all parents are positive, and you know I've talked about that, like after a game, right home in the car. Well, how do you handle your kids? You know what's the best thing to do? Parents are asking those questions all the time, all the time, as they should. Well, given that I was a teacher for many, many years, I was a teacher who everybody else gave me the kids that they couldn't handle, kids that were failing, kids that were discipline problems, and I could tell you then what I did to help change that, but I couldn't tell you why it worked. But I can now. So kids are, I think humans basically are born to be positive and productive. I mean smiling is one of the first things that we learn how to do, and I think the problem with adults is we have a tendency to get locked into certain behaviors and then we ultimately fildren into those same behaviors. So it was easier to work with kids. You're right, there are adults asking those questions now and we can answer them. So when you kind of brought this philosophy up to Bill Walsh, when you wanted to create place sixty, what was his answer like? He did he understand it all, or he was he just the part of the football part for the camps? Well, as I said before, excuse me, just as I said before, there are many positive, productive people in this world. Our research was to research those people to find out what were they doing and why did it work? So when I bet met Bill Walsh, he was one of those people. He basically said to me when I first met him, I have no idea why everybody's making this big fuss over the way I coach. He said this is I coach the same way now that I did when I was in high school. He said it's pretty simple. You just treat your people right, provide the right content and if you got the right talent you're going to get success. And he's right. And he was really a gentleman and we translated his football knowledge into activities that were systemic to eight year olds, twelve year olds, fourteen year olds, eighteen years and he was fascinated by it, as was Jim Flip, with Jack Nicholas, in the whole idea. How do you create content that matches the development of the person, which is why we called it a kidriculum. Jim Flick said to me he's said, you know, where were you when I was raising my daughter? I said, well, that's a hard question answer, but I think I knew you. Yeah, any I said why and he said, well, you know, I work with Jack Nichols to the best golf round the world and I'm his coach and I wanted to get my daughter involved in the game and she said she had went in to do with it. He said she's now thirty three or whatever it was then, and she loves the game. But she said he said when she was a kid, and he said I now understand that. I was trying to push the adult version of golfs on to her and she was a kid who wasn't really willing to accept it. Probably be go she didn't understand it, and that he was exactly right. Yeah, I know it sounds like I've been through that with my son's and now they love it and they're like dad, why don't you help us play when we were little? And I'm like, well, you don't want to, you know what I mean. So there's a way to understand and do that. Hey everyone, thanks for joining us on huddle up with guss. You know you can check me out and huddle up with gustscom or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, or you can follow me on social media. At Huddle up with guests. We're talking with my good friend Dr Russell here. He's a creative, winning profile and also you, as you've heard, the Kid Maurriculum, which this program is amazing. Camps and people should be training this way. I think it's incredible. He talked about how he took Bill Walsh's football brain and changed it into products that kids can play as they get older and Gary I'm sure that it's not the same for eight years old on up. It Chans to change, oh, without a doubt. If you understand children, let's let's talk about it. Seven year old, eight year old...

