Huddle Up with Gus
Huddle Up with Gus

Episode 157 · 4 months ago

Huddle Up with Gus: Chris Jacke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

NFL Packers kicking legend, Chris Jacke, and Gus talk about the nuances of holding, kicking, and transitioning to life after football.

Welcome to what surely will be a doozy of a match up. Brian here. Sports Fans, whether your game is on the Gridiron, at the diamond or on the links, we can only say get up off your seats and get ready for some real action. Welcome to this week's huddle up with Gus. Fifteen year NFL quarterback Gus Bar Rock. Passion for sports has taken him on the field and behind the benches. Playing for seven NFL franchises with one hundred fourteen TD's under his belt, Gust knows who the players are and how the Games are one every day get to hang out with an NFL quarterback up. Okay, sports bands, from the decked out and plush sixteen thirty one digital studios. It's kickoff time, so snap your two straps on and get ready to huddle up with us. Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of Huddle up with Gusts. I'm your host, fifteen year NFL former quarterback, Gust Farat, and I want to welcome you to huddle up with gusts. So I appreciate you being here and thank you for listening to the PODCASTS. On whatever station or were APP you listen to your podcast on so, wherever you are, check it out, give us some five stars and we would really appreciate any likes and shares as well. So we want to thank all of our sponsors and our partners. Six thirty one to new studios, MFN partners. They're helping us right now. They're great with us, and ffn operators, and then also Terry showman. She she's one of our our big helpers here and big part of huddle up with guests was. Thank you to Terry for always helping us with great guests. And we want to thank a couple of our sponsors. New Jeneks, you know if you've ever seen those commercials with Doug Fluty, who we had on the show before, and Frank Thomas or kind of funny. But new jenks are going to help you out, and little blue pill. Some of US needed some of us don't, but if you need it, go to little blue pill, check it out and hopefully it can help you out. So today's guest former super bowl winner in one thousand nine hundred and ninety six. He was drafted in one thousand nine hundred and eighty nine's out of the College of you tip and now he's helping former packers, you know, with different things, but also mainly on the golf course and trying to get them back out in the community, which I think is wonderful, when he has a company called player alumni resources. So joining us today is Packer Hall of Famer Chris Jack. Thanks for having me. And Yeah, as you go through your sponsors, I don't know if I should feel older or younger. I just had a birthday a couple days ago and turned fifty six and I haven't had to use the little blue pill ornw Jennex yet. So I'm gonna knock on Wood. But yeah, I you know, I haven't either, Chris. And no money, you know what I mean? Yeah, I come wood. No plenty, tend but you know, sometimes you got to find with sponsors you can find. And you know, I say, I'm assuming you're in your early S. probably. Yes, I'll be fifty one in July. So yeah, I'm not. I'm not far behind. You know, you and I went to college when you graduated. So, but I was just say I did. I did a little research on you as well and notice that you went to Tulsas and we played Tulsa. I think my senior year in Tulsa and I think rubly was the quarterback. He was. I was just a punk freshman from Pittsburgh to head. Nob You what I was doing, and then it took me a few years to grow up, which it's probably most of us going to college for the first year. Well, yeah, I mean some of us haven't grown up yet. I know I have. Yeah, it's a working well, you don't really want to write. You want to stay young. Absolutely got to stay young. Yeah, you know. So, anologically I'm fifty six, but I feel like a fifty four year old. So that's awesome. Well, you know, I don't know how many times I was three hundred pound ors shit you out there, but sometimes when they hit you get a little older. La, I don't even want. I don't even want to imagine. I enjoyed my life as a kicker watching you guys beat each other up. So, so, you were born in Richmond, but you grew up in Dallas. That right, I did.

I was lived it. Lived in Richmond, Virginia. Like you said, I was born there in one thousand nineteen and sixty six, and in one nineteen seventy my dad was working for temper insurance. If you're a big golfer, you probably remember the Kemper Open. Yeah, he got transferred to Dallas. I was fine and my brother was oh my God, my brother was probably one and we moved there in nineteen seventy. My folks are still there. They're still alive and kicking. My Dad's eighty four, my mom's eight ninety two and god of them, but they're yeah, anyone with older parents probably knows what I'm a looting to, but I'm Bowie, not go there. Everybody Lane. So I know exactly what your tip. I always say my my folks, if you ever watch that TV show everyone loves Raymond, my folks are are frank and Marie. I mean, okay, yeah, it's up. A couple had a couple of bombs in there. Maybe. Yeah, well, you know, usually they don't. If they have an opinion, they're going to voice it right. They're not like my dad was. My Dad was born and raised in Buffalo New York. So yeah, he speaks his mind, even if he's losing it. So yeah, I have lots of stories of that between my parents and my grandparents. So there's a lot of those kind of stories. So when you were in Dallas and you're growing up. What's the first memory of you have a fall in love with sports, because I mean I'm assuming you played a lot of sports growing up. Yeah, you know, I started playing soccer, shocker, when I was four years old. Soccer was pretty big and Dallas and my dad, who knew nothing about about coaching soccer, what was my coach for years when in the club soccer as I got older, because he I guess I was pretty I'm trying to say I'm was pretty good without actually saying I was pretty good at playing soccer. And you know, football kind of just fell into my lap in seventh grade and doubt and Dallas they start and junior high with football and one of the coaches at the end of the day asked is there anyone here can kick a football? And I said, you know, I thought to myself, will I play soccer? Can't be too much different. So I raised my hand and I never look back. You know, I really enjoyed kicking. I didn't bother playing other positions. I tried but I was horrible. So I learned how to kick a football really early. But but continue to play soccer and baseball all the way through high school and just just loved it. Have you how many kickers do you know didn't play soccer growing up? Zero, I can't even. I can't even think of what I'm the first one. The name to pop in my head was Mark Moseley, you know, the straight on kicker for right skins back at soccer. Wouldn't be good? Straight on right? No, no, that wouldn't be a good way to kick the soccer ball. Yeah, no, definitely. I think a lot of kids kind of start out that way, you know. And then I did the same thing. I when I was coached high school after I retired from the NFL. Right, I went over and said, hey, you got any kids over here in a soccer team which I knew? All the coaches were like, you know, just come over, they can just come and kick and practice and they don't even have to stay. They just kicking. Go and you know what I mean, like yeah, absolutely, special teams the first part of practice and if you need him for soccer practice, go take them and sure, and it was great. It worked out really well. Yeah, and I have a lot of over the years I have kids or even parents asked me, you know, how do I get my kid involved and kicking a football, I go the first thing they got to do is play soccer. I mean it's a self teacher, like a golf swing. It's it you self, teacher self how to do it and you just work on it and soccer is a great way to start doing that. Do you think it's it's it's good for kickers to like because soccer you got to use both feet right and so do you think that's good for you to kind of keep your balance, to all things you need to do to be a stronger kicker? I've never really thought of it that way. I mean I, as you might imagine, we had a lot of time and practice of myself and the punters or whoever the punter was at the time, and we would mess around with our opposite foot a little...