...child. They live in a world which was called concrete experience, which means every activity that they do is concrete in this nature and they don't have anything abstract about it. Translate what I just said. They don't understand the concepts of positions. They can tell me them through their language, which gives adults the idea. Well, maybe they'd actually understand this. If anybody out there's ever watched the soccer match of eleven kids versus eleven at eight seven, it looks like magnet ball be's on honey and they all follow the concreteness of the ball around and everybody on the sidelines is yelling spread out, get away from each other, pass it. They don't have any idea what you're talking about. As that. Those years progress around the age of ten, eleven and twelve, they get into abstract functional thought process. This is why we teach Algebra in eighth grade or seventh grade. I still don't know why would teach Algebr at all, because when I took it it was a plus B equals. Seeing that that makes no sense right. But to translate that information you have to be at a certain mental stage to understand it. So it isn't so about the age of ten twelve we're kids actually begin to really understand positional play and begin to be able to do in the soccer terms, support one another to make things work, and your language of football, it's knowing where the ball is going to come before it comes, all those things that are abstracted children, but two adults they can functionally handle that. Yeah, I know, I haven't makes a lot of sense that. You know, obviously the brain is still developing and growing and and creating those neurons. And now that you study that and then seeing that and you went through this whole kid Urriculum, what was your next process, because I don't think you had winning profile at that point. Or did you know? I've almost done things backwards, which is probably not unlike my profile, by the way. But what I actually did was study medicine, not to become a practitioner, because I wanted to develop a model in people or psychology that was like medicine. Medicines all about systems and understanding the structure of human anatomy, and once you master those you can become a practitioner. But when I looked into the psychology field and all the other instruments that very being used to measure talent or personality, they were all qualitative in nature. Sorry about it. Let me explain what I mean by qualitative. If I go to the emergency room today and I tell the nurse or doctor what's I'm feeling, that's qualitative information valid. But if they flip me on the table and took my appendix out at that moment, that would be a lawsuit. That's not going to happen. So what if they put you in the hospital and they run tests to gain quantitative information to back up the qualitative? Everything in psychology has been basically qualitated. What people think or when people feel, not bad, but to linear and we're not living. So I wanted to develop a model that would would parallel the idea of a medical model so that when I look at a human being, and if I had had the chance to work with you, we've talked about this when you were younger, I would create a model around you. What we know now about performance and talent. Teach you that model, teach people around you that model, and I believe, after watching you for years, you would have been even more successful than you've already been. We look how many mistakes we make now, Brady, going in the sixth round. I don't know who made that choice, but they shouldn't be working anymore. We were wrong, Russell Wilson. We could go on and on with people that we've missed, and it's no different than if I didn't have a medical model to treat you, you might get sicker and you might die. And Sport we just end up going away and we miss people who could have been a lot better than we would if we understood what was going on with that person at that time. Well, and you can also look at it the other way, right. So I take a first rounder and I think he's really good right, which is callitative where we don't really know, but I think he's going to be great because we're going to draft him in the first round and then he ends up doing nothing his whole career. And it whether it's because, would you say that's because the coaches didn't understand his profile or who he was? Is that a big part of it to why that person didn't go on to be better? Yeah, so, if you look at what we're doing even in the world today, in Business and in sport, we...

...use physicality or optics to make choices and the reality is, whether it's Tom Brady, you or whoever it might be, at the moment that we're looking at those optics. We don't know what's going on in here, in our head, our mental capacity. So part of our profile is to measure that. What are you like cognitively? How do you problem so how do you think? How do you make decisions and choices in your world? As the quarterback, those choices better happen pretty quick and you need to have the talent to be able to do that. And we've seen. You see quarterbacks who come out, they're supposed to be great and they just can, it seemed, to read the game, and that's mental process that we can't see. So we've developed a model to measure that. This other part of it is emotional, emotive. How do you attach yourself to the world? Through people, through logic, both, and we know the emotional part of the game. Keeping that under control is huge. So we develop the process that measures that as well as what are you going to be like under pressure? How do you handle that? What do you do? And then we measure of physicality, which is obviously obvious to do. We put those together, we triangulate that information with an algorithm and we come out with a threedimensional psychological outline of you. Every coach that ever coach shoot should have had that. You should have had it, your parents should have had it. Schools should add it, because it's unlocking that potential. To me, that's what winning is all about. This isn't necessarily a score, although I would say that if somebody's not worried about winning, they're the person I want to play next. So it is all about maximizing someone's given, God given talent that you're born with. That's what we know now. We know that talent is the prewired condition of we having birth, and it's done through the study of neurology. So if I was a parent and I say Hey, look, doc, I don't understand all this, this this high level talk, give me if I said I come to you as a parent, I want my kids to be the best people they can be, whether it's they're they're on the field playing, they're at home, they're out in public, whatever. I need to understand them better. Give me a layman's term of you know the Kate. We know the case not finished a while. What are we going to do to get this cake to taste like it should? Well, I think generally speaking, up until about the age of ten, Eleven, twelve. We should just let kids be kids and just have fun. We shouldn't be trying to coach them, direct them, lead them. We should be encouraging them to play. Plays like oxygen, and the more kids have an opportunity to play under the idea that it's supposed to be fun and we're supposed to enjoy what we're doing, as opposed to keeping the League score, a table and all those things. You know, if you notice the numbers of kids in sport today, they're dropping and I think a lot of it has to do with not being able to go out in the dirt like I did and just play without adult supervision. Just let them have fun have a good time. The other thing I think that's really key, especially with talent now that we know, is as you're watching kids play, look for the things that they are able to do without thinking any academic so for kids that are extremely verbal, we know that they have the ability to lead because they can talk and communicate. For the kids who are very quiet and kind of reserved and sit back, they need more opportunity to have an opportunity to get involved. So if you are helping to organize things, it's generally the kids that are allowed and stand out. We get all the attention, and the kids that are not loud and reticent kind of sitting the back and won't be long there. They won't show up for the next activity because they don't believe they're involved. Yeah, and no. I love that. And so everyone, if you're out there and you and you have kids, let them play, let them enjoy their time. Don't force them to do anything they don't want to do. I think it's it's part of that right, because kids are so nowadays. Gary, where they're, you know, they're they're they're in their house or playing video games, and I don't think that's bad, but I think that they need other activities. Hey, everyone, welcome to hoddle up with Guss if you have if you just joined us, I'm talking with my good friend Dr Gary Russell. We were just talking about, you know, how to bake best cake you can. So in terms of how do we raise our kids, how do we understand them? What should we do to...

...have the best kid that's on the field, off the field, at home, everywhere else, and Gary's given us a deep, deep look into the weeds about how to do that you can check me out and how tole up with gusts where ever you listen to your favorite podcast. So, Doctor Russell created this company called winning profile, and Gary, you've done all these things over career. Like you said, you've been studying this for fifty years. Why winning profile and why take everything that you just told us and say I got a package this and I got to figure out how deliverous to many people as I can. Well, let me just give you a little bit more background. I think you know the idea that Bill Walsh and we came up with is played. That was what place is now called, and the idea was to develop a curriculum that was systemic to children and for us to get out of the way as adults. We did that. We did another sports. The key to the difference of us is our work is based on the science of neurology. Now, I made bore some people with this information, but it's really important to understand that when children are born, their heads are bigger than the bodies and the reason for that is there's an overabundance of neurons that begin to start a process sixty day before birth, forty two days, two days after birth and tremendous burst of activity that goes on from those days up to the age of sixteen. Those neurons begin to weave themselves into three threads, which we now call behavior, our mental, emotional and actual components. The model basically takes all of the science of that and we created a profile to measure that so that when we work with someone like yourself, where children probably around the age of eleven or twelve, when their language is good enough to take an assessment, we can begin to assess the talent that that person has. Now, talent isn't what you do. It isn't football, it isn't golf, it isn't math. Talent is the way you are put together, the way you're wired, if you will. The beauty of what we know from science now is the concept of nor plasticity, which means your talent, themes that we measure, can be coached, they could move, they can get stronger, whereas the old theory was whatever you were born with, that's it, and that's just sorry, you guys, that's just not the way it is. So we now know, once we gain a profile of a person and we teach the person the profile, which doesn't take long and the people around that person. We can actually create activities that gives you structure and lessons of how to use the talent to improve yourself, so that begins to improve performance. That's using your talents and we use your behavioral components to do it. It's exciting, it works and the latest step that we've created is what we call human analytics. We can now profile a thousand people and if we want to replace Guss Frat. I'm not doing that, guys, but if we wanted to, we could put a thousand people in the database and find out from this internal data that we've graded who looks like you more than anybody else from the inside, not just what we see on the outside. Right. Yeah, I understand that. I mean you're you know you're and I talked a lot about talent and you know it's not just that. We see a lot of people that have talent, but their emotional and their mental side it's not it's not equal, and those things all have to be equal to be the best you can be. But I want to ask you give me an example of an athlete that you've worked with that you really felt like you've helped them understand themselves exceed beyond their expectations. Well, the one that stands out to me the most as a lady, your name is Mel read. She's English. She plays in the soul on cup. We met her when she was nineteen and when we profiled her in her emotive component she had competition lower inner profile than any other athlete we had seen. Not Bad, but lower. And the gentleman they in clock circle ive would work that I was working with. You, was the performance director in the British Olympics. Looked at me and said what do we do now, and I said, well, what we do now is teach the people around her what the theme is. The theme was competition, which you would expect, and great athletes right took that theme, got the team around her to coach or no different that you would do in a business, and over six months we tried to enhance that theme of competition, which we did, and in six months she became rookie of the year in Europe. She was then ranked number...