...bit. Now whether it helped me, I doubt it, but they can hurt. I know growing up, I know there was a couple of kids that could kick a soccer ball with either foot and it would know, it's been interesting to see if they could have kicked the football with either foot. Yeah, because, you know, I think I just think about soccer and like how you have to plant your foot when you can ball and it's moving. And then right then football, you know, it's just like sitting there, like it's like your your kicking. What are they called? Penalty kick? Right, it's not moved most of the time. and soccer the balls moving around. It absolutely I in football the only thing you got to worry about is a three hundred pound guy landing on top of you after kick it. So did you have have an experience like that in high school, college or the pros, where you swung and then somebody took you out? No, fortunately, you know, I never got hit. I remember I think it was in Madison. It was I want to say one thousand nine hundred and ninety two. We were we were still playing preseason games at the univous your Nevercy Wisconsin, and we had just scored and the quarterback that was on the field went running off the field and excitements and he came running back on and his name was Brett far yeah, and and and he was a horrible holder, but he was doing the whole dam because he had wasn't a starter at that point. And he fumbled the snap on the extra point and he picked it up and looked like he was going to pitch it to me and preseason and I just remembered distinctly saying Brett, don't throw me the ball. You're on M that's all. I avoided that. And you know, thank goodness, breath found a new career playing quarterback because he was not a good holder. Yeah, well, I was. So I was the seventh round draft pick. I know you were six rounds. Yeah, so when I came in, my coach, Cam Cameron, was like, Dude, you gotta learn how to hold. I said, well, he goes. The more you can do, the longer stay around. So I held every year I was in the NFL, you know, and including a hall of fame kicker and more and Anderson, who was very strict and very you know, everything we did had to be right, had to be perfect. But the problem was he was left footed and I never held for a left footed kicker before. It wasn't kind of nuts. It's kind of nuts, a little different. Yeah, so you know, back I think in a s when you were kicking, you know, and obviously I came in ninety four and I saw, you know it. Chiplow Miller was our first kicker and he was at the at the skins and those guys sometimes would practice and then all of a sudden they would leaves and in it's like what are they doing, you know, and chip of come back. I got to probably be like, oh, we just went play nine holes. Like I feel like the NFL is so different now, but back in the day those guys would just go and play golf and then come back right. I can neither confirm nor deny that we ever did that here trying to get a job now. No, we were. I mean we I don't I don't remember. Between and training camp. There was always time between practices. I know Craig Hendrick, the Punter of the time, he and I would go hit a bucket of balls. I don't ever recall playing around, but we do have a lot of time on our hands and I can remember. You remember back in the s game boy. I'm sure you played game boy. It's a little hand things. And One day we have a barn and inside facility, and most teams do now, I guess. And he and I were in there playing video golf and Mike Homerom came walking in and if you and everything you hear about my car, I could imagine. I mean he's a he's a militant and he just he just looked at us where, you know, we looked up. We're laying down or playing game boy, and he just took his head and walk back out and I looked at Craig I go I just think we got fired. Yeah, I don't know this is gonna be bad or good. This isn't going to be good, but yeah, we do have a lot of time on our hands and we got to fill it somehow. Right exactly. Hey everyone, thanks for listening to hoddle up with Gust appreciate you listening. CHECK US out at hoddle up with Gustscom we're speaking with Chris Jackie, Hall of fame, a packers kicker, and you know, Chris...

...and I thinking about like when you go from high school to College, I mean, how different was your body because you know a lot of guys, like for me, I was like two hundred pounds and I get to college and I feel like I thought I was big in high school. You know. You know, then you get to college and you see all these other guys. When you get the college, get have a lot of competition kicking, or did you just kind of when I got. When I got there as a freshman, there was probably, you know, college, you know, they have a team roster of about a hundred guys. They're probably had to be five or six kickers and four or five punters and you know, just being a freshman, you just, you know, just kind of fitted. I didn't play my freshman year and you just said, I think I was one sixty five or one hundred and seventy at that time and by the time I got drafted, I think I was two thousand and five. And not fat either, right before you go there. Absolutely. So yeah, I mean you just go. Why? I mean it's like going from the college levels to the NFL level. You just you go in with your eyes wide open and learning as much as you can and not trying to cause any commotion and kind of stay out of the radar a you didn't want to have to sing at the lunch table or dinner, so you tried to, you know, stay under the radar a little bit, especially kickers. You don't want to stick out too much because your kickers you get enough crap as it is. Right Great, so why you too? They offer me a scholarship. You know, I just I TCU in the area, growing up in Dallas, TCU, Baylor, smu. They wanted me to walk on and I my family is very blue collar. Really, I'll be honest. We couldn't. You couldn't afford that and you tap offered me a scholarship. Then I said, well, I'm going to take that and you know it. At worst case, you know, I'm going to get a free education. When you're a freshman, when you're eighteen years old, you don't. You don't have any aspirations. Will maybe you do. Now things are quite different, but back then, you know, I was just going to go get an education and play some football on the side. Yeah, well, I didn't have aspirations or dreams of playing in NFL. Will maybe a dream, but I was just going for the education and they were going to pay for it. Yeah, I know, that's awesome. And so that was a now you tube is is. I mean it's a division. It's kind of like Tulsa really, you know, it's a division one school. It's probably a small division. One school. There's like Tulsa. We would play you guys. Think we would actually down to utup and played you guys from Ames after you graduated, but you said you came to Tulsa. Yeah, played in Tulsa. Now, skelly stadium is known for having a terrible visitors locker room. I don't know if you remember that. Always, I think it was actually, I do not remember. God, that's got to be twenty. Will shoot, no, that's more neat. But every two, thirty four years ago, thirty four, thirty five years ago, like I have trouble remember stuff in this morning. So, yeah, I know, I well, I just remember because the University of Miami came and played us at so yeah, and all we heard about was how horrible or locker room was and our home locker room wasn't much better. So, but it you know, and I didn't know if anybody else remembered that. No, no, no, the big deal to you kicking off that old I remember being turf and I remember Tj rubly because he was like what six five or something or yeah, you know, just and he ended up playing with them. I think he's on the packers for a year or say. Was Je and he made an infamous check a play called during at the Vikings. Yeah, yeah, yeah, and Mike Homere did not like that. No, I think he was gone that week after that one. Yeah, that's honey. You talk about Mike homer and being militant, like you know, if it works out, yeah, yeah, okay, you do all right, but it doesn't work out, but it's it's the one, they're gone. Come absolutely hum so do you remember any episodes you have with Mike Word or did he just leave you alone? He left kickers and cunners alone pretty much. I'm...