...one and she's still playing. Her goal was always to get the number one. She's not there yet, but she's still working at it. So you could actually see the improvement, the the the process that we use with an athlete. Why we're doing this is to journal, because journaling takes everything that you're experiencing and pulls it together. And we literally taught her how to feel her themes so that as she journaled, which is qualitative information, see be getting too sense that things were happening and getting better. The Quantitative Dat it was easy or store dropped, and that was a way of showing her and a team how she was changing and moving forward. So a lot of your themes have been working with athletes and we're talking about that, but actually it's for everyone, you know, with normal plasticity and the understanding of that and that we can all increase her change what we know or understanding how to do things, because I know that you've worked with major companies as well across this United States, and and so tell me when that kind of when you figured out that all this isn't just for athletes and figuring out that this is for anybody in the workplace. When did that happen for you? I always felt it was going to happen, but I didn't have proof. So, simply speaking, we can go into the place like Morgan Stanley now or big retail groups or I'm working with Eddie had airlines now and we can get a person or a team of people and you can begin to see the patterns that they have that are like Olympians were like your your profile. They have everything but the physicality to do a sport. They have the mental capacity which is gripped. It's all about handling pressure, it's about leadership, it's about all these qualities that we're looking for people. The problem with new interview people and use a resume. You can't see those. So we make this takes the research, as we're having one out of five people correctly in this country. Not Great, not a great personage, and the reason is because we're not measuring the right things. I get excited when I say this because if you had an MRI or x Ray in medicine, we'd be able to see things. That's pretty simple. Right. Psychology we don't see things. So our profile provides an MRI or an x ray of what how you're put together psychologically, so you can begin to get patterns of people who are leaders and patterns of people who are followers. We need people to know how to follow. So we can do all of that we can profile teams so that we can get a scattering of talent in a team and we can see if there's any outliers in that team which might be slowing that team down. They would be the first people that you might want to replace. It's so exciting to be able to predict and help people understand themselves so that they can make better choices and perform at our level. Yeah, so usually when you think of psychology and getting to know someone, and you know my wife, an's a therapist, as you know, and to try and figure out them, it takes time. You know, the visits aren't you know, they're an hour once every other week, or you know, whatever it is, it takes time. So how have you with winning profile? How's extreamline that process of understanding as a coach, that your player or even yourself? Well, if you think of medicine, if I went into the hospital and I explained to all my symptoms and people had to take a lot of time to figure out what I'm saying, I could be dead right. We don't that time. So the beauty of this process is is that when we're working with a person in a company, for example, or or on a sporting team. We want to get analysis, quantitative analysis, quickly so we can profile someone in a matter of fifty minutes, turn that profile around back to them and begin teaching them these principles and the way we work with people. I'm working with someone right now in New York City who has been struggling in his job but everybody feels he has the talent to do it. So it's taken us now about five or six weeks and we're already beginning to see his behavior change back to what they thought they would get. Yeah, the beauty is you don't have to wait a year. You can do that medicine. You can do it in five or six weeks. And this whole idea of performance review in business, where we review performance three, six and twelve months, is nuts. It's...

...crazy. And when they what do they review? They review how many? How many widg you sold? Right, so it's not really figuring out why they're you know, they said, well, you got to sell more. That's not helping me. Well, it would be like me telling you that six games agoing you through six in completions. You would look at me and say, well, thanks very much, I already know that. And what good is he going to do me now? So the beauty of this process is it's now, it's it's in the moment. So we're not looking back. We already know something's going on. We're looking forward, which is this is why our prose gets process gives you what we call lead indicators. It tells you what a person should be like. Everybody else works with lag indicators, which tells you what you did yesterday. Thank you for I already know that right. So we got to move forward and this process is accelerating that. So you were talking before about the triangulation, triangulation that you do, so give me those three points that you're using to figure that out. Well, Nero, logically, our threads connect to three components behavior, mental cognitive, which is really problem solving, thinking choices. One to emotion. How do we attach ourselves to the world? Do we do it through people, Eq emotional intelligence? Do we do it through logic and things Iq, which is logic and reasoning, or do we have some combination of both? And then the third area is physicality. What are we like under pressure? We take those three instruments. Took US two years to develop an algorithm that would triangulate that information, which basically brings it all together. Your response was, I think, if I can quote you, is that when you read your profile, you had a sense about yourself, but what you learned was information, terms and details that literally explain, probably in greater detail than you've ever had about yourself. Yeah, you know, when I first work with you and you did my profile, you know, you get a sheet really tells you all the stories. You're taking three different types of tests and we're understanding everything you just talked about. But now you guys have streamlined it into you're working on streamlining it into more of an APP so that we can get everything right on our phone and we can understand ourselves better and get two things quicker, like you're talking about, and and try to be the best person we are faster. Absolutely, I mean that's the key. People don't want to hamburger five hours from now, they want it when I order it, and we're no different. We're very impatient, is people, and we're doing that because we want to get better. So you're absolutely right. We're able now to take all this information. Our APP isn't a hundred percent working the way we want it too yet, but we can still provide all the information, but eventually that's exactly what we want to we want a person to be sitting in a room a team of people and be able to look across the table and say, guss frock, how do you think? How does he feel and what's his actions and depressure the person across the rooms going to be looking at you. What that does is help the two of you know how to communicate with each other, how to interact with each other. You know what it is that the person's like, to be able to explain things better. All of that is speeds up the individual, speeds up the team, speeds up the performance and in sport, especially at the pro level, time is crucial because you don't have an hour to figure out a play. You have to figure out things at the moment. Eleven people begin to move against another eleven and those things happen in middle seconds. So all of this is designed to make it easier, handier and be able to communicate clearly what's going on with you and the people around here. Yeah, and I think as a coach and you look at we talked about the NFL all time in the combine. You know it starts there when they're young. You know you're getting kids that are twenty two years old and if it takes you ten years to figure it out, the average life in the NFL's only two and a half years. So I think with a profile, with what you're doing, a coach could take this or even the combine, which is a coaching it's just hey, we're figuring out who all these kids are. Would that be a great place for winning profile to be? Absolutely when you think about the combine, and I'm not trying to be critical of the NFL, but I think ninety percent of the time has been with physicality, running, jumping, leaping, lifting and not a lot of spent on, quote unquote, talking with another human being, let alone reading a diagnostic instrument that tells you how this person thinks. I was person emotes all the things that you knew. Need really need to make a choice. My ultimate dream is seven point five people,...