I mean during a game if we missed a field goal. I mean there's a couple times he'd come running down and say why did you miss that? I go, Mike, if I knew the answer to that. You know, yeah, yeah, and I mean there were times. You know, I your kind of Piss when you miss a field goal, and I remember what it was in Tampa and I missed one and he came running down. You go you can't miss those school goals, and I go, well, maybe if you're often scored more touchdowns, you wouldn't need field goals. And he didn't like that. But yeah, you on. I didn't get fired that day, I mean, but you know how it is on the field. He get heated and you say stuff. You know that you shouldn't say. Well, I had an episode with Nick Sabin like that when I played for the dolphins. Yeah, we're I threw like a post route to Chris Chambers. Chris fell down, the guy picked it off and nick came and met me at the numbers was in my face and I said yeah, I don't know. We got into it and it's it's like that. It's heated like you're right game, like right now. And I remember the coach is pulling me off and you can't talk to him like that. He's a had coach, and I'm like, sorry, just came out. You know, what do you want to do? Yeah, I know, I tell I mean, I've seen a lot worse than what I said on that field. I mean, I mean Mike was a very emotional guy. You know, we had emotional guys as players and sometimes you just get emotional on the field and it's just part of the game. Hey. So what I wanted to talk to you a little bit about was how coordinated and and how perfect everything has to be, because I held for many kickers, from Eddie Murray at the you know, he came to the skins and more Nana's and all these guys have helped for and everybody's a little different on how they liked the ball and for me it was always about the the snapper. Right, you had a good snapper, man, I could do whatever you want it, but if it was all over the place, it was brewder. And Yeah, you know what, unfortunately, when I came in the League we had a long snapper, Blair Bush. He had been, I think he was a fat for ten years. When I came in the League put I think he was on the Cincinnati Super Bowl team in the mid s and he was a very good snapper and then, you know, I think he left and I bounced around a little bit and ended up with frank winters being ours. Now there you go. He did okay, and I say that jokingly because he wasn't that good, but he was a snapper. We had to deal with it. I in practice, I know Craig Hendrick and I we at times. We would both sit back there with we brought out two baseball mits and we said, Frankie, just anywhere in this area. Yeah, drew a circle around, but he did. He did fine and fortunately I've had great holders and holders helped a lot with bad snaps. Craig Hendrick was very good. When I came to the league down Brac and the puncher was very good. Brett tried for a couple of games. He was horrible. Thank God he became a quarterback. Mike Tom Zach was a holder. You know a lot. So I had a lot of quarterbacks and punchers that were holders. So what makes a guy horrible? What makes it guy really good from a holding standpoint? Yes, if I make it, we have a good holder. If I'm missing, you know that holder is a problem. You know, I didn't ask a lot of the holder. I asked two things, laces forward and the ball straight up and down. I wasn't interested in how if you watch a lot of kickers, they leaned the ball in a little bit to kind of help with with a natural hook most soccer style kickers had. I didn't have a natural hook. I had a natural slice or a fade. Yeah, so I had the ball just as long as it was straight up and down. I loved it and those people and if I didn't see the laces I loved it even more. So you were left Hash Guy. If you had to put it somewhere, was it left hash, left Hash, yeah, because you had, yeah, I fade. I'd dreaded the right Hash does. I mean, it's just because it was against, for whatever reason, my normal, my one. No more flow because I had a fade. So it was my nickname was white right, believe.

Right now I think maybe I named myself that. There's other colorful terms out there, I'm sure, but maybe that's what your little brother called you. Yeah, there you go. Yeah, because he was a kicker. To write, my brother. Yeah, he went to Missouri and was at the Red Skins for a training camp. You know, he never made it for you know, for whatever reason you got to be lucky as well as good and that in the in the NFL, obviously, but it was a career. Had A good career in Missouri. Was He? It was at a ninety four. He was at the Oh, you can test me again. He's four years younger than me. I came in in eighty nine and he would have been in ninety three, maybe ninety two. So ex for for me, yeah, somewhere in that area. Yeah, so he would have been right before me before North Ry came in. Yeah, so you know, it's just have you one of these things is, you know, most kickers. Obviously you can. That's what you work on all the time. But did you work on punning as well? Because if you lose your punter, I mean you're the backup, you know, like I was a backup for it back you're the backup phunner. And so did you ever have to go into game and do that? Never had to do it. And I didn't practice punting on purpose, but we always did. When Jim Nickman was here, we would play a game called setback with with by punting the ball. Yeah, before games and stuff. So you know, just by default. I'm I was practicing, but I wasn't doing it on purpose and I punted in high school and college, but I didn't enjoy it near as much as kicking. Not as much, not as not as much as you know, you get a lot more, what's the word I'm looking for, credit for being a kicker than you do a pun or let's put it that way. Right. Yeah, well, plunning is it? I mean it's everything's fine until the one mistake happens and then exactly, you know, it's all over. Right. So playing in the NFL, you played back in the damn mean a lot of new stadiums come in. But what was your least favorite and most favorite stadium stuff? Lambo can be both. You know, I love playing at home in front of the crowd, but I hated playing there when in the when the field was frozen. You know, when I when I played, they had the heating system under under this under the field was electrical coils. Yeah, and they actually had to turn those off before the game. They didn't let things run like today. They have, I think like a thousand miles. And you know I'm exaggerating. I'm sure a PVC piping pumping hot water into the field that keep it from freezing. We had electric coils and the actually had to turn that off before the game because they didn't know where the coils were and they were worried about players stepping on them and e executing themselves. So if you if you ever played at Lambo and in December or January it was, it was frozen and it was just rble. The worst place I ever played was the old Cleveland Brown stadium. It was just horrendous. It was I craig Henshook and I were going down for pregame and I look down, I can look at the size of that cat and he goes cat. I go yeah, right, there it goes. That's not a cat. It was a rat. Yeah, it had to be. You know about this big. You know, it was just gigantic. There were never there were no chemicals in that river. there. No, I'm sure not. And we were all so excited when we stopped playing in Milwaukee County stadium to I mean that was you know, the Infield was just was just horrible. Yeah, well, that's what I always felt like for for was the hardest part because most times when I would hold you'd hold on that like when you go to a baseball stadium. Yeah, like the Rado Raiders and San Diego, some of those stadiums, you know where go from grass. So all of the sudden the infield right and you just drem like please, don't put us on, like right at it or you know, we'd always try to move it around it, but then if it did what, it was wet. That infield was awful to kick off. Yeah, well, I don't know. Yeah, Milwaukee was different. It wasn't. You would think it was be a clay or dirt, but it was a dirt and claim mix was stone, which which was really odd.

Yeah, and as yeah, we would, if we were all getting close to the end, feel we would actually angle the ball back in a little bit to stay on the grass within the grass. You know, they tried to put sod and the Wisconsin after baseball season and what October, I guess, when baseball seasons over and grass just doesn't take in Wisconsin. Well, that's why I ever understood is how they can just replace a field with turf and expected to not remove you know, like the steelers do that all the time. I think hit plays on it and then after two teams play on it for, you know, three months, it's it's roar out and then they got to replace it with turf. Our Super Bowl year, they we did that. We played San Francisco and the mud bowl and we just tore the field up and they brought in rolls of grass, I think, from somewhere in the northeast, and they put down a whole new field for us. But the grass it wasn't it was like six inches thick. So it actually it would it laid into it. Weighed like tongus and but yeah, I mean we were it was basically painted dirt up until that point. Yeah, that's pretty much. You know, I've it's funny when you play on a field like that. If you look from a far away, it looks Oh, there's grass, and then you get down here it's yeah, it's painted, painted green. Yes, it's crazy, like your uniform is just covered in it, not mine. Never you could slip, I mean my cool lip. That's true. Yeah, you know, I stretched on the sideline. Sometimes I got on the ground. My he's we get dirty right there. You just so one thing I stories, I tell people all the time is that as a quarterback going through, we used to when I was first in the league. We can manipulate the footballs right. And then I used to go in the equipment room and chip would be back there and all of a sudden I'd be like what are you doing? And he have like a wet towel than a dry towel and something else. Did they have it like duct tape that he throw it into dryer and and I'm like why are you doing that? He goes it's because it's I'm going to kick it better. It's got to be little more like, you know, a balloon. I'm like that's what you want. And now today they have to basically pulled out of the box. RIGHT DO? Yeah, what do? Yeah, I was I when I was around and they started that kicking ball stuff. And Yeah, I think they see, if you look at those balls, even they play to day, they're not right out of the box still. So I think they still do what you're referring to. They just don't let kickers after them. And I've gotten him more conversations about Tom Brady and the ball manipulation and I say it wasn't him manipulating the balls, it was the kickers, yeah, or the or the staff, you know, the man the managers or whoever. But we all did it. But we always ran it past, you know, we credit the punter and I we'd work the balls during the week. We put them in the Sauna, we put them in the hot tub and we'd scrub them and Brett would come. We'd have thirty or forty balls and Brett would come and kick the ones he wanted for the game. Yeah, we always. We always did that too, you know, for the well, that was the first question. That was the first question. On Away Games, when we walk the field and the other guys, the other kicker upun her down, there. The first thing we asked is how the balls? How are the balls? So well, yeah, I mean back in the day I thought I used to say is like you visiting teams ball like they had bolt. Now it's like you bring your own stuff, right, so different. I mean I've manipulated ball like where we take red dirt from Tennessee and we scrub the balls to get that wax off and that film and then, you know, you clean it and so you don't lose the KNOBS for a thrower and all that kind of it's crazy. The science, like what we used to do. Oh yeah, that. Yeah, it was a week long event for us. I mean we would start on Monday's, you know, the day after game, and start getting the balls ready for the following weekend. So yeah, so did you ever tell you like she go hey, what did you do this week? And you be like well, we kind of footballs and fixed we fix some balls. You right, right. So I think that you know, your experience is a Green Bay in that era, because you guys always green bays...