...seven point five billion people in this planet all have a profile, just like a fingerprint, and I believe every human being should know what their profile is so that they can maximize themselves with their parents, with schools, with coaches, in business, and this is in a process to select a or eliminate people. This is a process to match internal talent with the role that you expect that person to play. Big Difference in what I just said. Most people look at being selected as elimination. This is all about finding the right fit, the right person, not just for the role but most importantly, for the person, because the person goes into a role that isn't them, you're not going to be happy. Right please. An instrument in this country right now called an engagement score, which beings are people totally wrapped up in what they're doing, and we have the highest score in the world, which I think is thirty seven percent, and that's awful. We should be everything in our power to get that thirty seven up to a hundred percent of people being totally happy and and feeling well about who they are and what they're doing. Yeah, it, it is so true what you just said. We all have to be happy and if you're not happy at work or wherever it is, on a team with your parents, things can go right quickly. Hey everyone, thanks you join man how to up with Gus. We're having a great discussion about the psychology of the human and Gary Still Teaching me so much I'll never learn at all. He's been doing it for fifty years, but check me out how to up with gusts. If you want to watch this episode again or hear more tidbits, will put it out on social media and some good clips so that you can catch Dr Russell and understand what he's doing so that you can make yourself better. So, Gary, you know we've discussed a lot. You've really gone through. So tell me. You know, I know the one here in Pittsburgh where I live, and you've been here. Your son lives here. You've been in Pittsburgh for a while and you worked with a great company here and you really turn them around and gave them an understanding of what they should be and how they should treat people and that increase their profits. So tell me a little bit about when you worked with giant Eagle. Well, it's interesting. John Luco, who was the president at that time, when I met him, he said yet fifteen minutes. I went okay, I began to explain what we did and how we did it, and I use the example of Tom Brady as us not being able to be able to read people correctly, and he perked up when he said. So I said, I have store leaders that are generally great. He said, but we every once in a while we picked the wrong person. We think we know what we're doing, but we do have the right person. And I said, well, you're using the wrong instrument. He said, what do you mean? And I said, well, you're not measuring the right things, and I went through what I had just explained to you. So they brought me in and I ended up profiling about two hundred and twenty of their store leaders and we developed a model that basically matched the top people. In other words, we knew quantitatively who the top store leaders were and we then developed a profile of that top people and then, as they would hire people, they would use this template to help them understand are they hiring the right people? John, after me being there three and a half years, he retired and he's now the president of our board. So and he called me and he said, you know, what you did here was fantastic. I want to help you grow this business to help other people, and he's done that. So it's in. They did increase your profits and I'd love to say it was strictly because of me, but I can't. But you know, helping people to change the mindset of a positive thinking, positive modeling, in strength based coaching, developing culture, choices and freedom, like I mentioned earlier, was all a part of it. We took a store, one of their big stores, five hundred employees and we measured their level of engagement in the store, which, for Johnnygle was like sixty six out of a hundred, much better than the national average. Right. I asked them what would one percentage of improve an engagement due to their PNL STATE? They said we don't know, when I said, well, we're going to find out. So I took th thirty five of their top leaders trained them in this winning profile. They then went and worked with the...

...five hundred employees and in four months we change the level of engagement by twelve points. In each point was worth a hundred and Fiftyzero. And it was interesting. The gentleman who ran the store up until that point he said until now, he said, I wasn't sure about you, and he said that now that I've seen the PNL change, I'm convinced. So we were able to model that process in a store and that's what I've been doing with other companies ever since. So what bring it back to sports a little bit. This offseason we've seen a lot of coaches get fired, seen general managers get fired, new coaches come in and it seems like this process happens every year. Right, there's no long terms. The steelers are like one there's steelers are like one of the only teams that key their head coach. What do you think? My question is, if you're going to a franchise and you want to go in and you want to help them with winning profile, I believe that everyone from the top, the owner down, should no understand their profile, because I feel like the owner also needs to have a match, you know, be that a GM and a coach, that they understanding it along with absolutely you know, every year this happens and I really feel for these people who are trying to make a living and trying to make it work and it isn't working. I don't think anybody knows why it isn't working. We blame it on the football's not the right shape and the grasses and green enough, and I'm being to seisars, but but we don't really look at just systemic issues are what are going on? So if you're going to hire someone, then everybody in new organization, is you just said, should be profile to the understand what they're looking at. And then when you profile someone, you develop a