...always had significant players. I think in eighty nine there was a nickname that the team had, like cardiac pack or something. That was us. Yeah, and HARDIAC pack. So tell me about like the first like your experience. We talked a little bit about going to college from Heistan. Now you're going to the packers and that experience. Drafted right it? was there a big weight on your shoulders, or was it kind of like how did you feel? I think I feel, you know, like anybody that's draft. You know again, I think today is so much different from when we, you and I, were drafted. It's, you know, you're just excited to be there. You know, a lot of I think a lot of guys today have expectations of being drafted. I had no expectations of being drafted and all my agent that I had says, you're probably going to go on this round, this round, and you know, I this is before cell phones. I wasn't even around the phone when I got drafted. So and once you're drafted, I mean you get excited. I mean it's really different. Obviously the money's a little quite different than today, and you just go on, go into training camp. You Guy. I was like there were four or five other kickers that year because they were struggling with some with some kickers up to that point and I knew I had the inside track because I was drafted right. Unfortunately, I made the team and you know, one thousand nine hundred and eighty nine was just a mean I couldn't have had a more fun rookie season. You know. You know the cardiac pack. We had like five or six games come from behind wins, and a few of them with field bows or extra points. It was it was a it was a good group of guys, with Don mcowski, the magic man, and, you know, Brian Noble and trying to think of guys that were on that team that maybe people would remember, but sterling sharp was on the team, Chuck Cecil. So we had a fun group of guys. You know, I think it was Minnesota that not just out of the playoffs that year by winning their last game. We didn't get the playoffs and you know then the next couple of years we kind of sucked, which kind of open the doorway to, you know, what you see today, in my opinion. Right. Yeah, exactly, everyone. Thanks for joining us on huddle up with guests. Wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, we appreciate you listening to us. CHECK US out at huddle up with Guestscom and please give us some likes and shares and give us a five star review. We appreciate it. Have current events affected the ability for you to pay your bills? Has Your Credit Card debt overwhelmed you? Has Your income decreased because you're working less, or have you lost your job? Credit Guard of America may be able to help you find a solution to this problem. We offer a free, no obligation consultation to learn how you can cut your payments by up to half and potentially lower your interest down to zero. Credit Guard of America is an a plus rated nonprofit company that will work on your behalf. Credit Art of America is licensed in all fifty states and has counseled over one million consumers struggling with debt just like you. Let us help you analyze and prioritize your debt, negotiate with your creditors to reduce interest and payments, set up one affordable monthly payment and provide ongoing education and support. Call now for a free, no obligation consultation and learn how you can become debt free. Call eight hundred seven two, five, eight nine zero four. That's eight hundred seven two, five, eight nine zero four eight hundred seven two, five, eight, nine zero four. Do you use Viagra or see Ellis? Have you been thinking about trying by Agra or see Ellis? What if we could promise you the same results for less than and two dollars a pill? If you're paying twenty dollars a pill for a Viagra, you're being taken to the cleaners. Our pill delivers the exact same results for less than two dollars. Will do the math for you. You save more than sixteen dollars a pill for the same results. Want more? We'll give you a forty five blue pills or forty five yellow pills for ninety nine dollars, and add five more pills free. You save more than five hundred dollars. You don't have to be a rocket scientist to know what to do next. You need to call us at eight hundred seven two six sixty three fourteen and get your fifty pills for...

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...know bret was a leader in his own little way. He kept saying lights, lighthearted, I guess you. He was a jokester in the locker room, just like you see on TV, probably worse off here, but we had a lot of great leadership on that team, starting with Reggie White. Yeah, yeah, I couldn't imagine. So one thing I wanted to ask you. Now you see a lot of a lot of people do this. It played for the packers. Did you ever do the Lambo leap? No, I never even really thought about it, but if I had thought about it I'd probably be afraid that I wouldn't be able to jump that high. Yeah, yeah, I have that. I have that disease. We've never seen anything. I've never seen a kick do. But if there's one place you could do it, like maybe you know what kick Mason crossby did it two years ago. He cad I like can I think it was against Detroit. Maybe it was this year. It was a short field goal to beat Detroit here at Lambo and he did the Lambo leap. Yeah, so then that's the first time I'd ever seen a kicker to it. Yeah, I don't think I've ever seen kicker ever do any any place. No, nothing, nothing good can happen by jumping up in the air for a kicker. I mean, wasn't grammatically years ago that jump in Tours ACL you know? Yeah, that's just kick them all. Yes, kick it and it's a thing that's all the field. Yeah. So, so he had an incredible career at the packers and then all of a sudden you got to go look for a new job. I know what that's like. I've been through it. Well, tell people what that that's hard to do something and because you're in such a magical place right and you got to leave it. You know, it sucks. It just you know, you're you're sitting there and you're watching the not even watching the draft in this since I wasn't under conmy contract had expired. I know we were trying to work on a new contract and all sudden I get a call from a local meeting goes hey, they just drafted a kicker in the third round. I go, Huh, just just I was kind of shocked and it was just like well, I guess I'm looking for a new job. But you know, I ended up going to Pittsburgh actually, and I loved it there. If there's a place in need, if there's a place like Green Bay anywhere, it was Pittsburgh. Yeah, and I bill Kower, I thought was an excellent coach, well grounded guy, not a militant as some some other coaches are. Yeah, so I was excited about the opportunity there and then I got hurt and you know, that kind of screwed that up, and then I ended up playing and Arizona for a couple of years. I think even had one game at Washington. So it was yeah, I would just when you play for a place for so long and then all sudden they want to go in a different direction. That, quote unquote, what they tell you. We're going in a different direction. It's like well, I'm not ready to go in a different direction, right, but you make you make the most of it. I mean we guys are you do it every day. I mean guy players have to go through it every day. Yeah, and you do go through it a lot and it's never easy. And you know, when you go there it's like, okay, just had all these friends that I created for five, six years or whatever it was, right, you know, then I got to go to a new team, I don't know anybody. Then you find one guy you know and you grasp onto that and you just try to keep building out because you know it's a long season, right, it is. And just like I said, it was. I mean my my wife at the time was from Green Bay and we had our kids in Green Bay. We've had built a house in Green Bay and I still live in Green Bay. You know, I still called Green Bay home, even though it's the weather sucks, you know, twelve months of the year. But yeah, I mean you you kind of leave all that behind. You don't see the guys, is often that you played with, even though you know you're still in the same town or in the offseason, and it was just different. But you'll learn to adapt. You know, we're pretty good as athletes and adapting to different circumstances and and I would say ninety five percent of us can adapt to that. Right. I was surprobably stay in Arizona because the weather different. It's pretty big. Yeah, my Golf Game Plan got quite...