template of what you're looking for and then you profile to find out with the MRI idea, does the person have this, and then do they have the supporting staff around them that has the right profile to make it at all pulled together? The beauty of Bill Walsh is that there are people like him this seem to kind of just do it naturally, but they're few and far because between, as we've seen year after year after year. And I'm not being trying to be disparaged to any individuals, but I think anybody who goes up to become a head coach of an NFL team, if anybody needs a profile it's them so they understand who they are, what they are one of their talents and what do they need around them to make it all work. But if it were me, I would profile everybody in the whole organization. Yeah, you know, because I can give you a thousand examples of the time I spent in the NFL and when I would deal with coaches that didn't understand me. Just for an example, I'll give you. When I was with the with Washington, I was a pound over overweight. You know, supposed to way to hundred twenty eight, Wad two hundred and twenty nine. Nothing was said to me and all of a sudden I get a fine cheet in my locker that says you're a pound overweighting to cost you three hundred fifty dollars and I take it to the coach and said what's going on? I said you were a pound over weights and the rules and I said it's wait, you know I could lose it and you know I probably got to practice. Come in for practice and be three pounds under and instead of understanding me and working with me and just making a positive thing, it turned into a very negative thing and it had I had a lot of I don't know what, animosity towards the coaching staff. Then, well, you hear this whole time, not just you. The problem is, Gouy. We don't have a model. We don't have a medical model. Would have a system that we've follow. It's maybe not perfect, but it's for being good and we would learn very quickly with the research that we've done, that punishing people for a pound and charging is just excusing pression. Ask backwards. It's exactly the opposite of what we should be doing with kids, older kids and especially men, grown men. Instead of having a dialog and understanding that person and working out a problem, getting back to freedom and choice and communication, we go to this nonsense that we've had for four hundred, five hundred years of punishing someone to get what we want on them. It doesn't work. It appears that it works because basically people pay the fine and comply, but what we don't know is what they're thinking as they're doing it, which is not good. They're not outing and they reasonful and it's it's the very thing that we just talked about about with children. These things are modeled from the pros down to kids and kids linked. We have a football league here in my town. Now I get down and watching, what do I see? Adults screaming kids, putting their finger in their face, pushing them,...

...doing all the things that we see, unfortunately, at the adult level, and I just shake my head and it just breaks my heart to see this going on. These your kids, these are children that are learning how to get along with each other. Now we live in a world and for here on, getting philosophical. We're living in a world where everybody's pushing each other. Yeah, and we see it in sports programs either. was just one on TV the other night where hockey player in youth hockey came off the bench and went up and start fighting a parent. Like that kind of stuff is uncalled for. It's I get it. You have to understand what's going on, and parents really say parents have to be the bigger people, right, and and, but they also don't understand themselves and why they do these things. So, Gary, will you have a minute left? Tell me, give me a little bit of how we can connect with you, how of our fans can find you and, if they want to really understand winning profile and change their lives, what they can do to do that. Well, thanks for that. Offer my email, Justice Gary Dot r USSKELLL at winning profilecom. Certainly somebody can contact me there and I'd be glad to have a chat with you about what this is about in greater depth. For you, and I would encourage everybody to be looking for models like ours that are based on positive psychology, are based on research, based on information that will help things get better. Yeah, so go to winning profilecom. Check out Dr Russell and his whole staff. If you're an adult, if you are somebody who wants to be better, if you have kids, you want to understand stand them better, understand yourself first and then go and help understand your kids. Be Happy, be positive. That's what it's all about. Gary, I think you're doing incredible job and you know, whatever I could do to help you push this out there. We need it more in our country now than we ever have before. Well, I'm blessed to know you. Thank you so much. Yeah, I know, I appreciate you coming on and joining me. So go check Dr Russell out at winning profilecom. Remember, he's worked with many, many athletes, many companies. If you want to do the same thing, improve your company, improve the way you play, you got to understand yourself. Go to winning profilecom. That's it everyone. Thanks for joining me on huddle up with gusts. Will see you next week and I appreciate you all listening. Go to huddle up with Gustscom, where you can check out all kind of cool things on my website. It's being improved as we speak. And then, wherever you listen your favorite podcast, check me out and then go on to social media, add gusts rot. You can follow me there or you can go to at huddle up with gusts and falls there as well. So I appreciate joining me another great show and I want to thank Dr Russell again for joining us. Have a great weekend everyone. That's a wrap sports. Thanks for joining in the fun. Studios for number up GUS, featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback Justus Farrad. Huddle up with gusts is probably pretty us. By six hundred and thirty one digital media and disavailable a Happy Music.

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