...better. Yeah, Arizona wasn't as good about organization as they are now. I'm thinking. Yeah, it was a now that was, I don't want to sing, miserable, but it wasn't the greatest. Yeah, I could imagine. Yes, it from an organizational standpoint it was. It was just quite different. Yeah, the plane in at stadium, you know, it's like the College Stadium, I think, is their zone. Stay played there, right, and I remember as a visiting team. You the Walker rooms were a mile away, all the way up the hill over and up. II Remember, Oh man, and I'll never forget one time we go and and equipment guys bring the wrong socks and they brought like the cold weather wool socks or whatever we had and everybody had. Everybody was complaining, like because it was like on a degrees in Arizona that day. Was Crazy and I'll never forget that. But you know, so you finish your career and then I was tell people like it's crazy because it's over. There's not like I can go back. Once you're done, you're done, right. What did you have a plan for after or did you a wing it? Well, my plan was I went into the financial planning business. I graduated from UTAP with it, with a degree in finance, and during while I was still playing in Green Bay, I did internships at Merl Lynch here in town and got all my licensing done. So I was ready to get into that world as soon as my career ended. Now, whether it was it ended when it did or ten years later, you know, I was ready to do it and I ended up doing that. I actually ended up taking two years off because it's kind of fun to get to know your kids again, because, I mean, you're gone quite a bit and you travel and all that stuff. When it comes to football and I took a couple of years to get to know them again and be a soccer coach and and have fun and my wife said two years is enough, you need to go back to work, need to get out of the house. So and that's when I went back and started doing in the financial planning with a couple different companies here in Wisconsin and did that for about it, I want to say when I was thirteen, about ten years, and I hated every minute of it. It just it wasn't when you and you know this, when you come from playing football, how exciting and everything, and then you go to do something like this and it's like, my God, I'm trying to sell the same ETF to that the other guys trying to sell. How do I can visit the buy my ETF? And quite boring. And then, you know, we're go into what player alumni resources and dead and then I got inducted into the Packer Hall of fame in two thousand and thirteen and that's where the idea was born for player alumni resources and I quit the financial planning and did that and now doing that full time. Well, you know, I think a lot of guys, because I never felt like playing fifteen years in the NFL. Any Day was like Brown Oak Day, right, even though you've got to training camp for three or four weeks it, you know, and you're doing the same thing. It was always different, right, always something change. But then I get out, like you got to drive to a job and you know it's the same thing every day, or if you're in sales, and that to me was like, you know, it was hard and yeah, I imagine that's what it was like for you. Absolutely, yeah, I mean, yeah, just it was. Yeah, just, it wasn't exciting. And when I met my second wife, would talking about player alumni resources back in thirteen. She goes, you got to do what you love. It makes you cited to wake up every morning to do and financial planning wasn't that. Well, okay, so you leave financial planning. You're starting this company. This you know, I'm sure it. Did it start out like a company or just say I'm going to build a I'm just going to start with one guy. So tell me about how this started. Sure, I just mentioned that I went into the Packer Hall of fame in two thousand and thirteen and and I'm sure you get asked to do some things, but all of a sudden I'm getting ask to do a lot more speaking engagements, golf outings, come to this event and getting paid to do it here in...

...mystison and I said, well, this is this is a lot more fun than doing a financial plan for a couple that's over the age of seventy, which was my primary, you know, Clientele, where over seventy was retirement planning. So it's yeah, so with discussions with my wife, she's an organizational development she's an executive coach and she started her own business back in those three and she said we want you start a business for yourself. And it was it was you said one guy. That one guy was me. I go, well, I can. That's a good idea. You know, I like to, you know, play golf. I don't mind speaking. I can get better at it. I never I don't know if anybody really like speaking in front of however many people, but you get used to it. You know. I can do charity events or go sign autographs for, you know, for whatever reason. So it started out just for me and and I'm sitting here going okay, I got this idea, but how do I get the word out. So that's when I went to I don't know if you remember the name Gilbert Brown. Yeah, Yeah, defense he and so he and data soldfield went to Kansas together. Yeah, so one tell me were also played Kansas and they were the two defensive lineman and they literally both hit me at the same time. So I like six hundred pounds on more dam probably. Yeah. So I know Gilbert Brown. Yeah, Gilbert. Yeah, six hundred pounds. So he was he was a little light. But so I reached out to Gilbert Brown, I reached out to William Henderson, these guys. They're very recognizable with constant they were doing a lot of stuff. I was actually doing stuff with Gilbert to help his foundation, and I said, how are you guys, you know, getting asked to do things or getting asked to come do things, and they really didn't have an answer. It was more it's there. They had a network that they use. And then I kind of said, well, here's what I'm thinking to do them for myself. And then that's when the idea said, you know, here's here's the thing, this is what I'm trying to do for myself. What if I become a not your agent, the kind of an intermediary. If someone comes to me and wants Gilbert Brown to do something, I'll help set it up for you. And they said, you're not going to know, no contracts, you know not, you know, have to be just exclusive with me. Do as much as you can. And they love that idea. And then I started reaching out to other guys. I say, here's what I'm going to do. I go, I'm not your agent, I'm not going to pub publicize you, I'm going to publicize the group and you tell me what you like to do. Do you like the off do you like the fish? Do you like to speak in front of people or just sign autographs? And so over the next probably twelve months, I got about fifty guys, the majority of which I played with, that agreed to do this and they're up on the website at player alm my Resourcescom. And what I say about fifty guys. And so now I got these fifty guys. I go, now what do I do? How do I get the word out? So what I said where I started, as I go green bay packer sponsors and they're all they're all local. Right there. Don't know. It's it's Aaron's company, which is a big SNOWBLOWER, come snowblower company up here in Wisconsin, or grocery stores or you know, whoever, whoever it was. So I started with those guys. My wife was pretty well connected in Wisconsin. She set me up with a lot of her business contacts and it was just a coffee just to say here's what I'm doing. You know, I just want your you know, what do you think about this idea? And and that's how I started. And then I got in the social media, for better or worse, and started advertising a lot there, which is where primarily a lot of my business comes from, or repeat business. Well, that's how it all came together. I just it started just for me and then I just, you know, to kind of educate myself. I was talking to other guys and it just kind of blossom from there. So a question I have for you. So back in the day you said the quarterback club, if you remember that right there. A big channel did all that. So I was part of that, but it felt like, okay, I was on the Lower Cherry. You know, the top guys really or you know alway, you know something big guys Farsen...

...and all those guys. Sure and it seemed like they always got all the stuff, you know, which they deserve, right, and I would get hardly anything right. But I'm in this club and I felt like, okay, I'm in this club, I should be you should be finding something for me. So how do you do with that? For you when you have fifty guys? But say you know the Arrand's, a company you mentioned, doesn't want only on these two or what you know, I mean. So how does that work for you and how do you divvy it up so that all the guys can benefit from M I I don't control that. I let the client control that. When when someone reaches out to me and they want someone to come speak, you know I always eat. I try and email back within twenty four, forty eight hours and I I've got a copy and paste about six or seven questions. You know, what's your budget? But with reference what you're talking about, I go what alumni do you have in mind? Or do you have any alumni in mind? And if they don't, you know, based on their budget, because I kind of know what everybody charges to do different things. I'll send back five or six guys and I let them choose and I try and spread it around and if it's a smaller budget and they can't afford to fly some let's face it, another not a lot of guys live in Wisconsin. I don't know why. I mean, if you like winter, it's a great place to be. But I let the client choose, you know, and I helped them along based on their budget. I go well, here's five or six guys that fit within your budget and you prioritize them, and then I reach out to the guy guys and I just go one by one, and whoever's available rate is available and they get it and they get to do it. Yeah, that's pretty, pretty good, because any guy that gets an opportunity with you, it's like found money for them. Absolutely, it doesn't comest them a thing and it's exactly. Yeah, absolutely. You know, I did all that. I did all the payment of our cost uff front to create the website and all that stuff, and I was the one, you know, go out shaking hands and introducing the concept and and you know, I didn't mind doing that. So, out of all the packers, who's the biggest outdoorsmen? I mean, I'm good words men. Yeah, that's got to be a guy in your group that just said. I'll do all the fishing and hunting or whatever you need. You know, the include golf is outdoorsy. It's kind of it's I think anybody plays Golf, but I think you know fishing and we don't get a lot of request for fishing events or fishing trips or you know, whatever you want call I do. We did do a couple of fishing events when we first started and we'd brought back like ten or twelve guys and went out on Lake Michigan on five or six boats. But as far as golf, and again, people don't tend to spend a lot, especially recently because the Covid I think the dollars are kind of a kind of smaller than they used to be for this type of stuff. But Frank winners looks right in Chicago. It's an easy drive for him anywhere in the Wisconsin on Lynn dickey, yeah, he listen Kansas City, but there's easy flights back and for George Coates lives here in town. So there's a lot of guys that still live in Wisconsin that I kind of lean on a little bit for because if they have a smaller budget, these guys don't mind doing it, even for fifteen or two thousand bucks. They're willing to do it because it's it's easy money. Yeah, so now are do you work with the NFL alumni at all? Or you going because they're a chapter up there? You don't work for them at no. No, how do you want to say this? The NFL, and I'll say the packers in particularly, they don't care for player Alonni resources because they think it's competition. So I've been very careful. I have a good set of attorneys as far as trademark attorneys and making sure I'm not infringing on it. And then you you know the NFL. They want every dollar they could get. And I usually have a conversation about once a year on something that the NFL or the packers are saying. You know, you shouldn't be doing that or this, and I'll go. Let me get let me get my attorney on the call here, and my attorneys just shaking their head and you know, they're just they're just bugging...

...yet. Well, that's what everybody says, like Oh, you can't use the NFL films. That I'm like, well, that's me playing like right, I know, like I know they own it, though, and I'm like, okay, that's just a painted a butt. But there is a thing. I'm like, well, you know, there is a thing that you can use it something, but if you're not making money off it, you can use it for your pot like for my podcast, you know, just trying to get videos of guys and putting it up or trying to do so. You know, sometimes I'm like, okay, I'm talking may Chris. This is a kick you made in the Super Bowl and I just want to show that you know what I mean, like in right and I don't know. If you want to come after me for that, then go ahead. You know what I mean. I don't think it looks good. Oh and they will fill standpoint. Yeah, and they will, as you know I do. And so you're doing all these things. I think it's pretty incredible that you're helping the guys with the packers. I don't know, I haven't really heard of any other teams doing something like you're doing. No, I came close to almost franchising front with Mike Collis. He was a geer down to Jacksonville. He was looking into doing this and then I think he started a kicking camp instead. You know, and I wish guys would kind of take this on take the take this on themselves, and I don't know how it works in other cities with with other football teams. The packers do help alumni with with events. They bring them back on every home game and that type of stuff, but you don't have any control over what you're chart what you're getting as far as a fee right, the packers will say, you know, if you want to come do this, we're going to pay you a thousand bucks. Now, every other thing else you do you may charge five thou and I'd say, why are you accepting Onezero from the packers? But when you do something for me and I'm getting it for you, you want five, and they just kind of they kind of scratch their head and I don't yeah, it's sometimes. I talked to lot. I've had that conversation with a lot of alumni and they don't want to say no to their former team, I think, is what I've come to. They just they're they're afraid they're going to get oster sized or not get asked to do anything ever again. And and I say that's not going to happen. Yeah, you need us we don't. We don't need them anymore. So right, I would love to see, you know, something similar to play alumni resources in every nfl town where guys are kind of taken control of their own destiny as far as appearances. But well, there are guys like so, like for myself, I played for seven teams. It's hard to bring out which team I'm kind of an alumni. Right, I'm along of all of them. Absolutely. So how do I you know, for me, how do I work that? Where do I go? What do I do? And it's really not clear. And I live in Pittsburgher team I never played for. So it's really strange. Yeah, it is. Yeah, I mean I would love to see it grow. I don't push that. I'm Mike at my college. Reached out to me a couple years ago and I'll help you set it up and you know, I'll talk to my turning and see how we can set it up where you can kind of I can show you everything and you pay me maybe a onetime fee to get a set up and and we've got about halfway through and he said I'm going to start a kicking camp instead, and I said that's awesome, Mike, you know, but you can do both there. You still do both, absolutely, but yeah, exactly. So, Mike's there anything else that you're doing currently or you just still just besides living the good life? I'm living the good life, you know, with covid being over now, player alumni reason, I mean, you know, with appearances and golf outings, we kind of shut down for a year. I mean, I do nothing for a year and it was it was just crazy here because of covid. But we're starting to get back in the swing of things now. Last year was was better. This year we're almost back to where we were were. You know, I'm doing about thirty five golf outings and a lot of speaking engagements. A few in the summer, of but Modi, majority of those in the are in the winter. So things are getting back to normal finally and I'm excited about it. Yeah, well, I mean the season for golf and green days, it's how long anyway. So you preper used to take some time off...

...for golf. You will see golfers in Wisconsin if it gets about thirty five degrees, believe it or not. And Yeah, that's not me. No, it's not me either, going up there. Yeah, that's that's some brave stuff. Like most most fun weathers here, they'll open in April, is when they open here, and then go all the way through November. So we have a four or five months window of a golf yeah, that's that's that's that's really good. I love you. Nice Horses in Wisconsin, I give him that. Yeah, there are really Nice, very green, very plush. You know, it's a lot different than Arizona, that's for sure. Yes, now, I love what you're doing. I think you're helping the guys and that's what it's all about. You know, there's there there. There seems like there's a lot of us, but there's not that many of us comparative to the room. You know, the nation out there. I think there may be what twenty around, Twentyzero, and then you cut it down, just a Green Bay and former players. Yeah, maybe it's like I said, I I've got my niche. It's the guys I played with. I know them, I know their personalities. I mean it makes it a lot easier when someone wants a speaker because I do know the guy's personalities. I know what they charge and I know what they're willing to do. So it makes it a lot easier and I haven't reached out to some of the guys that have recently retired, like a Jordan Nelson or you know. I need those. I don't know those guys and I don't know what their stories are and we just had a fun grand I talked about it early in our conversations. That team I played with it sit or in the early mid s. It was just a fun group. We had a good, a great group of guys. I all got great stories. They talked about winning a super bowl and there's not a lot of alumni they can that have those stories right and well, and just the kind of being in Green Bay. It's like, you know, that's one of the places. Obviously, like John Madden, that was his spot. That's what he loved, talking about it, even though he was a raider. That was like, you know, when Madden it's always seem like he was different when he went to Green Bay and was, you know, talked about the guy. So yeah, it's just a special place and I did is you're doing is great, nice. I appreciate that. Yeah, so just let everybody know where they could find you, how they can get ahold of you and maybe again. What your website is. Okay, yeah, I'm not an expert on social media, but I'm all over social media, facebook, Linkedin and twitter and all those. You can find me just by looking for me, because I don't know what handles me and I'm just I'm just dangerous. On facebook, I try to keep it mostly football, but occasionally I dip into current, current stuff, and that's a code word for politics and my wife. In the last couple of years I've learned. I've learned to let my I see something before I hit post. That that way I could feel so I'll say now, let's not do that one. I go, okay, fine, but the website is player alumni resources and it has details everything that the guys do, whether it's fishing or appearance. Has I even have a golf even have a sex and it's create your own experience with the former alumni. I've had people and I've never done after once alumni tocome sit in on their wedding or be a you know, a groomsman or whatever, and it's never come to fruition, but there have been people. So it's a fun website. If you're a packer fan and you especially of that s team. There's a lot of guys are yeah, so everyone. Yeah, if you want, if you want, if you're in love with the packers and you want try and go get a packer to come to your event, you're outing, whatever it absolutely would. Please go to player alumni resources. Hit Up Chris and and he'll help you find the right packer that if it's your needs. Yes, that's pretty good commercial. That is a pretty good commercial. I know there's a pack of fans all over this country and we have packer PLA. We have an alumni to live all over the country. I know they are. There's probably some in your area. A lot of them are on the West Coast. I know there's a lot in the Atlanta areas. So even if you're not in Wisconsin and you and your packer fan you would love to have an alumni come to you to on a golf outing or a parents or whatever. You know, we could probably help you out. Yeah, it'd be great. And make sure that those guys, or if you're going to have a packer there, you got to have cheese cre they're right.

That's all. You got to have cheese currents. Yeah, yeah, well, I'm playing up. Yeah, he was content to make him. Yeah, when I came here is a rookie, the big thing up here was a perch plate and going up down yeah, perch, believe it or not. And you know, going up in Dallas perch was a crap fish. It was something you use as Bait. But I love purchase pretty good now. Yeah, yeah, so I've changed. While that's kind of like croppy. Right, it's a little bit. It's very secarious, a bad yeah, it's a Pan Fish, definitely. Yeah, and the croppy. So, but I mean you probably catch him, but they don't get big like they do down in Dallas and those places. Yeah, so, all right, Chris, I appreciate you joining me on hunt. Of all, thank us. Thank you for sharing your story with us. And Hey everyone, if you're if you're a fan of the packers, please go to player alumni resources look up Chris. He'll help you with whatever your needs are and I appreciate you. Listen to the show, huddle up with gusts, check us out wherever you listen to your favorite podcast. I want to thank all of our sponsors and partners. Credit Guard, Little Blue Pill. You guys know what that is new new neutrogenics, six thirty one digital news studio, and also you can find us, if you want to watch this as a video and not just a podcast, check us out on Youtube at huddle up with gusts, and you can find all the videos of all of our guests and, just like Chris, you get to see what they look like, get to hear him and watch him in person. So it's a lot of fun as well. So, Chris, appreciate you joining us. Thank you for taking the time out of your busy day and you know, maybe we'll see you around on a golf course. How Song? I have a good one, all right, take care of Christ see it. Yep, that's a wrap, sportsman. Thanks for joining in the fun. At the sixteen thirty one digital studios for another active puddle up with gus, featuring fifteen year NFL quarterback Gus Farat. Huddle up with GUS is probably produced by one thousand, six hundred and thirty one digital media and is available on Apple Music.

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